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  • 51.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Introduction2017In: Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes the multiple trends that have impacted European small-scale/private forest owners, and outlines the necessity to pay regard to forest within the context of rural literature. The chapter also outlines the European, and particularly the Swedish, case focus of the book: while comparatively little focus has so far been placed on forest in rural studies, it constitutes a case with relatively well-developed data that enable us to say something about the role of forest in relation to broader rural development. However, this also makes it crucial to contextualise this case in comparison with other examples throughout Europe, to illustrate the great variation in what forest ownership, forest use and the new forest owner may mean in different cases.

  • 52.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Introduction - adaptation to climate change in Europe: theoretical framework and study design2010In: Developing Adaptation Policy and Practice in Europe: Multi-level Governance of Climate Change / [ed] Keskitalo E.C.H., Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2010, p. 1-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As mitigation will not likely be sufficient to hinder climate change, adaptation to the consequences of climate change will be needed The impacts of climate change will include such phenomena as increased flooding and sea level rise, which will in turn have significant effects on densely populated and infrastructurally-developed areas in advanced industrial states Despite the potential for serious consequences very little of the existing climate change adaptation literature has focused on adaptation in the EU or the industrialised world in general This chapter and the volume at large address this gap This chapter describes the governance system of public and private actors and bodies that set the context for adaptive capacity at local, regional national and EU levels, and argues that adaptive capacity can largely be seen as related to the resource distribution and prioritisation processes within such systems The chapter further outlines the comparative approach taken by the volume, including a common methodology for the presented multi-level studies.

  • 53.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Introduction. Local organisation to address flood risks: possibilities for adaptation to climate change?2013In: Climate Change and Flood Risk Management: Adaptation and Extreme Events at the Local Level / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 1-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Konflikter mellan rennäring och skogsbruk i Sverige2008In: Omstridd natur: trender & utmaningar i nordisk naturförvaltning / [ed] Camilla Sandström, Sissel Hovik, Eva Irene Falleth, Umeå: Borea , 2008, 1, p. 248-268Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 55.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Negotiating the Arctic: The construction of an international region2004Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 56.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    "New Governance" in the Arctic and Its Role for Supporting Climate Change Adaptation2009In: Climate Governance in the Arctic / [ed] Timo Koivurova, E. Carina H. Keskitalo, Nigel Bankes, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2009, Vol. 50, p. 97-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Formal Arctic governance has developed mainly since the 1990s when the eight-state Arctic Council was established to provide a common forum for national, indigenous peoples' and environmental interests. The Arctic is seen as encompassing the northernmost areas of the Nordic states, USA, Russia and Canada, thereby including areas that will be among those impacted the earliest by the effects of climate change on sea ice and permafrost. However, most of the pollution affecting the Arctic is not released in the area, and cohesion among the states in confronting the climate change problem has been limited. Based in interviews with organisations involved in new governance initiatives (high level fora, NGOs and international organisations) in the Arctic region, this chapter discusses the capacity of the Arctic governance framework to support adaptation to climate change. The paper views adaptation in governance as requiring horizontal and vertical interlinkage between actors, and outlines the interlinkages between regional actors as well as the resources (including funding and legislation) perceived by the interviewees as available to the organisations. The paper concludes that organisational capacities will need to be strengthened for effective implementation of adaptive actions.

  • 57.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sustainable development and human dimensions: environmentalinitiatives2005In: Encyclopedia of the Arctic / [ed] Nuttall, M., New York & London: Routledge , 2005, Vol. 3, p. 1972-1975Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 58.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The Arctic as an international region—but for whom2004In: Arctic governance: Northern institute of environmental and minority law / [ed] Timo Koivurova, Tanja Joona and Reija Shnoro, Rovaniemi: University of Lapland , 2004, p. 2-26Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 59.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    ’The North’ – is there such a thing?: Deconstructing/contesting Northern and Arctic discourse2009In: Cold Matters: Cultural perceptions of snow, ice and cold / [ed] Heidi Hansson and Cathrine Norberg, Umeå: Umeå University and the Royal Skyttean Society , 2009, 1, p. 23-39Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 60.
    Keskitalo, E Carina H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    The politics of Arctic resources: change and continuity in the "Old North" of Northern Europe2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arctic has often been seen as a natural area, or even a "wilderness", where mainly indigenous and subsistence activities have been prominent. Contrary to this, the present volume highlights the very long historical development of resource use systems in northern Europe, across multiple actors and multiple levels, and including varying population groups.

    The book takes a past-present-future perspective that illustrates the paths to institutional emergence, change or persistence over time. It also illustrates how institutions may themselves drive changes, through a focus on resource use cases in northern Europe. This volume demonstrates that understanding "northern" issues is less about understanding sets of geophysical, climatological or environmental conditions than about understanding social and institutional structures. Understanding these trajectories into the future is seen as a key way of understanding what responses to future change may be likely and what the institutions are that will shape, limit or enable our responses to climate change.

    This book will be of great use to scholars and graduates in the fields of Arctic and northern-region politics, and to researchers of resource use and climate change with a focus on vulnerability, social vulnerability, adaptation and mitigation.

  • 61.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    The role of discourse analysis in understanding spatial systems2015In: Handbook of the politics of the Arctic / [ed] Leif Christian Jensen, Geir Hønneland, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 421-433Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Keskitalo, E Carina H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Understanding adaptive capacity in forest governance: editorial2013In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 45-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Vulnerability and adaptive capacity in forestry in northern Europe: a Swedish case study2008In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 87, no 1/2, p. 219-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is likely to present new and substantially unpredictable challenges to human societies. The prospect is of particular concern at the local and regional levels, since vulnerability and adaptive capacity are location-specific and many decisions regarding climate-induced risks are made at those levels. In this light, one is compelled to survey stakeholders’ understandings of their situation and perceived problems. Assessments should also include the context of other ongoing changes, such as globalisation, that will impact communities and exacerbate their vulnerabilities. This paper presents an assessment of vulnerability and adaptive capacity in the forestry sector in the Pite River basin in northern Sweden. The study was carried out using a multi-method design encompassing literature surveys, interviews with stakeholders, and stakeholder meetings. The paper concludes that while climate change will have an impact on the region, its effect will be superseded by that of broader socio-economic changes. The results illustrate the need to understand local and regional perceptions of adaptation in formulating appropriate policy measures.

  • 64.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Vulnerability in forestry, fishing and reindeer herding systems in northern Europe and Russia2006In: Justice as a social and political matter: Proceedings of the international summer school, Bremen, Germany: Forschungsstelle Osteuropa Research Centre for East European Studies , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Vulnerability in forestry, fishing and reindeer herding systems in northern Europe and Russia2007In: Movements, migrants, marginalisation.: Challenges of societal and political participation in Eastern Europe and the enlarged EU, Stuttgart: Ibidem Publishers , 2007, p. 203-212Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 66.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Andersson, Elias
    Why Organization May Be the Primary Limitation to Implementing Sustainability at the Local Level: Examples from Swedish Case Studies2017In: Resources, E-ISSN 2079-9276, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of the effort to address environmental issues at the local level has focused on defining principles and aims rather than addressing the operational difficulties of implementation. Drawing upon insights from sustainability scholarship, this study reviews two cases: the development of a Swedish standard for implementing sustainable development at municipality, county council, and regional levels, and attempts by a small rural municipality to establish a process towards implementing the Aalborg Commitments. The research illustrates the specific organizational and managerial complexity of these case study experiences. It concludes that an organizational focus on integration and mainstreaming deserves particular attention to achieve broader sustainability, or related environmental or adaptation goals. The results, in particular, highlight the role that integrated management systems can play for sustainability work at the local level.

  • 67.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Baird, Julia
    Laszlo Ambjörnsson, Emmeline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Plummer, Ryan
    Social network analysis of multi-level linkages: a Swedish case study on Northern forest-based sectors2014In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 745-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest use in Northern Sweden is being influenced both by global trends and local situations. This results in interactions between numerous groups that may impact local forest governance. Social network analysis can here provide insight into the total pattern of positive, negative, and cross-level interactions within user group community structure (within and among groups). This study analyses interactions within selected renewable resource sectors in two northern Swedish municipalities, both with regard to whether they are positive, neutral, or negative, as well as with regard to how local actors relate to actors across levels, e.g., with regional, national, and international actors. The study illustrates that many interactions both within and outside a given sector are seen as neutral or positive, and that considerable interaction and impact are defined as national and in some cases even international. It also indicates that the impact of Sweden's only existing Model Forest may to some extent constitute a bridge between different sectors and levels, in comparison with the interactions between sectors in a municipality where such a cooperation mechanism does not exist.

  • 68.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Bergh, Johan
    Department of Forestry and Wood Technology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Felton, Adam
    SLU, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Björkman, Christer
    SLU, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Berlin, Mats
    Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Axelsson, Petter
    SLU, Umeå.
    Ring, Eva
    Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Ågren, Anneli
    SLU, Umeå.
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    SLU, Umeå.
    Klapwijk, Maartje J.
    SLU, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Boberg, Johanna
    SLU, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Adaptation to Climate Change in Swedish Forestry2016In: Forests, ISSN 1999-4907, E-ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 28-, article id UNSP 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptation to climate change in forestry has become a growing concern, in part due to the impact of storms and other events that have raised the awareness of such risks amongst forest owners. Sweden is one of Europe's most densely-forested countries, with this sector playing a major role economically. However adaptation has, to a large extent, been limited to the provision of recommendations to forest managers, most of which have only been partially implemented. This paper summarizes research with direct implications for adaptation to climate change within the forestry sector in Sweden. The focus is based in particular on providing examples of adaptations that illustrate the specific Swedish orientation to adaptation, in line with its relatively intensive forest management system. The paper thus illustrates a specific Swedish orientation to adaptation through active management, which can be contrasted with approaches to adaptation in other forestry systems, in particular those with limited management or management based on maintaining natural forests in particular.

  • 69.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Dannevig, Halvor
    CICERO Center for International Climate and Environmental Research, Gaustadalleen 21, 0373 Oslo, Norway.
    Hovelsrud, Grete K.
    CICERO Center for International Climate and Environmental Research, Gaustadalleen 21, 0373 Oslo, Norway.
    West, Jennifer J.
    CICERO Center for International Climate and Environmental Research, Gaustadalleen 21, 0373 Oslo, Norway.
    Swartling, Åsa Gerger
    Stockholm Environment Institute and Stockholm Resilience Centre, Kräftriket 2 B, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adaptive capacity determinants in developed states: examples from the Nordic countries and Russia2011In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 579-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptive capacity in a community context has so far mainly been studied in developing countries as well as indigenous communities in the industrialised world. This article adds to that literature through reviewing studies undertaken in the Nordic countries and Russia, highlighting the ways in which general determinants of adaptive capacity play out in Northern, industrialised contexts. The paper illustrates that the determinants of adaptive capacity in industrialised states exhibit systematic differences from mixed subsistence-cash based communities such as those found in Arctic Canada. We discuss in particular the importance of economic resources in a market-based system, technological competition, and infrastructure, in determining adaptive capacity of natural resource-dependent communities in the Nordic countries and Russia. The paper also illustrates differences in adaptive capacity within the case study region, including between peripheral and central locations with regard to economic resources and diversification possibilities, and between Nordic and Russian cases with regard to infrastructure and technology access. The findings indicate that understanding of determinants of adaptive capacity in resource-dependent communities would benefit from both further contextualisation and broad comparison, across different types of political and administrative systems.

  • 70.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Ford, D. James
    Department of Geography, McGill University, Room 308C, Burnside Hall, 805 Sherbrooke St. W, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Smith, Tanya
    Department of Geography, McGill University, Room 308C, Burnside Hall, 805 Sherbrooke St. W, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Pearce, Tristan
    Department of Geography, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
    Berrang-Ford, L.
    Department of Geography, McGill University, Room 308C, Burnside Hall, 805 Sherbrooke St. W, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Duerden, Frank
    Department of Geography, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Smit, Barry
    Department of Geography, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
    Case study and analogue methodologies in climate change vulnerability research2010In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews - Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 374-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessing vulnerability is an important component of human dimensions of climate change (HDCC) research. Vulnerability assessments identify and characterize who and what are sensitive to climatic risks and why, characterize adaptive capacity and its determinants, and identify opportunities for adaptation. This paper examines the importance of case study and analogue methodologies in vulnerability research, reviews the historical evolution of the two methodologies in the HDCC field, and identifies ways in which they can be used to increase our understanding of vulnerability. Case studies involve in-depth place-based research that focuses on a particular exposure unit (e.g., community, industry, etc.) to characterize vulnerability and its determinants. Temporal analogues use past and present experiences and responses to climatic variability, change and extremes to provide insights for vulnerability to climate change; spatial analogues involve conducting research in one region and identifying parallels to how another region might be affected by climate change. Vulnerability research that uses case studies and analogues can help to develop an understanding of the determinants of vulnerability and how they interact, and identify opportunities to reduce vulnerability and enhance adaptive capacity to current and future climate risks. This information can assist policy makers in developing adaptation plans and to mainstream climate change adaptation into other policy- and decision-making processes.

  • 71.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    Baron, Nina
    Fyhn, Håkon
    Klein, Johannes
    Implementing Local Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Actions: The Role of Various Policy Instruments in a Multi-Level Governance Context2016In: Climate, ISSN 2225-1154, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, considerable focus, e.g., in the fifth IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) Assessment Report (2014) has been trained on why adaptation and mitigation have not been developed more than at present, with relatively few local government actions taken compared with, for example, more discursive policy agreement on the importance of the issue of climate change. Going beyond a focus on general limits and barriers, this comment suggests that one important issue is that climate change has not yet been sufficiently integrated into the state regulative structure of legislation and policy-making. A comparison between three cases suggests that local developments that are not supported in particular by binding regulation are unlikely to achieve the same general level of implementation as issues for which such regulative demands (and thereby also requirements for prioritization) exist. This constitutes an important consideration for the development of adaptation and mitigation as policy areas, including on the local level.

  • 72.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Westerhoff, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Climate change as governmentality: technologies of government for adaptation in three European countries2012In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 435-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the Foucauldian theoretical framework of governmentality, this paper examines the role of regulative 'technologies of government' in climate change adaptation. The paper examines such technologies and underlying rationalities in a multi-level context, in three European countries that represent different stages of adaptation policy development: the UK, Finland and Sweden. Drawing upon policy documents and interviews at different levels, the paper illustrates differences in technologies of government for adaptation between the relatively 'regulative' UK state system and Finland and Sweden's traditional legalistic and welfarist systems. The study illustrates that, while the treatment of adaptation as an issue on a national level coheres with national rationalities, local and regional levels show a diversity in the development of bottom-up adaptation technologies.

  • 73.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Karlsson, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Pettersson, Örjan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Slee, Bill
    Villa, Mariann
    Feliciano, Diana
    Rural-urban policies: changing conceptions of the human-environment relationship2017In: Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 183-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes how understandings of the "rural" have progressed from a focus on either decline or amenity, whereby these more simplified understandings can be seen to have had an impact on rural policy development. The chapter argues that rural areas, including forests, need to be understood in relation to both production and integration with urban landscapes. It thus illustrates the role of both historical processes and policy in creating current understandings of the rural: drawing upon an example from the Swedish case, it amongst others shows that a redistributive tax system has played a larger and more crucial role than rural policy in retaining active rural areas in Sweden.

  • 74.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Klenk, Nicole
    Bullock, Ryan
    Smith, Andrea L.
    Bazely, Dawn R.
    Preparing for and Responding to Disturbance: Examples from the Forest Sector in Sweden and Canada2011In: Forests, ISSN 1999-4907, E-ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 505-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coping or adaptation following large-scale disturbance may depend on the political system and its preparedness and policy development in relation to risks. Adaptive or foresight planning is necessary in order to account and plan for potential risks that may increase or take place concurrently with climate change. Forests constitute relevant examples of large-scale renewable resource systems that have been directly affected by recent environmental and social changes, and where different levels of management may influence each other. This article views disturbances in the forest sectors of Sweden and Canada, two large forest nations with comparable forestry experiences, in order to elucidate the preparedness and existing responses to multiple potential stresses. The article concludes that the two countries are exposed to stresses that indicate the importance of the governing and institutional system particularly with regard to multi-level systems including federal and EU levels. While economic change largely results in privatization of risk onto individual companies and their economic resources (in Canada coupled with a contestation of institutional systems and equity in these), storm and pest outbreaks in particular challenge institutional capacities at administrative levels, within the context provided by governance and tenure systems.

  • 75.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Koivurova, Timo
    Arctic Center, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Bankes, Nigel
    Fac. Law, University of Calgary, Canada.
    Climate Governance in the Arctic: Introduction and Theoretical Framework2009In: Climate Governance in the Arctic / [ed] Timo Koivurova, E. Carina H. Keskitalo, Nigel Bankes, DORDRECHT: Springer Netherlands, 2009, Vol. 50, p. 1-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The introductory chapter describes the objectives of this edited volume and provides a theoretical framework for considering the contributions of the various authors. The objective of the book is to take an institutional perspective on climate change in the Arctic discussing both mitigation and adaptation. Beginning with an account of the soft law institutions in the Arctic, the chapter then briefly canvasses the relevance of general legal norms that apply in the Arctic e. g. the law of the sea and international human rights. The theoretical framework is introduced by a discussion of key terms including mitigative and adaptive capacity and vulnerability. The chapter canvasses the different perspective of both international lawyers and international relations scholars and some of their terminology before concluding with summary accounts of the various contributions.

  • 76.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Koivurova, Timo
    Arctic Center, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Bankes, Nigel
    Fac. Law, University of Calgary, Canada.
    Conclusions on Climate Governance in the Arctic2009In: Climate Governance in the Arctic / [ed] Timo Koivurova, E. Carina H. Keskitalo, Nigel Bankes, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2009, Vol. 50, p. 429-443Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This concluding chapter seeks to systematize the mitigative and adaptive responses to climate change considered by the different authors of this volume by posing four questions: who is charged with adaptation and mitigation, which adaptive and mitigative measures are being targeted, what are the means for adaptation and mitigation, and, finally, are the suggested actions able to support expressed aims for adaptation and mitigation? The discussion of these questions reveals the importance of the current institutional contexts in the framing of adaptation and mitigation issues. It also emphasises the importance of context and the variety of adaptive measures that are being considered, both within national and local contexts but also within the patchwork of different international regimes that touch the Arctic. The chapter concludes by canvassing recent governance developments and especially the initiative of the five coastal states (the Ilulissat Declaration) and that of the European Union. These developments have the potential to challenge existing governance structures based on the eight member states of the Arctic Council and its system of permanent representatives.

  • 77.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Kulyasova, A.
    Local adaptation to climate change in fishing villages and forest settlements in north-western Russia2009In: Changing Governance of Renewable Natural Resources in Northwest Russia / [ed] Nystén-Haarala, S, Aldershot: Ashgate , 2009, p. 227-243Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 78.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Kulyasova, Antonina A.
    Centre for Independent Social Research, P.O. Box 193, RU-191040, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    The role of governance in community adaptation to climate change2009In: Polar Research, ISSN 0800-0395, E-ISSN 1751-8369, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 60-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capacity to adapt to challenges such as climate change can be seen as largely determined by socioeconomic context or social vulnerability. This article examines the adaptive capacity of local actors in response to globalization and climate change, asking: how much of the desirable adaptation can be undertaken at a local level, and how much is determined by actors at other levels, for instance, when resource conflicts occur? Drawing on case studies of fishing in northern Norway and north-west Russia, the paper shows that adaptive capacity beyond the immediate economic adaptations available to local actors is, to a considerable extent, politically determined within larger governance networks.

  • 79.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Management, Forests Rural Studies Unit, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden.
    Legay, M.
    Marchetti, M.
    Nocentini, S.
    Spathelf, P.
    The role of forestry in national climate change adaptation policy: cases from Sweden, Germany, France and Italy2015In: International forestry review, ISSN 1465-5489, E-ISSN 2053-7778, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 30-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forestry is one of Europe's largest land uses, for which adaptation to climate change will require coordinated action among multiple actors. However, so far, adaptation has been less placed in focus than has mitigation, and adaptation in the forest sector has mainly been reactive. This paper explores and reviews the integration of forestry in the development of planned adaptation policy in different countries. Sweden, Germany and France are taken as examples of countries with different developments of their adaptation policies as well as different requirements of their forest systems and actors. Italy is utilised as an example of how adaptation actions for forestry have been defined in a country where no national adaptation policy currently exists; in general, the results illustrate the seemingly large role of extreme events in driving adaptation policy forward in different policy systems.

  • 80.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lidestav, Gun
    Karppinen, Heimo
    Zivojinovic, Ivana
    Is there a new European forest owner?: The institutional context2017In: Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 17-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This chapter describes how the forest owner can be seen as differently constructed in different European countries depending on, amongst other things, whether it has been necessary to re-create the forest owner and forest ownership tradition following restitution, forest or agricultural traditions, and the historical role of the small-scale forest owner. Patterns of international and national policy change, the role of supporting infrastructure such as forest owner organisations, and patterns of inheritance have also been important in constructing the forest owner. In that, the chapter contextualises and clarifies much of the case focus in other chapters—it also clarifies how different forest systems, forest owner structures, and thereby potentially also the role of forest in rural development and rural studies may vary in different countries.

  • 81.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Liljenfeldt, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Working with sustainability: Experiences of sustainability processes in Swedish municipalities2012In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 16-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working with sustainability goals at the local level places large requirements on developing and integrating priorities within the budgeting and organization of local government. This study reviews how selected Swedish municipalities have dealt with developing local sustainability processes, in particular in regard to the Aalborg Declaration commitments. The study highlights difficulties, including the lack of funding and staff time for clearly relating to outside sustainability documents and strategies. It also focuses on the requirement for dedicated resources to development, prioritization and follow-up of sustainability goals, especially in smaller municipalities.

  • 82.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Limpangog, Cirila
    Visions of citizenship: Women, democracy and information2002In: Feminist challenges in the information age / [ed] Floyd Christiane, Govind Kelkar, Silvie Klein-Franke, Cheris Kramarae, Cirila Limpangog, Opladen, Germany: Leske + Budrich , 2002, p. 315-327Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 83.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The controversy over protected areas and forest-sector employment in Norrbotten, Sweden: forest stakeholder perceptions and statistics2010In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 146-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even as environmental protection constitutes an aim of national policy, the conservation of productive forest may impact communities reliant on local employment, with one example being Norrbotten County in Northern Sweden. The study focuses on the perceptions of environmental protection among stakeholders in forestry and of its relation to employment and how these compare with quantitative impacts of environmental protection. Results show that although forest stakeholders believe that forestry in the region is threatened by environmental protection, protection has thus far had only a limited impact on employment in the sector when compared to the impacts of internal processes of rationalization and mechanization. That stakeholders emphasize environmental protection as a crucial concern and risk may be due to their limited control over environmental protection processes as compared to internal processes in the production and management of the resource and the future of the forest economy. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 84.
    Keskitalo, E Carina H
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Wiberg, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Müller, Dieter K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Pettersson, Örjan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Contrasting arctic and mainstream Swedish descriptions of Northern Sweden: the view from established domestic research2013In: Arctic, ISSN 0004-0843, E-ISSN 1923-1245, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 351-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2011, Sweden released its first-ever Arctic strategy, in preparation for taking over the chairmanship of the Arctic Council, an eight-state cooperation organization. The recent political development that will include Sweden more extensively in Arctic regional cooperation makes it relevant to review and comment on the image of the areas involved from a Swedish viewpoint and to improve the often very brief descriptions of northernmost Sweden in Arctic literature. In this paper, we contrast descriptions of the Arctic in the Arctic Human Development Report (AHDR) with descriptions of northern Sweden in established domestic demographic and regional development research. The study shows that many of the assumptions in the first AHDR to the effect that the eight "Arctic" regions are rather directly comparable in fact reveal substantial differences between areas, with northern Sweden standing in sharp contrast to many of the descriptions. Instead of having a population that is very small, young, and rapidly growing because of a high birth rate, northern Sweden is characterized by relatively dense habitation with a stable and aging population of long-term residents. Moreover, it has a very small and relatively integrated indigenous population with largely the same health situation as in Sweden overall. While depopulation and urbanization are evident in its less populated areas, migration from the region is partly directed at the larger regional centres in the area, following a pattern seen in the Western world at large.

  • 85.
    Keskitalo, E Carina H
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Nocentini, S
    Bottalico, F
    Adaptation to climate change in forest management: what role does national context and forest management tradition play?2013In: Forest management of Mediterranean forest under the new context of climate change / [ed] Manuel Esteban Lucas-Borja, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013, p. 149-161Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Nordlund, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Environmental Impact Assessment as a Social Process: The Case of Nuclear Waste Storage in Sweden2015In: CyberGeo: European Journal of Geography, ISSN 1278-3366, E-ISSN 1278-3366, article id 715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process underlying the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for large developments is often designed to allow opportunities for members of the public and NGOs to voice their opinions. This study describes the EIA process leading to a decision in the question of radioactive waste storage in Sweden. While it should be possible for a deciding authority to reject an EIA on the basis of non-involvement of the public or NGOs, this study illustrates the way in which the EIA process may be formed by different social norms that relate to the specific case. Authorities can be considered to represent a plan paradigm (by which the project itself as well as political decisions made about it are in focus), whereas many environmental organizations traditionally represent an environment paradigm, focusing on the risk of potentially ecologically harmful processes. These differences can also be seen as symptomatic of the inclusion of parts of an environment paradigm in legislation such as the Swedish Environmental Code.

  • 87.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Nordlund, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Grunden för beslut i kärnavfallsfrågan: Upplevelser av lagstiftningsgrund och MKB-process2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 88.
    Keskitalo, E Carina H
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Nuttall, Mark
    Globalization of the "Arctic"2015In: The new Arctic / [ed] Birgitta Evengård, Joan Nymand Larsen, Øyvind Paasche, Cham: Springer, 2015, p. 175-187Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arctic has long been subject to the effects and influences of increasing globalization. Yet while globalization is a commonly used term to account for and explain dramatic and wide-reaching changes and transformations, it is also a commonly misapplied one, evoking a range of meanings, from negative impacts to positive trends in the contemporary world. In this chapter, we cast light on globalization processes in the Arctic and then sharpen our focus on the diversity of identities in the region. In this way, we illustrate a complex reality that contradicts the logic of previous nationalizing state developments and current ethnopolitical movements that describe resources and people, communities and wider regional populations in certain and often very prescribed ways.

  • 89.
    Keskitalo, E Carina H
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Pettersson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Can adaptation to climate change at all be mainstreamed in complex multi-level governance systems?: A case study of forest-relevant policies at the EU and Swedish levels2016In: Implementing climate change adaptation in cities and communities: integrating strategies and educational approaches / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Kathryn Adamson, Rachel M. Dunk, Ulisses M. Azeiteiro, Sam Illingworth, Fátima Alves, Basel: Springer, 2016, p. 53-74Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mainstreaming adaptation to climate change in forest-relevant policy can be as a "most difficult" case, relevant for asking the question to extent to which adaptation can at all be mainstreamed in complex multi-level governance systems. This study examines the case of to what extent EU and national (exemplified by Swedish) legal and policy frameworks are able to integrate with each other in ways that may support climate change adaptation in forests. To move as close to the real life situation of mainstreaming challenges as possible, the study focuses on not only one area of mainstreaming or integration, but on the three broad policy areas: (a) adaptation per se; (b) forest biodiversity and habitat protection with respect to invasive species; and (c) water protection in relation to forest use. The study concludes that conflicts between international legal principles such as precaution and free trade, as well as distribution of competences at EU and national level, results in a great discrepancy in terms of opportunities for a nation to effectively act independently as well as for effectively integrating adaptation aims in the connected EU-national systems.

  • 90.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Pettersson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Implementing Multi-level Governance?: The Legal Basis and Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive for Forestry in Sweden2012In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 90-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Commission Water Framework Directive (WFD) aims to achieve good status for all waters by 2015. This study reviews implementation mechanisms with regard to forestry in Sweden, a country with a large proportion of forest land, where forest practices will be important for limiting nutrient and particle runoff that impact the water status. Taking a multi-level governance perspective, this study reviews the legislative requirements at the EU level, legal and policy implementation at the Swedish level and, finally, local implementation in the forest industry. The study illustrates the national specific interpretation of the WFD as well as the way in which existing practices and measures influence WFD implementation. These include for example the Swedish practice to integrate environmental values in forestry via considerations, supported also by the use of forest certification measures (a voluntary private sector initiative through which environmental consideration is controlled by third-party auditors). The study thereby exemplifies the large role of private and overlapping authorities and jurisdictions in Swedish forest-water governance. Copyright (c) 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 91.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Pettersson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Laszlo Ambjörnsson, Emmeline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Davis, Emily Jane
    Agenda-setting and framing of policy solutions for forest pests in Canada and Sweden: Avoiding beetle outbreaks?2016In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 65, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extreme events such as pest outbreaks is one of the issues that may become more pronounced with climate change, placing potentially unprecedented requirements on policy systems to manage and develop responses to these, including potential changes in legislation. This study reviews the way in agenda-setting and framing of policy solutions was developed for the issue of bark beetle pest outbreaks following major outbreaks in Sweden and Canada. The study concludes that the larger events in Canada have resulted in a longer policy window, with a higher focus on developing responses on multiple levels, while the issue in Sweden has led to more specialized response, with the policy window closing after instrumental revisions of legislation. While such responses may be appropriate at the present, they place into consideration development of responses to potentially larger events in the context of climate change. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 92.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Rask, E
    Bernal, P
    Gabrielsen, A
    Gonzalez, A.C.
    Pedroro, C
    Nienhuis, I
    Overeem, I
    Zhou, Y
    Zajickova, Z
    Participatory Modeling: Universal Simplifications for Local Problems?2006In: Puzzle solving for policy, 2006, p. 121-127Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tysiachniouk, Maria
    Centre for Independent Social Research, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Local consequences of applying international norms: differences in the application of forest certification in northern Sweden, northern Finland, and northwest Russia2009In: Ecology and Society, ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 14, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest certification, developed in the early 1990s, is a process in which independent assessors grant use of the certification label to producers who meet certain environmental and social criteria set for their forest products. This label was quickly seen to offer a market advantage and to signal corporate social and environmental responsibility. This paper focuses on international norms pertaining to environmental and indigenous rights, as manifested in cases of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)- and Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC)-compatible certification, and how these norms have been applied domestically and perceived locally in different states. Case studies are drawn from northern Sweden, northern Finland, and three regions in northwest Russia. The studies illustrate that the choice and implementation of certification type depend considerably on national infrastructure and market characteristics and result in substantial differences in the impact that international norms have at the local level.

  • 94.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Schilar, Hannelene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Co-constructing "northern" tourism representations among tourism companies, DMOs and tourists: an example from Jukkasjärvi, Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 406-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In tourism, simplified destination representations are often assumed to be a necessity in order to compete in an international marketplace. Consequently, destination dynamics are regarded as characterised by power struggles over these representations, and power is often seen as lying outside of the destination, depriving local tourism actors of agency. In this study, the Jukkasjärvi area in northern Sweden is taken as an example in order to study the complexity of these processes and show whether power also lies within destinations. This study was based on a Foucauldian discourse analysis taking into account different groups (tourism companies, DMOs and tourists) and both interview (local tourism) and online material (tourism websites and TripAdvisor reviews from mostly international tourists). The results illustrate that the different tourism actors in the Jukkasjärvi case discursively co-construct the destination as naturalised/authenticated while also regarding it as packaged and constructed for tourism production. Consequently, our work suggests a more critical approach towards depicting local tourism actors as deprived of power over representations, as well as paying more attention (also methodologically) to the co-constructive nature of destination discourses and how these are packaged in relation to potential tourism market requirements.

  • 95.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Southcott, Chris
    Tollefsen, Aina (Contributor)
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Crate, Susan (Contributor)
    Globalisation2015In: Arctic human development report: regional processes and global linkages / [ed] Joan Nymand Larsen and Gail Fondahl, Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers , 2015, p. 401-425Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Strömberg, Caroline
    Petterson, Maria
    Boberg, Johanna
    Klapwijk, Maartje
    Olivia Palau, Jonàs
    Stenlid, Jan
    Implementing plant health regulations with focus on invasive forest pests and pathogens: examples from Swedish forest nurseries2018In: The human dimensions of forest and tree health: global perspectives / [ed] Julie Urquhart, Mariella Marzano, Clive Potter, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 193-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International trade and climate change have increased the movement potential for invasive alien species (IAS), including invasive pests and pathogens (IPPs), to the point where biological invasions are considered one of the major threats to biodiversity. However, practical implementation of plant health with regard to IAS and IPPs is difficult: regulative responsibilities are commonly spread across different authorities, and resources on the ground are often limited. Based on a legislative and literature review and semi-structured qualitative interviews (N = 7), the present study examines the possibilities and potential risks of monitoring and detection of forest invasive species in Sweden, with a particular focus on forest plant nurseries. The study thus adds practical implementation aspects concerning possibilities to limit the spread of invasive species in the plant trade.

  • 97.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Vulturius, Gregor
    Adaptive capacity building in Saxony: Responses in planning and policy to the 2002 flood2013In: Climate Change and Flood Risk Management: Adaptation and Extreme Events at the Local Level / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 35-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Keskitalo, E Carina H
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Vulturius, Gregor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Scholten, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Adaptation to climate change in the insurance sector: examples from the UK, Germany and the Netherlands2014In: Natural Hazards, ISSN 0921-030X, E-ISSN 1573-0840, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 315-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptation to climate change, particularly flood risks, may come to pose large challenges in the future and will require cooperation among a range of stakeholders. However, there presently exists little research especially on the integration of the private sector in adaptation. In particular, recently developed state programs for adaptation have so far been focused on the public sector. Insurance providers may have much to contribute as they offer other parts of society services to appropriately identify, assess and reduce the financial impacts of climate change-induced risks. This study aims to explore how the institutional distribution of responsibility for flood risk is being renegotiated within the UK, Germany and Netherlands. Examining how the insurance industry and the public sector can coordinate their actions to promote climate change adaptation, the study discusses how layered natural hazard insurance systems may result from attempts to deal with increasing risks due to increasing incidences of extreme events and climate change. It illustrates that concerns over the risks from extreme natural events have prompted re-assessments of the current systems, with insurance requiring long-term legislative frameworks that defines the objectives and responsibilities of insurers and the different political authorities.

  • 99.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Westerhoff, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Agenda-setting on the environment: the development of climate change adaptation as an issue in European states2012In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 381-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptation to climate change is increasingly recognized as a necessary complement to mitigation, resulting in a growing number of adaptation policies and actions across the globe. This study applies John Kingdon's theory of agenda setting through a multi-level approach to explain the ways in which the climate change adaptation issue has recently developed in four European countries: the United Kingdom, Sweden, Finland and Italy. The study illustrates that a multi-level adaptation policy window has been opened in the context of the UK, whereas adaptation has mainly developed on the national and in specific local cases in Finland and Sweden, while in Italy the issue remains off the agenda. The study thus shows that policy windows may be supported through the interaction of streams at both national and sub-national levels, particularly buttressed by focusing climate events and media reporting. Copyright (c) 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment

  • 100.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Åkermark, Jenny
    Vola, J
    Flood risks along the Torne River between Sweden and Finland2013In: Climate Change and Flood Risk Management:: Adaptation and Extreme Events at Local Level / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 67-94Chapter in book (Refereed)
123 51 - 100 of 135
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