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  • 51.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    A gender perspective on public health politics.: In the Swedish National Institute of Public Health: Report on Public Health Policy.2005Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 52.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    A Tool for Developing Gender Research in Medicine: Examples from the Medical Literature on Work Life.2007In: Gender Medicine, ISSN 1550-8579, Vol. 4S2, p. S123-S132Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Det behövs tillämpad genusforskning inom folkhälsoområdet!2008In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 385, no 3, p. 191-193Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Gender perspective on medicine - 20 years´development of awareness about sex and gender within medicine.2005Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 55.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    I spänningsfälten mellan biologi och kultur - en vetenskapsanalys av könskonstruktoner vid depression.2004In: Teori- och begreppsutveckling inom medicinsk genusforskning.: Rapport från en workshop., Stockholm: Vetnskapsrådet , 2004Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 56.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    In the tension fields between biology and culture: analyses of science of gendered constructions of depression2004In: Development of concepts and theory within medical gender research. Report from a workshop., 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Public Health questions from a gender perspective: labour market, masculinities and gender-relatd violence.2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 58.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Which is the difference between gender research and research about gender differences?2004In: Body, gender and medicine., Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2004, p. 79-86Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 59.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Annandale, Ellen
    A Conceptual Muddle: An Empirical Analysis of the Use of 'Sex' and 'Gender' in 'Gender-Specific Medicine' Journals2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 4, p. e34193-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: At the same time as there is increasing awareness in medicine of the risks of exaggerating differences between men and women, there is a growing professional movement of 'gender-specific medicine' which is directed towards analysing 'sex' and 'gender' differences. The aim of this article is to empirically explore how the concepts of 'sex' and 'gender' are used in the new field of 'gender-specific medicine', as reflected in two medical journals which are foundational to this relatively new field. Method and Principal Findings: The data consist of all articles from the first issue of each journal in 2004 and an issue published three years later (n = 43). In addition, all editorials over this period were included (n = 61). Quantitative and qualitative content analyses were undertaken by the authors. Less than half of the 104 papers used the concepts of 'sex' and 'gender'. Less than 1 in 10 papers attempted any definition of the concepts. Overall, the given definitions were simple, unspecific and created dualisms between men and women. Almost all papers which used the two concepts did so interchangeably, with any possible interplay between 'sex' and gender' referred to only in six of the papers. Conclusion: The use of the concepts of 'sex' and gender' in 'gender-specific medicine' is conceptually muddled. The simple, dualistic and individualised use of these concepts increases the risk of essentialism and reductivist thinking. It therefore highlights the need to clarify the use of the terms 'sex' and 'gender' in medical research and to develop more effective ways of conceptualising the interplay between 'sex' and 'gender' in relation to different diseases.

  • 60.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Experiences of barriers and facilitators to weight-loss in a diet intervention: a qualitative study of women in Northern Sweden2014In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 14, p. 59-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of research about the experiences of participating in weight-reducing interventions. The aim of this study was to explore barriers and facilitators to weight-loss experienced by participants in a diet intervention for middle-aged to older women in the general population in Northern Sweden.

    METHOD: In the intervention the women were randomised to eat either a Palaeolithic-type diet or a diet according to Nordic Nutrition recommendations for 24 months. A strategic selection was made of women from the two intervention groups as well as from the drop-outs in relation to social class, civil status and age. Thematic structured interviews were performed with twelve women and analysed with qualitative content analyses.

    RESULTS: The results showed that the women in the dietary intervention experienced two main barriers - struggling with self (related to difficulties in changing food habits, health problems, lack of self-control and insecurity) and struggling with implementing the diet (related to social relations and project-related difficulties) - and two main facilitators- striving for self-determination (related to having clear goals) and receiving support (from family/friends as well as from the project) - for weight-loss. There was a greater emphasis on barriers than on facilitators.

    CONCLUSION: It is important to also include drop-outs from diet interventions in order to fully understand barriers to weight-loss. A gender-relational approach can bring new insights into understanding experiences of barriers to weight-loss.

  • 61.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    It´s no surprise! Men are not hit more than women by the health consequences of unemployment in the Northern Swedish Cohort2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Research often fails to ascertain whether men and women are equally hit by the health consequences of unemployment. The aim of this study was to analyze whether men’s self-reported health and health behaviour were hit more by unemployment than women’s in a follow-up of the Northern Swedish Cohort.

    Methods: A follow-up study of a cohort of all school leavers in a middle-sized industrial town in northern Sweden was performed from age 16 to age 42. Of those still alive of the original cohort, 94% (n = 1,006) participated during the whole period. A sample was made of participants in the labour force and living in Sweden (n = 916). Register data were used to assess the length of unemployment from age 40 to 42, while questionnaire data were used for the other variables.

    Results: In multivariate logistic regression analyses significant relations between unemployment and mental health/smoking were found among both women and men, even after control for unemployment at the time of the investigation and indicators of health-related selection. Significant relations between unemployment and alcohol consumption were found among women, while few visits to a dentist was significant among men.

    Conclusions: Men are not hit more by the health consequences of unemployment in a Swedish context, with a high participation rate of women in the labour market. The public health relevance is that the study indicates the need to take gendered contexts into account in public health research.

  • 62.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Haukenes, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Fjellman Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lehti, Arja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Professionell Development.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Evengard, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Low-Educated Women with Chronic Pain Were Less Often Selected to Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Programs2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e97134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a lack of research about a potential education-related bias in assessment of patients with chronic pain. The aim of this study was to analyze whether low-educated men and women with chronic pain were less often selected to multidisciplinary rehabilitation than those with high education. Methods: The population consisted of consecutive patients (n = 595 women, 266 men) referred during a three-year period from mainly primary health care centers for a multidisciplinary team assessment at a pain rehabilitation clinic at a university hospital in Northern Sweden. Patient data were collected from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation National Pain Register. The outcome variable was being selected by the multidisciplinary team assessment to a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program. The independent variables were: sex, age, born outside Sweden, education, pain severity as well as the hospital, anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Results: Low-educated women were less often selected to multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs than high-educated women (OR 0.55, CI 0.30-0.98), even after control for age, being born outside Sweden, pain intensity and HADS. No significant findings were found when comparing the results between high-and low-educated men. Conclusion: Our findings can be interpreted as possible discrimination against low-educated women with chronic pain in hospital referrals to pain rehabilitation. There is a need for more gender-theoretical research emphasizing the importance of taking several power dimensions into account when analyzing possible bias in health care.

  • 63.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hensing, H
    Folkhälsofrågor ur ett genusperspektiv.: Arbetsmarknad, maskuliniteter, medikalisering och könsrelaterat våld.2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 64.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    An agenda for unemployment research: a challenge for public health.2005In: Int J Health Serv, ISSN 0020-7314, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 765-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Cohort Profile: The Northern Swedish Cohort2012In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1545-1552Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Do health consequences of unemployment differ among young men and women?2006In: Unemployment and health: International and interdisciplinary perspectives, Bowen Hills , 2006, p. 135-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Health selection in a 14-year follow-up study--a question of gendered discrimination?2005In: Soc Sci Med, ISSN 0277-9536, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 2221-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Johansson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Genusvetenskapens utveckling inom medicinen.2002In: Genusvägar - antologi om genusforskning, Stockholm: Liber förlag , 2002Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Johansson, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Annandale, Ellen
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Aléx, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Christianson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Elwer, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Eriksson, Carola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gilenstam, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Per E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Harryson, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lehti, Arja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Professionell Development.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Verdonk, Petra
    Central gender theoretical concepts in health research: the state of the art2014In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 185-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increasing awareness of the importance of gender perspectives in health science, there is conceptual confusion regarding the meaning and the use of central gender theoretical concepts. We argue that it is essential to clarify how central concepts are used within gender theory and how to apply them to health research. We identify six gender theoretical concepts as central and interlinked-but problematic and ambiguous in health science: sex, gender, intersectionality, embodiment, gender equity and gender equality. Our recommendations are that: the concepts sex and gender can benefit from a gender relational theoretical approach (ie, a focus on social processes and structures) but with additional attention to the interrelations between sex and gender; intersectionality should go beyond additive analyses to study complex intersections between the major factors which potentially influence health and ensure that gendered power relations and social context are included; we need to be aware of the various meanings given to embodiment, which achieve an integration of gender and health and attend to different levels of analyses to varying degrees; and appreciate that gender equality concerns absence of discrimination between women and men while gender equity focuses on women's and men's health needs, whether similar or different. We conclude that there is a constant need to justify and clarify our use of these concepts in order to advance gender theoretical development. Our analysis is an invitation for dialogue but also a call to make more effective use of the knowledge base which has already developed among gender theorists in health sciences in the manner proposed in this paper.

  • 70.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lehti, Arja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Danielsson, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Bengs, Carita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Johansson, E.E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Gender-related explanatory models of depression: a critical evaluation of medical articles2009In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 123, no 10, p. 689-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Although research has consistently shown a higher prevalence of depression among women compared with men, there is a lack of consensus regarding explanatory factors for these gender-related differences. The aim of this paper was to analyse the scientific quality of different gender-related explanatory models of depression in the medical database PubMed.

    Study design: Qualitative and quantitative analyses of PubMed articles.

    Methods: In a database search in PubMed for 2002, 82 articles on gender and depression were selected and analysed with qualitative and quantitative content analyses. In total, 10 explanatory factors and four explanatory models were found. The ISI Web of Science database was searched in order to obtain the citation number and journal impact factor for each article.

    Results: The most commonly used gender-related explanatory model for depression was the biomedical model (especially gonadal hormones), followed by the sociocultural and psychological models. Compared with the other models, the biomedical model scored highest on bibliometric measures but lowest on measures of multifactorial dimensions and differences within the group of men/women.

    Conclusion: The biomedical model for explaining gender-related aspects of depression had the highest quality when bibliometric methods were used. However, the sociocultural and psychological models had higher quality than the biomedical model when multifactoriality and intersectionality were analysed. There is a need for the development of new methods in order to evaluate the scientific quality of research.

  • 71.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Health and masculinities shaped by agency within structures among young unemployed men in a northern Swedish context2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 1-18, article id e0124785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of our paper was to explore expressions of life choices and life chances (aspects of agency within structures) related to power and experiences of health among early unemployed adolescent young men during the transition period to adulthood. These expressions of agency within structure were interpreted in the light of Cockerham’s Health Lifestyles Theory. Furthermore, social constructions of masculinities were addressed in our analysis.

    Repeated interviews with ten young men in a cohort of school leavers were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Cockerham’s model was useful for interpreting our findings and we found disposition to act to be a crucial theoretical tool to capture the will and intentions of participants in relation to health. We developed the model in the following ways: structure and socialization were visualized as surrounding the whole model. Analyses of what enhances or restricts power are important. In addition to practices of health lifestyles, we added experiences of health as outcome as well as emotional aspects in disposition to act. We interpret our findings as constructions of masculinities within certain structures, in relation to choices, habitus and practices.

    Qualitative research could contribute to develop the understanding of the agency within structure relationships. Future studies need to pay attention to experiences of health among young people at the margin of the labor market in various milieus – and to analyze these in relation to gender constructions and within the frame-work of agency within structure.

  • 72.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Månsdotter, A
    Varför behövs ett genusperspektiv inom folkhälsoområdet?2007In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 3, p. 196-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary in English

  • 73.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Dags att bryta den mansdominerade katedrala undervisningen2007In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 84, no 6, p. 560-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students at the medical programme at Umeå university point out the lack of female lecturers. The aim of this study was to see how many men respectively women our students meet as teachers in different teaching situations and to analyze the result from a student perspective. Students more often meet men than women in cathedral lectures. The male dominance is less obvious in group teaching and supervision. The medical programme should pay effort to have more women as cathedral lecturers.

  • 74.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Phillips, Susan P.
    Gender inequity needs to be regarded as a social determinant of depressive symptoms: Results from the Northern Swedish cohort2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 746-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The importance of social and avoidable determinants of depressive symptoms has been increasingly recognized in public health research. However, when it comes to determinant of gender differences in depressive symptoms the focus is predominantly on biological unavoidable determinants. Thus, there is a need for more focus on gendered social determinants of health. The aim of this study was to analyse the importance of gender relations for depressive symptoms after taking socioeconomic factors and earlier depressive symptoms into account in the Northern Swedish cohort. Methods: A 26-year follow-up study of a cohort of all school leavers in a middle-sized industrial town in Northern Sweden was performed from age 16 until age 42. Of those still alive of the original cohort, 94% participated during the whole period and answered extensive questionnaires. Exposure was measured as socioeconomic status, financial strain, perceived gender inequity in the couple relationship and division of responsibility for domestic work. The outcome was depressive symptoms at age 42, while depressive symptoms were controlled at age 30. Results: In multivariate logistic regression analyses significant relations between financial strain and, among women only, also perceived gender equity in the couple relationship and depressive symptoms after adjustment for earlier health status, as well as for all other exposure measures. Conclusions: Financial strain, and among women, also gender inequity in the couple relationship was related to depressive mood. There is a need to pay more attention to gender relations in future research on social determinants of depressive mood.

  • 75.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Mechanisms for the social gradient in health: results from a 14-year follow-up of the northern swedish cohort2011In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 125, no 9, p. 567-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although numerous studies have demonstrated a socio-economic gradient in health, there is still a lack of research about the mechanisms behind this gradient. The aim of this study was to analyse possible mechanisms from adolescence to adulthood to explain the socio-economic gradient in somatic symptoms among men and women in the Northern Swedish Cohort. Study design: A prospective cohort study was performed, in which all pupils (n = 1083) in the last year of compulsory school were followed for 14 years. The response rate was high, with 96.6% still participating after 14 years. The data were mainly collected through repeated comprehensive self-administered questionnaires.

    Methods: The main dependent variable was a combination of socio-economic position and somatic health at 30 years of age. Multivariate multinomial and bivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken.

    Results: After controlling for parental working-class position and health-related selection, the authors identified mechanisms from adolescence to adulthood for the socio-economic gradient in health that were related to social relations (poor relationship with father and unemployed friends among men, violence among women), labour market experiences (unemployment among men and women, physically heavy work among women), economic hardship (among women) and poor health behaviour.

    Conclusion: These analyses contribute to the development of epidemiological methods for analysing mechanisms for the socio-economic gradient in health. (C) 2011 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 76.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Are the health consequences of temporary employment worse among low educated than among high educated?2011In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 756-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the inconsistent findings of the growing amount of research analysing the possible health consequences of temporary employment, there is a lack of heterogeneous perspectives. The aim of the study was to analyse whether the health consequences of temporary employment are worse among low educated compared with high educated, after control for health-related selection.

    Methods: A 26-year follow-up study of a cohort of all school leavers in a middle-sized industrial town in northern Sweden was performed between 1981 and 2007. Of those still alive of the original cohort, 94% participated during the whole period. For this study, a sample of participants with temporary and permanent employment contracts between the age of 30 and 42 years was selected (n = 660).

    Results: In multivariate logistic regression analyses, an additive synergistic interaction effect was found for low education and high exposure to temporary employment in relation to suboptimal self-rated health, after controlling for health-related selection and sex. An additive antagonistic interaction was found between low education in combination with high exposure to temporary employment in relation to psychological distress, whereas no interaction was found for depressive symptoms.

    Conclusion: Our hypothesis regarding worse health effects of temporary employment among low educated was partly confirmed. Our results indicate the need to analyse temporary employment from a more heterogeneous perspective as well as in relation to different health outcomes.

  • 77.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Kirves, Kaisa
    Nygren, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin. School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Hägglöf, Bruno
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Addressing challenges of validity and internal consistency of mental health measures in a 27- year longitudinal cohort study–the Northern Swedish Cohort study2016In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, ISSN 1471-2288, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 16, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:There are inherent methodological challenges in the measurement of mental health problems in longitudinal research. There is constant development in definitions, taxonomies and demands concerning the properties of mental health measurements. The aim of this paper was to construct composite measures of mental health problems (according to today’s standard) from single questionnaire items devised in the early 1980s, and to evaluate their internal consistency and factorial invariance across the life course using the Northern Swedish Cohort.Methods:All pupils in the last year of compulsory school in Luleå in 1981 (n= 1083) form a prospective cohort study where the participants have been followed with questionnaires from the age of 16 (in 1981) until the age of43 (in 2008). We created and tested the following composite measures from self-reports at each follow-up:depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, functional somatic symptoms, modified GHQ and positive health. Validity and internal consistency were tested by confirmatory factor analysis, including tests of factorial invariance over time.Results:As an overall assessment, the results showed that the composite measures (based on more than 30-year-old single item questions) are likely to have acceptable factorial invariance as well as internal consistency over time.Conclusions:Testing the properties of the mental health measures used in older studies according to the standards of today is of great importance in longitudinal research. Our study demonstrates that composite measures of mental health problems can be constructed from single items which are more than 30 years old and that these measures seem to have the same factorial structure and internal consistency across a significant part of the life course. Thus, it can be possible to overcome some specific inherent methodological challenges in using historical data in longitudinal research.

  • 78.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Lehti, Arja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Professionell Development.
    Haukenes, Inger
    Department of Public Mental Health, Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health; Research Unit for General Practice, Uni Research Health, Kalfarveien 31, Bergen, Norway.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Developing a Tool for Increasing the Awareness about Gendered and Intersectional Processes in the Clinical Assessment of Patients: A Study of Pain Rehabilitation2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 4, article id e0152735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: There is a need for tools addressing gender inequality in the everyday clinical work in health care. The aim of our paper was to develop a tool for increasing the awareness of gendered and intersectional processes in clinical assessment of patients, based on a study of pain rehabilitation.

    METHODS: In the overarching project named "Equal care in rehabilitation" we used multiple methods (both quantitative and qualitative) in five sub studies. With a novel approach we used Grounded Theory in order to synthesize the results from our sub studies, in order to develop the gender equality tool. The gender equality tool described and developed in this article is thus based on results from sub studies about the processes of assessment and selection of patients in pain rehabilitation. Inspired by some questions in earlier tools, we posed open ended questions and inductively searched for findings and concepts relating to gendered and social selection processes in pain rehabilitation, in each of our sub studies. Through this process, the actual gender equality tool was developed as 15 questions about the process of assessing and selecting patients to pain rehabilitation. As a more comprehensive way of understanding the tool, we performed a final step of the GT analyses. Here we synthesized the results of the tool into a comprehensive model with two dimensions in relation to several possible discrimination axes.

    RESULTS: The process of assessing and selecting patients was visualized as a funnel, a top down process governed by gendered attitudes, rules and structures. We found that the clinicians judged inner and outer characteristics and status of patients in a gendered and intersectional way in the process of clinical decision-making which thus can be regarded as (potentially) biased with regard to gender, socio-economic status, ethnicity and age.

    IMPLICATIONS: The clinical implications of our tool are that the tool can be included in the systematic routine of clinical assessment of patients for both awareness raising and as a base for avoiding gender bias in clinical decision-making. The tool could also be used in team education for health professionals as an instrument for critical reflection on gender bias.

    CONCLUSIONS: Thus, tools for clinical assessment can be developed from empirical studies in various clinical settings. However, such a micro-level approach must be understood from a broader societal perspective including gender relations on both the macro- and the meso-level.

  • 79.
    Harryson, Lisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Aléx, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    “An equal share, that’s my medicine”. Experiences of domestic work, health and illness from a gender relational perspective.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Gender inequalities in domestic work have been shown to be related to mental illness among both women and men. The aim of this study was to analyse experiences of domestic work, health and illness among women and men from a gender relational perspective. Methods: A strategic section from the Northern Swedish Cohort of four women and four men living in couple relationships with children was included in the study. The strategic selection included variation socioeconomic class and perception of gender equality in the couple relationship. Interviews were conducted in 2012 when the participants were 47 years old. Data collection and analysis was performed with a Grounded Theory approach. Results: We identified three categories. “Living with the burden of domestic work –an obstacle for women’s health” was built on women’s experiences of having the main responsibility for everyday domestic work as burdensome, stressful and something that caused sleeping and mental illness problems. “Being trapped in an outmoded masculinity – a stressful situation” was built on men’s experiences of domestic work such as fixing things that were broken at home as well as having responsibility for the seasonal outdoor work, something that was connected to feelings of stress. “Negotiating gender equality” included women’s and men’s experiences of striving for gender equality in the couple relationship as a possible way to improved health. Conclusions: Gender relations are an important part of how the domestic work is unequally organized and related to experiences of mental illness. We found that gender constructions in the domestic sphere included various dimensions of gender inequality that were constantly negotiated in order to improve health.

  • 80.
    Harryson, Lisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Aléx, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    "I have surly passed a limit, it is simply too much": women's and men's experiences of stress and wellbeing when living within a process of housework resignation2016In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Gender inequality within paid and unpaid work exposes women and men to different environments and responsibilities. These gender patterns shape living conditions for women and men, either negatively or positively, by affecting the prospect of good health. Most public health studies of gender and housework are quantitative, and knowledge about the relationship between housework experiences and health for women and men is limited. The aim of this study was to explore the housework experiences and practices of women and men and their experiences of stress and perceived wellbeing from a gender perspective.

    METHODS: We conducted thematic interviews with four women and four men living in Sweden, and performed an analysis using the Grounded Theory method.

    FINDINGS: We found that stereotypical gender practices in housework influenced experiences of stress and perceived wellbeing among women and men. Despite proposing gender equality in housework as a means of improving wellbeing, inequality was amplified by the way women and men handle the gendered division of housework. We call this recurring theme "The process of housework resignation", which also constitute the core category in our analysis. "The process of housework resignation" was theorised from the categories "Gender practices in housework", "Experiencing stress and wellbeing" and "Managing daily life".

    CONCLUSIONS: Stereotypical gender practices in housework can increase experiences of stress among women and men. Challenging stereotypical masculinities can be a key for breaking the process of resignation in housework and for facilitating improved health among both women and men in heterosexual couple relationships within a Swedish context.

  • 81.
    Harryson, Lisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Novo, Mehmet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Is gender inequality in the domestic sphere associated with psychological distress among women and men? Results from the Northern Swedish Cohort2012In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 271-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to analyse whether gender inequality in the domestic sphere was associated with psychological distress among women and men.

    Methods In a cohort study, all pupils in the last year of compulsory school in a middle-sized industrial town in northern Sweden were followed until the age of 42. For this study a sample of cohabiting participants (n¼372 women, 352 men) was selected. Gender inequality was measured as perceptions of gender inequality in the couple relationship, time spent on household work, responsibility for domestic work and childcare, and was analysed in relation to psychological distress, after taking possible background variables as well as earlier health status into account.

    Results In the multivariate analyses, perception of gender inequality in the couple relationship was associated with psychological distress for both women (OR 2.23, CI 1.20 to 4.18) and men (OR 3.51, CI 1.69 to 7.31). For women only, taking whole responsibility for domestic work was associated with the outcome (OR 2.17, CI 1.05 to 4.48). For men, taking less than half of the responsibility for domestic work was associated with psychological distress (OR 2.25, CI 1.24 to 3.91).

    Conclusions Gender inequality in the domestic sphere seems to be an important determinant of psychological distress for both women and men.

  • 82.
    Harryson, Lisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Domestic work and psychological distress: what is the importance of relative socioeconomic position and gender inequality in the couple relationship?2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 6, p. e38484-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the relation between responsibility for domestic work and psychological distress was influenced by perception of gender inequality in the couple relationship and relative socioeconomic position.

    Methods: In the Northern Swedish Cohort, all pupils who studied in the last year of compulsory school in a northern Swedish town in 1981 have been followed regularly until 2007. In this study, participants living with children were selected (n = 371 women, 352 men). The importance of relative socioeconomic position and perception of gender inequality in the couple relationship in combination with domestic work for psychological distress was examined through logistic regression analysis.

    Results: Two combinations of variables including socioeconomic position ('having less than half of the responsibility for domestic work and partner higher socioeconomic position' and 'having more than half the responsibility for domestic work and equal socioeconomic position') were related to psychological distress. There were also higher ORs for psychological distress for the combinations of having 'less than half of the responsibility for domestic work and gender-unequal couple relationship' and 'more than half the responsibility for domestic work and gender-unequal couple relationship'. Having a lower socioeconomic position than the partner was associated with higher ORs for psychological distress among men.

    Conclusions: This study showed that domestic work is a highly gendered activity as women tend to have a greater and men a smaller responsibility. Both these directions of inequality in domestic work, in combination with experiencing the couple relationship as gender-unequal, were associated with psychological distress There is a need for more research with a relational approach on inequalities in health in order to capture the power relations within couples in various settings.

  • 83.
    Haukenes, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Mental Hlth, Dept Publ Mental Hlth, Bergen, Norway.
    Hensing, G.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine. Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Mental Hlth, Dept Publ Mental Hlth, Bergen, Norway.
    Does pain severity guide selection to multimodal pain rehabilitation across gender?2015In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 826-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Studies have addressed the effect of multimodal pain rehabilitation (MMR), whereas criteria for selection are sparse. This study examines whether higher scores on musculoskeletal pain measures are associated with selection to MMR, and whether this differs across gender.

    Method A clinical population of 262 male and 589 female patients was recruited consecutively during 3 years, 2007-2010. The patients were referred from primary care to a pain rehabilitation clinic in Northern Sweden for assessment and selection to MMR. Register-based data on self-reported pain were linked to patients' records where outcome (MMR or not) was stated. We modelled odds ratios for selection to MMR by higher scores on validated pain measures (pain severity, interference with daily life, pain sites and localized pain vs. varying pain location). Covariates were age, educational level and multiple pain measures. Anxiety and depression (Hospital, Anxiety and Depression Scale) and working status were used in sensitivity tests.

    Results Higher scores of self-reported pain were not associated with selection to MMR in multivariate models. Among women, higher scores on pain severity, pain sites and varying pain location (localized pain=reference) were negatively associated with selection to MMR. After adjustment for multiple pain measures, the negative odds ratio for varying location persisted (OR=0.59, 95% CI=0.39-0.89).

    Conclusion Higher scores on self-reported pain did not guide selection to MMR and a negative trend was found among women. Studies of referral patterns and decision processes may contribute to a better understanding of the clinical practice that decides selection to MMR.

  • 84.
    Janlert, Urban
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Which theory is best? Explanatory models of the relationship between unemployment and health.2009In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 9, no 235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A number of different models have been used in order to explain the links between unemployment and ill-health. The objective of this study was to test different proposed models in an empirical setting. METHODS: A cohort of school-leavers consisting of more than 1000 persons was followed for 14 years up to the age of 30. They have repeatedly been asked questions that could be used to operationalise different proposed models as well as health outcomes. Seven different models explaining the health effect of unemployment were identified: an economic deprivation model, a lack of control model as well as a locus of control model, a stress model, a social support model, a work involvement model and a model of latent functions. Health outcomes used were somatic symptoms, depressive symptoms, self-perceived health and nervous problems. Statistical tests included bivariate correlations and logistic regression. RESULTS: Most of the models correlated fairly well with unemployment measures. The capacity of the models to explain the connection between unemployment and ill-health varied, however. The model of latent functions was most successful, followed by the economic deprivation model. The social support and the control models were also fairly good. The work involvement scale and the stress model demonstrated the smallest explanatory power. CONCLUSION: Studies comparing different explanatory models in the field are rare. Few models apply a multidisciplinary approach. In view of the findings, it should be possible to develop multidisciplinary and better models to explain the links between unemployment and health in more detail.

  • 85.
    Janlert, Urban
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Winefield, Anthony H.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
    Length of unemployment and health-related outcomes: a life-course analysis2015In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 662-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most previous studies on the effects of length of unemployment on health have focused on the duration of continuous spells of unemployment rather than on the cumulative length of intermittent spells. This study analysed the relationship between the cumulative length of intermittent spells of unemployment and different health-related outcomes using data from a longitudinal study of school leavers. Methods: All pupils who completed compulsory schooling in 1981 in a medium-sized town in northern Sweden (N=1083) were followed for 14 years with repeated questionnaires including questions about unemployment, health and health behaviour. Results: Men tended to react with a steady state or a levelling off of health symptoms with increased unemployment, whereas women showed deteriorating health symptoms. For health behaviour the reverse occurred. Women's health behaviour was less connected with increased unemployment while men's health behaviour tended to deteriorate. Conclusion: Cumulative length of unemployment is correlated with deteriorated health and health behaviour. Long-term unemployment, even as a result of cumulated shorter employment spells over a number of years should be an urgent target for policy makers.

  • 86.
    Johansson, Klara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Neighbourhood disadvantage and individual adversities in adolescence and total alcohol consumption up to mid-life: Results from the Northern Swedish Cohort2015In: Health & place, ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 33, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study tests if neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage and family social and material adversities during adolescence are independently related to total alcohol consumption from adolescence through to mid-life. Self-reports from the Northern Swedish Cohort (effective sample=950) at ages 16, 18, 21, 30 and 42 was combined with register data on the socioeconomic composition of neighbourhoods at age 16. Total volume of alcohol consumed between age 16-42 was estimated based on the five survey waves, and self-reported social and material adversities were computed as composite variables. Neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage at age 16 was associated with alcohol consumption age 16-42 for men but not for women. Social adversities at age 16 were associated with alcohol consumption age 16-42 for both women and men, but material adversity or parental class was not. In conclusion, neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage in adolescence has a significant relationship with later alcohol consumption among men, even independently from individual factors. On family level, social factors but not socioeconomic factors in adolescence independently predict later alcohol consumption.

  • 87.
    Johansson, Klara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Parental leave and increased physical activity of fathers and mothers-results from the Northern Swedish Cohort2014In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 935-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity is an important public health issue. Factors shown to be associated with physical activity are parenthood and country-level gender equality, while the importance of individual gender equality (in parenthood or in general) remains to explore. In Scandinavia, where parental leave can be shared equally between mothers and fathers, parental leave is one dimension of gender equality in parenthood. The aim of this study was to investigate parental leave in relation to increased physical activity among men and women. Methods: Participants in the Northern Swedish Cohort with a child born 1993-2005 (n = 584) were investigated with questionnaires at ages 21 and 42; register data on parental leave between ages 28 and 42 were obtained from Statistics Sweden. The relationships between parental leave between ages 28 and 42 and meeting WHO guidelines for physical activity at age 42, as well as changes in physical activity between ages 21 and 42, were tested with multinomial regression, controlling for socio-economic status and birth year of the child. Results: For women, the length of parental leave was not associated with increased physical activity or with meeting WHO guidelines at age 42. For men, parental leave was associated with increased physical activity, controlling for socio-economic status and age of the child, but not with meeting WHO guidelines for physical activity at age 42. Conclusions: A gender non-traditional out-take of parental leave might be associated with an increase in physical activity among men at the lower end of the physical activity spectrum, but not among women.

  • 88.
    Jonsson, F.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Strömsten, Lotta M. J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gustafsson, Per E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Paths of adversity linking adolescent socioeconomic conditions to adult functional somatic symptoms2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Jonsson, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Per E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Social capital across the life course and functional somatic symptoms in mid-adulthood2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 581-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine social capital across life and functional somatic symptoms in middle-age, according to life-course models of cumulative risk and sensitive periods.

    Methods: Data from the 26-year prospective study the Northern Swedish Cohort enabled complete case analyses on 940 individuals (451 women and 489 men) participating in questionnaire surveys at ages 16, 21, 30 and 42. Social capital was operationalized at the individual level, comprising items on social participation, social influence and social support. Functional somatic symptoms were a summary measure of self-reported physical symptoms, palpitation and sleeping difficulties occuring during the 12 months prior to the data collection. Linear regression was used as the main statistical method, examining the relationship between functional somatic symptoms at age 42 and social capital across life.

    Results: Lower levels of social capital accumulated over the life course were associated with higher levels of functional somatic symptoms at age 42, for both women and men. Social capital was, especially among adolescent men, related to functional somatic symptoms at age 42, independently of social capital later in life and baseline material circumstances.

    Conclusions: The health impact of poor social capital may be due to accumulation across the life course and to adolescence being a particularly sensitive period. It is relevant for preventive work to acknowledge effects of social capital throughout life.

  • 90.
    Jonsson, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stromsten, Lotta M. J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarstrom, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Life Course Pathways of Adversities Linking Adolescent Socioeconomic Circumstances and Functional Somatic Symptoms in Mid-Adulthood: A Path Analysis Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e0155963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While research examining the health impact of early socioeconomic conditions suggests that effects may exist independently of or jointly with adult socioeconomic position, studies exploring other potential pathways are few. Following a chain of risk life course model, this prospective study seeks to examine whether pathways of occupational class as well as material and social adversities across the life course link socioeconomic disadvantage in adolescent to functional somatic symptoms in mid-adulthood. Applying path analysis, a multiple mediator model was assessed using prospective data collected during 26 years through the Northern Swedish Cohort. The sample contained 987 individuals residing in the municipality of Lulea, Sweden, who participated in questionnaire surveys at age 16, 21, 30 and 42. Socioeconomic conditions (high/low) in adolescence (age 16) were operationalized using the occupation of the parents, while occupational class in adulthood (manual/nonmanual) was measured using the participant's own occupation at age 21 and 30. The adversity measurements were constructed as separate age specific parcels at age 21 and 30. Social adversity included items pertaining to stressful life events that could potentially harm salient relationships, while material adversity was operationalized using items concerning unfavorable financial and material circumstances. Functional somatic symptoms at age 42 was a summary measure of self-reported physical symptoms, palpitation and sleeping difficulties that had occurred during the last 12 months. An association between socioeconomic conditions at age 16 and functional somatic symptoms at age 42 (r = 0.068) which was partially explained by people's own occupational class at age 21 and then material as well as social adversity at age 30 was revealed. Rather than proposing a direct and independent health effect of the socioeconomic conditions of the family, the present study suggests that growing up in an unfavorable socioeconomic environment might be a source for a chain of adverse material and social living situations, which in turn affects adult health.

  • 91.
    Jonsson, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sebastian, Miguel San
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Intragenerational social mobility and functional somatic symptoms in a northern Swedish context: analyses of diagonal reference models2017In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 16, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Research indicate that social class mobility could be potentially important for health, but whether this is due to the movement itself or a result of people having been integrated in different class contexts is, to date, difficult to infer. In addition, although several theories suggest that transitions between classes in the social hierarchy can be stressful experiences, few studies have empirically examined whether such movements may have health effects, over and above the implications of "being" in these classes. In an attempt to investigate whether intragenerational social mobility is associated with functional somatic symptoms in mid-adulthood, the current study tests three partially contrasting theories.

    METHOD: The dissociative theory suggests that mobility in general and upward mobility in particular may be linked to psychological distress, while the falling from grace theory indicates that downward mobility is especially stressful. In contrast, the acculturation theory holds that the health implications of social mobility is not due to the movement itself but attributed to the class contexts in which people find themselves. Diagonal Reference Models were used on a sample of 924 individuals who in 1981 graduated from 9(th) grade in the municipality of Luleå, Sweden. Social mobility was operationalized as change in occupational class between age 30 and 42 (measured in 1995 and 2007). The health outcome was functional somatic symptoms at age 42, defined as a clustering self-reported physical symptoms, palpitation and sleeping difficulties during the last 12 months.

    RESULTS: Overall mobility was not associated with higher levels of functional somatic symptoms compared to being immobile (p = 0.653). After controlling for prior and current class, sex, parental social position, general health, civil status, education and unemployment, the association between downward mobility was borderline significant (p = 0.055) while upward mobility was associated with lower levels of functional somatic symptoms (p = 0.03).

    CONCLUSION: The current study did not find unanimous support for any of the theories. Nevertheless, it sheds light on the possibility that upward mobility may be beneficial to reduce stress-related health problems in mid-life over and above the exposure to prior and current class, while downward mobility can be of less importance for middle-age health complaints.

  • 92.
    Kalucza, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Mental health and parenthood: a longitudinal study of the relationship between self-reported mental health and parenthood2015In: Health Sociology Review, ISSN 1446-1242, E-ISSN 1839-3551, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 283-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to previous studies, the relationship between parenthood and mental health is not straightforward. One reason could be that selection effects on parenthood are seldom accounted for. Using the unique Northern Swedish Cohort dataset, following individuals from age 16 to 43 (n=1001), this study examines whether there is a selection effect of self-reported mental health in adolescence into parenthood; and whether entry into parenthood is related to subsequent mental health after controlling for prior mental health. Our results show no evidence of a selection effect for women, but men with poor mental health at age 16 were less likely to become fathers. Having children improved women's subsequent mental health after controlling for adolescent mental health, something that was not true for men. Our result reinforces the need for future research of the complex relationship between mental health and parenthood through focusing on, for example, timing of parenthood as well as through using different mental health measures.

  • 93.
    Khatun, Masuma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    An epidemiological study of the influence of adolescence and early adulthood factors upon the social class inequity of musculuskeletal pain in young adults.2004In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 33, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Khatun, Masuma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    The influence of factors identified in adolescence and early adulthood on social class inequities of musculoskeletal disorders at age 30: A prospective population-based cohort study2004In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 1353-1360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Social class inequities have been observed for most measures of health. A greater understanding of the relative importance of different explanations is required. In this prospective population-based cohort study we explored the contribution of factors, ascertained at different stages between adolescence and early adulthood, to social class inequities in musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) at age 30.

    Methods We used data from 547 men and 497 women from a town in north Sweden who were baseline examined at age 16 and followed up to age 30. Using logistic regression models, we estimated the unadjusted odds ratios (OR) for MSD for blue-collar versus white-collar workers in men and women separately. We assessed the contribution of different factors identified between adolescence and early adulthood by comparing the unadjusted OR for social class differences with OR adjusted for these explanatory factors.

    Results We found significant class differences at age 30 with higher MSD among blue-collar workers (OR = 2.03 in men [95% CI: 1.42, 2.90] and 1.98 in women [95% CI: 1.29, 3.02]). After adjustment for explanatory factors, class differences decreased and were no longer significant, with OR of 1.20 in men (95% CI: 0.76, 1.95) and 1.18 in women (95% CI: 0.69, 2.03). School grades at age 16; being single and alcohol consumption at age 21; having children, restricted financial resources, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking, and working conditions at age 30 were important for men; parents' social class, school grade, smoking and physical activity at age 16; being single at age 21; and working conditions at age 30 were important for women.

    Conclusion The accumulation of adverse behavioural and social circumstances from adolescence to early adulthood may be an explanation for the class differences in MSD at age 30. Interventions aimed at reducing health inequities need to consider exploratory factors identified at early and later stages in life, also including structural determinants of health.

  • 95. Lallukka, Tea
    et al.
    Mekuria, Gashaw B.
    Nummi, Tapio
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden and Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Co-occurrence of depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms: trajectories from adolescence to midlife using group-based joint trajectory analysis2019In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, article id 236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Co-occurrence of mental and somatic symptoms is common, and recent longitudinal studies have identified single trajectories of these symptoms, but it is poorly known whether the symptom trajectories can also co-occur and change across the lifespan. We aimed to examine co-occurring symptoms and their joint trajectories from adolescence to midlife.

    Methods: Longitudinal data were derived from Northern Sweden, where 506 girls and 577 boys aged 16years participated at baseline in 1981 (99.7% of those initially invited), and have been followed up in four waves until the age of 43. Survey data were collected about depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms. Potential joint development of this three-component symptom set was examined with multiple response trajectory analysis, a method that has not been previously used to study co-occurrence of these symptoms.

    Results: We identified a five trajectory solution as the best: very low (19%), low (31%), high (22%), late sharply increasing (16%) and a very high increasing (12%). In the late sharply increasing and very high increasing groups the scores tended to increase with age, while in the other groups the levels were more stable. Overall, the results indicated that depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms co-exist from adolescence to midlife.

    Conclusions: The multiple response trajectory analysis confirmed high stability in the co-occurrence of depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms from adolescence to midlife. Clinicians should consider these findings to detect symptoms in their earliest phase in order to prevent the development of co-occurring high levels of symptoms.

  • 96.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Almquist, Ylva B.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Disentangling the directions of associations between structural social capital and mental health: Longitudinal analyses of gender, civic engagement and depressive symptoms2016In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 163, p. 135-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper analysed the directions of associations between individual-level structural social capital, in the form of civic engagement, and depressive symptoms across time from age 16-42 years in Swedish men and women. More specifically, we asked whether civic engagement was related to changes in depressive symptoms, if it was the other way around, or whether the association was bi-directional. This longitudinal study used data from a 26-year prospective cohort material of 1001 individuals in Northern Sweden (482 women and 519 men). Civic engagement was measured by a single-item question reflecting the level of engagement in clubs/organisations. Depressive symptoms were assessed by a composite index. Directions of associations were analysed by means of gender-separate cross-lagged structural equation models. Models were adjusted for parental social class, parental unemployment, parental health, and family type at baseline (age 16). Levels of both civic engagement and depressive symptoms were relatively stable across time. The model with the best fit to data showed that, in men, youth civic engagement was negatively associated with depressive symptoms in adulthood, thus supporting the hypothesis that involvement in social networks promotes health, most likely through provision of social and psychological support, perceived influence, and sense of belonging. Accordingly, interventions to promote civic engagement in young men could be a way to prevent poor mental health for men later on in life. No cross-lagged effects were found among women. We discuss this gender difference in terms of gendered experiences of civic engagement which in turn generate different meanings and consequences for men and women, such as civic engagement not being as positive for women's mental health as for that of men. We conclude that theories on structural social capital and interventions to facilitate civic engagement for health promoting purposes need to acknowledge gendered life circumstances. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 97.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Brydsten, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Almquist, Ylva B
    The role of social position and depressive symptoms in adolescence for life-course trajectories of education and work: a cohort study2016In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 1169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: While a vast amount of studies confirm the social reproduction of class and status from one generation to the next, less is known about the role of health in the child generation for these processes. Research has shown that particularly mental distress in adolescence is important for future life chances. This study aimed to examine the importance of parental socioeconomic position and depressive symptoms in youth for life-course trajectories of education and labour market attachment among men and women.

    METHODS: Based on four waves of questionnaire data from the Northern Swedish Cohort (n = 1,001), consisting of individuals born in 1965, three steps of gender-separate analyses were undertaken. First, the individual trajectories of education and labour market attachment from age 18 to 42 were mapped through sequence analysis. Second, cluster analysis was used to identify typical trajectories. Third, two indicators of parental socioeconomic position - occupational class and employment status - and depressive symptoms at age 16 were used in multinomial regression analyses to predict adult life-course trajectories.

    RESULTS: Four typical trajectories were identified for men, of which three were characterised by stable employment and various lengths of education, and the fourth reflected a more unstable situation. Among women, five trajectories emerged, characterised by more instability compared to men. Low parental occupational class and unemployment were significantly associated with a higher risk of ending up in less advantaged trajectories for men while, for women, this was only the case for occupational class. Youth levels of depressive symptoms did not significantly differ across the trajectories.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study found support for the intergenerational reproduction of social position, particularly when measured in terms of parental occupational class. Youth depressive symptoms did not show clear differences across types of trajectories, subsequently impeding such symptoms to trigger any selection processes. While this could be a consequence of the specific framework of the current study, it may also suggest that depressive symptoms in youth are not a root cause for the more complex processes through which how social position develops across life. The possible impact of welfare and labour market policies is discussed.

  • 98.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Gustafsson, Per E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Johansson, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Longitudinal associations between social relationships at age 30 and internalising symptoms at age 42: findings from the Northern Swedish Cohort.2016In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 75-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Little is known on long-term consequences of poor social relationships in adulthood. The study aimed to examine associations between social relationships at age 30 and internalising symptoms at age 42.

    METHODS: Data was drawn from four waves of the Northern Swedish cohort (n = 1001, 94 % response rate). The outcome internalising symptoms was measured by a composite index of depressiveness and anxiety. A cumulative measure was constructed to reflect various aspects of social relationships. Multivariate ordinal logistic regressions were used, controlling for socioeconomic indicators and previous level of internalising symptoms.

    RESULTS: An accumulation of poor social relationships indicators at age 30 is related to internalising symptoms at age 42 in women (OR 1.30; CI 1.11-1.52) and men (OR 1.17; CI 1.02-1.36). The associations remained significant after adjustment for covariates.

    CONCLUSIONS: Poor quality of social relationships at age 30 can predict internalising symptoms 12 years later in both men and women even when previous mental health as well as financial disadvantage is accounted for. More research is required to further examine pathways and mechanisms as well as suitable interventions.

  • 99.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Winefield, Helen
    How well do parental and peer relationships in adolescence predict health in adulthood?2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 460-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Although health effects of social relationships are well-researched, long-term health consequences of adolescent family as well as peer relationships are poorly understood. The aim of the study was to explore the prospective importance of parental and peer social relationships in adolescence on internalising and functional somatic symptoms in adulthood. Methods: Data were drawn from four waves of the Northern Swedish Cohort Study, response rate 94.3%, N=1001. Outcome variables were internalising and functional somatic symptoms at the ages of 21, 30 and 42. Relationship variables at age 16 were poor parental contact and three indicators of poor peer relationships. Associations were assessed in multivariate ordinal logistic regressions with adjustment for confounders and baseline health. Results: Results show that the main relationships-related predictors of adult internalising symptoms were self-rated poor peer relationships in terms of spending time alone during after-school hours and poor parental relationship. Functional somatic symptoms on the other hand were most strongly associated with poor parental contact and not being happy with classmates at age 16. Conclusions: The quality of parental and peer relationships in adolescence predicts adult mental and functional somatic health as much as 26 years later, even when accounting for confounders and adolescent symptomatology. This study extends past research by exploring how both adolescent parental and peer relationships (self-reported as well as teacher reported) predict adult self-reported health.

  • 100.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Harryson, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Changing housework, changing health?: A longitudinal analysis of how changes in housework are associated with functional somatic symptoms2016In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 2242-3982, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 75, article id 31781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse how changes in housework over the course of adulthood are related to somatic health in Swedish men and women.

    Methods: Data were drawn from 2 waves of the Northern Swedish Cohort Study, response rate 94.3%, N1,001. A subsample of cohabiting individuals was selected (n328 women, 300 men). Outcome variable was functional somatic symptoms (FSS) at age 42. Associations were assessed in multivariate general linear models with adjustment for confounders and somatic health at age 30.

    Results: Housework is primarily performed by women, and women’s responsibility for and performance of housework increased from ages 30 to 42. These changes were associated with elevated levels of FSS at age 42 in women. Men reported considerably lower responsibility for and performed less housework compared with women, the load of housework for men does not change substantially from ages 30 to 42 and no associations with FSS were identified.

    Conclusions: The gendered division of housework means that women are particularly exposed to a heavy workload. Women’s responsibility for and performance of housework increase between ages 30 and 42 and this threatens to be embodied in the form FSS. We conclude that housework should be considered an important source of stress in addition to that from waged work and that a deeper understanding of the links between housework and health requires a gender theoretical analysis.

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