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  • 51.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Marketisation on export: representations of the Swedish free school model in English media2015In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 549-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how 'social democratic' Sweden initiated and implemented choice reforms that attracted the interest of 'liberal' England. By studying how English media framed and portrayed the Swedish free school 'export' from 2008 to 2014, this paper aims to describe and discuss how a market-oriented policy idea, the Swedish system of free schools, is represented as it travels across national contexts. Initially, the Swedish free school model was portrayed as an inspiration for both the English political left and, in particular, the right. But the national stereotypical representation of Sweden as a legitimate 'reference society' was significantly toned down after the 2010 election—often accompanied by references to Sweden’s poor PISA performances. The study shows how Swedish policy 'retailers', such as school chain representatives, use the media for further display and reach. They are not only selling policy ideas, but also their own services, curricular approaches, and teaching methods, expanding their share in the global 'edu-business'. In sum, such educational policy retailing, along with media-policy interaction that (re)interprets national stereotypes linked to political legitimation, are important sources for understanding and further exploring international flows and interpretations of market-oriented reform ideas.

  • 52.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Marketisation on Export: Swedish Free Schools as Global Edu-business?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One central element in many recent reform efforts concern marketization and the use of business-like conditions and ideals in the public sector. Looking at education in particular, there are good reasons to speak about a growing ‘edu-business’ (Ball, 2007) in that field. Reforms and the ideas they build on are naturally not bound by national borders, instead they travel and diffuse and are learned, borrowed and brokered across nation states (Lawn, 2011). From an international perspective, the Swedish education system is viewed as being extensively effected by marketisation. Taken together, the choice reforms initiated in the 1990s turned the Swedish school system into “one of the world’s most liberal public education systems” (Blomqvist 2004: 148 c.f. Lundahl et. al., 2013). Parents can choose any school for their child free of charge, public as well as private (but still tax funded) free schools. The Swedish system of school choice has received international interest and attention and has provoked statements such as “When it comes to choice, Milton Friedman would be more at home in Stockholm than in Washington, DC” (The Economist, 2013). Put in a market-oriented vocabulary from which the reforms originate, the Swedish system of school choice has been transformed into a ‘commodity’ to be ‘exported’ to other countries. Not only have the reform ideas seemed to travel, but companies that operate Swedish free schools have been on the move as well. Swedish free school chains, i.e. large stock companies that own several schools, have tried to establish themselves and set up new schools abroad, for instance Kunskapsskolan now operate schools in England, the US and India (c.f. Erixon-Arreman & Holm, 2011; Wiborg, 2010; Allen, 2010). It is particularly interesting to note that ’social democratic’ Sweden initiated and implemented choice reforms that attracted the interest of ’liberal’ nations, such as England (c.f. Baggesen Klitgaard, 2008). For instance, in the British national elections in 2010, the Swedish model of free schools was strongly advocated by the Conservative Party. It is expected that the Conservative’s 2015 election manifesto will include more steps in the same Swedish direction, for instance by allowing profit-making companies to run free schools (The Guardian, 2013). This paper aims to describe and discuss the Swedish system of school choice as an example of how market-oriented ideas travel, translate and diffuse across national contexts, thereby illustrating how national reform ideas and practices can become global edu-business. The central questions concern how the Swedish ’export’ is framed and portrayed in a) the Swedish context and b) other national contexts - in particular the English - and c) what consequences follow from these representations. By analyzing empirical sources such as media outlets, official government publications and research reports, the representation of the image Sweden sends out and how the ideas are represented in international contexts are unveiled and critically discussed.  The theoretical foundations of the study include perspectives on policy transfer, borrowing and learning (c.f. Benson & Jordan, 2011; Dolowitz, 2009; Meseguer, 2009; Ozga & Jones, 2006).

  • 53.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Political party convergence and divergence: the issue of inspecting educational performance2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Problemen kan inte inspekteras bort2015In: Pedagogiska Magasinet, ISSN 1401-3320, no 1, p. 14-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Reinforcing or challenging?: Media representations of national quality assurance evaluations in four Swedish Higher Education institutions2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the contemporary “audit society” (Power 1999), scrutiny, evaluation and control are prominent means of governing institutions, organisations and professionals (Dahler-Larsen 2011). The field of Higher Education is no exception. Under the umbrella of New Public Management, different evaluative activities are linked to and promoted by developments entailing increased marketization and privatization of public welfare in both Europe and beyond. Within such a neo-liberal agenda, HE is increasingly conceived as a form of private good (Englund 1996), which positions students as consumers and quality evaluations as means to assist, account, regulate and even fortify these relationships. The media is an important actor in this context, aligned with a public mission to scrutiny and at the same time providing powerful “interpretative frameworks for our understanding of society as a whole” (Hjarvard 2013:3).

    In 2011, Sweden introduced a highly debated evaluation framework for assessing quality in HE focusing on results and student outcomes (Segerholm et al 2014). Implementing this framework led to Sweden being excluded from ENQA, European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education, of which Sweden originally had been one of the founding members (Segerholm & Hult 2015). Among other things, the Swedish HE evaluation framework did not consider HEIs internal quality assurance procedures. It only focused on student results and outcomes, which was criticized by ENQA and turned out to be an infected issue in the Swedish domestic debate (Lindgren & Rönnberg 2015).

    The evaluation framework targeted programmes of study that could lead to the award of a first or second-cycle qualification and resulted in a final overall grade: Very high, high or inadequate quality. The lowest grade meant a follow up by the Agency, with the possibility to revoke the entitlement to award degree qualifications (UKÄ 2014). The evaluations in full, and not only the final grade, were then made public on the Agency’s website. Needless to say, media reporting on such evaluations are of course ‘high stakes’: Attracting future students are vital and the HE institution’s (HEI’s) reputation are under potential threat, depending not only on the actual outcome of the evaluation, but also - importantly enough - on how the outcome is reported and represented by the media and thereby transmitted to the wider public and thereby to different HEI stakeholders.

    This paper is interested in exploring media-policy interactions in the governing of Swedish higher education. More specifically, the paper aims to describe and analyse local newspaper reporting on the results of national quality evaluations of study programmes. The paper will initially a) map the attempted framing of the evaluation results made by the HEIs, via website announcements and press releases from both the HEIs and the evaluation agency UKÄ, and secondly b) analyse if and how these framings from the HEIs are (re)presented by the local media. A central question concerns to what extent local media is reinforcing or even promoting the representation attempted by HEIs, or if it is challenged and how this can be understood. Theoretically, the paper draws on literatures related to media-education governing interactions, including a) work of governance and governing (Clarke 2015; Bell et al 2010; Clarke & Newman 2009), b) literature conceptualising the relationship between media, society and policy/politics (Thorbjørnsrud 2015; Hjarvard 2013; Strömbäck 2008) and c) literature more specifically targeting the media in the context of education as a policy field (Rawolle 2010; Thomas 2009; Anderson 2007; Gewirtz, Dickson & Power 2004).

    Four HEIs are studied in this paper. The cases have been selected as a part of a wider research project (Segerholm et al 2012) to represent different overall outcomes in the national evaluations (share of study programmes judged as “inadequate”) and different institutional characteristics (University or University College, old established institution or younger). In brief, U1 is a large old university with several faculties and subject areas that overall did well the evaluations on an aggregate level, U2 is an old and specialised university with one faculty and mainly professional programmes that did not do as well, U3 is a comparably recently established university college with mainly professional programmes that did well in the national evaluations, and U4 is a comparably recently established university with both professional and academic programmes and courses that overall did not succeed very well in the national evaluations. Thus, the cases are characterised by different contextual conditions as well as different outcomes of the national quality evaluations. This paper is based on the following empirical sources: a) the four HEIs’ webpages and their records/archives of press releases etc. b) articles from the media database Mediearkivet, using search terms such as the HEI name, evaluation agency name and so on, and c) press releases and evaluation reports from the responsible national evaluation Agency UKÄ. This study also benefits from data collected within the wider research project, encompassing for instance interviews with vice chancellors and senior management at faculty level, providing additional contextual understandings of the cases. The data is coded thematically and analysed by qualitative content analysis (Bergström & Boreus, 2005).

    The findings empirically illuminate some of the interdependencies when high stakes national evaluation and measurements, PR strategies from the HEIs and media coverage meet and intertwine. The results indicate that mutually reinforcing processes may be at play, in which for instance favorable ‘branding’ of the HEI is amplified by supportive local newspaper reporting. This paper and its preliminary findings suggests that such interdependencies need to be further unpacked and critically discussed in relation to their possible constitutive effects (Dahler-Larsen 2012).

  • 56.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Reinstating Swedish National School Inspections: The Return of the State2012In: Nordic Studies in Education, ISSN 1891-5914, E-ISSN 1891-5949, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 69-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the reintroduction of national school inspections in Sweden in 2003 with reference to the problems they were intended to resolve, by applying an approach used in order to uncover representations of policy problems to official policy texts and by drawing on theories of governance. The problem was represented as a need for additional state control in order to uphold equivalence and quality in education. It is concluded that state steering by an extensive inspection scheme means that the reins have been tightened, in line with the theoretical state-centric approach to governance, and that values of educational quality and equivalence are being re-embedded in a regime of external scrutiny and control.

  • 57.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    School inspection in Sweden: historical evolution, resurrection and gradual change2014In: Revue française de pédagogie, ISSN 0556-7807, E-ISSN 2105-2913, Vol. 186, p. 35-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to describe and highlight some important continuities and changes in the Swedish school inspection case, with particular emphasis on the justification and use of inspections as an enduring and recurring political instrument to govern education: What roles and functions have been assigned to the inspectorate in all its incarnations, what means of operations have been employed, and how can the continuities as well as the changes be understood? The analysis is based on policy texts, such as government commission reports and bills, as well as on a range of previous research and studies. The theoretical resources aim to account for the dynamic relationship that underlies both drastic as well as more incremental institutional reproduction and change. School inspections were first performed in Sweden as early as the 1860s. Since then, inspections have been carried out by different national and regional agencies, and they have differed in focus, scope, and intensity. School inspection was abolished altogether in the wake of the extensive decentralization reforms of the 1990s, but after being in the political cold for a decade, inspections were reintroduced in 2003. In 2008 a separate agency, the Schools Inspectorate (SI), was formed, intensifying inspection efforts even further. Through gradual as well as more fundamental processes of change, school inspection institutions seem to be readily adaptable to different expectations and solutions as the political context varies. It has remained, at its core, an enduring institution that manages to gain and regain legitimacy; this is amply illustrated by the Swedish case.

  • 58.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Skolans marknadsanpassning: kontroll som frälsare eller förgörare?2013In: När förvaltning blir business: marknadiseringens utmaningar för demokratin och välfärdsstaten / [ed] Rönnberg, Linda (Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Umeå Universitet); Strandberg, Urban (Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Göteborgs universitet); Wihlborg, Elin (Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Statsvetenskap) (Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten); Winblad, Ulrika (Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet), Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013, p. 135-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

     

  • 59.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Skolinspektionen som politisk problemlösare2014In: Resultatdialog 2014 / [ed] Vetenskapsrådet, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2014, p. 184-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med detta forskarassistentprojekt var att beskriva, analysera och kritisktgranska spänningen mellan centralisering och decentralisering i densvenska styrningen av skolan, genom att studera den statliga skolinspektionenmed särskilt fokus på a) det sammanhang den införs i och hur inspektionsverksamhetenutformas, b) hur den genomförs och tas emot i kommuneroch skolor, och c) vilka konsekvenser som följer av inspektionen.Den redogörelse som följer tar ett brett grepp och lyfter fram ett urval avde många iakttagelser som gjorts. Jag kommer genomgående att hänvisa tillandra publikationer där det går att läsa mer och hitta fördjupade resonemang.

  • 60.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science. University of Turku.
    Swedish school companies going global2019In: Neoliberalism and market forces in education: lessons from Sweden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt and Andreas Fejes, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 183-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Taking inspection in one’s own hands: local enactments of Swedish national school inspection2012In: ECER 2012, European Conference of Educational Research, Cádiz, Spain, September 17-21, 2012, ECER , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, the political belief in school inspection as a means to effectively govern education is strong. At the same time, contemporary education policy is formulated, negotiated and implemented in an era of far reaching attempts to base policy making on 'evidence'. In this light, it is interesting to note that actually little is known about the effects and consequences of school inspection (Gaertner & Pant, 2011). This paper provides empirical illustrations of local functions of Swedish national inspection - how head teachers, teachers and officers from responsible authorities make use of inspection in order to promote their agendas. It highlights the ways in which these local functions may or may not challenge and/or extend beyond the politically anticipated effects and impacts. This paper draws on the concept of constitutive effects, which attempts to capture the inherently political and contested nature of identifying and studying effects (Dahler Larsen, 2011a). The empirical basis for the discussion are qualitative case study data from twelve Swedish compulsory schools, including for instance interviews with teachers, head teachers and municipal officers etc.

  • 62.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The Re-emergence and Political Trajectories of School Inspection: The Swedish case2014In: Education, Governance and Inspection within Transnational and Cross-Disciplinary Contexts (EDUGOV), Olso, 4-5 June 2014, University of Olso , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The re-emerging State: Motives and arguments underlying the reintroduction of Swedish national school inspections2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The re-emerging State: Motives and arguments underlying the reintrodution of Swedish national schoool inspections2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Swedish Experiment with Localized Control of Time Schedules: Policy Problem Representations2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 119-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish compulsory schools are the most autonomous in Europe regarding time allocation and time management. Still, the Swedish state decided to take this even further, when introducing an experiment that permits some compulsory schools to abandon the regulations of the national time schedule. The aim of this study is to explore and analyse the representations of the policy problem that the experiment with local time schedules is designed to solve. Taking a post-positivist approach to policy analysis and drawing on official documents, the task is to uncover and contextualise these representations and to ask what remains untouched. The four representations of the problem which the experiment addressed all have the common denominator of the experiment producing a particular effect: to break through stagnation, to strengthen management by objectives, to remove an obsolete means of steering education, or to increase individualisation. Roughly, the effect-assumption takes into account either that a change will take place in schools or that changes that already have taken place will be legitimised.

  • 66.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tid för reformering: Försöksverksamheten med slopad timplan i grundskolan2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1999, the Swedish Parliament decided to launch an experiment to test the idea of replacing, at the compulsory educational level, the national time schedule with localized control of schedules. This was in keeping with strategies of deregulation, decentralisation and increased local autonomy that had dominated Swedish education policy, particularly since the 1990s. The aim of the thesis is to describe and analyse the initiation, decision, implementation and consequences of this experiment

    The analytical framework combines several different approaches and theories from the literature on public policy and policy analysis. The framework encompasses four dimensions, which cover the experiment’s origins, local application in the classroom setting and consequences. On the empirical level, findings are based on interviews with 32 municipal school directors, and head teachers, teachers and pupils in three schools participating in the experiment, as well as written sources from schools, municipalities, and the national level.

    The thesis shows that the policy problem the experiment was intended to resolve was represented in an inconsistent manner: On the one hand, the experiment was perceived as a driving force for change; on the other hand, it was seen as legitimising a change that had already taken place. Furthermore, the experiment was formulated in vague terms, which accorded far-reaching discretionary space to the schools. The program’s causal theory expressed by the policy makers was complex, containing a multifaceted chain of presumptions on a range of activities and processes through which the experiment ultimately would lead to improved opportunities for pupils to reach the educational objectives. Empirically, this prediction proved to be invalid as student achievement did not increase.

    The degree of implementation at the local level varied according to the comprehension, capability and willingness of those involved to carry out the experiment. The courses of action taken by the schools frequently could have been undertaken within the existing legislative framework, as they mostly concerned new ways of working and organising staff and pupils. An assessment of the objectives attained showed that, even if elements of developmental work corresponding to the direction stated in the policy documents were observed, the experiment did not emerge as the primary explanatory factor for this result Thus, the net impact of the experiment can be questioned. If judged against the criterion of adaptiveness, the results are more successful than if the experiment is assessed according to goal-attainment and the validity of the program theory. The experiment was found to integrate, alter and accommodate itself readily to local needs.

    The thesis illustrates the complexity of formulating and implementing policy in a decentralised context and points to important aspects in the historical background of the programme, which often tend to be overlooked when policy is analysed and discussed. At the same time, the study sheds light on the significant role played by street-level implementation actors in the educational context.

  • 67.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    "What has worked in Sweden can work here”: den svenska friskolemodellen som engelsk reformförebild2017In: Bortom PISA: Internationell och jämförande pedagogik / [ed] Joakim Landahl, Christian Lundahl, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2017, p. 221-243Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I det här kapitlet diskuteras den engelska mediaspeglingen av den svenska så kallade exporten av friskolemodellen till England. Kapitlet visar bland annat hur nationella stereotyper används som viktiga legitimeringsgrunder när reformidéer lånas in från andra länder och ger exempel på hur media både kan förstärka och utmana sådana stereotyper. Kapitlet visar även hur de mediala och politiska hänvisningarna till de svenska PISA-resultaten hade betydelse för att den svenska friskolemodellen så småningom tappade sin status som reformförebild för de engelska politikerna.

  • 68.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    What’s the problem?: representations of the policy problem in the case of the Swedish experiment with local time schedules2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Hult, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Segerholm, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Assuring quality assurance in Swedish higher education: A national try-out evaluation2018In: Abstract book NERA, 8-10 March 2018: Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: 211, University of Oslo , 2018, p. 210-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Nordic countries and beyond, evaluation and quality assurance are becoming increasingly insitutionalised as means to govern the welfare state (Dahler-Larsen, 2011). Higher education is no exception (Leiber, Stensaker & Harvey, 2015; Jarvis, 2014). Since the 1990s, different national evaluation systems have been developed and implemented in Swedish Higher Education (HE) (Segerholm, 2016). Over time, these systems have displayed different political purposes and designs. One major component in the most recent system in operation from 2017 and onwards is national evaluation of the higher education institutions’ (HEIs) own internal quality assurance systems, carried out by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education (SHEA) (Lindgren & Rönnberg, 2017).This paper aims to analyse a SHEA try-out evaluation in which HEIs internal quality assurance were evaluated. The following questions guide our study: What enactments do these try-out exercises entail and what actors are involved? What kind of knowledge is mobilized and used in these enactments? We focus on two cases where the work with and experiences from a) HEI actors, b) officials at the SHEA, and c) external review panels are analysed. We collected data as the national try-out evaluation was implemented. This include near 30 interviews with SHEA staff, HEI actors, and members in external review panels. Extensive documentary materials, such as self-evaluations from the HEIs, schedules, plans and SHEA decisions, were also analysed.This paper is part of a larger research project, “Governing by evaluation in higher education in Sweden”, analyzing how evaluative activities govern Swedish Higher Education policy and practice. We conceptualise governing as activities composed of assemblages of places, people, policies, practices and power (Clarke, 2015). Following this, we analyse the activities and the actual work connected to quality assurance and its policy-making, and how it is enacted and learned (Ball et. al, 2012). Drawing on Freeman and Sturdy (2014), we see knowledge in policy as taking different forms, i.e. as embodied, inscribed and enacted.

  • 70.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Drive-by Governing and Policy Rerouting: The Case of Quality Evaluations in Swedish Higher Education2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on political moves and intentions underlying the highly debated quality assurance reform in Swedish Higher Education from 2010 – a system with a result oriented approach mainly directed to assess student outcomes – against the backdrop of current and ongoing policy developments which will reform the system. The aim is to describe and analyse the policy process underlying the quality assurance reform from 2010 and to discuss to what extent shifts and continuities can be observed with regards to the current restructuring of the quality assurance system. Empirically, the official documents produced in the process leading up to the 2010 reform are analysed, such as the Government bill and the subsequent Parliamentary debate, complemented with publications from other stakeholders such as agencies and associations. Theoretically, the paper draws on an approach in policy analysis asking What’s the Problem represented to be? (Bacchi, 2009), emphasizing the constructed nature of policy problems and the power relations at play when some issues are incorporated into policy processes while others are left out, thereby framing and legitimizing certain solutions.  In conclusion, the paper draws attention to how certain modes and processes of policymaking correspondingly permeate the actual policy, as illustrated by the shift from the competitive-oriented (Lewin, 2002) ‘drive-by governing’ to ‘policy rerouting’ via the more consensus-oriented process initiated in April 2014.

  • 71.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lindgren, joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Education governance in times of marketization: The quiet Swedish revolution2019In: Handbuch Educational Governance Theorien / [ed] R. Langer and T. Brüsemeister, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2019, p. 711-727Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we focus on how education governance can be conceptualized and understood in a context of far-reaching marketization and privatization. We address the challenges and limitations of (political) education governance in times of educational marketization. We argue that the Swedish case is a good starting point for such analytical exploration, since Sweden has experienced quite a far-reaching transformation in this regard, from a strongly centralist and state-led education system to a dispersed, multi-actor and marketized education system, which may be of relevance and importance for additional theorizing in this area. We show that few current political and societal challenges to the dominant policy trajectory exist and that both social democratic and non-socialist governments follow an entrenched policy path, governing largely by preservation and restoration. We argue for the need to critically discuss and unpack the complexities of governing education in a policy context in which market forces have entered, and fundamentally are affecting, education in all policy stages.

  • 72.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Segerholm, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet.
    In the public eye: school inspection reports in Swedish newspapers2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Segerholm, Christina
    Department of Education, Mid-Sweden University.
    In the public eye: Swedish schoolinspection and local newspapers: exploring the audit–media relationship2013In: Journal of education policy, ISSN 0268-0939, E-ISSN 1464-5106, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 178-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the dual dependencies apparent at the intersection of the media society and the audit society by empirically exploring and discussing the relationship between Swedish local newspaper coverage and school inspection activities. The research questions pertain to the Inspectorate’s media strategy, how inspection is represented and conveyed, the messages sent, and who gets to speak. Literature on governance, and the role and function of the media in the wider audit society is applied theoretically. Four municipalities were selected to represent different demographical and economical structures and previous inspection experiences. The empirical material includes interviews with leading inspection officers and newspaper articles. The local newspapers portray the Inspectorate as a legitimate institution acting on behalf of and protecting the public, and even more so, the educational consumer. The current format used by the Inspectorate – a succinct reporting only on deviations – links with a favored format of the media, reinforcing the tight media–inspection relationship and leading to implications for education governance and policy

  • 74.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Segerholm, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Skolinspektionen2011In: Utvärdering och bedömning i skolan: för vem och varför? / [ed] Agneta Hult och Anders Olofsson, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2011, 1, p. 49-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Segerholm, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Skolinspektionen2017In: Utvärdering och bedömning i skolan: För vem och varför? / [ed] Agneta Hult, Anders Olofsson, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2017, 2, p. 49-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Strandberg, UrbanStatsvetenskapliga institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.Wihlborg, ElinInstitutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Statsvetenskap, Linköpings universitet.Winblad, UlrikaInstitutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    När förvaltning blir business: marknadiseringens utmaningar för demokratin och välfärdsstaten2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att företag bedriver vård, omsorg och andra verksamheter på det offentligas uppdrag är idag en del av vår vardag. Den svenska förvaltningen har förändrats och blivit alltmer business.I den här boken väcker forskare från flera lärosäten frågor och uppmuntrar till fortsatt diskussion på detta tema. Vi tar upp vad marknadisering, konkurrensutsättning och privatisering betyder för den svenska demokratin och förvaltningsmodellen. Hur står det till med politikens möjligheter till styrning? Vad händer med synen på medborgarskapet? Finns det till exempel vinnare och förlorare? Finns det en framtid för förvaltningen som business?

  • 77.
    Segerholm, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hult, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Enacting a National Reform Interval: Policies and practices at universities for a new quality assurance system in Swedish higher education2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Segerholm, Christina
    et al.
    Mittuniversitet.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Hult, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Mittuniversitet.
    Changing evaluation systems – changing expectations? The case of Swedish higher education2014In: Symposium Governing by Expectations: School Inspection and Evaluation across Europe and Beyond, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a part of the ‘audit society’ (Power 1997), the idea of systematic evaluations is strongly promoted in contemporary education policy (Ozga et al. 2011). Higher education is not an exception and European policy like the Bologna declaration and the development of common quality indicators are just a few examples. Looking at the national arena, this paper aims at exploring the relation between evaluation systems in Swedish higher education and governing from 1993 and onwards. Theoretically we recognize the dynamic relationship underling both institutional reproduction and change (Mahoney & Thelen 2010). Evaluation systems may change gradually or more dramatically and these dynamics hold implications for governing and for how we can understand expectations of what is to count as, for instance, as ‘good quality’ Hopmann et al. 2007). Official policy texts are used and a qualitative content analysis (Bergström & Boréus 2005) is performed, guided by questions like: What is evaluated? Why? By whom? How? With what consequences? The results suggest that the governing potential in the evaluation systems in higher education in the Swedish case partly relies on the shifts themselves. By constantly changing the systems, expectations are also changed and form one important part of the work of governing. 

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