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  • 51.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Mini-muddling: Learning from project plan deviations2007In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 92-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the informal and incidental learning that takes place in project work among individuals who must adapt to deviations from project plans.

    Design/methodology/approach – Reflections in the study are built on four power plant projects found in an integrated provider of projects of this type. The projects were followed by participative observations during ten weeks of onsite visits. Furthermore, 26 interviews were done among participants in the organisation on working practices and implications. Data included interviews, reports, minutes-of-meetings, observations, and e-mail correspondence that characterised the cases.

    Findings – The paper finds that learning occurred at two levels. First, there was the learning that occurred as each of the deviations was handled. The second aspect of learning involved the patterns in which remedies were handled.

    Research limitations/implications – Because research was built on case studies, one has the reservations common with that approach. Nevertheless, the learning architecture that Sense related to intra-project learning has features that relate to the situation where learning has occurred from projects. Further, by associating observations with the background provided by Lindblom and Simon, suggestions carry inherent credibility.

    Practical implications – The organisation that was set up seemed particularly effective in handling the deviations. Also, intuition came into play. Both these items may interest consultants and trainers as well as academics.

    Originality/value – Although the need to handle project deviations is appreciated in practice, it is not clear that there is an understanding of how response occurs. The paper documents response across the stages of projects, which is original. Value is associated with the interpretation.

  • 52.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Projects-as-practice: a new approach2008In: Projects & Profits, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 35-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As projects have unique activities, they are inherently uncertain and this article addresses a challenge to our present treatment of projects. Instead of treating them as a managerial form the organization does, they are seen as something that people do. Consequently, project management requires the management of the unexpected—the deviations from plan that occur in the real world.

  • 53.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    The nature and management of crises in construction projects: projects-as-practice observations2008In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 830-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The uniqueness of projects introduces aspects of management associated with disruptions that threaten progress and crises that affect the organisations that conduct them. The purpose of this paper thus is to review the nature of crises and their remedies that have interfered with project progress of an international construction company. Fifteen crises were studied in a “projects-as-practice” approach. Characterisation was made of both the nature of these crises and how they were managed.

  • 54.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Opportunities for learning from crises in projects2011In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 196-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Concepts of learning are extended to the non-routine case of crises in projects.

    Design/methodology/approach: The multiple case protocol described by Yin and his six sources of evidence were utilized in the study. Observations were contemporaneous and somewhere between direct and participative. Bias was avoided by having the observer on site, but not part of the project team. A diary recorded events; company notes and records substantiated observations.

    Findings: The study contributes to the understanding of the need that project managers have to adapt to changes from plan and the coincidental learning that occurs in the workplace. Both cumulative and abrupt crises treated by project/site teams and corporate staff are described. A necessary and sufficiency approach was used to rationalize the organizational learning. The necessary condition was that the episodes could be described in terms used by Gherardi in her treatment of routine learning. As a sufficiency condition we discussed the systemic approach in which these episodes are handled.

    Research limitations/implications: Because research was built on case studies, one has the reservations commonly associated with this approach. Extension from and agreement with previous studies, however, lend to acceptance of the study.

    Practical implications: Results suggest that crises can be managed in accordance with four general responses associated with learning within the organization. The responses themselves are associated with five organizational practices that aid management in general.

    Originality/value: The value of the work is that it extends basic concepts of organizational learning to treating crises in projects, which are both by definition unique.

  • 55.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Impromptu teams in a temporary organization: on their nature and role2016In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 584-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The abundance and importance of temporary project teams in society introduces the need of understanding their nature. The purpose of this article thus is to highlight the existence of an only accidentally investigated type of team that we identify as Impromptu teams, and analyze their role in a temporary organization. Based on a detailed retrospective account of the infamous disaster on Mount Everest in 1996, we identify three examples of Impromptu teams. The three examples indicate that the teams are characterized by being triggered by an unexpected event, and formed through a bottom-up process, where joining the team is voluntary and the activities are based on a logic of appropriateness, rather than rule following. The identification and nature of Impromptu teams have implications far beyond Mount Everest, since most organizations at some point need to use teams similar to the identified examples.

  • 56.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The grabber: making a first impression the Wilsonian way2014In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 739-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of what a good grabber is and how to construct one. This is done by drawing on the insights provided by Professor Timothy L. Wilson, for whom this paper is written as an “honorary piece.”

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a small sample of papers from the 48 journals that have received contributions from Professor Wilson throughout the years. A total of 12 papers have been selected, using a mix of convenience and haphazard sampling. The grabber of each paper has then been analyzed based on its nature and style.

    Findings – Based on the review and analysis, five different types of grabbers were identified; the quote, the anecdote, the provocative question, the surprise, and the metaphor, each type representing a unique way (and strategy) of creating initial interest.

    Research limitations/implications – As this paper was intentionally based on a convenience sample, further investigation is needed to establish whether the presented categories have clear validity and/or whether there are additional categories/strategies for how to create good grabbers.

    Originality/value – Creation of interest is an increasingly important part of everyday academic practice. As the grabber is a rarely addressed phenomenon in academic literature, the presented categories should be of both interest and practical use to academics in most fields. 

  • 57.
    Kutsch, Elmar
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Turner, Neil
    Cranfield University, UK.
    The internalization of attention at 28,000 feet: revisiting the K2 2008 disaster2016In: Managing project risks for competitive advantage in changing business environments / [ed] Constanta-Nicoleta Bodea, Augustin Purnus, Martina Huemann & Miklós Hajdu, Hershey: Business Science Reference , 2016, p. 196-215Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Lindberg, Ola
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rantatalo, Oscar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Making sense through false syntheses: Working with paradoxes in the reorganization of the Swedish police2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 175-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses how a working group in the Swedish police made sense of their task in the wake of reorganization. It aims to describe how inputs from top management prompted processes of sensemaking within the group, and their subsequent results in responding to latent paradoxes. The police group’s work was studied through participant observation, interviews and documents. The findings illustrate how the group made latent paradoxes salient and how they worked with these paradoxes to ultimately make them latent again by what we call “false syntheses”. Through this process, the group achieved its task, but the paradoxes were reproduced, made latent and pushed away to another part of the organization. Thus, sensemaking transforms paradoxes from latent to salient, from macro to micro levels of the organization.

  • 59.
    Lundin, Rolf
    et al.
    Jönköpings University.
    Hällgren, MarkusUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Advancing research on projects and temporary organizations2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Project management as a field is sometimes characterised by prescriptive analysis often founded on little deep research. This book is different - drawing on some of the most interesting contributors to the field, it should be read by anyone interested in seeing projects as a social accomplishment in which people, rather than systems, have the most pertinent role.

  • 60.
    Lundin, Rolf
    et al.
    jönköping International Business School.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    An Introduction by the Editors: Advancing research on projects and temporary organizations2014In: Advancing research on projects and temporary organizations / [ed] Lundin, R & Hällgren, M, Copenhagen Business School Press, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 61. Lundin, Rolf
    et al.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Current foci of Nordic approaches to project research2013In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Lundin, Rolf
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    On the Notions of Temporality and Organizing: Reflections on Future Advances2014In: Advancing research on projects and temporary organizations / [ed] Lundin, R & Hällgren, M, Copenhagen Business School Press, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Ohlin, Tomas
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Internet voting in practice: the case of the Umeå student union2002In: e-Service Journal, ISSN 1528-8226, E-ISSN 1528-8234, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 35-61Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In May 2001, the student union at Umeå University conducted an election to its Council where Internet voting for the first time was one of three methods to cast a vote. The election was preceded by an online deliberation phase among the voters, which however attracted very limited interest. This paper reports on a comprehensive evaluation of the election, focusing on logistics, security, and voters’ and non-voters’ views on several issues regarding e-voting, including accessibility, usability, privacy, security, and the symbolic values of the voting act. Methods used include a questionnaire to 2,500 students and expert evaluations of the used technical system and the manual routines in which it was used. Internet voting was by far the most used way to vote but still the impact on participation turned out to be limited. The voters prioritized convenience over security. The general attitudes towards the voting act as a manifestation of the democratic system have not been changed by the use of electronic voting, but there is openness to new procedures. Manual routines were to some extent problematic due to a lack of understanding of the technology used. Hence, improvised solutions had to be used to take care of several incidents. These improvised solutions not only in themselves increase the risk for further problems, but may also result in an increase of the user organization’s dependency of the provider. The paper concludes by discussing some issues raised by the evaluation as well as the Government decisions made related to the results, including the view of local popular votes, the relation between user organizations and software providers, and voters’ view of symbolic values associated with the voting act.

  • 64.
    Rantatalo, Oscar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Lindberg, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kihlberg, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Negotiations and Research Bargains: Bending Professional Norms in the Effort to Gain Field Access2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, ISSN 1609-4069, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study provides an autoethnographic account of the efforts to gain field access to a police organization, spanning more than 2 years. The aim is to describe a case of gaining access in relation to the professional norms of science put forward by Robert K. Merton. Aided by an organized record of notes, e-mails, and other written communications regarding access (144 memos of various types), the study describes and discusses the negotiations with Mertonian norms that followed from the dissonance between ideals of research and practical reality. Opening up for further scholarly discussion, this article concludes that Merton’s norms are incongruent with both prevailing guidelines of research ethics and with the practical, short-term problems of access negotiations and research bargains.

  • 65.
    Rosales, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Socio-materiality gone wild: a case of routine inertia in the emergency department2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Rosales, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Turf Wars: Understanding Intraorganizational Coopetition in the Emergency Department2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on coopetition has largely been based on collaborative relationships between competitors. Building on this body of knowledge and addressing recent calls for research on intra-organizational and emergent coopetition, the purpose of this paper is to further our understanding in regard to these issues. The study is based on an in-depth qualitative study at the Emergency Department of Umeå University Hospital and consists of more than 80 hours of participant observation and interviews. The paper analyses the collaborative and competitive practices that exist among medical doctors and nurses, and discusses what seems to be triggering intra-organizational coopetition and its consequences. The analysis illustrates that coopetition emerges among individuals and groups not necessarily as the result of the implementation of an intended strategy. On the contrary, triggers of emergent intra- organizational coopetition include the organizational structure, diversity of professions, division of work activities, availability of resources, uncertainty and workload levels. All this makes a distinct contribution to the understanding of intra-organizational coopetition as an emergent practice, knowledge that should be of use from both a theoretical and a practical point of view. 

  • 67. Svensson, Martin
    et al.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Sensemaking in sensory deprived settings: the role of non-verbal auditory cues for emergency assessment2018In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 306-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emergency calls are high-stake situations characterized by volatile and time-critical conditions. The use of the telephone restricts sensory perception to a single modality hearing which makes both sense making and embodied sensemaking more difficult. Using observations, interviews, and organizational documents, we unveil how attention to the non-verbal cues of callers and their surroundings assists emergency operators to make sense of incoming calls for help. We find that operators use two practices to prioritize the calls: a frame-confirming practice and a frame-modifying practice. The practices are underpinned by configurations of verbal and non-verbal cues, wherein caller's emotional expressions and environmental sounds are both considered as distinct input. The non-verbal focus in this study extends our understanding of first-order sensemaking within the emergency domain but also in other sensory deprived settings in high-consequence industries. The contributions of this analysis to sense making research reside in the revelation that non-verbal cues contextualize and consequently frame the discursive elements of sensemaking. More specifically, this research offers the insight that embodies sensemaking benefits from attention being given to callers' non-verbal cues, rather than valuing only one's own bodily experiences and mere verbal descriptions about events.

12 51 - 67 of 67
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