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  • 51.
    Carlsson, Katrin E
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Liu, Junfa
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Edqvist, Petra J
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Extracytoplasmic-stress-responsive pathways modulate type III secretion in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.2007Ingår i: Infect Immun, ISSN 0019-9567, Vol. 75, nr 8, s. 3913-24Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Three signal transduction pathways, the two-component systems CpxRA and BaeSR and the alternative sigma factor sigma(E), respond to extracytoplasmic stress that facilitates bacterial adaptation to changing environments. At least the CpxRA and sigma(E) pathways control the production of protein-folding and degradation factors that counter the effects of protein misfolding in the periplasm. This function also influences the biogenesis of multicomponent extracellular appendages that span the bacterial envelope, such as various forms of pili. Herein, we investigated whether any of these regulatory pathways in the enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis affect the functionality of the Ysc-Yop type III secretion system. This is a multicomponent molecular syringe spanning the bacterial envelope used to inject effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells. Disruption of individual components revealed that the Cpx and sigma(E) pathways are important for Y. pseudotuberculosis type III secretion of Yops (Yersinia outer proteins). In particular, a loss of CpxA, a sensor kinase, reduced levels of structural Ysc (Yersinia secretion) components in bacterial membranes, suggesting that these mutant bacteria are less able to assemble a functional secretion apparatus. Moreover, these bacteria were no longer capable of localizing Yops into the eukaryotic cell interior. In addition, a cpxA lcrQ double mutant engineered to overproduce and secrete Yops was still impaired in intoxicating cells. Thus, the Cpx pathway might mediate multiple influences on bacterium-target cell contact that modulate Yersinia type III secretion-dependent host cell cytotoxicity.

  • 52.
    Carlsson, Katrin E
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Liu, Junfa
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Edqvist, Petra J
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Influence of the Cpx extracytoplasmic-stress-responsive pathway on Yersinia sp.-eukaryotic cell contact.2007Ingår i: Infect Immun, ISSN 0019-9567, Vol. 75, nr 9, s. 4386-99Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The extracytoplasmic-stress-responsive CpxRA two-component signal transduction pathway allows bacteria to adapt to growth in extreme environments. It controls the production of periplasmic protein folding and degradation factors, which aids in the biogenesis of multicomponent virulence determinants that span the bacterial envelope. This is true of the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Ysc-Yop type III secretion system. However, despite using a second-site suppressor mutation to restore Yop effector secretion by yersiniae defective in the CpxA sensor kinase, these bacteria poorly translocated Yops into target eukaryotic cells. Investigation of this phenotype herein revealed that the expression of genes which encode several surface-located adhesins is also influenced by the Cpx pathway. In particular, the expression and surface localization of invasin, an adhesin that engages beta1-integrins on the eukaryotic cell surface, are severely restricted by the removal of CpxA. This reduces bacterial association with eukaryotic cells, which could be suppressed by the ectopic production of CpxA, invasin, or RovA, a positive activator of inv expression. In turn, these infected eukaryotic cells then became susceptible to intoxication by translocated Yop effectors. In contrast, bacteria harboring an in-frame deletion of cpxR, which encodes the cognate response regulator, displayed an enhanced ability to interact with cell monolayers, as well as elevated inv and rovA transcription. This phenotype could be drastically suppressed by providing a wild-type copy of cpxR in trans. We propose a mechanism of inv regulation influenced by the direct negative effects of phosphorylated CpxR on inv and rovA transcription. In this fashion, sensing of extracytoplasmic stress by CpxAR contributes to productive Yersinia sp.-eukaryotic cell interactions.

  • 53.
    Cava, Felipe
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    de Pedro, Miguel A.
    Peptidoglycan plasticity in bacteria: emerging variability of the murein sacculus and their associated biological functions2014Ingår i: Current Opinion in Microbiology, ISSN 1369-5274, E-ISSN 1879-0364, Vol. 18, s. 46-53Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The peptidoglycan (PG) sacculus once thought to be just a reinforcing, static and uniform structure, is fast becoming recognized as a dynamic cell constituent involved in every aspect of bacterial physiology. Recent advances showed that in addition to 'classical' tasks - as an essential element to define bacterial shape, size, division and resistance to osmotic stress the sacculus plays very important roles in many other fields. The very few chemical and structural changes that were once considered as bizarre, or maybe exotic exceptions, are now universally accepted as fundamental pieces in bacterial cell wall adaptation to different kinds of environmental stresses; immune response; intra-specific and inter-specific signalling and antibiotics, just to mention a few. Most, if not all, of these implications are a consequence of the enormous adaptability of PG metabolism to cope with changing conditions, a characteristic for which the term plasticity is proposed. Here we overview and comment on a number of recent contributions on the cell wall adaptive responses to environmental challenges that has greatly impacted the already high complexity of the PG biology field. These new evidences have revived the interest in PG plasticity as an exciting and trendy topic in current microbiology which considers this variability as the trustworthy picture of bacterial PG in nature.

  • 54.
    Cava, Felipe
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Kuru, Erkin
    Brun, Yves V.
    de Pedro, Miguel A.
    Modes of cell wall growth differentiation in rod-shaped bacteria2013Ingår i: Current Opinion in Microbiology, ISSN 1369-5274, E-ISSN 1879-0364, Vol. 16, nr 6, s. 731-737Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A bacterial cell takes on the challenge to preserve and reproduce its shape at every generation against a substantial internal pressure by surrounding itself with a mechanical support, a peptidoglycan cell wall. The enlargement of the cell wall via net incorporation of precursors into the pre-existing wall conditions bacterial growth and morphology. However, generation, reproduction and/or modification of a specific shape requires that the incorporation takes place at precise locations for a defined time period. Much has been learnt in the past few years about the biochemistry of the peptidoglycan synthesis process, but topological approaches to the understanding of shape generation have been hindered by a lack of appropriate techniques. Recent technological advances are paving the way for substantial progress in understanding the mechanisms of bacterial morphogenesis. Here we review the latest developments, focusing on the impact of new techniques on the precise mapping of cell wall growth sites.

  • 55.
    Chabes, Andrei
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Stillman, Bruce
    Constitutively high dNTP concentration inhibits cell cycle progression and the DNA damage checkpoint in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.2007Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, Vol. 104, nr 4, s. 1183-8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 56.
    Chandra, Naresh
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Avdelningen för virologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå University.
    The glycobiology of human adenovirus infections: implications for tropism and treatment2019Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are common human pathogens, causing gastrointestinal, ocular, and respiratory infections on a regular basis. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) is a severe ocular infection for which no approved antivirals are available. HAdV-D37 is one of the causative agents of EKC and uses sialic acid (SA)-containing glycans as cellular receptors. HAdV-D37 interacts with SA via the knob domain of the trimeric virus fiber protein, containing three SA-binding sites. HAdV-D37 also bind to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), but the outcome of this interaction remains unknown. Here, using biochemical and cell-based assays, the impact of GAGs on HAdV-D37 infection (paper I) was investigated. We found that HAdV-D37 interacts with both soluble and cell-surface sulfated GAGs via the knob domain of the viral fiber protein. Remarkably, removal of heparan sulfate (HS; a type of GAG) from human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells by heparinase III enhanced HAdV-D37 infection. We propose that sulfated GAGs in bodily secretions and on plasma membranes function as decoy receptors that prevent the virus from binding to SA-containing receptors and inhibit subsequent virus infection. We also found abundant HS in the basement membrane of the human corneal epithelium. We suggest that this layer of HS functions as a barrier to sub-epithelial infection of HAdV-D37. Based on this finding, we hypothesized that GAG-mimetics may act as artificial decoy receptors and inhibit HAdV-D37 infection. Here, the antiviral effect of suramin (a known GAG-mimetic) and its analogs against HAdV-D37 (paper II) was evaluated. Interestingly, all compounds displayed antiviral effects by inhibiting the binding of HAdV-D37 to HCE cells. The antiviral effect of suramin was HAdV species-specific. We report for the first time that virus binding to cell-surface decoy receptor constitutes a potential target for antiviral drug development.

    HAdVs are the major cause of infectious conjunctivitis, constituting up to 75% of all conjunctivitis cases worldwide. Species B HAdV type 3 (HAdV-B3) causes pharyngoconjunctival fever (PCF), whereas HAdV-D8, -D37, and -D64 cause EKC. Recently, HAdV-D53, -D54, and -D56 have emerged as new EKC-causing agents. HAdV-E4 causes both PCF and EKC. SA-containing glycans have been established as cellular receptors for HAdV-D37. By means of cell-based assays, we investigated if ocular HAdVs other than HAdV-D37 also use SA-containing glycans as receptors on HCE cells (paper III). It was found that SA-containing glycans function as cellular receptors for five (HAdV-D8, -D37, -D53, -D54, and -D64) out of six EKC-causing species D HAdVs. We showed that these viruses interact with SAs via the knob domain of the viral fiber protein. HAdV-E4 and -D56 infection of cells was independent of SAs. Surprisingly, HCE cells were completely refractory to HAdV-B3 infection. A trivalent sialic acid (TSA) derivative ME0462 (compound 17a in paper II), designed to bind to SA-binding sites on HAdV-D37 fiber knob, also showed potent antiviral activity against several EKC-causing HAdVs. This suggests that ME0462 can be used as a broad-spectrum antiviral against known and emerging EKC-causing HAdVs. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis confirmed a direct interaction between ME0462 and fiber knobs of EKC-causing HAdVs.

    Recently, a TSA derivative (ME0322; designed to bind to SA-binding sites on HAdV-D37 fiber knob) was shown potent antiviral against HAdV-D37 in vitro. To improve the antiviral potency of this compound, six new TSA derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory effects were evaluated against HAdV-D37 (paper IV). Interestingly, the best compound 17a was found approximately three orders of magnitude more potent (IC50 (binding) = 1.4 nM, IC50 (infection) = 2.9 nM) than ME0322 (IC50 in µM range). SPR data showed that HAdV-D37 fiber knob binds to TSA compounds with high affinities. Structural data revealed the trivalent binding mode of all newly synthesized TSA compounds to HAdV-D37 fiber knob. Ophthalmic toxicity of compound 17a (best compound) was also investigated in rabbits without any sign of toxicity.

    HAdV-D36 is a member of species D HAdV and has the ability to infect a broad range of animals, which is unusual for HAdVs. Another remarkable feature of HAdV-D36 is that this virus induces obesity in experimental animals. Several epidemiological studies highlighted a link between HAdV-D36 and human obesity. There is no information about the cellular receptor usage by HAdV-D36. Using structural biology and cell-based approaches, we investigated the cellular receptor(s) for HAdV-D36 (paper V).  We show that HAdV-D36 attaches to host cells (via the fiber knob) using the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), SA-containing glycans, and one or more unknown proteins or glycoproteins. Using glycan microarray, we found that HAdV-D36 displays binding preference to a rare SA-variant: 4-O,5-N-diacetylneuraminic acid (Neu4,5Ac2), over the more common SA (in humans) i.e. 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Structural analysis of HAdV-D36 fiber knob:Neu4,5Ac2 complex explained this preference. To date, Neu4,5Achas not been detected in humans, although it is synthesized by many domestic and livestock animals. Our results indicate that HAdV-D36 has evolved to utilize a specialized set of cellular receptors that coincide with a unique host range and pathogenicity profile.

    These studies provide insights into multiple roles of glycans in HAdV infection cycle and highlight the therapeutic potential of glycans/glycan-mimetics in HAdV-D37 infection.

  • 57.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
    CRISPR-Cas9: how research on a bacterial RNA-guided mechanism opened new perspectives in biotechnology and biomedicine2015Ingår i: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 7, nr 4, s. 363-365Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 58.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany; Institute for Biology, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    Spotlight on... Emmanuelle Charpentier2018Ingår i: FEMS Microbiology Letters, ISSN 0378-1097, E-ISSN 1574-6968, Vol. 365, nr 4, artikel-id fnx271Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 59.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Richter, Hagen
    van der Oost, John
    White, Malcolm F.
    Biogenesis pathways of RNA guides in archaeal and bacterial CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity2015Ingår i: FEMS Microbiology Reviews, ISSN 0168-6445, E-ISSN 1574-6976, Vol. 39, nr 3, s. 428-441Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-mediated adaptive immune system that defends bacteria and archaea against mobile genetic elements. Short mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are key elements in the interference step of the immune pathway. A CRISPR array composed of a series of repeats interspaced by spacer sequences acquired from invading mobile genomes is transcribed as a precursor crRNA (pre-crRNA) molecule. This pre-crRNA undergoes one or two maturation steps to generate the mature crRNAs that guide CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein(s) to cognate invading genomes for their destruction. Different types of CRISPR-Cas systems have evolved distinct crRNA biogenesis pathways that implicate highly sophisticated processing mechanisms. In Types I and III CRISPR-Cas systems, a specific endoribonuclease of the Cas6 family, either standalone or in a complex with other Cas proteins, cleaves the pre-crRNA within the repeat regions. In Type II systems, the trans-acting small RNA (tracrRNA) base pairs with each repeat of the pre-crRNA to form a dual-RNA that is cleaved by the housekeeping RNase III in the presence of the protein Cas9. In this review, we present a detailed comparative analysis of pre-crRNA recognition and cleavage mechanisms involved in the biogenesis of guide crRNAs in the three CRISPR-Cas types.

  • 60. Chauhan, Deepika
    et al.
    Srivastava, Pulkit Anupam
    Ritzl, Barbara
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Priyadarshini, Richa
    Amino Acid-Dependent Alterations in Cell Wall and Cell Morphology of Deinococcus indicus DR12019Ingår i: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, artikel-id 1449Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits growth medium-dependent morphological variation in cell shape, but there is no evidence whether this phenomenon is observed in other members of the Deinococcaceae family. In this study, we isolated a red-pigmented, aerobic, Deinococcus indicus strain DR1 from Dadri wetland, India. This D. indicus strain exhibited cell-morphology transition from rod-shaped cells to multi-cell chains in a growth-medium-dependent fashion. In response to addition of 1% casamino acids in the minimal growth medium, rod-shaped cells formed multi-cell chains. Addition of all 20 amino acids to the minimal medium was able to recapitulate the phenotype. Specifically, a combination of L-methionine, L-lysine, L-aspartate, and L-threonine caused morphological alterations. The transition from rod shape to multi-cell chains is due to delay in daughter cell separation after cell division. Minimal medium supplemented with L-ornithine alone was able to cause cell morphology changes. Furthermore, a comparative UPLC analysis of PG fragments isolated from D. indicus cells propagated in different growth media revealed alterations in the PG composition. An increase in the overall cross-linkage of PG was observed in muropeptides from nutrient-rich TSB and NB media versus PYE medium. Overall our study highlights that environmental conditions influence PG composition and cell morphology in D. indicus.

  • 61.
    Chen, Shiyun
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens and Biosafety, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Thompson, Karl
    Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA.
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Environmental Regulation of Yersinia Pathophysiology2016Ingår i: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 6, artikel-id 25Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Hallmarks of Yersinia pathogenesis include the ability to form biofilms on surfaces, the ability to establish close contact with eukaryotic target cells and the ability to hijack eukaryotic cell signaling and take over control of strategic cellular processes. Many of these virulence traits are already well-described. However, of equal importance is knowledge of both confined and global regulatory networks that collaborate together to dictate spatial and temporal control of virulence gene expression. This review has the purpose to incorporate historical observations with new discoveries to provide molecular insight into how some of these regulatory mechanisms respond rapidly to environmental flux to govern tight control of virulence gene expression by pathogenic Yersinia.

  • 62. Chen, Xi
    et al.
    Venkatachalapathy, Muthukumaran
    Dehmelt, Leif
    Wu, Yao-Wen
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Multidirectional Activity Control of Cellular Processes by a Versatile Chemo-optogenetic Approach2018Ingår i: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 57, nr 37, s. 11993-11997Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of proteins or organelles plays a vital role in controlling diverse cellular processes. However, acute control of activity at distinct locations within a cell is challenging. A versatile multidirectional activity control (MAC) approach is presented, which employs a photoactivatable system that may be dimerized upon chemical inducement. The system comprises second-generation SLF*-TMP (S*T) and photocaged NvocTMP-Cl dimerizers; where, SLF*-TMP features a synthetic ligand of the FKBP(F36V) binding protein, Nvoc is a caging group, and TMP is the antibiotic trimethoprim. Two MAC strategies are demonstrated to spatiotemporally control cellular signaling and intracellular cargo transport. The novel platform enables tunable, reversible, and rapid control of activity at multiple compartments in living cells.

  • 63.
    Chorell, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Andersson, Emma
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Evans, Margery L.
    Jain, Neha
    Götheson, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Åden, Jörgen
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Chapman, Matthew R.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Bacterial Chaperones CsgE and CsgC Differentially Modulate Human α-Synuclein Amyloid Formation via Transient Contacts2015Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, nr 10, s. 1-11, artikel-id e0140194Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid formation is historically associated with cytotoxicity, but many organisms produce functional amyloid fibers (e.g., curli) as a normal part of cell biology. Two E. coli genes in the curli operon encode the chaperone-like proteins CsgC and CsgE that both can reduce in vitro amyloid formation by CsgA. CsgC was also found to arrest amyloid formation of the human amyloidogenic protein α-synuclein, which is involved in Parkinson’s disease. Here, we report that the inhibitory effects of CsgC arise due to transient interactions that promote the formation of spherical α-synuclein oligomers. We find that CsgE also modulates α-synuclein amyloid formation through transient contacts but, in contrast to CsgC, CsgE accelerates α-synuclein amyloid formation. Our results demonstrate the significance of transient protein interactions in amyloid regulation and emphasize that the same protein may inhibit one type of amyloid while accelerating another.

  • 64.
    Chorell, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Pinkner, Jerome S
    Bengtsson, Christoffer
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Edvinsson, Sofie
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Cusumano, Corinne K
    Rosenbaum, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Johansson, Lennart B-Å
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Hultgren, Scott J
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Design and Synthesis of Fluorescent Pilicides and Curlicides: Bioactive Tools to Study Bacterial Virulence Mechanisms2012Ingår i: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, nr 15, s. 4522-4532Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Pilicides and curlicides are compounds that block the formation of the virulence factors pili and curli, respectively. To facilitate studies of the interaction between these compounds and the pili and curli assembly systems, fluorescent pilicides and curlicides have been synthesized. This was achieved by using a strategy based on structure-activity knowledge, in which key pilicide and curlicide substituents on the ring-fused dihydrothiazolo 2-pyridone central fragment were replaced by fluorophores. Several of the resulting fluorescent compounds had improved activities as measured in pili- and curli-dependent biofilm assays. We created fluorescent pilicides and curlicides by introducing coumarin and 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) fluorophores at two positions on the peptidomimetic pilicide and curlicide central fragment. Fluorescence images of the uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain UTI89 grown in the presence of these compounds shows that the compounds are strongly associated with the bacteria with a heterogeneous distribution.

  • 65.
    Chylinski, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Le Rhun, Anaïs
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    The tracrRNA and Cas9 families of type II CRISPR-Cas immunity systems2013Ingår i: RNA Biology, ISSN 1547-6286, E-ISSN 1555-8584, Vol. 10, nr 5, s. 726-737Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    CRISPR-Cas is a rapidly evolving RNA-mediated adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea against mobile genetic elements. The system relies on the activity of short mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that guide Cas protein(s) to silence invading nucleic acids. A set of CRISPR-Cas, type II, requires a trans-activating small RNA, tracrRNA, for maturation of precursor crRNA (pre-crRNA) and interference with invading sequences. Following co-processing of tracrRNA and pre-crRNA by RNase III, dual-tracrRNA:crRNA guides the CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 (Csn1) to cleave site-specifically cognate target DNA. Here, we screened available genomes for type II CRISPR-Cas loci by searching for Cas9 orthologs. We analyzed 75 representative loci, and for 56 of them we predicted novel tracrRNA orthologs. Our analysis demonstrates a high diversity in cas operon architecture and position of the tracrRNA gene within CRISPR-Cas loci. We observed a correlation between locus heterogeneity and Cas9 sequence diversity, resulting in the identification of various type II CRISPR-Cas subgroups. We validated the expression and co-processing of predicted tracrRNAs and pre-crRNAs by RNA sequencing in five bacterial species. This study reveals tracrRNA family as an atypical, small RNA family with no obvious conservation of structure, sequence or localization within type II CRISPR-Cas loci. The tracrRNA family is however characterized by the conserved feature to base-pair to cognate pre-crRNA repeats, an essential function for crRNA maturation and DNA silencing by dual-RNA:Cas9. The large panel of tracrRNA and Cas9 ortholog sequences should constitute a useful database to improve the design of RNA-programmable Cas9 as genome editing tool.

  • 66.
    Chylinski, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, Austria .
    Makarova, Kira S.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Braunschweig, Germany ; Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany .
    Koonin, Eugene V.
    Classification and evolution of type II CRISPR-Cas systems2014Ingår i: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 42, nr 10, s. 6091-6105Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The CRISPR-Cas systems of archaeal and bacterial adaptive immunity are classified into three types that differ by the repertoires of CRISPR-associated (cas) genes, the organization of cas operons and the structure of repeats in the CRISPR arrays. The simplest among the CRISPR-Cas systems is type II in which the endonuclease activities required for the interference with foreign deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are concentrated in a single multidomain protein, Cas9, and are guided by a co-processed dual-tracrRNA: crRNA molecule. This compact enzymatic machinery and readily programmable site-specific DNA targeting make type II systems top candidates for a new generation of powerful tools for genomic engineering. Here we report an updated census of CRISPR-Cas systems in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Type II systems are the rarest, missing in archaea, and represented in similar to 5% of bacterial genomes, with an over-representation among pathogens and commensals. Phylogenomic analysis suggests that at least three cas genes, cas1, cas2 and cas4, and the CRISPR repeats of the type II-B system were acquired via recombination with a type I CRISPR-Cas locus. Distant homologs of Cas9 were identified among proteins encoded by diverse transposons, suggesting that type II CRISPR-Cas evolved via recombination of mobile nuclease genes with type I loci.

  • 67. Codemo, Mario
    et al.
    Muschiol, Sandra
    Iovino, Federico
    Nannapaneni, Priyanka
    Plant, Laura
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Henriques-Normark, Birgitta
    Immunomodulatory Effects of Pneumococcal Extracellular Vesicles on Cellular and Humoral Host Defenses2018Ingår i: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 9, nr 2, artikel-id e00559-18Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Gram-positive bacteria, including the major respiratory pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, were recently shown to produce extracellular vesicles (EVs) that likely originate from the plasma membrane and are released into the extracellular environment. EVs may function as cargo for many bacterial proteins, however, their involvement in cellular processes and their interactions with the innate immune system are poorly understood. Here, EVs from pneumococci were characterized and their immunomodulatory effects investigated. Pneumococcal EVs were protruding from the bacterial surface and released into the medium as 25 to 250 nm lipid stained vesicles containing a large number of cytosolic, membrane, and surface-associated proteins. The cytosolic pore-forming toxin pneumolysin was significantly enriched in EVs compared to a total bacterial lysate but was not required for EV formation. Pneumococcal EVs were internalized into A549 lung epithelial cells and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and induced proinflammatory cytokine responses irrespective of pneumolysin content. EVs from encapsulated pneumococci were recognized by serum proteins, resulting in C3b deposition and formation of C5b-9 membrane attack complexes as well as factor H recruitment, depending on the presence of the choline binding protein PspC. Addition of EVs to human serum decreased opsonophagocytic killing of encapsulated pneumococci. Our data suggest that EVs may act in an immunomodulatory manner by allowing delivery of vesicle-associated proteins and other macromolecules into host cells. In addition, EVs expose targets for complement factors in serum, promoting pneumococcal evasion of humoral host defense.

    Importance: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality worldwide, being the major cause of milder respiratory tract infections such as otitis and sinusitis and of severe infections such as community-acquired pneumonia, with or without septicemia, and meningitis. More knowledge is needed on how pneumococci interact with the host, deliver virulence factors, and activate immune defenses. Here we show that pneumococci form extracellular vesicles that emanate from the plasma membrane and contain virulence properties, including enrichment of pneumolysin. We found that pneumococcal vesicles can be internalized into epithelial and dendritic cells and bind complement proteins, thereby promoting pneumococcal evasion of complement-mediated opsonophagocytosis. They also induce pneumolysin-independent proinflammatory responses. We suggest that these vesicles can function as a mechanism for delivery of pneumococcal proteins and other immunomodulatory components into host cells and help pneumococci to avoid complement deposition and phagocytosis-mediated killing, thereby possibly contributing to the symptoms found in pneumococcal infections.

  • 68.
    Costa, Tiago
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Amer, Ayad
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Farag, Salah
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Type III secretion translocon assemblies that attenuate Yersinia virulence2013Ingår i: Cellular Microbiology, ISSN 1462-5814, E-ISSN 1462-5822, Vol. 15, nr 7, s. 1088-1110Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion enables bacteria to intoxicate eukaryotic cells with anti-host effectors. A class of secreted cargo are the two hydrophobic translocators that form a translocon pore in the host cell plasma membrane through which the translocated effectors may gain cellular entry. In pathogenic Yersinia, YopB and YopD shape this translocon pore. Here, four in cis yopD mutations were constructed to disrupt a predicted α-helix motif at the C-terminus. Mutants YopD(I262P) and YopD(K267P) poorly localized Yop effectors into target eukaryotic cells and failed to resist uptake and killing by immune cells. These defects were due to deficiencies in host-membrane insertion of the YopD-YopB translocon. Mutants YopD(A263P) and YopD(A270P) had no measurable in vitro translocation defect, even though they formed smaller translocon pores in erythrocyte membranes. Despite this, all four mutants were attenuated in a mouse infection model. Hence, YopD variants have been generated that can spawn translocons capable of targeting effectors in vitro, yet were bereft of any lethal effect in vivo. Therefore, Yop translocators may possess other in vivo functions that extend beyond being a portal for effector delivery into host cells.

  • 69.
    Costa, Tiago
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Department of Life Sciences, MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Imperial College, London, UK.
    Francis, Monika K.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Region Västerbotten.
    Farag, Salah
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Measurement of Yersinia translocon pore formation in erythrocytes2019Ingår i: Pathogenic Yersinia: methods and protocols / [ed] Viveka Vadyvaloo and Matthew B. Lawrenz, New York, NY, U.S.A.: Humana Press, 2019, s. 211-229Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Many Gram-negative pathogens produce a type III secretion system capable of intoxicating eukaryotic cells with immune-modulating effector proteins. Fundamental to this injection process is the prior secretion of two translocator proteins destined for injectisome translocon pore assembly within the host cell plasma membrane. It is through this pore that effectors are believed to travel to gain access to the host cell interior. Yersinia species especially pathogenic to humans and animals assemble this translocon pore utilizing two hydrophobic translocator proteins-YopB and YopD. Although a full molecular understanding of the biogenesis, function and regulation of this translocon pore and subsequent effector delivery into host cells remains elusive, some of what we know about these processes can be attributed to studies of bacterial infections of erythrocytes. Herein we describe the methodology of erythrocyte infections by Yersinia, and how analysis of the resultant contact-dependent hemolysis can serve as a relative measurement of YopB- and YopD-dependent translocon pore formation.

  • 70.
    Costa, Tiago R. D.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    YopD translocator function in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis type III secretion2012Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are a common feature of Gram-negative bacteria, allowing them to inject anti-host effectors into the interior of infected eukaryotic cells. By this mechanism, these virulence factors help the bacteria to modulate eukaryotic cell function in its favor and subvert host innate immunity. This promotes a less hostile environment in which infecting bacteria can colonize and cause disease.

    In pathogenic Yersinia, a crucial protein in this process is YopD. YopD is a T3S substrate that, together with YopB, forms a translocon pore in the host cell membrane through which the Yop effectors may gain access to the target-cell cytosol. The assembly of the translocator pore in plasma membranes is considered a fundamental feature of all T3SSs. How the pore is formed, what determines the correct size and ultimately the stoichiometry between YopD YopB, is still unknown. Portions of YopD are also observed inside HeLa cells. Moreover, YopD functions together with its T3S chaperone, LcrH, to control Yops synthesis in the bacterial cytoplasm. The multifunctional YopD may influence all these processes by compartmentalizing activities into discrete modular domains along the protein length. Therefore, understanding how particular domains and/or residues within these regions coordinate multiple functions of the protein will provide a platform to improve our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind translocation through T3SSs.

    Comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis of the YopD C-terminal amphipathic α-helix domain, pinpointed hydrophobic residues as important for YopD function. Some YopD variants were defective in self-assembly and in the ability to interact with the needle tip protein, LcrV, which were required to facilitate bacterial T3S activity. A similar mutagenesis approach was used to understand the role of the two predicted coiled-coils located at the N-terminal and C-terminal region of YopD. The predicted N-terminal element that occurs solely in the Yersinia YopD translocator family is essential for optimal T3SS and full disease progression. The predicted YopD C-terminal coiled-coil shapes a functional translocon inserted into host cell membranes. This translocon was seen to be a dynamic structure facilitating at least two roles during effectors delivery into cells; one to guarantee translocon pore insertion into target cell membranes and the other to promote targeted activity of internalized effector toxins.

    In Yersinia expression of yop genes and secretion of the corresponding polypeptides is tightly regulated at a transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. If T3S chaperones of the translocator class are known to influence transcriptional output of T3SS genes in other bacteria, we show that in Yersinia the class II T3S chaperone LcrH has no such effect on the LcrF transcriptional activator activity. We also demonstrate that there are possibly additional yop-regulatory roles for the LcrH chaperone besides forming a stable complex with YopD to impose post-transcriptional silencing on Yops synthesis. This mechanism that relies upon an active T3SS, might act independently of both YopD and the regulatory element LcrQ.

    In conclusion, this work has sought to delineate the encrypted functions of the YopD translocator that contribute to Yersinia T3SS-dependent pathogenesis. Contributions of the YopD cognate chaperone LcrH in yop regulatory control are also presented.  

  • 71.
    Costa, Tiago R. D.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Amer, Ayad A. A.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Farag, Salah I.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew S.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Active type III translocon assemblies that attenuate Yersinia virulenceManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion enables bacteria to intoxicate eukaryotic cells with anti-host effectors. A class of secreted cargo are the two hydrophobic translocators that form a translocon pore in the host cell plasma membrane through which the translocated effectors may gain cellular entry. In pathogenic Yersinia, YopB and YopD shape this translocon pore. Here, four in cis yopD mutations were constructed to disrupt a predicted a-helix motif at the C-terminus. Mutants YopDI262P and YopDK267P poorly localised Yop effectors into target eukaryotic cells and failed to resist uptake and killing by immune cells. These defects were due to deficiencies in host-membrane insertion of the YopD-YopB translocon. Mutants YopDA263P and YopDA270P had no measurable in vitro translocation defect, even though they formed smaller translocon pores in erythrocyte membranes. Despite this, all four mutants were attenuated in a mouse infection model. Hence, YopD variants have been generated that can spawn translocons capable of targeting effectors in vitro, yet were bereft of any lethal effect in vivo. It is therefore probable that an active translocon makes a range of contributions during bacteria-host cell contact that extends beyond effector delivery per se.

  • 72.
    Costa, Tiago R. D.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Amer, Ayad A. A.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Coiled-coils in the YopD translocator family: A predicted structure unique to the YopD N-terminus contributes to full virulence of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2012Ingår i: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, ISSN 1567-1348, E-ISSN 1567-7257, Vol. 12, nr 8, s. 1729-1742Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Pathogenic Yersinia all harbor a virulence plasmid-encoded Ysc–Yop T3SS. In this system, translocator function is performed by the hydrophobic proteins YopB and YopD. With the goal to better understand how YopD orchestrates yop-regulatory control, translocon pore formation and Yop effector translocation, we performed an in silico prediction of coiled-coil motifs in YopD and YopD-like sequences from other bacteria. Of interest was a predicted N-terminal coiled-coil that occurred solely in Yersinia YopD sequences. To investigate if this unique feature was biologically relevant, two in cis point mutations were generated with a view to disrupting this putative structure. Both mutants maintained full T3SS function in vitro in terms of environmental control of Yops synthesis and secretion, effector toxin translocation and evasion of phagocytosis and killing by cultured immune cells. However, these same mutants were attenuated for virulence in a murine oral-infection model. The cause of this tardy disease progression is unclear. However, these data indicate that any structural flaw in this element unique to the N-terminus will subtly compromise an aspect of YopD biology. Sub-optimal T3SSs are then formed that are unable to fortify Yersinia against attack by the host innate and adaptive immune response.

  • 73.
    Costa, Tiago R. D.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Carlsson, Katrin E.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edqvist, Petra J.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew S.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Influence of the LcrH chaperone on type III secretion system regulation in Yersinia pseudotuberculosisManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Human pathogenic Yersiniae share a common virulence plasmid that encodes for the Ysc-Yop type III secretion system (T3SS). Control of yop expression involves several pathways in which their cross-talk is not completely understood. LcrF, an AraC-like transcriptional activator, is required for temperature-dependent yop-transcription. In contrast, a repressive effect of the T3S chaperone LcrH and the cognate translocator substrate YopD occurs through binding to yop mRNA and inhibiting translation; a process that is also thought to involve LcrQ. Several homologous members of the LcrH family of translocator-class of T3S chaperones can act as a cofactor to amplify the activity of transcriptional activators analogous to LcrF. However, we show here in Y. pseudotuberculosis that LcrH does not induce LcrF-dependent transcription of target genes. Moreover, a full length DlcrH null mutant in which YopB and YopD are rapidly degraded is totally de-repressed for Yop synthesis even though the anti-activator LcrQ is forced to accumulate in the cytoplasm through rendering the Ysc-Yop T3SS non-functional or ectopically producing LcrQ in trans. Typically, this mutant cannot grow at 37°C. Thus, in all respects, the DlcrH null mutant mirrors the regulatory defects established for Yersinia lacking the translocator and anti-activator YopD. On the other hand, Y. pseudotuberculosis producing the LcrHE30G point mutant that is defective for YscY chaperone binding exhibits a mild regulatory defect that permits some growth at 37°C, but is blind to the cytoplasmic accumulation of LcrQ. Critically however, this mutant still responds to repression caused by YopD accumulation, which is stably produced and efficiently secreted by this strain. Thus, our work with LcrHE30G indicates an additional regulatory function of this versatile T3S chaperone that is independent of the LcrF transcription factor and the YopD anti-activator.

     

  • 74.
    Costa, Tiago R D
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edqvist, Petra J
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bröms, Jeanette E
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Åhlund, Monika K
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    YopD self-assembly and binding to LcrV facilitate type III secretion activity by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2010Ingår i: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 285, nr 33, s. 25269-25284Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    YopD-like translocator proteins encoded by several Gram-negative bacteria are important for type III secretion-dependent delivery of anti-host effectors into eukaryotic cells. This probably depends on their ability to form pores in the infected cell plasma membrane, through which effectors may gain access to the cell interior. In addition, Yersinia YopD is a negative regulator essential for the control of effector synthesis and secretion. As a prerequisite for this functional duality, YopD may need to establish molecular interactions with other key T3S components. A putative coiled-coil domain and an alpha-helical amphipathic domain, both situated in the YopD C terminus, may represent key protein-protein interaction domains. Therefore, residues within the YopD C terminus were systematically mutagenized. All 68 mutant bacteria were first screened in a variety of assays designed to identify individual residues essential for YopD function, possibly by providing the interaction interface for the docking of other T3S proteins. Mirroring the effect of a full-length yopD gene deletion, five mutant bacteria were defective for both yop regulatory control and effector delivery. Interestingly, all mutations clustered to hydrophobic amino acids of the amphipathic domain. Also situated within this domain, two additional mutants rendered YopD primarily defective in the control of Yop synthesis and secretion. Significantly, protein-protein interaction studies revealed that functionally compromised YopD variants were also defective in self-oligomerization and in the ability to engage another translocator protein, LcrV. Thus, the YopD amphipathic domain facilitates the formation of YopD/YopD and YopD/LcrV interactions, two critical events in the type III secretion process.

  • 75. Crawford, Aaron C.
    et al.
    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E.
    Alamir, Omran
    Niemiec, Maria Joanna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Research Group Microbial Immunology, Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology–Hans Knoell Institute, Jena, Germany; Center for Sepsis Control and Care (CSCC), University Hospital, Jena, Germany.
    Alawfi, Bader
    Alsarraf, Mohammad
    Skrahina, Volha
    Costa, Anna C. B. P.
    Anderson, Andrew
    Yellagunda, Sujan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Ballou, Elizabeth R.
    Hube, Bernhard
    Urban, Constantin F.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Wilson, Duncan
    Biphasic zinc compartmentalisation in a human fungal pathogen2018Ingår i: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 14, nr 5, artikel-id e1007013Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutritional immunity describes the host-driven manipulation of essential micronutrients, including iron, zinc and manganese. To withstand nutritional immunity and proliferate within their hosts, pathogenic microbes must express efficient micronutrient uptake and homeostatic systems. Here we have elucidated the pathway of cellular zinc assimilation in the major human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Bioinformatics analysis identified nine putative zinc transporters: four cytoplasmic-import Zip proteins (Zrt1, Zrt2, Zrt3 and orf19.5428) and five cytoplasmic-export ZnT proteins (orf19.1536/Zrc1, orf19.3874, orf19.3769, orf19.3132 and orf19.52). Only Zrt1 and Zrt2 are predicted to localise to the plasma membrane and here we demonstrate that Zrt2 is essential for C. albicans zinc uptake and growth at acidic pH. In contrast, ZRT1 expression was found to be highly pH dependent and could support growth of the ZRT2-null strain at pH 7 and above. This regulatory paradigm is analogous to the distantly related pathogenic mould, Aspergillus fumigatus, suggesting that pH-adaptation of zinc transport may be conserved in fungi and we propose that environmental pH has shaped the evolution of zinc import systems in fungi. Deletion of C. albicans ZRT2 reduced kidney fungal burden in wild type, but not in mice lacking the zinc-chelating antimicrobial protein calprotectin. Inhibition of zrt2 Delta growth by neutrophil extracellular traps was calprotectin-dependent. This suggests that, within the kidney, C. albicans growth is determined by pathogen-Zrt2 and host-calprotectin. As well as serving as an essential micronutrient, zinc can also be highly toxic and we show that C. albicans deals with this potential threat by rapidly compartmentalising zinc within vesicular stores called zincosomes. In order to understand mechanistically how this process occurs, we created deletion mutants of all five ZnT-type transporters in C. albicans. Here we show that, unlike in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, C. albicans Zrc1 mediates zinc tolerance via zincosomal zinc compartmentalisation. This novel transporter was also essential for virulence and liver colonisation in vivo. In summary, we show that zinc homeostasis in a major human fungal pathogen is a multi-stage process initiated by Zrtl/Zrt2-cellular import, followed by Zrcl-dependent intracellular compartmentalisation.

  • 76.
    Croxatto, Antony
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Weber, Barbara
    Chen, Chang
    Milton, Debra L
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Post-transcriptional regulation of the Vibrio anguillarum quorum-sensing regulator vanT by RpoSManuskript (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 77.
    Dahlgren, Markus K
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Zetterström, Caroline E
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Linusson, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Statistical molecular design of a focused salicylidene acylhydrazide library and multivariate QSAR of inhibition of type III secretion in the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia2010Ingår i: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 18, nr 7, s. 2686-2703Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A combined application of statistical molecular design (SMD), quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and prediction of new active compounds was effectively used to develop salicylidene acylhydrazides as inhibitors of type III secretion (T3S) in the Gram-negative pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. SMD and subsequent synthesis furnished 50 salicylidene acylhydrazides in high purity. Based on data from biological evaluation in T3S linked assays 18 compounds were classified as active and 25 compounds showed a dose-dependent inhibition. The 25 compounds were used to compute two multivariate QSAR models and two multivariate discriminant analysis models were computed from both active and inactive compounds. Three of the models were used to predict 4416 virtual compounds in consensus and eight new compounds were selected as an external test set. Synthesis and biological evaluation of the test set in Y. pseudotuberculosis and the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis validated the models. Y. pseudotuberculosis and C. trachomatis cell-based infection models showed that compounds identified in this study are selective and non-toxic inhibitors of T3S dependent virulence.

  • 78.
    Dang, Hung The
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, USA.
    Uvell, Hanna
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Pinkner, Jerome S.
    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, USA.
    Hultgren, Scott J.
    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, USA.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Syntheses and biological evaluation of 2-amino-3-acyl-tetrahydrobenzothiophene derivatives: antibacterial agents with antivirulence activity2014Ingår i: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 12, nr 12, s. 1942-1956Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing new compounds targeting virulence factors (e.g., inhibition of pilus assembly by pilicides) is a promising approach to combating bacterial infection. A high-throughput screening campaign of a library of 17 500 small molecules identified 2-amino-3-acyl-tetrahydrobenzothiophene derivatives (hits 2 and 3) as novel inhibitors of pili-dependent biofilm formation in a uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain UTI89. Based on compounds 2 and 3 as the starting point, we designed and synthesized a series of structurally related analogs and investigated their activity against biofilm formation of E. coli UTI89. Systematic structural modification of the initial hits provided valuable information on their SARs for further optimization. In addition, small structural changes to the parent molecules resulted in low micromolar inhibitors (20-23) of E. coli biofilm development without an effect on bacterial growth. The hit compound 3 and its analog 20 were confirmed to prevent pili formation in a hemagglutination (HA) titer assay and electron microscopy (EM) measurements. These findings suggest that 2-amino-3-acyl-tetrahydrobenzothiophenes may serve as a new class of compounds for further elaboration as antibacterial agents with antivirulence activity.

  • 79.
    de Pedro, Miguel A.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Structural constraints and dynamics of bacterial cell wall architecture2015Ingår i: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 6, artikel-id 449Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The peptidoglycan wall (PG) is a unique structure which confers physical strength and defined shape to bacteria. It consists of a net-like macromolecule of peptide interlinked glycan chains overlying the cell membrane. The structure and layout of the PG dictates that the wall has to be continuously modified as bacteria go through division, morphological differentiation, and adaptive responses. The PG is poorly known in structural terms. However, to understand morphogenesis a precise knowledge of glycan strand arrangement and of local effects of the different kinds of subunits is essential. The scarcity of data led to a conception of the PG as a regular, highly ordered structure which strongly influenced growth models. Here, we review the structure of the PG to define a more realistic conceptual framework. We discuss the consequences of the plasticity of murein architecture in morphogenesis and try to define a set of minimal structural constraints that must be fulfilled by any model to be compatible with present day information.

  • 80.
    Deltcheva, Elitza
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Chylinski, Krzysztof
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Sharma, Cynthia M
    Gonzales, Karine
    Chao, Yanjie
    Pirzada, Zaid A
    Eckert, Maria R
    Vogel, Jörg
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    CRISPR RNA maturation by trans-encoded small RNA and host factor RNase III2011Ingår i: Nature, Vol. 471, nr 7340, s. 602-607Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    CRISPR/Cas systems constitute a widespread class of immunity systems that protect bacteria and archaea against phages and plasmids, and commonly use repeat/spacer-derived short crRNAs to silence foreign nucleic acids in a sequence-specific manner. Although the maturation of crRNAs represents a key event in CRISPR activation, the responsible endoribonucleases (CasE, Cas6, Csy4) are missing in many CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Here, differential RNA sequencing of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes uncovered tracrRNA, a trans-encoded small RNA with 24-nucleotide complementarity to the repeat regions of crRNA precursor transcripts. We show that tracrRNA directs the maturation of crRNAs by the activities of the widely conserved endogenous RNase III and the CRISPR-associated Csn1 protein; all these components are essential to protect S. pyogenes against prophage-derived DNA. Our study reveals a novel pathway of small guide RNA maturation and the first example of a host factor (RNase III) required for bacterial RNA-mediated immunity against invaders.

  • 81.
    Dingeldein, Artur P. G.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Lindberg, Mikael J.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Ådén, Jörgen
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Zhong, Xueyin
    Stoll, Raphael
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Bax to the future – A novel, high-yielding approach for purification and expression of full-length Bax protein for structural studies2019Ingår i: Protein Expression and Purification, ISSN 1046-5928, E-ISSN 1096-0279, Vol. 158, s. 20-26Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis (programmed cell death) involves a sophisticated signaling and regulatory network that is regulated by the Bcl-2 protein family. Members of this family have either pro- or anti-apoptotic functions. An important pro-apoptotic member of this family is the cytosolic Bax. This protein is crucial for the onset of apoptosis by perforating the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). This process can be seen as point of no return, since disintegration of the MOM leads to the release of apotogenic factors such as cytochrome c into the cytosol triggering the activation of caspases and subsequent apoptotic steps. Bax is able to interact with the MOM with both its termini, making it inherently difficult to express in E. coli. In this study, we present a novel approach to express and purify full-length Bax with significantly increased yields, when compared to the commonly applied strategy. Using a double fusion approach with an N-terminal GST-tag and a C-terminal Intein-CBD-tag, we were able to render both Bax termini inactive and prevent disruptive interactions from occurring during gene expression. By deploying an Intein-CBD-tag at the C-terminus we were further able to avoid the introduction of any artificial residues, hence ensuring the native like activity of the membrane-penetrating C-terminus of Bax. Further, by engineering a His6-tag to the C-terminus of the CBD-tag we greatly improved the robustness of the purification procedure. We report yields for pure, full-length Bax protein that are increased by an order of magnitude, when compared to commonly used Bax expression protocols.

  • 82.
    Dongre, Mitesh
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Bacterial nanotubes for intimate sharing2011Ingår i: Frontiers in microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 2, s. 108-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 83.
    Dongre, Mitesh
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    The Protease of Vibrio cholerae (PrtV)2013Ingår i: Handbook of proteolytic enzymes: volume 1 / [ed] Neil D. Rawlings, Guy Salvesen, Elsevier, 2013, 3, Vol. 1, s. 1219-1225Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The third edition of the Handbook of Proteolytic Enzymes aims to be a comprehensive reference work for the enzymes that cleave proteins and peptides, and contains over 850 chapters. Each chapter is organized into sections describing the name and history, activity and specificity, structural chemistry, preparation, biological aspects, and distinguishing features for a specific peptidase. The subject of Chapter 273 is The Protease of Vibrio cholerae (PrtV). Keywords Auto-proteolysis, Caenorhabditis elegans, cytokine induction, fibrinogen, fibronectin, HapR. Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC), M6-peptidase family, plasminogen, polycystic kidney disease (PKD) domains, Quorum Sensing (QS), zinc-dependent metalloproteases.

  • 84.
    Doudna, Jennifer A.
    et al.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Helmholtz Ctr Infect Res, Dept Regulat Infect Biol, D-38124 Braunschweig, Germany; Hannover Med Sch, D-30625 Hannover, Germany.
    The new frontier of genome engineering with CRISPR-Cas92014Ingår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 346, nr 6213, s. 1077-+Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of facile genome engineering using the bacterial RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system in animals and plants is transforming biology. We review the history of CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeat) biology from its initial discovery through the elucidation of the CRISPR-Cas9 enzyme mechanism, which has set the stage for remarkable developments using this technology to modify, regulate, or mark genomic loci in a wide variety of cells and organisms from all three domains of life. These results highlight a new era in which genomic manipulation is no longer a bottleneck to experiments, paving the way toward fundamental discoveries in biology, with applications in all branches of biotechnology, as well as strategies for human therapeutics.

  • 85. Dörr, Tobias
    et al.
    Alvarez, Laura
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Delgado, Fernanda
    Davis, Brigid M.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Waldor, Matthew K.
    A cell wall damage response mediated by a sensor kinase/response regulator pair enables beta-lactam tolerance2016Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, nr 2, s. 404-409Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The bacterial cell wall is critical for maintenance of cell shape and survival. Following exposure to antibiotics that target enzymes required for cell wall synthesis, bacteria typically lyse. Although several cell envelope stress response systems have been well described, there is little knowledge of systems that modulate cell wall synthesis in response to cell wall damage, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Here we describe WigK/WigR, a histidine kinase/response regulator pair that enables Vibrio cholerae, the cholera pathogen, to survive exposure to antibiotics targeting cell wall synthesis in vitro and during infection. Unlike wild-type V. cholerae, mutants lacking wigR fail to recover following exposure to cell-wall-acting antibiotics, and they exhibit a drastically increased cell diameter in the absence of such antibiotics. Conversely, overexpression of wigR leads to cell slimming. Overexpression of activated WigR also results in increased expression of the full set of cell wall synthesis genes and to elevated cell wall content. WigKR-dependent expression of cell wall synthesis genes is induced by various cell-wall-acting antibiotics as well as by overexpression of an endogenous cell wall hydrolase. Thus, WigKR appears to monitor cell wall integrity and to enhance the capacity for increased cell wall production in response to damage. Taken together, these findings implicate WigKR as a regulator of cell wall synthesis that controls cell wall homeostasis in response to antibiotics and likely during normal growth as well.

  • 86.
    Edqvist, Petra J
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Bröms, Jeanette E
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Betts, Helen J
    Forsberg, Ake
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Pallen, Mark J
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Tetratricopeptide repeats in the type III secretion chaperone, LcrH: their role in substrate binding and secretion.2006Ingår i: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 59, nr 1, s. 31-44Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-flagellar type III secretion systems (T3SSs) transport proteins across the bacterial cell and into eukaryotic cells. Targeting of proteins into host cells requires a dedicated translocation apparatus. Efficient secretion of the translocator proteins that make up this apparatus depends on molecular chaperones. Chaperones of the translocators (also called class-II chaperones) are characterized by the possession of three tandem tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). We wished to dissect the relations between chaperone structure and function and to validate a structural model using site-directed mutagenesis. Drawing on a number of experimental approaches and focusing on LcrH, a class-II chaperone from the Yersinia Ysc-Yop T3SS, we examined the contributions of different residues, residue classes and regions of the protein to chaperone stability, chaperone-substrate binding, substrate stability and secretion and regulation of Yop protein synthesis. We confirmed the expected role of the conserved canonical residues from the TPRs to chaperone stability and function. Eleven mutations specifically abrogated YopB binding or secretion while three mutations led to a specific loss of YopD secretion. These are the first mutations described for any class-II chaperone that allow interactions with one translocator to be dissociated from interactions with the other. Strikingly, all mutations affecting the interaction with YopB mapped to residues with side chains projecting from the inner, concave surface of the modelled TPR structure, defining a YopB interaction site. Conversely, all mutations preventing YopD secretion affect residues that lie on the outer, convex surface of the triple-TPR cluster in our model, suggesting that this region of the molecule represents a distinct interaction site for YopD. Intriguingly, one of the LcrH double mutants, Y40A/F44A, was able to maintain stable substrates inside bacteria, but unable to secrete them, suggesting that these two residues might influence delivery of substrates to the secretion apparatus.

  • 87.
    Edwin, Aaron
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap, Klinisk neurovetenskap.
    Stier, Gunter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Domain isolation, expression, purification and proteolytic activity of the metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae2014Ingår i: Protein Expression and Purification, ISSN 1046-5928, E-ISSN 1096-0279, Vol. 96, s. 39-47Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae serves an important function for the bacteria's ability to invade the mammalian host cell. The protein belongs to the family of M6 proteases, with a characteristic zinc ion in the catalytic active site. PrtV constitutes a 918 amino acids (102kDa) multidomain pre-pro-protein that so far has only been expressed in V. cholerae. Structural studies require high amounts of soluble protein with high purity. Previous attempts for recombinant expression have been hampered by low expression and solubility of protein fragments. Here, we describe results from parallel cloning experiments in Escherichia coli where fusion tagged constructs of PrtV fragments were designed, and protein products tested for expression and solubility. Of more than 100 designed constructs, three produced protein products that expressed well. These include the N-terminal domain (residues 23-103), the PKD1 domain (residues 755-839), and a 25kDa fragment (residues 581-839). The soluble fusion proteins were captured with Ni(2+) affinity chromatography, and subsequently cleaved with tobacco etch virus protease. Purification protocols yielded ∼10-15mg of pure protein from 1L of culture. Proper folding of the shorter domains was confirmed by heteronuclear NMR spectra recorded on (15)N-labeled samples. A modified protocol for the native purification of the secreted 81kDa pro-protein of PrtV is provided. Proteolytic activity measurements suggest that the 37kDa catalytic metalloprotease domain alone is sufficient for activity.

  • 88.
    Edwin, Aaron
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Persson, Cecilia
    Mayzel, Maxim
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap, Klinisk neurovetenskap.
    Karlsson, B. Göran
    Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Structure of the N-terminal domain of the metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae2015Ingår i: Protein Science, ISSN 0961-8368, E-ISSN 1469-896X, Vol. 24, nr 12, s. 2076-2080Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae serves an important function for the ability of bacteria to invade the mammalian host cell. The protein belongs to the family of M6 proteases, with a characteristic zinc ion in the catalytic active site. PrtV constitutes a 918 amino acids (102 kDa) multidomain pre-pro-protein that undergoes several N- and C-terminal modifications to form a catalytically active protease. We report here the NMR structure of the PrtV N- terminal domain (residues 23-103) that contains two short alpha-helices in a coiled coil motif. The helices are held together by a cluster of hydrophobic residues. Approximately 30 residues at the C-terminal end, which were predicted to form a third helical structure, are disordered. These residues are highly conserved within the genus Vibrio, which suggests that they might be functionally important.

  • 89.
    Edwin, Aaron
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Rompikuntal, Pramod
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Björn, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Stier, Gunter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Sauer-Eriksson, Elisabeth A.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Calcium binding by the PKD1 domain regulates interdomain flexibility in Vibrio cholerae metalloprotease PrtV2013Ingår i: FEBS Open Bio, E-ISSN 2211-5463, Vol. 3, s. 263-270Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, releases several virulence factors including secreted proteases when it infects its host. These factors attack host cell proteins and break down tissue barriers and cellular matrix components such as collagen, laminin, fibronectin, keratin, elastin, and they induce necrotic tissue damage. The secreted protease PrtV constitutes one virulence factors of V. cholerae. It is a metalloprotease belonging to the M6 peptidase family. The protein is expressed as an inactive, multidomain, 102 kDa pre-pro-protein that undergoes several N- and C-terminal modifications after which it is secreted as an intermediate variant of 81 kDa. After secretion from the bacteria, additional proteolytic steps occur to produce the 55 kDa active M6 metalloprotease. The domain arrangement of PrtV is likely to play an important role in these maturation steps, which are known to be regulated by calcium. However, the molecular mechanism by which calcium controls proteolysis is unknown. In this study, we report the atomic resolution crystal structure of the PKD1 domain from V. cholera PrtV (residues 755–838) determined at 1.1 Å. The structure reveals a previously uncharacterized Ca2+-binding site located near linker regions between domains. Conformational changes in the Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bound forms suggest that Ca2+-binding at the PKD1 domain controls domain linker flexibility, and plays an important structural role, providing stability to the PrtV protein.

  • 90. Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Salomonsson, Emelie Naslund
    Aas, Finn Erik
    Forslund, Anna-Lena
    Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.
    Maier, Josef
    Macellaro, Anna
    Kuoppa, Kerstin
    Oyston, Petra C. F.
    Titball, Richard W.
    Thomas, Rebecca M.
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Prior, Joann L.
    Koomey, Michael
    O-Linked glycosylation of the PilA pilin protein of francisella tularensis: identification of the endogenous protein-targeting oligosaccharyltransferase and characterization of the native oligosaccharide2011Ingår i: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 193, nr 19, s. 5487-5497Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Findings from a number of studies suggest that the PilA pilin proteins may play an important role in the pathogenesis of disease caused by species within the genus Francisella. As such, a thorough understanding of PilA structure and chemistry is warranted. Here, we definitively identified the PglA protein-targeting oligosaccharyltransferase by virtue of its necessity for PilA glycosylation in Francisella tularensis and its sufficiency for PilA glycosylation in Escherichia coli. In addition, we used mass spectrometry to examine PilA affinity purified from Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica and demonstrated that the protein undergoes multisite, O-linked glycosylation with a pentasaccharide of the structure HexNac-HexHex-HexNac-HexNac. Further analyses revealed microheterogeneity related to forms of the pentasaccharide carrying unusual moieties linked to the distal sugar via a phosphate bridge. Type A and type B strains of Francisella subspecies thus express an O-linked protein glycosylation system utilizing core biosynthetic and assembly pathways conserved in other members of the proteobacteria. As PglA appears to be highly conserved in Francisella species, O-linked protein glycosylation may be a feature common to members of this genus.

  • 91. Eggenschwiler, Reto
    et al.
    Moslem, Mohsen
    Fráguas, Mariane Serra
    Galla, Melanie
    Papp, Oliver
    Naujock, Maximilian
    Fonfara, Ines
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany.
    Gensch, Ingrid
    Wähner, Annabell
    Beh-Pajooh, Abbas
    Mussolino, Claudio
    Tauscher, Marcel
    Steinemann, Doris
    Wegner, Florian
    Petri, Susanne
    Schambach, Axel
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Cathomen, Toni
    Cantz, Tobias
    Improved bi-allelic modification of a transcriptionally silent locus in patient-derived iPSC by Cas9 nickase2016Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, artikel-id 38198Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Homology directed repair (HDR)-based genome editing via selectable long flanking arm donors can be hampered by local transgene silencing at transcriptionally silent loci. Here, we report efficient bi-allelic modification of a silent locus in patient-derived hiPSC by using Cas9 nickase and a silencing-resistant donor construct that contains an excisable selection/counter-selection cassette. To identify the most active single guide RNA (sgRNA)/nickase combinations, we employed a lentiviral vector-based reporter assay to determine the HDR efficiencies in cella. Next, we used the most efficient pair of sgRNAs for targeted integration of an improved, silencing-resistant plasmid donor harboring a piggyBac-flanked puro Delta tk cassette. Moreover, we took advantage of a dual-fluorescence selection strategy for bi-allelic targeting and achieved 100% counter-selection efficiency after bi-allelic excision of the selection/counter-selection cassette. Together, we present an improved system for efficient bi-allelic modification of transcriptionally silent loci in human pluripotent stem cells.

  • 92.
    Ekestubbe, Sofie
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Timing and targeting of Type III secretion translocation of virulence effectors in Yersinia2017Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The Type III secretion system (T3SS) is an important virulence mechanism that allows pathogenic bacteria to translocate virulence effectors directly into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic host cells to manipulate the host cells in favor of the pathogen. Enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis use a T3SS to translocate effectors, Yops, that prevent phagocytosis by immune cells, and is largely dependent on it to establish and sustain an infection in the lymphoid tissues of a mammalian host. Translocation into a host cell requires specific translocator proteins, and is tightly controlled from both the bacterial and host cell cytoplasm. We aimed to investigate two of the regulatory elements, YopN and LcrV, to gain more insight into the translocation mechanism. Two separate regulatory complexes regulate expression and secretion of Yops, however, the processes are linked so that expression is induced when secretion is activated. A complex, including YopD, prevents expression of Yops, while YopN-TyeA and LcrG block secretion. LcrV is required to relieve the secretion block, by sequestering LcrG. We verified that LcrG binds to the C-terminal part of LcrV, which is consistent with what has been shown in Y. pestis. In addition to their regulatory roles, both LcrV and YopD are translocators and are assumed to interact at the bacterial surface, where LcrV promotes insertion of YopB and YopD into the host cell membrane. However, here we show that purified YopD failed to interact with LcrV, instead YopD solely interacted with a complex of LcrV-LcrG. This indicates that LcrV and YopD interact in the bacterial cytosol, which may be important for regulation of Yop expression and secretion. The established role of YopN is to block secretion prior to host cell contact. We found that deleting the central region (amino acids 76-181) had no effect on the regulatory role of YopN in expression and secretion of Yops. Interestingly, we found that, even though the YopN∆76-181 mutant secreted the translocators with similar kinetics as the wild type strain, translocation of the effector YopH, into HeLa cells, was significantly reduced. Consequently, the YopN∆76-181 mutant was unable to block phagocytosis, almost to the same level as the ∆lcrV mutant which is completely unable to translocate YopH. Our results indicate that YopN is involved in the translocation step in addition to its role in regulating secretion. Further, we show that the amino terminal of LcrV, in the context of translocation, is involved in the early intracellular targeting of YopH in order to block phagocytosis efficiently and sustain an in vivo infection. LcrV mutants that failed to efficiently target YopH intracellularly were severely attenuated also for in vivo virulence. All together, we show that LcrV and YopN are involved in more steps in the regulation of translocation, than what was known before. Our studies also highlight that early translocation is essential for Yersinia to block phagocytosis, which in the end is essential for in vivo virulence.

  • 93.
    Ekestubbe, Sofie
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bröms, Jeanette E.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew S.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    The amino-terminal part of the needle-tip translocator LcrV of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is required for early targeting of YopH and in vivo virulence2016Ingår i: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 6, artikel-id 175Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are dedicated to targeting anti-host effector proteins into the cytosol of the host cell to promote bacterial infection. Delivery of the effectors requires three specific translocator proteins, of which the hydrophilic translocator, LcrV, is located at the tip of the T3SS needle and is believed to facilitate insertion of the two hydrophobic translocators into the host cell membrane. Here we used Yersinia as a model to study the role of LcrV in T3SS mediated intracellular effector targeting. Intriguingly, we identified N-terminal IcrV mutants that, similar to the wild-type protein, efficiently promoted expression, secretion and intracellular levels of Yop effectors, yet they were impaired in their ability to inhibit phagocytosis by J774 cells. In line with this, the YopH mediated dephosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase early after infection was compromised when compared to the wild type strain. This suggests that the mutants are unable to promote efficient delivery of effectors to their molecular targets inside the host cell upon host cell contact. The significance of this was borne out by the fact that the mutants were highly attenuated for virulence in the systemic mouse infection model. Our study provides both novel and significant findings that establish a role for LcrV in early targeting of effectors in the host cell.

  • 94. Elsholz, Alexander K. W.
    et al.
    Birk, Marlene S.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany; Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    Turgay, Kuersad
    Functional Diversity of AAA plus Protease Complexes in Bacillus subtilis2017Ingår i: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, ISSN 2296-889X, Vol. 4, artikel-id 44Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we review the diverse roles and functions of AAA+ protease complexes in protein homeostasis, control of stress response and cellular development pathways by regulatory and general proteolysis in the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis. We discuss in detail the intricate involvement of AAA+ protein complexes in controlling sporulation, the heat shock response and the role of adaptor proteins in these processes. The investigation of these protein complexes and their adaptor proteins has revealed their relevance for Gram-positive pathogens and their potential as targets for new antibiotics.

  • 95.
    Emtenäs, Hans
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Soto, Gabe
    Hultgren, Scott J.
    Marshall, Garland R.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Stereoselective Synthesis of Optically Active β-Lactams, Potential Inhibitors of Pilus Assembly in Pathogenic Bacteria2000Ingår i: Organic Letters, Vol. 2, s. 2065-2067Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 96.
    Engström, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Chemical genetics discloses the importance of heme and glucose metabolism in Chlamydia trachomatis pathogenesis2013Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlamydiae are important human bacterial pathogens with an intracellular life cycle that consists of two distinct bacterial forms, an infectious form (EB) that infects the eukaryotic host cell, and a non-infectious form (RB) that allows intracellular proliferation. To be successful, chlamydiae need to alternate between EB and RB to generate infectious EB’s which are competent to infect new host cells.

    Chemical genetics is an attractive approach to study bacterial pathogenesis; in principal this approach relies on an inhibitory compound that specifically inhibits a protein of interest. An obstacle in using this approach is target identification, however whole genome sequencing (WGS) of spontaneous mutants resistant to novel inhibitory compounds has significantly extended the utility of chemical genetic approaches by allowing the identification of their target proteins and/or biological pathways.

    In this thesis, a chemical genetics approach is used, I have found that heme and glucose metabolism of C. trachomatis is specifically important for the transition from the RB form to the infectious EB form. Heme and glucose metabolism are both coupled to energy metabolism, which suggests a common link between the RB-to-EB transitions. In connection with the above findings I have developed strategies that enable the isolation of isogenic C. trachomatis mutant strains. These strategies are based on WGS of spontaneous mutant populations and subsequent genotyping of clonal strains isolated from these mutant populations. Experiments with the mutant strains suggest that the uptake of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) regulates the RB-to-EB transition, representing one of the first examples where genetics has been used to study C. trachomatis pathogenesis. Additional experiments with the mutant strains indicate that G-6-P promotes bacterial growth during metabolic stress.

    In concert with other findings presented in this thesis, I have fine-tuned methods that could be employed to reveal how novel inhibitory chemical compounds affect chlamydiae. In a broader context, I suggest that C. trachomatis could be used as a model organism to understand how new inhibitory drugs affect other bacterial pathogens.

    In addition, I observed that C. pneumoniae infections resulted in generalized bone loss in mice and that these mice display a cytokine profile similar to infected bone cells in vitro. Thus, this study indicates that C. pneumoniae potentially can infect bone cells in vivo, resulting in bone loss, alternatively, the inflammatory responses seen in vivo could be the causative factor of the bone loss observed.

  • 97.
    Engström, Patrik
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bergström, Malin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Alfaro, Astrid C.
    Krishnan, K. Syam
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Bahnan, Wael
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Expansion of the Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion does not require bacterial replication2015Ingår i: International Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 1438-4221, E-ISSN 1618-0607, Vol. 305, nr 3, s. 378-382Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlamydia trachomatis replication takes place inside of a host cell, exclusively within a vacuole known as the inclusion. During an infection, the inclusion expands to accommodate the increasing numbers of C. trachomatis. However, whether inclusion expansion requires bacterial replication and/or de novo protein synthesis has not been previously investigated in detail. Therefore, using a chemical biology approach, we herein investigated C. trachomatis inclusion expansion under varying conditions in vitro. Under normal cell culture conditions, inclusion expansion correlated with C trachomatis replication. When bacterial replication was inhibited using KSK120: an inhibitor that targets C. trachomatis glucose metabolism, inclusions expanded even in the absence of bacterial replication. In contrast, when bacterial protein synthesis was inhibited using chloramphenicol, expansion of inclusions was blocked. Together, these data suggest that de novo protein synthesis is necessary, whereas bacterial replication is dispensable for C trachomatis inclusion expansion. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  • 98.
    Engström, Patrik
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Krishnan, K. Syam
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Ngyuen, Bidong D.
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Silver, Jim
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Bastidas, Robert J.
    Welch, Matthew D.
    Hultgren, Scott J.
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Valdivia, Raphael H.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    A 2-Pyridone-Amide Inhibitor Targets the Glucose Metabolism Pathway of Chlamydia trachomatis2015Ingår i: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 6, nr 1, artikel-id e02304-14Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In a screen for compounds that inhibit infectivity of the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, we identified the 2-pyridone amide KSK120. A fluorescent KSK120 analogue was synthesized and observed to be associated with the C. trachomatis surface, suggesting that its target is bacterial. We isolated KSK120-resistant strains and determined that several resistance mutations are in genes that affect the uptake and use of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6P). Consistent with an effect on G-6P metabolism, treatment with KSK120 blocked glycogen accumulation. Interestingly, KSK120 did not affect Escherichia coli or the host cell. Thus, 2-pyridone amides may represent a class of drugs that can specifically inhibit C. trachomatis infection. IMPORTANCE Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial pathogen of humans that causes a common sexually transmitted disease as well as eye infections. It grows only inside cells of its host organism, within a parasitophorous vacuole termed the inclusion. Little is known, however, about what bacterial components and processes are important for C. trachomatis cellular infectivity. Here, by using a visual screen for compounds that affect bacterial distribution within the chlamydial inclusion, we identified the inhibitor KSK120. As hypothesized, the altered bacterial distribution induced by KSK120 correlated with a block in C. trachomatis infectivity. Our data suggest that the compound targets the glucose-6-phosphate (G-6P) metabolism pathway of C. trachomatis, supporting previous indications that G-6P metabolism is critical for C. trachomatis infectivity. Thus, KSK120 may be a useful tool to study chlamydial glucose metabolism and has the potential to be used in the treatment of C. trachomatis infections.

  • 99.
    Engström, Patrik
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Nguyen, Bidong D.
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bastidas, Robert J.
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Fields, Kenneth A.
    Valdivia, Raphael H.
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Mutations in hemG Mediate Resistance to Salicylidene Acylhydrazides, Demonstrating a Novel Link between Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase (HemG) and Chlamydia trachomatis Infectivity2013Ingår i: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 195, nr 18, s. 4221-4230Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Salicylidene acylhydrazides (SAHs) inhibit the type III secretion system (T3S) of Yersinia and other Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, SAHs restrict the growth and development of Chlamydia species. However, since the inhibition of Chlamydia growth by SAH is suppressed by the addition of excess iron and since SAHs have an iron-chelating capacity, their role as specific T3S inhibitors is unclear. We investigated here whether SAHs exhibit a function on C. trachomatis that goes beyond iron chelation. We found that the iron-saturated SAH INP0341 (IS-INP0341) specifically affects C. trachomatis infectivity with reduced generation of infectious elementary body (EB) progeny. Selection and isolation of spontaneous SAH-resistant mutant strains revealed that mutations in hemG suppressed the reduced infectivity caused by IS-INP0341 treatment. Structural modeling of C. trachomatis HemG predicts that the acquired mutations are located in the active site of the enzyme, suggesting that IS-INP0341 inhibits this domain of HemG and that protoporphyrinogen oxidase (HemG) and heme metabolism are important for C. trachomatis infectivity.

  • 100.
    Enquist, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Hägglund, Ulrik
    Creative Antibiotics, Tvistevägen 48, SE90719 Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindström, Pia
    Creative Antibiotics, Tvistevägen 48, SE90719 Umeå, Sweden.
    Norberg-Scherman, Henrik
    Creative Antibiotics, Tvistevägen 48, SE90719 Umeå, Sweden.
    Sundin, Charlotta
    Creative Antibiotics, Tvistevägen 48, SE90719 Umeå, Sweden.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Derivatives of 8-hydroxyquinoline-antibacterial agents that target intra- and extracellular Gram-negative pathogens2012Ingår i: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, ISSN 0960-894X, E-ISSN 1090-2120, Vol. 22, nr 10, s. 3550-3553Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Small molecule screening identified 5-nitro-7-((4-phenylpiperazine-1-yl-)methyl)quinolin-8-ol INP1750 as a putative inhibitor of type III secretion (T3S) in the Gram-negative pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. In this study we report structure-activity relationships for inhibition of T3S and show that the most potent compounds target both the extracellular bacterium Y. pseudotuberculosis and the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis in cell-based infection models.

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