umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
9101112 551 - 599 of 599
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 551.
    van Dijken, Jan W V
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    University of Copenhagen.
    A six-year prospective randomized study of a nano-hybrid and a conventional hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations2013In: Dental Materials, ISSN 0109-5641, E-ISSN 1879-0097, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of this 6 year prospective randomized equivalence trial was to evaluate the long-term clinical performance of a new nano-hybrid resin composite (RC) in Class II restorations in an intraindividual comparison with its well-established conventional hybrid RC predecessor. Methods: Each of 52 participants received at least two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations. The cavities were chosen at random to be restored with an experimental nano-hybrid RC (Exite/Tetric EvoCeram (TEC); n = 61) and a conventional hybrid RC (Exite/Tetric Ceram (TC); n = 61). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then annually during 6 years. Results: Two patient drop outs with 4 restorations (2TEC, 2TC) were registered during the follow-up. A prediction of the caries risk showed that 16 of the evaluated 52 patients were considered as high risk patients. Eight TEC (2 P, 6M) and 6 TC (2P, 4M) restorations failed during the 6 years. The main reason of failure was secondary caries (43%; including the failure fracture + secondary caries it increases to 57.1%). 63% of the recurrent caries lesions were found in high caries risk participants. The overall success rate at six years was 88.1%. No statistical significant difference was found in the overall survival rate between the two investigated RC.Significance: The nano-hybrid RC showed good clinical performance during the 6 year evaluation, comparable to the well-established conventional hybrid RC.

  • 552.
    van Dijken, Jan W V
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    Bulk-filled posterior resin restorations based on stress-decreasing resin technology: a randomized, controlled 6-year evaluation2017In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 125, no 4, p. 303-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This randomized study evaluated a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in posterior restorations and compared it intraindividually with a conventional 2-mm resin composite layering technique over a 6-yr follow-up period. Thirty-eight pairs of Class II restorations and 15 pairs of Class I restorations were placed in 38 adults. In all cavities a single-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V) was applied. In the first cavity of each pair, the flowable resin composite (SDR) was placed, in bulk increments of up to 4 mm. The occlusal part was completed with a layer of nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono). In the second cavity of each pair, the hybrid resin composite was placed in 2-mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified US Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then annually for a time period of 6 yr. After 6 yr, 72 Class II restorations and 26 Class I restorations could be evaluated. Six failed Class II molar restorations, three in each group, were observed, resulting in a success rate of 93.9% for all restorations and an annual failure rate (AFR) of 1.0% for both groups. The AFR for Class II and Class I restorations in both groups was 1.4% and 0%, respectively. The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture.

  • 553.
    van Dijken, Jan W V
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite with and without an intermediate layer of flowable resin composite: a 7-year evaluation2011In: Dental Materials, ISSN 0109-5641, E-ISSN 1879-0097, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 150-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite.

    METHODS: Each participant received at least two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations of the hybrid resin composite. One resin composite restoration of each pair (59) was chosen at random to be restored with an intermediary layer with flowable resin composite. The other was restored without. The 118 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 7 years.

    RESULTS: Four drop outs were registered during the 7-year follow up (2 with and 2 without flowable) restorations. A prediction of the caries risk showed that 18 of the evaluated 46 patients were considered as high risk patients. Seventeen failures were observed, 8 in restorations with and 9 in restorations without an intermediate layer of flowable resin composite, resulting in a 14.9% failure rate after 7 years. The main reasons for failure were: fracture of resin composite (8), secondary caries (4) and cusp fracture (3). No statistical difference was seen between restorations restored with and without flowable layer.

    CONCLUSION: The hybrid resin composite showed a good clinical performance during the 7-year evaluation. The use of flowable resin composite as an intermediate layer did not result in improved effectiveness of the Class II restorations.

  • 554.
    van Dijken, Jan W V
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    Durability of a low shrinkage TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in Class II restorations: A 6-year follow up2017In: Dental Materials, ISSN 0109-5641, E-ISSN 1879-0097, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 944-953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective trial was to evaluate the durability of a low shrinkage and TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in posterior restorations in a 6-year follow up.

    METHODS: 139 Class II restorations were placed in 67 patients with a mean age of 53 years (range 29-82). Each participant received at random two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations. In the first cavity of each pair the TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system was placed with its 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (cmf-els). In the second cavity a 1-step HEMA-free self-etch adhesive was used (AdheSe One F). The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 6 years. Caries risk and parafunctional habits of the participants were estimated.

    RESULTS: Three molar teeth showed mild post-operative sensitivity during 3 weeks for temperature changes and occlusal forces. After 6 years, 134 Class II restorations were evaluated. Twenty-one restorations, 8 cmf-els (11.4%) and 13 ASE-els (20%) failed during the 6 years (p<0.0001). The annual failure rates were 1.9% and 3.3%, respectively. The main reasons for failure were fracture followed by recurrent caries. Most fractures and all caries lesions were found in high risk participants.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The Class II resin composite restorations performed with the new TEGDMA/HEMA-free low shrinkage resin composite system showed good durability over six years.

  • 555.
    van Dijken, Jan W V
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive2015In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 1371-1379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up.

    METHODS: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years.

    RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-eight restorations were evaluated after 8 years. Three participants with five restorations (three Xeno III, two Excite) were registered as dropouts. Twenty-one failed restorations (13.3 %) were observed during the follow-up. Twelve in the one-step self-etch adhesive group (13.5 %) and nine in the two-step etch-and-rinse group (13.0 %). This resulted in nonsignificant different annual failure rates of 1.69 and 1.63 %, respectively. Fracture of restoration was the main reason for failure.

    CONCLUSION: Good clinical performance was shown during the 8-year evaluation and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations.

  • 556.
    van Dijken, Jan W V
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    Institute of Odontology, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Four-year clinical evaluation of Class II nano-hybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive2011In: Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0300-5712, E-ISSN 1879-176X, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 16-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the 4-year clinical performance of an ormocer-based nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X; Dentsply/DeTrey) in Class II restorations placed with a one-step self-etch (Xeno III; Dentsply/DeTrey) and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Ivoclar Vivadent).

    METHODS: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations of the nano-hybrid resin composite bonded with either a single step self-etch adhesive or a control 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 4 years.

    RESULTS: 162 restorations were evaluated at 4 years. Postoperative sensitivity was observed in 6 patients (3 Xeno III, 3 Exite) between 1-3 weeks. Eleven failed restorations (6.8%) were observed during the follow up. Seven in the one-step self-etch adhesive group (7.7%) and four in the 2-step etch-and-rinse group (5.6%). This resulted in non-significant different annual failure rates of 1.9% and 1.4%, respectively. Fracture of restoration was the main reason for failure.

    CONCLUSION: The ormocer-based nano-hybrid resin composite showed a good clinical performance in Class II cavities during the 4 year evaluation. No significant difference was seen in overall clinical effectiveness between the two adhesives.

  • 557.
    van Dijken, Jan W V
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations: a 5-year randomized controlled clinical study2016In: Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0300-5712, E-ISSN 1879-176X, Vol. 51, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 5 years. Caries risk and bruxing habits of the participants were estimated.

    RESULTS: No post-operative sensitivity was reported. At 5-year 183, 68 Class I and 115 Class II, restorations were evaluated. Ten restorations failed (5.5%), all Class II, 4 SDR-CeramX mono+ and 6 CeramX mono+-only restorations. The main reasons for failure were tooth fracture (6) and secondary caries (4). The annual failure rate (AFR) for all restorations (Class I and II) was for the bulk-filled-1.1% and for the resin composite-only restorations 1.3% (p=0.12). For the Class II restorations, the AFR was 1.4% and 2.1%, respectively.

    CONCLUSION: The stress decreasing flowable bulk-fill resin composite technique showed good durability during the 5-year follow-up.

    CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The use of a 4mm incremental technique with the flowable bulk-fill resin composite showed during the 5-year follow up slightly better, but not statistical significant, durability compared to the conventional 2mm layering technique in posterior resin composite restorations.

  • 558.
    van Dijken, Jan W. V.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Dental Hygiene.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    Randomized 3-year Clinical Evaluation of Class I and II Posterior Resin Restorations Placed with a Bulk-fill Resin Composite and a One-step Self-etching Adhesive2015In: The Journal of Adhesive Dentistry, ISSN 1461-5185, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the 3-year clinical durability of the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR in Class I and Class II restorations. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight pairs of Class I and 62 pairs of Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female patients (mean age 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two extended Class I or Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. In all cavities, a one-step self-etching adhesive (XenoV+) was applied. One of the cavities of each pair was randomly assigned to receive the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR in increments up to 4 mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with an ormocer-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, only the resin composite CeramX mono+ was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then annually for 3 years. Caries risk and bruxing habits of the participants were estimated.

    Results: No post-operative sensitivity was reported. At the 3-year follow-up, 196 restorations - 74 Class I and 122 Class II - were evaluated. Seven restorations failed (3.6%), 4 SDR-CeramX mono+ and 3 CeramX mono+ only restorations, all of which were Class II. The main reason for failure was tooth fracture, followed by resin composite fracture. The annual failure rate (AFR) for all restorations (Class I and II) was 1.2% for the bulk filled restorations and 1.0% for the resin composite-only restorations (p > 0.05). For the Class II restorations, the AFR was 2.2% and 1.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The 4-mm bulk-fill technique showed good clinical effectiveness during the 3-year follow-up.

  • 559.
    van Dijken, Jan W. V.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    Three-year randomized clinical study of a one-step universal adhesive and a two-step self-etch adhesive in class II composite restorations2017In: Journal of Adhesive Dentistry, ISSN 1461-5185, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 287-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 3-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations.

    Materials and Methods: Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 years) received at least two extended Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All-Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage composite (Aelite LS) was used for all restorations, which were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and 1, 2, and 3 years.

    Results: 114 Class II restorations were evaluated at three years. Eight restorations, 3 AU and 5 OX, failed during the follow-up, resulting in 94.7% (AU) and 91.2% (OX) success rates (p > 0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.9%, respectively. The main reason for failure was composite fracture.

    Conclusion: Class II composite restorations placed with a 1-step universal adhesive showed good short-term efficacy.

  • 560.
    van Dijken, Jan W. V.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pallesen, Ulla
    Benetti, Ana
    A randomized controlled evaluation of posterior resin restorations of an altered resin modified glass-ionomer cement with claimed bioactivity2019In: Dental Materials, ISSN 0109-5641, E-ISSN 1879-0097, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the short time clinical behaviour of an altered resin modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC), which is claimed to possess bioactivity, in posterior restorations and to compare it intraindividually with a nanofilled resin composite.

    METHODS: Totally 78 pairs Class II and 4 pairs Class I restorations were placed in 29 female and 38 male participants with a mean age of 58.3 years (range 37-86). Each patient received at random at least one pair of, as similar as possible, Class II or Class I restorations. In the first cavity of each pair, the modified flowable RMGIC (ACTIVA Bioactive; AB) was placed after phosphoric acid etching of the cavity and without adhesive, according to the instructions of the manufacturer. In the other cavity a well established nanofilled resin composite (CeramX; RC) with a single step self-etch adhesive (Xeno Select) was placed. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Caries risk and parafunctional habits of the participants were estimated.

    RESULTS: 158 restorations, 8 Class I and 150 Class II, were evaluated at the one year recalls. At baseline two failed restorations were observed (2AB), at 6 months six failures (5AB, 1RC) and at 12 months another thirteen failed restorations were observed (12AB, 1RC). This resulted in annual failure rates of 24.1% for the AB and 2.5% for RC (p<0.0001). The main reasons for failure for AB were lost restorations (5), postoperative symptoms (4) and secondary caries (3). Do to the unacceptable very high one-year failure frequency, the clinical study was stopped and no further evaluation will be performed.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The use of the AB restorative in Class II cavities, applied as instructed by the manufacturer after a short phosphoric acid pretreatment but without adhesive system, resulted in a non-acceptable very high failure frequency after a one year period. Further studies should be conducted using a bonding agent.

  • 561. van Heumen, Céleste C M
    et al.
    Tanner, Johanna
    van Dijken, Jan W V
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pikaar, Ronald
    Lassila, Lippo V J
    Creugers, Nico H J
    Vallittu, Pekka K
    Kreulen, Cees M
    Five-year survival of 3-unit fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures in the posterior area.2010In: Dental Materials, ISSN 0109-5641, E-ISSN 1879-0097, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 954-960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of three-unit posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs) made of fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC), and to identify design factors influencing the survival rate.

    Methods: 77 patients (52 females, 25 males) received 96 indirectly made FRC FPDs, using pre-impregnated unidirectional glass-fibers, requiring manual wetting, as framework material. FPDs were surface (n = 31) inlay (n = 45) or hybrid (n = 20) retained and mainly located in the upper jaw. Hybrid FPDs consisted of a wing retainer at canine and an inlay retainer at distal abutment tooth. Surface FPDs consisted of uplay and wing combinations. Follow-up period was at minimum 4.5 years, with checkups at every 1–2 years. The study was carried out by six operators in three centers in the Netherlands, Finland and Sweden. Survival rates, including reparable defects of FPDs, and success rates were determined.

    Results: Kaplan–Meier survival rate at 5 years was 71.2% (SE 4.8%) for success and 77.5% (SE 4.4%) for survival. Differences were not significantly different. Main failure modes were delamination and fracture of the FPD. Only FPDs with surface retainers showed debonding.

    Conclusions: A success rate of 71% and a survival rate of 78% after 5 years was found. Survival rates of inlay, hybrid and surface retained FPDs did not significantly differ.

  • 562.
    Vestman, Nelly Romani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Hasslöf, Pamela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Keller, Mette K
    Granström, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Roos, Stefan
    Twetman, Svante
    Stecksen-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Lactobacillus reuteri influences regrowth of mutans streptococci after full-mouth disinfection: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial2013In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 338-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed whether the persistence of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289 in saliva could delay the regrowth of mutans streptococci (MS) after a full-mouth disinfection with chlorhexidine (CHX). A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with a 6-week intervention period and 3- and 6-month follow-up was performed. 62 healthy subjects with moderate to high counts of MS were randomly assigned to a test group (n = 32) or a placebo group (n = 30). Before onset of the intervention, subjects received two sessions of professional cleaning, flossing, and application of CHX varnish and rinsed their mouth with a CHX solution between the sessions (2 days). Thereafter, the test group used probiotic lozenges (2/day) containing L. reuteri (DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289; 1 × 108 CFU of each strain), and the placebo group used identical lozenges lacking the lactobacilli. Saliva samples were collected and cultured onto selective media, and isolates of L. reuteri as well as DNA directly extracted from saliva were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers. Presence of salivary MS was analysed with a chair-side test. L. reuteri was frequently detected by culture during the intervention period but in only 3 test group subjects at follow-ups. Regrowth of MS statistically significantly differed depending on the presence or absence of L. reuteri DSM 17938 detected by PCR. We conclude that cultivable L. reuteri strains may only sporadically be confirmed after termination of the intervention, but subjects with PCR-detected L. reuteridemonstrated slower regrowth of MS.

  • 563.
    Vestman, Nelly Romani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Timby, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Holgerson, Pernilla Lif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Kressirer, Christine A
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Öhman, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Tanner, Anne CR
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Characterization and in vitro properties of oral lactobacilli in breastfed infants2013In: BMC Microbiology, ISSN 1471-2180, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 13, p. 193-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lactobacillus species can contribute positively to general and oral health and are frequently acquired by breastfeeding in infancy. The present study aimed to identify oral lactobacilli in breast and formula-fed 4 month-old infants and to evaluate potential probiotic properties of the dominant Lactobacillus species detected. Saliva and oral swab samples were collected from 133 infants who were enrolled in a longitudinal study (n=240) examining the effect of a new infant formula on child growth and development. Saliva was cultured and Lactobacillus isolates were identified from 16S rRNA gene sequences. Five L. gasseri isolates that differed in 16S rRNA sequence were tested for their ability to inhibit growth of selected oral bacteria and for adhesion to oral tissues. Oral swab samples were analyzed by qPCR for Lactobacillus gasseri.

    Results: 43 (32.3%) infants were breastfed and 90 (67.7%) were formula-fed with either a standard formula (43 out of 90) or formula supplemented with a milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction (47 out of 90). Lactobacilli were cultured from saliva of 34.1% breastfed infants, but only in 4.7% of the standard and 9.3% of the MFGM supplemented formula-fed infants. L. gasseri was the most prevalent (88% of Lactobacillus positive infants) of six Lactobacillus species detected. L. gasseri isolates inhibited Streptococcus mutans binding to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, and inhibited growth of S. mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces oris, Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum in a concentration dependent fashion. L. gasseri isolates bound to parotid and submandibular saliva, salivary gp340 and MUC7, and purified MFGM, and adhered to epithelial cells. L. gasseri was detected by qPCR in 29.7% of the oral swabs. Breastfed infants had significantly higher mean DNA levels of L. gasseri (2.14 pg/uL) than infants fed the standard (0.363 pg/uL) or MFGM (0.697 pg/uL) formula.

    Conclusions: Lactobacilli colonized the oral cavity of breastfed infants significantly more frequently than formulafed infants. The dominant Lactobacillus was L. gasseri, which was detected at higher levels in breastfed than formula-fed infants and displayed probiotic traits in vitro.

  • 564.
    Wahlin, Ylva Britt
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Konradsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Antibiotikaprofylax är sällan indicerat i tandhygienistens arbete2010In: Tandhygienisttidningen, ISSN 1102-6146, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 565. Wennhall, I
    et al.
    Mårtensson, EM
    Sjunnesson, I
    Matsson, L
    Schröder, U
    Twetman, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Caries-preventive effect of an oral health program for preschool children in a low socio-economic, multicultural area in Sweden: results after one year.2005In: Acta odontologica Scandinavica, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 163-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the caries-preventive effect of an oral health program for preschool children living in a multicultural, low socio-economic area. In total, 804 2-year-old children were invited and recalled every 3rd month to an outreach facility for parent education and toothbrushing instruction. In addition, fluoride tablets (0.25 mg/day) were provided free of charge. A clinical examination and questionnaire were completed at baseline and at age 3 years. The results of the intervention were compared with a non-intervention Reference group of 3-year-old children (n=217) from the same area. In the Intervention group, the 1-year attrition rate was 8.2%, and more than 90% of the children attended at least 4 of their scheduled appointments. The parents' daily assistance with toothbrushing and the use of fluoride toothpaste and tablets improved significantly during the intervention. Compared with the Reference group when the children were 3 years old, the number of children in the Intervention group who consumed frequent in-between meals and sweet drinks at night was significantly lower. Caries prevalence at age 3 was significantly lower in the Intervention group than in the Reference group (3.0 deft versus 4.4 deft; p<0.01). The number of caries-free children after the 1-year intervention was 37% in the Intervention group compared with 15% in the Reference group. The relative risk (RR) was calculated to be 2.5 (95% CI 1.8-3.4) and the number needed to treat (NNT) 4.6. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the oral health program significantly affected the prevalence of caries and various risk factors for caries development.

  • 566.
    Wernersson, Josephine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Danielsson Niemi, Liza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Einarson, S
    Hernell, O
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Effects of human milk on adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite in vitro2006In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 412-417Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adhesion of bacteria to pellicle-coated tooth surfaces is the first step in biofilm formation on teeth. The aim of this study was to explore whether human milk prevents or promotes adhesion of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) using an in vitro model system. S. mutans binding to HA coated with human parotid saliva (s-HA) or human milk was studied, in addition to binding inhibition to s-HA by human milk. S. mutans did not bind to HA coated with milk. S. mutans binding to s-HA was inhibited by milk from 15 (71 %) of 21 women, whereas milk from the remaining 6 mothers enhanced binding of S. mutans to s-HA. Inhibition of S. mutans binding correlated with bacterial binding to s-HA (r = 0.76). Human milk does not mediate adhesion of S. mutans to HA in vitro, but affects adhesion in an individually varying fashion. Phenotypic variations in milk and saliva glycosylation may explain the inhibitory capacity and possibly affect susceptibility to colonization by S. mutans in childhood. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 567.
    Westberg, Karl-Gunnar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Kolta, Arlette
    Faculté de médecine dentaire, and Groupe de Recherche sur le Système Nerveux Central du FRSQ, Université de Montréal C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-villeMontréal (Qc), Canada.
    The trigeminal circuits responsible for chewing2011In: Translating mechanisms of orofacial neurological disorder: from the peripheral nervous system to the cerebral cortex / [ed] Masayuki Kobayashi, Noriaki Koshikawa, Koichi Iwata och John Waddington, London ; Waltham, MA: Academic Press, 2011, Vol. 97, p. 77-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mastication is a vital function that ensures that ingested food is broken down into pieces and prepared for digestion. This review outlines the masticatory behavior in terms of the muscle activation patterns and jawmovements and gives an overview of the organization and function of the trigeminal neuronal circuits that are known to take part in the generation and control of oro-facial motor functions. The basic pattern of rhythmic jaw movements produced during mastication is generated by a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) located in the pons and medulla. Neurons within the CPG have intrinsic properties that produce a rhythmic activity, but the output of these neurons is modified by inputs that descend from the higher centers of the brain, and by feedback from sensory receptors, in order to constantly adapt the movement to the food properties.

  • 568.
    Westberg, Karl-Gunnar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    McFarland, David
    Kolta, Arlette
    Stohler, Christian
    Feine, Jocelyne
    Woda, Alain
    From movement to pain: a tribute to professor James P. Lund2008In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 297-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This tribute article to Professor James P. Lund stems from 6 of the presentations delivered at the July 1, 2008, symposium that honored 3 "giants" in orofacial neuroscience: B. J. Sessle, A. G. Hannam, and J. P. Lund. It was noted that soon after his training as a dentist in Australia, Jim Lund became interested in research. At the time he decided to do a PhD, there was a lot of discussion about how rhythmic movements were programmed. The early belief, based on Sherrington's studies of motor systems, was that these movements were simply an alternating series of reflexes. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, some still shared this belief, whereas others favored Graham Brown's hypothesis that repetitive movements were centrally programmed and did not depend on reflexes triggered by sensory inputs. There was no strong evidence then for either scenario except for the rhythmic movements of respiration. Lund's pioneering work during his PhD proved the existence of a central pattern generator (CPG) for mastication in the brainstem. Since then he has been interested in understanding how CPGs function and how sensory feedback works to adjust the motor patterns that they produce. Sections in this tribute article to Lund are written by some of his close collaborators and reflect the evolution of his work throughout the years. The first 4 presentations in this article (by K.-G. Westberg, D. McFarland, A. Kolta, and C. Stohler) highlight various aspects of these interests, and the final 2 presentations (by J. Feine and A. Woda) focus especially on clinical aspects of Lund's interests. The last section of this article is a final commentary from Professor Lund.

  • 569. Westerlund, Anna
    et al.
    Sjöström, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Bjornstrom, Lena
    Ransjo, Maria
    What Factors Are Associated With Impacted Canines in Cleft Patients?2014In: Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery (Print), ISSN 0278-2391, E-ISSN 1531-5053, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2109-2114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: It is important to predict and prevent the impaction of canines. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of impacted canines in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to identify factors associated with impaction. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cohort study included patients with nonsyndromic UCLP. The predictors were pre-eruptive inclination angle, deviation in tooth number (agenesis or supernumerary lateral incisors), and reoperation of bone transplant. The outcome variable was impacted and surgically exposed canines. Results: The prevalence of impacted and surgically exposed canines in the 68 consecutive patients with UCLP was 20.6%. The pre-eruptive inclination angle was significantly larger (34.4 degrees) for the impacted canines on the cleft side compared with the spontaneously erupted canines on the cleft and non-cleft sides (25.5 degrees vs 15.4; P < .05). Reoperation of the bone transplant significantly increased canine impaction (50%; P < .05). Conclusion: The eruption of maxillary canines needs to be supervised carefully in patients with UCLP, because the prevalence of impaction is 10 times higher compared with the general population. Factors associated with canine impaction are a pre-eruptive inclination larger than 30 degrees and reoperation of the bone transplant.

  • 570.
    Wiesinger, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    On the relationship between spinal pain and temporomandibular disorders2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Both spinal pain and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) commonly occur in the general population. Previous studies demonstrate neurophysiologic and biomechanical couplings between the trigeminal and cervical regions. This investigation tested the null hypothesis of no relationship between spinal pain (neck, shoulder and/or low back) and TMD, by using questionnaires and clinical examinations of the jaw function.

    In an age- and sex-matched case-control study, the specific aim was to compare the prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMD among cases with long-term spinal pain and controls without spinal pain. The results showed that subjects with spinal pain had signs and symptoms of TMD significantly more often than did controls. The associations remained after excluding all participants with jaw pain. Furthermore, the comorbidity pattern was similar, regardless of location of spinal pain.

    In a cross-sectional study, the specific aim was to test whether there is a reciprocal cross-sectional dose-response-like relationship between spinal pain and TMD. Two different designs were used, one with frequency/severity of spinal pain as independent variable, and the other, with frequency/severity of TMD symptoms as independent variable. The analysis showed increasing odds for presence of TMD symptoms with increasing frequency/severity of spinal pain, and increasing odds for presence of spinal pain with increasing frequency/severity of TMD symptoms.

    In a case-control study within a 2-year prospective cohort, the specific aim was to test whether there is a reciprocal temporal relationship between signs and symptoms in trigeminally, and symptoms in spinally, innervated areas. Incidence of symptoms in these areas was analyzed in relation to presence of spinal pain, headaches, and signs and symptoms of TMD at baseline. The main findings were that presence of signs of TMD at baseline increased the onset of spinal pain and symptoms in the trigeminal area, and that spinal pain increased the onset of symptoms in the trigeminal area. An augmentation effect between the significant baseline variables was observed for the incidence of headaches and jaw pain.

    In conclusion, the investigation demonstrated a cross-sectional and temporal relationship between spinal pain and TMD; thus, the null hypothesis was rejected. The results indicate common pathophysiological mechanisms in the development of spinal pain and TMD. The comorbidity and reciprocal influence that were found call for an integrated and multidimensional approach in the management of individuals with long-term spinal pain and TMD.

  • 571.
    Wiesinger, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Hellström, F
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Experimental masseter muscle pain alters jaw-neck motor strategy2013In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 995-1004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A functional integration between the jaw and neck regions has been demonstrated during normal jaw function. The effect of masseter muscle pain on this integrated motor behaviour in man is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of induced masseter muscle pain on jaw-neck movements during a continuous jaw opening-closing task.

    Methods: Sixteen healthy men performed continuous jaw opening-closing movements to a target position, defined as 75% of the maximum jaw opening. Each subject performed two trials without pain (controls) and two trials with masseter muscle pain, induced with hypertonic saline as a single injection. Simultaneous movements of the mandible and the head were registered with a wireless optoelectronic three-dimensional recording system. Differences in movement amplitudes between trials were analysed with Friedman's test and corrected Wilcoxon matched pairs test.

    Results: The head movement amplitudes were significantly larger during masseter muscle pain trials compared with control. Jaw movement amplitudes did not differ significantly between any of the trials after corrected Wilcoxon tests. The ratio between head and jaw movement amplitudes was significantly larger during the first pain trial compared with control.

    Conclusions: Experimental masseter muscle pain in humans affected integrated jaw-neck movements by increasing the neck component during continuous jaw opening-closing tasks. The findings indicate that pain can alter the strategy for jaw-neck motor control, which further underlines the functional integration between the jaw and neck regions. This altered strategy may have consequences for development of musculoskeletal pain in the jaw and neck regions.

  • 572.
    Wiesinger, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Umeå, Sweden.
    Englund, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Does induced masseter muscle pain affect integrated jaw-neck movements similarly in men and women?2016In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 124, no 6, p. 546-553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normal jaw opening-closing involves simultaneous jaw and head-neck movements. We previously showed that, in men, integrated jaw-neck movements during jaw function are altered by induced masseter muscle pain. The aim of this study was to investigate possible sex-related differences in integrated jaw-neck movements following experimental masseter muscle pain. We evaluated head-neck and jaw movements in 22 healthy women and 16 healthy men in a jaw opening-closing task. The participants performed one control trial and one trial with masseter muscle pain induced by injection of hypertonic saline. Jaw and head movements were registered using a three-dimensional optoelectronic recording system. There were no significant sex-related differences in jaw and head movement amplitudes. Head movement amplitudes were significantly greater in the pain trials for both men and women. The proportional involvement of the neck motor system during jaw movements increased in pain trials for 13 of 16 men and for 18 of 22 women. Thus, acute pain may alter integrated jaw-neck movements, although, given the similarities between men and women, this interaction between acute pain and motor behaviour does not explain sex differences in musculoskeletal pain in the jaw and neck regions.

  • 573.
    Wiklund, Urban
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Öström, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Messner, Torbjörn
    Influence of energy drinks and alcohol on post-exercise heart rate recovery and heart rate variability2009In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 74-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Background: Media have anecdotally reported that drinking energy drinks in combination with alcohol and exercise could cause sudden cardiac death. This study investigated changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG) and heart rate variability after intake of an energy drink, taken in combination with alcohol and exercise.

    Methods: Ten healthy volunteers (five men and five women aged 19–30) performed maximal bicycle ergometer exercise for 30 min after: (i) intake of 0·75 l of an energy drink mixed with alcohol; (ii) intake of energy drink; and, (iii) no intake of any drink. ECG was continuously recorded for analysis of heart rate variability and heart rate recovery.

    Results: No subject developed any clinically significant arrhythmias. Post-exercise recovery in heart rate and heart rate variability was slower after the subjects consumed energy drink and alcohol before exercise, than after exercise alone.

    Conclusion: The healthy subjects developed blunted cardiac autonomic modulation after exercising when they had consumed energy drinks mixed with alcohol. Although they did not develop any significant arrhythmia, individuals predisposed to arrhythmia by congenital or other rhythm disorders could have an increased risk for malignant cardiac arrhythmia in similar situations.

  • 574.
    Wikén Albertsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Dental Hygiene.
    Persson, Anitha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    van Dijken, Jan WV
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Dental Hygiene.
    Effect of essential oils containing and alcohol-free chlorhexidine mouthrinses on cariogenic micro-organisms in human saliva2013In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 71, no 3-4, p. 883-891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in saliva of mouthrinsing with essential oils and an alcohol-free chlorhexidine. Materials and method. Twenty healthy volunteers (mean age 59 years) participated in the double-blind randomized cross-over study. Three mouthrinses were used in 16 days rinsing periods in addition to their regular mechanical oral hygiene: a solution with essential oils (EO; Listerine), a solution with alcohol-free chlorhexidine (CHX; Paroex) and water (negative control). The mouthrinse periods were separated by 3-month washout periods. At days 0 (baseline) and 17 (end) of each mouthrinse period, paraffin stimulated whole saliva was collected in order to analyse CFU/ml saliva of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli. Results. Only the CHX rinse showed a significant difference for CFU mutans streptococci between baseline and end (p = 0.004). The CFU mutans streptococci at the end of the rinse periods showed statistically significant differences between CHX vs EO (p = 0.039) and CHX vs water (p = 0.022). The difference in CFU lactobacilli between baseline and end was significant for CHX (p = 0.031), but not for the other rinses. No statistically significant differences for lactobacilli were found at the end of the rinse periods between the mouthrinses. Conclusion. A significant reduction in amount of cariogenic bacteria in saliva was observed after 16 days of alcohol-free chlorhexidine mouthrinse but not after the essential oils rinse. The high number of participant's not changing to a bacterial class with a reduced number of micro-organisms showed that both rinses had little clinical significance as a caries preventing treatment method, which can decrease the number of CFU cariogenic micro-organisms.

  • 575.
    Yekkalam, Negin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Factors associated with clinical decision-making in relation to treatment need for temporomandibular disorders2016In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 134-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze dentist's clinical decision-making related to treatment need for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in an adult population. Materials and methods. The study population comprised 779 randomly selected 35, 50, 65 and 75 year old individuals living in the county of Vasterbotten, Sweden. The participants filled out a questionnaire and were examined clinically according to a structured protocol. The four examiners (two men, two women) were experienced dentists and were calibrated before the start of the study. After examination they individually assessed the need of treatment owing to TMD. Results. In total, 15% of the study population was considered to have a treatment need owing to TMD. The highest estimate was noted for 35 and 50 years old women and the lowest for 65 and 75 years old men. Overall, 21% of the women and 8% of the men were considered to have a treatment need owing to TMD, with statistically significant differences between men and women for the 35 and 50 years old groups. Inter-individual variations in dentists' decisions were observed. In a multivariate analysis, female gender, signs and symptoms of TMD pain, signs and symptoms of TMD dysfunction and smoking were associated with estimated treatment need. Conclusions. The prevalence of estimated treatment need owing to TMD was fairly high, but the dentists' clinical decision-making process showed large inter-individual variability. The observation calls for further research on the factors affecting the decision-making process in care providers.

  • 576.
    Yekkalam, Negin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Prevalence of signs and symptoms indicative of temporomandibular disorders and headaches in 35-, 50-, 65- and 75-year-olds living in Västerbotten, Sweden2014In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 6, p. 458-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare prevalence of signs and frequently occurring symptoms indicative of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and headaches in 35-, 50-, 65- and 75-year-old men and women in Västerbotten County, Sweden.

    Materials and methods. From a total target population of 11 324 subjects living in Västerbotten County in the year 2002, 300 individuals in each age group were randomly selected. Of these, 998 (82% response rate) answered and returned a postal questionnaire and 779 (65% response rate) individuals accepted a clinical examination.

    Results. The prevalence of frequent TMD symptoms peaked among 50-year-old women and then declined. Women at this age reported significantly higher prevalence compared to men for all TMD symptoms except temporomandibular joint locking. In the 65- and 75-year-olds, the prevalence was practically equal between men and women as well as between these ages. Frequent headaches showed the highest prevalence among 35- and 50-year-old women, with a statistically significant difference between men and women of 50 years of age (p < 0.05). Fifty-year-old women had statistically significantly higher prevalence of muscle pain to palpation (p < 0.001), temporomandibular joint sounds (p < 0.01) and impaired maximal jaw opening capacity (p < 0.01), compared to 50-year-old men.

    Conclusions. The different symptoms indicative of TMD and headaches showed a similar pattern, with higher prevalence among the 35- and 50-year-old, as compared to the 65- and 75-year-old, participants. The pattern may be related to biological, psychosocial or generation-related factors.

  • 577. Young, Geoffrey
    et al.
    Turner, Sally
    Davies, John K
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Figdor, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics. Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bacterial DNA persists for extended periods after cell death2007In: Journal of Endodontics, ISSN 0099-2399, E-ISSN 1878-3554, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 1417-1420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fate of DNA from bacteria that infect the root canal but cannot survive is currently unknown, yet such information is essential in establishing the validity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based identification methods for root canal samples. This in vitro study tested the hypothesis that PCR-detectable DNA from dead bacteria might persist after cell death and investigated the efficiency of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as a field decontamination agent. Using heat-killed Enterococcus faecalis, the persistence of DNA encoding the 16S rRNA gene was monitored by PCR. While most probable number analysis showed an approximate 1000-fold decay in amplifiable template, E. faecalis DNA was still PCR-detectable 1 year after cell death. NaOCl (1%) eliminated amplifiable DNA within 60 seconds of exposure. Our findings also disclosed a previously overlooked problem of concentration-dependent inhibition of the PCR reaction by thiosulfate-inactivated NaOCl. These results highlight the challenges of reliably identifying the authentic living root canal flora with PCR techniques.

  • 578.
    Zafar, Hamayun
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Rehabilitation Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Alghadir, Ahmad H.
    Iqbal, Zaheen A.
    Effect of jaw functional status on neck muscle endurance2019In: Archives of Oral Biology, ISSN 0003-9969, E-ISSN 1879-1506, Vol. 101, p. 30-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the effect of resting jaw and maximum voluntary clenching on neck flexor and extensor muscle endurance.

    Design: Neck flexor and extensor endurance was measured in a college health clinic in 85 male college students in two test positions: resting jaw (control) and maximum voluntary clenching.

    Results: Mean neck flexor muscle endurance values during resting jaw and maximum voluntary clenching were 70.06 SD 28.24, and 60.03 SD 16.5, seconds respectively. Mean neck extensor muscle endurance values during resting jaw and maximum voluntary clenching were 105.54 SD 29.9, and 98.32 SD 24.54, respectively. Both values were significantly lower while maximum voluntary clenching as compared to resting jaw position (p < 0.05).

    Conclusion: Modification of jaw position can affect neck muscle endurance. Results of this study further supports sensory-motor relation between jaw and neck region.

  • 579.
    Zijnge, Vincent
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Ammann, Thomas
    Institute of Oral Biology, Section of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Thurnheer, Thomas
    Institute of Oral Biology, Section of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Gmuer, Rudolf
    Institute of Oral Biology, Section of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Subgingival Biofilm Structure2012In: Periodontal Disease / [ed] Kinane D.F. (Philadelphia, Pa.), Mombelli A. (Geneva), S. Karger, 2012, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the oral cavity initiated by a microbial biofilm (or 'dental plaque'). Subgingival biofilms in periodontal pockets are not easily analyzed without the loss of structural integrity. These subgingival plaques are structured communities of microorganisms with great phylogenetic diversity embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix. For almost three decades, knowledge of the structure of plaque located below the gingival margin has been limited to landmark studies from the 1970s that were unaware of the breadth of microbial diversity we appreciate now. Only recently has technical progress - combining histology, confocal scanning fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis - provided new insights into the architecture of subgingival biofilms. This review focuses on the structure and composition of subgingival biofilms and discusses current knowledge on the nature of the extracellular matrix. We describe further structural aspects of 'subgingival' biofilms produced in vitro that are gaining considerable interest as we search for models to investigate biofilm development, resistance to antibiotics, extracellular polymeric matrix composition and function, and reciprocal host-cell-to-biofilm interactions.

  • 580. Zijnge, Vincent
    et al.
    Kieselbach, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Oscarsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Proteomics of protein secretion by aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 7, p. e41662-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extracellular proteome (secretome) of periodontitis-associated bacteria may constitute a major link between periodontitis and systemic diseases. To obtain an overview of the virulence potential of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral and systemic human pathogen implicated in aggressive periodontitis, we used a combined LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics approach to characterize the secretome and protein secretion pathways of the rough-colony serotype a strain D7S. LC-MS/MS revealed 179 proteins secreted during biofilm growth. Further to confirming the release of established virulence factors (e.g. cytolethal distending toxin [CDT], and leukotoxin [LtxA]), we identified additional putative virulence determinants in the secretome. These included DegQ, fHbp, LppC, Macrophage infectivity protein (MIP), NlpB, Pcp, PotD, TolB, and TolC. This finding indicates that the number of extracellular virulence-related proteins is much larger than previously demonstrated, which was also supported by in silico analysis of the strain D7S genome. Moreover, our LC-MS/MS and in silico data revealed that at least Type I, II, and V secretion are actively used to excrete proteins directly into the extracellular space, or via two-step pathways involving the Sec/Tat systems for transport across the inner membrane, and outer membrane factors, secretins and auto-transporters, respectively for delivery across the outer membrane. Taken together, our results provide a molecular basis for further elucidating the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in periodontal and systemic diseases.

  • 581.
    Åkesson, Joacim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Dental Materials Science.
    Sundh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Dental Materials Science.
    Sjögren, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Dental Materials Science.
    Fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns placed on apreparation with a slice-formed finishing line: Fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns2009In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, ISSN 0305-182X, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 516-523Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 582.
    Åkesson, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Warnberg Gerdin, Elisabeth
    Soderstrom, Ulf
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Health-related quality of life and prospective caries development2016In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 16, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The present study was conducted to prospectively assess the association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the development of dental caries in adults in northern Sweden. The SF-36 questionnaire was used to estimate HRQoL. Methods: Adults who had (i) participated in a population-based health screening in northern Sweden between 2003 and 2009 and had completed the SF-36 questionnaire, and (ii) received a dental check-up within 1 year (n = 15,615) were included in the study. Of these, 9,838 had a second caries examination 2-7 years after the baseline recording. Information regarding SF-36, lifestyle factors and medical conditions was retrieved by questionnaires, and anthropometric status and blood lipid levels were measured. The association between dental caries (outcome) and SF-36 scores (exposure) with the inclusion of potential confounders was analysed by linear and logistic regression. Results: Caries increment increased significantly with decreasing scores for both physical and mental dimensions of SF-36 in women, but no association was seen in men. However, lifelong caries experience (DMFS) increased linearly with decreasing physical HRQoL in both men and women; this was also observed for the single dimension of mental HRQoL. The crude odds ratio for being in the highest caries quintile compared to the lowest when having the poorest physical HRQoL compared with the best physical HRQoL was 1.88 (95 % CI: 1.54-2.3). Several factors were identified as potential confounders in the associations between DMFS and SF-36 scores, including education level, smoking, age, medications, higher levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and sugar intake. Except for education level and smoking, the effect sizes for the association between gradually decreasing SF-36 scores and increasing caries were generally moderate. Conclusions: Increased development of caries was associated with low physical HRQoL and some aspects of mental HRQoL. The mechanisms underlying these associations, which are likely confounded by both biological and lifestyle factors, remain to be elucidated. The study implies that, when possible, subjects with poor HRQoL would benefit from caries prevention measures meeting the underlying situation.

  • 583. Åstrand, Per
    et al.
    Ahlqvist, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Gunne, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Prosthetic Dentistry.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Prosthetic Dentistry.
    Implant treatment of patients with edentulous jaws: a 20-year follow-up2008In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 207-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Implant-supported prostheses are today often used in rehabilitation of partially or totally edentulous patients. Both patients and the dental profession often regard implant treatment as successful in a life perspective. Therefore, studies with a long-term follow-up are important.

    PURPOSE: The aim was to investigate the outcome of implant treatment with fixed prostheses in edentulous jaws after 20 years, with special reference to survival rate of implants and prostheses and frequency of peri-implantitis.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The patient material was a group of patients treated in the early 1980s. The original patient group comprised the first 48 consecutive patients treated with implant-supported prostheses at Umeå University. All patients were edentulous in one or two jaws. The patients had a mean age at the implant insertion of 54.3 years (range 40-74). At the planning of this study 20 years after treatment, 19 of the 48 patients were found to be deceased. Of the 29 patients still alive, 21 patients with altogether 23 implant-supported prostheses could be examined clinically and radiographically. All patients were treated ad modum Brånemark (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) with a two-stage surgical procedure. The implants had a turned surface. Abutment connections were performed 3 to 4 months after fixture insertion in the mandible, and after a minimum of 6 months in the maxilla. The prostheses were fabricated with a framework of gold alloy and acrylic artificial teeth.

    RESULTS: The 21 patients (with 23 implant prostheses) examined had at the time of treatment got 123 implants (27 in the upper jaw and 96 in the lower jaw) inserted. Only one of these implants had been lost (about 2 years after loading) giving a survival rate of 99.2%. Very small changes occurred in the marginal bone level. Between the 1 and 20-year examinations, the mean bone loss was 0.53 mm and the mean bone level at the final examination was 2.33 mm below the reference point.

    CONCLUSIONS: This follow-up over two decades of implant-supported prostheses demonstrates a very good prognosis for the treatment performed. The frequencies of peri-implantitis, implant failures, or other complications were very small, and the original treatment concept with a two-stage surgery and a turned surface of the implants will obviously give very good results.

  • 584. Åstrand, Per
    et al.
    Billström, Camilla
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Fischer, Kerstin
    Henricsson, Vincent
    Johansson, Björn
    Nyström, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Sunzel, Bo
    Tapered implants in jaws with soft bone quality: a clinical and radiographic 1-year study of the Brånemark System Mark IV fixture.2003In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 213-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The survival rate of oral implants in soft-quality bone has been demonstrated to be inferior to that of implants inserted in good-quality bone. A possible way to increase the survival rate in soft-quality bone may be to use a tapered implant. Such an implant has been developed and manufactured by Nobel Biocare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden. So far, there have been only a few publications regarding this implant. PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to compare the outcome of using the tapered Brånemark System Mark IV fixture with the outcome of using earlier Brånemark fixtures in a controlled prospective study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was performed as a multicenter study including seven specialist centers. The material consisted of 40 patients in need of implant-supported bridges in the maxilla. Twenty-five patients belonged to the test group, in which the tapered Mark IV implants were inserted, and 15 patients belonged to the control group, in which Brånemark Standard or Mark II implants were used. The patients were allocated to the test group or the control group according to randomization schedules. The implants were inserted according to the guidelines for Brånemark implants. A two-stage surgical protocol was used, and abutment connection was made 6 months after fixture insertion. The test group comprised 97 Mark IV implants, and the control group made up 92 implants. The prosthetic procedure followed the guidelines for Brånemark implants, and all patients were provided with full fixed maxillary bridges. The patients were followed up with clinical and radiographic records for 1 year after loading. RESULTS: The survival rate was 96.9% for the Mark IV implants and 98.9% for the control implants. There was no significant difference between the two groups. There was a mean marginal bone loss of 0.2 mm during the observation period, and there was no difference between test implants and control implants. CONCLUSIONS: With regard to survival rate and marginal bone level changes, no differences could be demonstrated between the Mark IV tapered implant and the Brånemark implants used earlier. However, compared with earlier results of Brånemark implants in soft-quality bone, the Mark IV implant demonstrated an improved survival rate.

  • 585. Çaglar, E
    et al.
    Cildir, SK
    Ergeneli, S
    Sandalli, N
    Twetman, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli levels after ingestion of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 by straws and tablets.2006In: Acta odontologica Scandinavica, no 64, p. 314-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have suggested that lactobacilli-derived probiotics in dairy products may affect oral ecology, but the impact of different vehicles of ingestion has received little attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 on the levels of salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in young adults when ingested by two different delivery systems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The material comprised 120 healthy young adults (21-24 years) and a placebo-controlled study design with parallel arms was utilized. The subjects were randomly assigned to four equally sized groups: group A drank 200 ml of water through a prepared straw containing L. reuteri ATCC 55730 once daily for 3 weeks, while group B took 200 ml water through a placebo straw during the same period. Group C was given one tablet containing L. reuteri ATCC 55730 once daily for 3 weeks, while group D received placebo tablets without bacteria. Salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli were enumerated with chair-side kits at baseline and 1 day after the final ingestion. RESULTS: A statistically significant reduction of the mutans streptococci levels was recorded after ingestion of the probiotic bacteria via the straw (p<0.05) and the tablets (p<0.01), which was in contrast to the placebo controls. A similar but non-significant trend was seen for lactobacilli. CONCLUSIONS: A short-term daily ingestion of lactobacilli-derived probiotics delivered by prepared straws or lozenges reduced the levels of salivary mutans streptococci in young adults.

  • 586. Çaglar, E
    et al.
    Sandalli, N
    Twetman, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Probiotics and oral health.2006In: Prophylaxe impuls, no 10, p. 62-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Probiotics are living microorganisms that beneficially affect the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance. While the role of probiotics in preventive and therapeutic medicine is firmly established, only limited research is available on its effect on oral health. Recent findings have however suggested that strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium may inhibit mutans streptococci and candida species in the oral cavity. The present overview focuses on vehicles, installation in the mouth and possible benefits on oral ecology. Although an increasing number of studies suggest a role of lactobacilli-derived probiotics on caries pathogens, its efficacy as a preventive measure is still to be determined in randomized controlled trials.

  • 587. Çaglar, E
    et al.
    Sandalli, N
    Twetman, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Selvi, S
    Ergeneli, S
    Kavaloglu, S
    Effect of yoghurt with Bifidobacterium DN-173010 on salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli2005In: Acta odontologica Scandinavica, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 317-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. Probiotic bacteria are thought to reduce the risk of disease. Previous studies have suggested that lactobacilli-derived probiotics in dairy products may affect the oral ecology but the effect of bifidobacteria has not previously been reported. The aim of the present study was to examine whether or not a short-term consumption of yogurt containing bifidobacteria would affect the salivary levels of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in young adults. A double blind, randomized crossover study was performed and 21 healthy subjects were followed over four periods. During period 2 and 4 (two weeks each), they ingested 200 g yogurt containing Bifidobacterium DN-173 010 once daily or a control yogurt without viable bacteria. Periods 1 and 3 were run-in and washout periods, respectively. Salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli were enumerated with chair-side kits. A statistically significant reduction (p<0.05) of salivary mutans streptococci was recorded after the probiotic yogurt consumption, which was in contrast to the controls. A similar trend was seen for lactobacilli but this decrease failed to reach statistical significance. In conclusion, probiotic bifidobacteria in yogurt may reduce the levels of selected caries-associated microorganisms in saliva.

  • 588.
    Öberg, Sven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Kahnberg, Karl-Erik
    Combined use of hydroxy-apatite and Tisseel in experimental bone defects in the rabbit1993In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 147-153Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 589.
    Öberg, Sven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Rosenquist, Jan
    Bone healing after implantation of hydroxyapatite granules and blocks (Interpore 200) combined with autolyzed antigen-extracted allogeneic bone and fibrin glue1994In: International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 110-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 590.
    Öberg, Sven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Rosenquist, Jan
    Gordh, Monica
    Healing of bone defects in osteopenic rabbits.: Effect of autolyzed antigen-extracted allogeneic bone substitute on calvarial and tibial bone.Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 591.
    Öberg, Sven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Rosenquist, Jan
    Johansson, Carina
    Bone formation after implantation of autolyzed antigen-extracted allogeneic bone in ovariectomized rabbits.2003In: International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 628-632Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 592.
    Öberg, Sven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Sennerby, Lars
    Integration of titanium implants in bone defects reconstructed with autolyzed antigen-extracted allogeneic (AAA) bone powder prior to implant placement: a histological and resonance frequency analysis study in the rabbitManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 593.
    Öhlund, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lif Holgerson, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Lind, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Bäckman, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Diet intake and caries prevalence in four-year-old children living in a low-prevalence country.2007In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preventive measures have dramatically decreased the prevalence of dental caries in children. However, risk factors for the disease in children living in low-prevalence areas remain elusive. In the present study we evaluated associations between dental caries, saliva levels of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli, and diet with special emphasis on the intake of fermentable carbohydrates and dairy products in 4-year-old children living in an area where the overall caries prevalence was low. Dietary intake was recorded in 234 infants as part of the Study of Infant Nutrition in Umea, Sweden (SINUS). Of these the parents of 124 children gave consent to participate in a follow-up at 4 years of age. Dietary intake, height and weight, dental caries, oral hygiene, including tooth brushing habits, presence of plaque and gingival inflammation, fluoride habits and numbers of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in saliva were recorded. Using multivariate stepwise logistic regression, caries experience was negatively associated with intake frequency of cheese (OR = 0.67; 95% CI = 0.44-0.98) and positively associated with the salivary level of mutans streptococci (OR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.21-2.03). Caries experience was not correlated with intake frequency or amounts of carbohydrate-containing foods, with any other particular food, or with daily intake of energy, carbohydrate or any other macro- or micronutrient. We conclude that cheese intake may have a caries-protective effect in childhood populations where the overall caries prevalence and caries experience are low and the children are regularly exposed to fluoride from toothpaste.

  • 594.
    Österlund, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Extra- and intrafusal muscle fibre type compositions of the human masseter at young age.: In perspective of growth and functional maturation of the jaw-face motor system.2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Muscles control body posture and movement by extrafusal and intrafusal (muscle spindle) fibres. The purpose of this thesis was to provide insight into the muscular basis for human jaw function at young age. Extrafusal and intrafusal fibres in the young masseter, and for comparison young biceps, were examined for composition of fibre types and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms by means of morphological, enzyme-histochemical, biochemical and immuno-histochemical techniques. For evaluation of plasticity during life span the data for young muscles were compared with previous reported data for adult and elderly muscles.

    The results showed significant differences in extrafusal fibre types and MyHC expression between young masseter and young biceps and between young masseter and masseter in adults and elderly. Compared with young biceps, young masseter was more intricate in composition of extrafusal MyHC expression. Muscle spindles were larger and more frequent in the masseter than in the biceps. Masseter and biceps muscle spindles showed fundamental similarities but also marked differences in MyHC expression.

    The results suggest that the young masseter is specialized in fibre types already at young age and shows a unique fibre type growth pattern. Whereas masseter extrafusal fibres display marked plasticity in fibre types and MyHC isoforms during life span muscle spindles/intrafusal fibres are morphologically mature already at young age and precede extrafusal fibres in growth and maturation. Results showed similarities in intrafusal MyHC expression between young masseter and biceps, but also differences implying muscle specific proprioceptive control. Differences in fibre types and MyHC expression between young masseter and young biceps extrafusal fibres are proposed to reflect diverse evolutionary and developmental origins and accord with the masseter and biceps being separate allotypes of muscle.

  • 595.
    Österlund, Catharina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Berglund, H.
    Åkerman, M.
    Nilsson, E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Petersson, H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lam, J.
    Alstergren, P.
    Diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders: Diagnostic accuracy for general dentistry procedure without mandatory commands regarding myalgia, arthralgia and headache attributed to temporomandibular disorder2018In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 45, no 7, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical examination in diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD) is a strict procedure and comprises mandatory commands. However, learning and using these mandatory commands in general practice have proven to be difficult and their use of DC/TMD is minimal. To investigate whether reliability on a diagnostic level for DC/TMD diagnoses differs between examiners using the mandatory commands or not. Six examiners were divided into two groups: one using the mandatory commands in DC/TMD for the clinical examination and one who did not use the mandatory commands. A reliability assessment was performed twice, one occasion for each group of examiners. The assessment was performed according to the guidelines from the International Network for Orofacial Pain and Related Disorders Methodology. Each group of examiners thereby examined 16 subjects (11 TMD patients and 5 healthy individuals) each, and the diagnostic agreement (reliability) as compared to diagnoses derived by a reference standard examiner was calculated with Cohen' s kappa coefficient. The DC/TMD diagnoses myalgia, arthralgia and headache attributed to TMD were included in the reliability assessment. There was no significant difference regarding diagnostic agreement reliability between the examiners using or not using the mandatory DC/TMD commands. This study indicates that not using the mandatory commands in DC/TMD in general practice does not impair the diagnostic reliability regarding the diagnoses myalgia, arthralgia and headache attributed to TMD compared to including the commands.

  • 596.
    Österlund, Catharina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Lindström, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Eriksson, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Remarkable heterogeneity in myosin heavy-chain composition of the human young masseter compared with young biceps brachii2012In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 669-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adult human jaw muscles differ from limb and trunk muscles in enzyme-histochemical fibre type composition. Recently, we showed that the human masseter and biceps differ in fibre type pattern already at childhood. The present study explored the myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) expression in the young masseter and biceps muscles by means of gel electrophoresis (GE) and immuno-histochemical (IHC) techniques. Plasticity in MyHC expression during life was evaluated by comparing the results with the previously reported data for adult muscles. In young masseter, GE identified MyHC-I, MyHC-IIa MyHC-IIx and small proportions of MyHC-fetal and MyHC-alpha cardiac. Western blots confirmed the presence of MyHC-I, MyHC-IIa and MyHC-IIx. IHC revealed in the masseter six isomyosins, MyHC-I, MyHC-IIa, MyHC-IIx, MyHC-fetal, MyHC alpha-cardiac and a previously not reported isoform, termed MyHC-IIx'. The majority of the masseter fibres co-expressed two to four isoforms. In the young biceps, both GE and IHC identified MyHC-I, MyHC-IIa and MyHC-IIx. MyHC-I predominated in both muscles. Young masseter showed more slow and less-fast and fetal MyHC than the adult and elderly masseter. These results provide evidence that the young masseter muscle is unique in MyHC composition, expressing MyHC-alpha cardiac and MyHC-fetal isoforms as well as hitherto unrecognized potential spliced isoforms of MyHC-fetal and MyHC-IIx. Differences in masseter MyHC expression between young adult and elderly suggest a shift from childhood to adulthood towards more fast contractile properties. Differences between masseter and biceps are proposed to reflect diverse evolutionary and developmental origins and confirm that the masseter and biceps present separate allotypes of muscle.

  • 597.
    Österlund, Catharina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Liu, Jing-Xia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Eriksson, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Intrafusal myosin heavy chain expression of human masseter and biceps muscles at young age shows fundamental similarities but also marked differences2013In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 139, no 6, p. 895-907Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Muscle spindles are skeletal muscle mechanoreceptors that provide proprioceptive information to the central nervous system. The human adult masseter muscle has greater number, larger and more complex muscle spindles than the adult biceps. For a better knowledge of muscle diversity and physiological properties, this study examined the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression of muscle spindle intrafusal fibres in the human young masseter and young biceps muscles by using a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different MyHC isoforms. Eight MyHC isoforms were detected in both muscles-slow-tonic, I, IIa, IIx, foetal, embryonic, α-cardiac and an isoform not previously reported in intrafusal fibres, termed IIx'. Individual fibres co-expressed 2-6 isoforms. MyHC-slow tonic separated bag(1), AS-bag(1) and bag(2) fibres from chain fibres. Typically, bag fibres also expressed MyHC-I and α-cardiac, whereas chain fibres expressed IIa and foetal. In the young masseter 98 % of bag(1) showed MyHC-α cardiac versus 30 % in the young biceps, 35 % of bag(2) showed MyHC-IIx' versus none in biceps, 17 % of the chain fibres showed MyHC-I versus 61 % in the biceps. In conclusion, the result showed fundamental similarities in intrafusal MyHC expression between young masseter and biceps, but also marked differences implying muscle-specific proprioceptive control, probably related to diverse evolutionary and developmental origins. Finding of similarities in MyHC expression between young and adult masseter and biceps muscle spindles, respectively, in accordance with previously reported similarities in mATPase fibre type composition suggest early maturation of muscle spindles, preceding extrafusal fibres in growth and maturation.

  • 598.
    Österlund, Catharina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Liu, Jing-Xia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Eriksson, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Muscle spindle composition and distribution in human young masseter and biceps brachii muscles reveal early growth and maturation2011In: Anatomical Record, ISSN 0003-276X, E-ISSN 1097-0185, Vol. 294, no 4, p. 683-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant changes in extrafusal fiber type composition take place in the human masseter muscle from young age, 3-7 years, to adulthood, in parallel with jaw-face skeleton growth, changes of dentitions and improvement of jaw functions. As motor and sensory control systems of muscles are interlinked, also the intrafusal fiber population, that is, muscle spindles, should undergo age-related changes in fiber type appearance. To test this hypothesis, we examined muscle spindles in the young masseter muscle and compared the result with previous data on adult masseter spindles. Also muscle spindles in the young biceps brachii muscle were examined. The result showed that muscle spindle composition and distribution were alike in young and adult masseter. As for the adult masseter, young masseter contained exceptionally large muscle spindles, and with the highest spindle density and most complex spindles found in the deep masseter portion. Hence, contrary to our hypothesis, masseter spindles do not undergo major morphological changes between young age and adulthood. Also in the biceps, young spindles were alike adult spindles. Taken together, the results showed that human masseter and biceps muscle spindles are morphologically mature already at young age. We conclude that muscle spindles in the human young masseter and biceps precede the extrafusal fiber population in growth and maturation. This in turn suggests early reflex control and proprioceptive demands in learning and maturation of jaw motor skills. Similarly, well-developed muscle spindles in young biceps reflect early need of reflex control in learning and performing arm motor behavior.

  • 599.
    Österlund, Catharina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Eriksson, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Differences in fibre type composition between human masseter and biceps muscles in young and adults reveal unique masseter fibre type growth pattern2011In: Anatomical Record, ISSN 0003-276X, E-ISSN 1097-0185, Vol. 294, no 7, p. 1158-1169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human jaw system is different from those of other primates, carnivores, ruminants, and rodents in temporomandibular joint and muscle anatomy. In adults, jaw muscles also differ markedly from limb and trunk muscles in composition and distribution of fibre types. It can be assumed that age-related changes between young age to adulthood in terms of craniofacial growth, teeth eruption, and improvement of jaw functions are paralleled by alterations also in composition and distribution of jaw muscle fibre types. To address this question, we have examined the fibre type composition of the human masseter, a jaw closing muscle, at young age. For comparison, the young biceps brachii was examined. The results were compared with previous data for adult masseter and biceps muscles. Young masseter and biceps were similar in that type I fibres outnumbered other fibre types and were of the same diameter. However, they differed in composition of other fibre types. Young masseter contained fibre types I, IM, IIC, IIAB, IIB, and scarce IIA, with regional differences, whereas young biceps showed types I, IIA, IIAB, and few IIB. Young masseter differed from young biceps also by smaller type II fibre diameter and by containing fetal MyHC. In addition, the masseter and biceps differed in age-related changes of composition and distribution of fibre types between young age and adulthood. We conclude that the human masseter is specialized in fibre types already at young age and shows a unique fibre type growth pattern, in concordance with being a separate allotype of muscle.

9101112 551 - 599 of 599
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf