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  • 1.
    Frisan, Teresa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Department of Cell and Molecular Biology Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nagy, Noemi
    Chioureas, Dimitrios
    Terol, Marie
    Grasso, Francesca
    Masucci, Maria G.
    A bacterial genotoxin causes virus reactivation and genomic instability in Epstein-Barr virus infected epithelial cells pointing to a role of co-infection in viral oncogenesis2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have addressed the role of bacterial co-infection in viral oncogenesis using as model Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human herpesvirus that causes lymphoid malignancies and epithelial cancers. Infection of EBV carrying epithelial cells with the common oral pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) triggered reactivation of the productive virus cycle. Using isogenic Aa strains that differ in the production of the cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and purified catalytically active or inactive toxin, we found that the CDT acts via induction of DNA double strand breaks and activation of the Ataxia Telangectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase. Exposure of EBV-negative epithelial cells to the virus in the presence of sub-lethal doses of CDT was accompanied by the accumulation of latently infected cells exhibiting multiple signs of genomic instability. These findings illustrate a scenario where co-infection with certain bacterial species may favor the establishment of a microenvironment conducive to the EBV-induced malignant transformation of epithelial cells.

  • 2. Kusmierek, Maria
    et al.
    Hossmann, Joern
    Witte, Rebekka
    Opitz, Wiebke
    Vollmer, Ines
    Volk, Marcel
    Heroven, Ann Kathrin
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Dersch, Petra
    A bacterial secreted translocator hijacks riboregulators to control type III secretion in response to host cell contact2019In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous Gram-negative pathogens use a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) to promote virulence by injecting effector proteins into targeted host cells, which subvert host cell processes. Expression of T3SS and the effectors is triggered upon host cell contact, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we report a novel strategy of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in which this pathogen uses a secreted T3SS translocator protein (YopD) to control global RNA regulators. Secretion of the YopD translocator upon host cell contact increases the ratio of post-transcriptional regulator CsrA to its antagonistic small RNAs CsrB and CsrC and reduces the degradosome components PNPase and RNase E levels. This substantially elevates the amount of the common transcriptional activator (LcrF) of T3SS/Yop effector genes and triggers the synthesis of associated virulence-relevant traits. The observed hijacking of global riboregulators allows the pathogen to coordinate virulence factor expression and also readjusts its physiological response upon host cell contact. Author summary Many bacterial pathogens sense contact to host cells and respond by inducing expression of crucial virulence factors. This includes the type III secretion systems (T3SSs) and their substrates, which manipulate different host cell functions to promote colonization and survival of the pathogen within its host. In this study, we used enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to elucidate the molecular mechanism of how cell contact is transmitted and translated to trigger this process. We found that multiple global riboregulators control the decay and/or translation of the major transcriptional activator of the T3SS. In the absence of cell contact, these important RNA regulators are coopted by one of the substrate proteins of the T3SS to repress expression of the secretion machinery. Translocation of the substrate protein upon cell contact relieves riboregulator-mediated repression. This leads to a strong induction of the master regulator of T3SS/effector gene expression promoting an increase of the virulence potential and provokes a fast adaptation of the pathogen's fitness, e.g. to compensate for the imposed energetic burden.

  • 3. Schmidt, Tobias T.
    et al.
    Sharma, Sushma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Reyes, Gloria X.
    Gries, Kerstin
    Gross, Maike
    Zhao, Boyu
    Yuan, Jui-Hung
    Wade, Rebecca
    Chabes, Andrei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Hombauer, Hans
    A genetic screen pinpoints ribonucleotide reductase residues that sustain dNTP homeostasis and specifies a highly mutagenic type of dNTP imbalance2019In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 237-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The balance and the overall concentration of intracellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) are important determinants of faithful DNA replication. Despite the established fact that changes in dNTP pools negatively influence DNA replication fidelity, it is not clear why certain dNTP pool alterations are more mutagenic than others. As intracellular dNTP pools are mainly controlled by ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), and given the limited number of eukaryotic RNR mutations characterized so far, we screened for RNR1 mutations causing mutator phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 24 rnr1 mutant alleles resulting in diverse mutator phenotypes linked in most cases to imbalanced dNTPs. Among the identified rnr1 alleles the strongest mutators presented a dNTP imbalance in which three out of the four dNTPs were elevated (dCTP, dTTP and dGTP), particularly if dGTP levels were highly increased. These rnr1 alleles caused growth defects/lethality in DNA replication fidelity-compromised backgrounds, and caused strong mutator phenotypes even in the presence of functional DNA polymerases and mismatch repair. In summary, this study pinpoints key residues that contribute to allosteric regulation of RNR’s overall activity or substrate specificity. We propose a model that distinguishes between different dNTP pool alterations and provides a mechanistic explanation why certain dNTP imbalances are particularly detrimental.

  • 4.
    Alvarez, Laura
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid- Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid, Spain.
    Sanchez-Hevia, Dione
    Sanchez, Mercedes
    Berenguer, Jose
    A new family of nitrate/nitrite transporters involved in denitrification2019In: International Microbiology, ISSN 1139-6709, E-ISSN 1618-1905, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Denitrifying bacteria carry out nitrate and nitrite respiration inside and outside the cell, respectively. In Thermus thermophilus, nitrate and nitrite transport processes are carried out by major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters. The sequence of the nar operon of nitrate-only respiring strains of T. thermophilus includes two tandemly organized MFS transporter genes (narK and narT) of the NarK1 and NarK2 families. Both can function as nitrate/nitrite antiporters, but NarK has been proposed as more specific for nitrate whereas NarT more specific for nitrite. In some nitrate- and nitrite-respiring strains of the same species, a single MFS transporter (NarO) belonging to a different MFS subfamily appears. To analyze the role of this single MFS in the same genetic context, we transferred the two types of nar operon to the aerobic strain HB27, and further included in both of them the ability to respire nitrite. The new denitrifying strains HB27dn, with two MFS, and HB27dp, with a single one, were used to isolate mutants devoid of transporters. Through in trans complementation experiments, we demonstrate that the NarO single MFS works efficiently in the transport of both nitrate and nitrite.

  • 5. Xing, Xuanxuan
    et al.
    Kane, Daniel P.
    Bulock, Chelsea R.
    Moore, Elizabeth A.
    Sharma, Sushma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chabes, Andrei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Shcherbakova, Polina V.
    A recurrent cancer-associated substitution in DNA polymerase ε produces a hyperactive enzyme2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alterations in the exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase ε (Polε) cause ultramutated tumors. Severe mutator effects of the most common variant, Polε-P286R, modeled in yeast suggested that its pathogenicity involves yet unknown mechanisms beyond simple proofreading deficiency. We show that, despite producing a catastrophic amount of replication errors in vivo, the yeast Polε-P286R analog retains partial exonuclease activity and is more accurate than exonuclease-dead Polε. The major consequence of the arginine substitution is a dramatically increased DNA polymerase activity. This is manifested as a superior ability to copy synthetic and natural templates, extend mismatched primer termini, and bypass secondary DNA structures. We discuss a model wherein the cancer-associated substitution limits access of the 3'-terminus to the exonuclease site and promotes binding at the polymerase site, thus stimulating polymerization. We propose that the ultramutator effect results from increased polymerase activity amplifying the contribution of Polε errors to the genomic mutation rate.

  • 6.
    Kasari, Villu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Pochopien, Agnieszka A.
    Margus, Tonu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Murina, Victoriia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Turnbull, Kathryn Jane
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Zhou, Yang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Nissan, Tracy
    Graf, Michael
    Novacek, Jiri
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Johansson, Marcus J. O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Wilson, Daniel N.
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    A role for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ABCF protein New1 in translation termination/recycling2019In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 47, no 16, p. 8807-8820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Translation is controlled by numerous accessory proteins and translation factors. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, translation elongation requires an essential elongation factor, the ABCF ATPase eEF3. A closely related protein, New1, is encoded by a non-essential gene with cold sensitivity and ribosome assembly defect knock-out phenotypes. Since the exact molecular function of New1 is unknown, it is unclear if the ribosome assembly defect is direct, i.e. New1 is a bona fide assembly factor, or indirect, for instance due to a defect in protein synthesis. To investigate this, we employed yeast genetics, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and ribosome profiling (Ribo-Seq) to interrogate the molecular function of New1. Overexpression of New1 rescues the inviability of a yeast strain lacking the otherwise strictly essential translation factor eEF3. The structure of the ATPase-deficient (EQ2) New1 mutant locked on the 80S ribosome reveals that New1 binds analogously to the ribosome as eEF3. Finally, Ribo-Seq analysis revealed that loss of New1 leads to ribosome queuing upstream of 3′-terminal lysine and arginine codons, including those genes encoding proteins of the cytoplasmic translational machinery. Our results suggest that New1 is a translation factor that fine-tunes the efficiency of translation termination or ribosome recycling.

  • 7. Jacquier, Nicolas
    et al.
    Yadav, Akhilesh K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Pillonel, Trestan
    Viollier, Patrick H.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Greub, Gilbert
    A SpoIID Homolog Cleaves Glycan Strands at the Chlamydial Division Septum2019In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 10, no 4, article id e01128-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlamydiales species are obligate intracellular bacteria lacking a classical peptidoglycan sacculus but relying on peptidoglycan synthesis for cytokinesis. While septal peptidoglycan biosynthesis seems to be regulated by MreB actin and its membrane anchor RodZ rather than FtsZ tubulin in Chlamydiales, the mechanism of peptidoglycan remodeling is poorly understood. An amidase conserved in Chlamydiales is able to cleave peptide stems in peptidoglycan, but it is not clear how peptidoglycan glycan strands are cleaved since no classical lytic transglycosylase is encoded in chlamydial genomes. However, a protein containing a SpoIID domain, known to possess transglycosylase activity in Bacillus subtilis, is conserved in Chiamydiales. We show here that the SpoIID homologue of the Chlamydia-related pathogen Waddlia chondrophila is a septal peptidoglycan-binding protein. Moreover, we demonstrate that SpoIID acts as a lytic transglycosylase on peptidoglycan and as a muramidase on denuded glycan strands in vitro. As SpoIID-like proteins are widespread in nonsporulating bacteria, SpoIID might commonly be a septal peptidoglycan remodeling protein in bacteria, including obligate intracellular pathogens, and thus might represent a promising drug target. IMPORTANCE Chlamydiales species are obligate intracellular bacteria and important human pathogens that have a minimal division machinery lacking the proteins that are essential for bacterial division in other species, such as FtsZ. Chlamydial division requires synthesis of peptidoglycan, which forms a ring at the division septum and is rapidly turned over. However, little is known of peptidoglycan degradation, because many peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes are not encoded by chlamydial genomes. Here we show that an homologue of SpoIID, a peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme involved in sporulation of bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, is expressed in Chlamydiales, localizes at the division septum, and degrades peptidoglycan in vitro, indicating that SpoIID is not only involved in sporulation but also likely implicated in division of some bacteria.

  • 8. Fleurie, Aurore
    et al.
    Zoued, Abdelrahim
    Alvarez, Laura
    Hines, Kelly M.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Xu, Libin
    Davis, Brigid M.
    Waldor, Matthew K.
    A Vibrio cholerae BolA-Like Protein Is Required for Proper Cell Shape and Cell Envelope Integrity2019In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 10, no 4, article id e00790-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BolA family proteins are conserved in Gram-negative bacteria and many eukaryotes. While diverse cellular phenotypes have been linked to this protein family, the molecular pathways through which these proteins mediate their effects are not well described. Here, we investigated the roles of BolA family proteins in Vibrio cholerae, the cholera pathogen. Like Escherichia coli, V. cholerae encodes two BolA proteins, BolA and IbaG. However, in marked contrast to E. coli, where bolA is linked to cell shape and ibaG is not, in V. cholerae, bolA mutants lack morphological defects, whereas ibaG proved critical for the generation and/or maintenance of the pathogen's morphology. Notably, the bizarre-shaped, multipolar, elongated, and wide cells that predominated in exponential-phase Delta ibaG V. cholerae cultures were not observed in stationary-phase cultures. The V. cholerae Delta ibaG mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to cell envelope stressors, including cell wall-acting antibiotics and bile, and was defective in intestinal colonization. Delta ibaG V. cholerae had reduced peptidoglycan and lipid II and altered outer membrane lipids, likely contributing to the mutant's morphological defects and sensitivity to envelope stressors. Transposon insertion sequencing analysis of ibaG's genetic interactions suggested that ibaG is involved in several processes involved in the generation and homeostasis of the cell envelope. Furthermore, copurification studies revealed that IbaG interacts with proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters or involved in their assembly. Collectively, our findings suggest that V. cholerae IbaG controls cell morphology and cell envelope integrity through its role in biogenesis or trafficking of iron-sulfur cluster proteins. IMPORTANCE BolA-like proteins are conserved across prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These proteins have been linked to a variety of phenotypes, but the pathways and mechanisms through which they act have not been extensively characterized. Here, we unraveled the role of the BolA-like protein IbaG in the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. The absence of IbaG was associated with dramatic changes in cell morphology, sensitivity to envelope stressors, and intestinal colonization defects. IbaG was found to be required for biogenesis of several components of the V. cholerae cell envelope and to interact with numerous iron-sulfur cluster-containing proteins and factors involved in their assembly. Thus, our findings suggest that IbaG governs V. cholerae cell shape and cell envelope homeostasis through its effects on iron-sulfur proteins and associated pathways. The diversity of processes involving ironsulfur-containing proteins is likely a factor underlying the range of phenotypes associated with BolA family proteins.

  • 9.
    Murina, Victoriia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Kasari, Marje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Takada, Hiraku
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Hinnu, Mariliis
    Kumar Saha, Chayan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Grimshaw, James W.
    Seki, Takahiro
    Reith, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Putrins, Marta
    Tenson, Tanel
    Strahl, Henrik
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Atkinson, Gemma Catherine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    ABCF ATPases Involved in Protein Synthesis, Ribosome Assembly and Antibiotic Resistance: Structural and Functional Diversification across the Tree of Life2019In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 431, no 18, p. 3568-3590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the larger ABC superfamily of ATPases, ABCF family members eEF3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and EttA in Escherichia coli have been found to function as ribosomal translation factors. Several other ABCFs including biochemically characterized VgaA, LsaA and MsrE confer resistance to antibiotics that target the peptidyl transferase center and exit tunnel of the ribosome. However, the diversity of ABCF subfamilies, the relationships among subfamilies and the evolution of antibiotic resistance (ARE) factors from other ABCFs have not been explored. To address this, we analyzed the presence of ABCFs and their domain architectures in 4505 genomes across the tree of life. We find 45 distinct subfamilies of ABCFs that are widespread across bacterial and eukaryotic phyla, suggesting that they were present in the last common ancestor of both. Surprisingly, currently known ARE ABCFs are not confined to a distinct lineage of the ABCF family tree, suggesting that ARE can readily evolve from other ABCF functions. Our data suggest that there are a number of previously unidentified ARE ABCFs in antibiotic producers and important human pathogens. We also find that ATPase-deficient mutants of all four E. coli ABCFs (EttA, YbiT, YheS and Uup) inhibit protein synthesis, indicative of their ribosomal function, and demonstrate a genetic interaction of ABCFs Uup and YheS with translational GTPase BipA involved in assembly of the 50S ribosome subunit. Finally, we show that the ribosome-binding resistance factor VmlR from Bacillus subtilis is localized to the cytoplasm, ruling out a role in antibiotic efflux.

  • 10.
    Zlatkov, Nikola
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Absence of Global Stress Regulation in Escherichia coli Promotes Pathoadaptation and Novel c-di-GMP-dependent Metabolic Capability2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 2600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    athoadaptive mutations linked to c-di-GMP signalling were investigated in neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli (NMEC). The results indicated that NMEC strains deficient in RpoS (the global stress regulator) maintained remarkably low levels of c-di-GMP, a major bacterial sessility-motility switch. Deletion of ycgG2, shown here to encode a YcgG allozyme with c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity, and the restoration of RpoS led to a decrease in S-fimbriae, robustly produced in artificial urine, hinting that the urinary tract could serve as a habitat for NMEC. We showed that NMEC were skilled in aerobic citrate utilization in the presence of glucose, a property that normally does not exist in E. coli. Our data suggest that this metabolic novelty is a property of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli since we reconstituted this ability in E. coli UTI89 (a cystitis isolate) via deactivation rpoS; additionally, a set of pyelonephritis E. coli isolates were shown here to aerobically use citrate in the presence of glucose. We found that the main reason for this metabolic capability is RpoS inactivation leading to the production of the citrate transporter CitT, exploited by NMEC for ferric citrate uptake dependent on YcgG2 (an allozyme with c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity).

  • 11.
    Taheri, Nayyer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Accumulation of virulence-associated proteins in Campylobacter jejuni Outer Membrane Vesicles at human body temperature2019In: Journal of Proteomics, ISSN 1874-3919, E-ISSN 1876-7737, Vol. 195, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. In contrast, colonization in avian hosts is asymptomatic. Body temperature differs between human (37 °C) and avian (42 °C) hosts, and bacterial growth in 37 °C is therefore a potential cue for higher virulence properties during human infection. The proteome of the bacteria was previously shown to be altered by temperature. Here we investigated whether temperature has an effect on the C. jejuni outer membrane vesicle (OMV) proteome, as OMVs are considered to be bacterial vehicles for protein delivery and might play a role during infection. OMVs isolated from C. jejuni strain 81-176 grown at 37 °C and 42 °C were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. 181 proteins were detected in both sample groups, one protein was exclusively present, and three were absent in OMVs from 37 °C. Of the 181 proteins, 59 were differentially expressed; 30 proteins were detected with higher abundance, and 29 proteins with lower abundance at 37 °C. Among the more highly abundant proteins, significantly more proteins were predicted to be associated with virulence. These data show that temperature has an impact on the property of the OMVs, and this might affect the outcome of colonization/infection by C. jejuni in different hosts.

  • 12. Howell, Matthew
    et al.
    Aliashkevich, Alena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sundararajan, Kousik
    Daniel, Jeremy J.
    Lariviere, Patrick J.
    Goley, Erin D.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Brown, Pamela J. B.
    Agrobacterium tumefaciens divisome proteins regulate the transition from polar growth to cell division2019In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 1074-1092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms that restrict peptidoglycan biosynthesis to the pole during elongation and re-direct peptidoglycan biosynthesis to mid-cell during cell division in polar-growing Alphaproteobacteria are largely unknown. Here, we explore the role of early division proteins of Agrobacterium tumefaciens including three FtsZ homologs, FtsA and FtsW in the transition from polar growth to mid-cell growth and ultimately cell division. Although two of the three FtsZ homologs localize to mid-cell, exhibit GTPase activity and form co-polymers, only one, FtsZ(AT), is required for cell division. We find that FtsZ(AT) is required not only for constriction and cell separation, but also for initiation of peptidoglycan synthesis at mid-cell and cessation of polar peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Depletion of FtsZ(AT) in A. tumefaciens causes a striking phenotype: cells are extensively branched and accumulate growth active poles through tip splitting events. When cell division is blocked at a later stage by depletion of FtsA or FtsW, polar growth is terminated and ectopic growth poles emerge from mid-cell. Overall, this work suggests that A. tumefaciens FtsZ makes distinct contributions to the regulation of polar growth and cell division.

  • 13. Chauhan, Deepika
    et al.
    Srivastava, Pulkit Anupam
    Ritzl, Barbara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Priyadarshini, Richa
    Amino Acid-Dependent Alterations in Cell Wall and Cell Morphology of Deinococcus indicus DR12019In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, article id 1449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits growth medium-dependent morphological variation in cell shape, but there is no evidence whether this phenomenon is observed in other members of the Deinococcaceae family. In this study, we isolated a red-pigmented, aerobic, Deinococcus indicus strain DR1 from Dadri wetland, India. This D. indicus strain exhibited cell-morphology transition from rod-shaped cells to multi-cell chains in a growth-medium-dependent fashion. In response to addition of 1% casamino acids in the minimal growth medium, rod-shaped cells formed multi-cell chains. Addition of all 20 amino acids to the minimal medium was able to recapitulate the phenotype. Specifically, a combination of L-methionine, L-lysine, L-aspartate, and L-threonine caused morphological alterations. The transition from rod shape to multi-cell chains is due to delay in daughter cell separation after cell division. Minimal medium supplemented with L-ornithine alone was able to cause cell morphology changes. Furthermore, a comparative UPLC analysis of PG fragments isolated from D. indicus cells propagated in different growth media revealed alterations in the PG composition. An increase in the overall cross-linkage of PG was observed in muropeptides from nutrient-rich TSB and NB media versus PYE medium. Overall our study highlights that environmental conditions influence PG composition and cell morphology in D. indicus.

  • 14.
    Ahmad, Irfan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Institute of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Health Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan.
    Karah, Nabil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Nadeem, Aftab
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Analysis of colony phase variation switch in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 1, article id e0210082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reversible switching between opaque and translucent colony formation is a novel feature of Acinetobacter baumannii that has been associated with variations in the cell morphology, surface motility, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance and virulence. Here, we assessed a number of phenotypic alterations related to colony switching in A. baumannii clinical isolates belonging to different multi-locus sequence types. Our findings demonstrated that these phenotypic alterations were mostly strain-specific. In general, the translucent subpopulations of A. baumannii produced more dense biofilms, were more piliated, and released larger amounts of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). In addition, the translucent subpopulations caused reduced fertility of Caenorhabditis elegans. When assessed for effects on the immune response in RAW 264.7 macrophages, the OMVs isolated from opaque subpopulations of A. baumannii appeared to be more immunogenic than the OMVs from the translucent form. However, also the OMVs from the translucent subpopulations had the potential to evoke an immune response. Therefore, we suggest that OMVs may be considered for development of new immunotherapeutic treatments against A. baumannii infections.

  • 15. Zbornikova, Eva
    et al.
    Knejzlik, Zdenek
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu,Estonia.
    Krasny, Libor
    Rejman, Dominik
    Analysis of nucleotide pools in bacteria using HPLC-MS in HILIC mode2019In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 205, article id UNSP 120161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nucleotides, nucleosides and their derivatives are present in all cells at varying concentrations that change with the nutritional, and energetic status of the cell. Precise measurement of the concentrations of these molecules is instrumental for understanding their regulatory effects. Such measurement is challenging due to the inherent instability of these molecules and, despite many decades of research, the reported values differ widely. Here, we present a comprehensive and easy-to-use approach for determination of the intracellular concentrations of > 25 target molecular species. The approach uses rapid filtration and cold acidic extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode using zwitterionic columns coupled with UV and MS detectors. The method reliably detects and quantifies all the analytes expected to be observed in the bacterial cell and paves the way for future studies correlating their concentrations with biological effects.

  • 16.
    Dorafshan, Eshagh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Kahn, Tatyana G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Glotov, Alexander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Savitsky, Mikhail
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Walther, Matthias
    Reuter, Gunter
    Schwartz, Yuri B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Ash1 counteracts Polycomb repression independent of histone H3 lysine 36 methylation2019In: EMBO Reports, ISSN 1469-221X, E-ISSN 1469-3178, Vol. 20, no 4, article id e46762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycomb repression is critical for metazoan development. Equally important but less studied is the Trithorax system, which safeguards Polycomb target genes from the repression in cells where they have to remain active. It was proposed that the Trithorax system acts via methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 and lysine 36 (H3K36), thereby inhibiting histone methyltransferase activity of the Polycomb complexes. Here we test this hypothesis by asking whether the Trithorax group protein Ash1 requires H3K36 methylation to counteract Polycomb repression. We show that Ash1 is the only Drosophila H3K36-specific methyltransferase necessary to prevent excessive Polycomb repression of homeotic genes. Unexpectedly, our experiments reveal no correlation between the extent of H3K36 methylation and the resistance to Polycomb repression. Furthermore, we find that complete substitution of the zygotic histone H3 with a variant in which lysine 36 is replaced by arginine does not cause excessive repression of homeotic genes. Our results suggest that the model, where the Trithorax group proteins methylate histone H3 to inhibit the histone methyltransferase activity of the Polycomb complexes, needs revision.

  • 17.
    Javadi, Ala
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Söderholm, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Flärdh, Klas
    Sandblad, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Assembly mechanisms of the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FilP2019In: Life Science Alliance, ISSN 2575-1077, Vol. 2, no 3, article id e201800290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite low-sequence homology, the intermediate filament (IF)–like protein FilP from Streptomyces coelicolor displays structural and biochemical similarities to the metazoan nuclear IF lamin. FilP, like IF proteins, is composed of central coiled-coil domains interrupted by short linkers and flanked by head and tail domains. FilP polymerizes into repetitive filament bundles with paracrystalline properties. However, the cations Na+ and K+ are found to induce the formation of a FilP hexagonal meshwork with the same 60-nm repetitive unit as the filaments. Studies of polymerization kinetics, in combination with EM techniques, enabled visualization of the basic building block — a transiently soluble rod-shaped FilP molecule—and its assembly into protofilaments and filament bundles. Cryoelectron tomography provided a 3D view of the FilP bundle structure and an original assembly model of an IF-like protein of prokaryotic origin, thereby enabling a comparison with the assembly of metazoan IF.

  • 18.
    Swacha, Patrycja
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Erttmann, Saskia F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Biochemical and microscopic analysis of inflammasome complex formation2019In: DNA Sensors and Inflammasomes / [ed] Jungsan Sohn, Elsevier, 2019, Vol. 625, p. 287-298, article id S0076-6879(19)30173-9Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein signaling platforms responsible for the maturation of pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18 as well as the induction of an inflammatory cell death termed pyroptosis. Most inflammasomes consist of an upstream sensor, in most cases an adaptor protein (ASC) and inflammatory caspases such as caspase-1. Upon activation, sensor proteins oligomerize with adaptor proteins, forming large complexes called specks. These complexes can be stabilized and detected by Western blotting or fluorescence microscopy providing a direct evidence of inflammasome activation. Here we describe protocols for two complementary methods for detecting inflammasome complexes: (1) biochemical isolation and detection of ASC oligomers by Western blot analysis and (2) microscopic visualization of active caspase-1—ASC complexes. These protocols have successfully been applied in our recent study to unveil new regulatory mechanisms for different inflammasomes including the DNA sensor AIM2 (Erttmann et al., 2016).

  • 19.
    Farag, Salah I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University.
    Biogenesis, function and regulation of the type III secretion translocon of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many Gram negative bacteria use type III secretion systems to cross-talk with eukaryotic cells. Type III secretion system assembly and function is tightly regulated. It initiates with assembly of a basal body-like structure, and is followed by a cytoplasmic-located substrate sorting and export platform that first engages with early substrates required for needle assembly. At the needle tip, a translocon is formed upon eukaryotic cell contact to allow the translocation of effector proteins to the host cell. The focus of this thesis is on understanding aspects of biogenesis, regulation and function of the translocon and its interaction with the host cell. Research questions are addressed in enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis model.

    Prioritising the secretion of translocon components before effector proteins is a task given partly to the InvE/MxiC/HrpJ family of proteins. In Yersinia, homology to this protein family is partitioned over two proteins; YopN and TyeA. Certain Yersinia strains naturally produce a single YopN/TyeA polypeptide hybrid. To understand the implications of hybrid formation towards type III secretion control, a series of mutants were engineered to produce only a single hybrid peptide. Using in vitro assays revealed no difference in substrate secretion profiles between parent and mutants. Moreover, no obvious prioritisation of secretion between translocator and effector substrates was observed. Although these in vitro studies indicate that the YopN-TyeA single polypeptide is fully functionally competent, these mutants were attenuated in the mouse infection model. Hence, natural production of YopN and TyeA as a single polypeptide alone is unlikely to confer a fitness advantage to the infecting bacteria and is unlikely to orchestrate hierarchal substrate secretion.

    The YopB and YopD translocon components form a pore in the host cell plasma membrane to deliver the effectors into the host cell. To better understand how YopD contributes to the biogenesis, function and regulation of the translocon pore, a series of mutants were constructed to disrupt two predicted α-helix motifs, one lying at the N-terminus and the other at the C-terminus. Based upon phenotypes associated with environmental control of Yop synthesis and secretion, effector translocation, evasion of phagocytosis, killing of immune cells and virulence in a mouse infection model, the mutants were grouped into three phenotypic classes. A particularly interesting mutant class maintained full T3SS function in vitro, but were attenuated for virulence in a murine oral-infection model. To better understand the molecular basis for these phenotypic differences, the effectiveness of RAW 264.7 cells to respond to infection by these mutants was scrutinised. Sixteen individual cytokines were profiled with mouse cytokine screen multiplex analysis. Signature cytokine profiles were observed that could again separate the different YopD mutants into distinct categories. The activation and supression of certain cytokines that function as central innate immune response modulators correlated well with the ability of mutant bacteria to modulate programmed cell death and antiphagocytosis pathways. Hence, the biogenesis of sub-optimal translocon pores alters host cell responsiveness and limits the ability of Yersinia to fortify against attack by both early and late arms of the host innate immune response.

    The amount of bacteria now resistant to multiple antibiotics is alarming. By providing insights into a common virulence process, this work may ultimately facilitate the design of novel broad-acting inhibitors of type III secretion, and thereby be useful to treat an array of bacterial infections.

  • 20. Flentie, Kelly
    et al.
    Harrison, Gregory A.
    Tükenmez, Hasan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Livny, Jonathan
    Good, James A. D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sarkar, Souvik
    Zhu, Dennis X.
    Kinsella, Rachel L.
    Weiss, Leslie A.
    Solomon, Samantha D.
    Schene, Miranda E.
    Hansen, Mette R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Cairns, Andrew G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Kulén, Martina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wixe, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Lindgren, Anders E. G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110.
    Bengtsson, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Krishnan, K. Syam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Hultgren, Scott J.
    Larsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Stallings, Christina L.
    Chemical disarming of isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis2019In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, no 21, p. 10510-10517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) killed more people in 2017 than any other single infectious agent. This dangerous pathogen is able to withstand stresses imposed by the immune system and tolerate exposure to antibiotics, resulting in persistent infection. The global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic has been exacerbated by the emergence of mutant strains of Mtb that are resistant to frontline antibiotics. Thus, both phenotypic drug tolerance and genetic drug resistance are major obstacles to successful TB therapy. Using a chemical approach to identify compounds that block stress and drug tolerance, as opposed to traditional screens for compounds that kill Mtb, we identified a small molecule, C10, that blocks tolerance to oxidative stress, acid stress, and the frontline antibiotic isoniazid (INH). In addition, we found that C10 prevents the selection for INH-resistant mutants and restores INH sensitivity in otherwise INH-resistant Mtb strains harboring mutations in the katG gene, which encodes the enzyme that converts the prodrug INH to its active form. Through mechanistic studies, we discovered that C10 inhibits Mtb respiration, revealing a link between respiration homeostasis and INH sensitivity. Therefore, by using C10 to dissect Mtb persistence, we discovered that INH resistance is not absolute and can be reversed.

  • 21.
    Sixt, Barbara Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). INSERM U1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France; Equipe 11 labellisée Ligue Nationale contre le Cancer, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France; Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France; Metabolomics and Cell Biology Platforms, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Núñez-Otero, Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Kepp, Oliver
    INSERM U1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers; Equipe 11 labellisée Ligue Nationale contre le Cancer, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers; Université Paris Descartes; Metabolomics and Cell Biology Platforms, Institut Gustave Roussy.
    Valdivia, Raphael H
    Duke University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology.
    Kroemer, Guido
    INSERM U1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers; Equipe 11 labellisée Ligue Nationale contre le Cancer, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers; Université Paris Descartes; Metabolomics and Cell Biology Platforms, Institut Gustave Roussy.
    Chlamydia trachomatis fails to protect its growth niche against pro-apoptotic insults2019In: Cell Death and Differentiation, ISSN 1350-9047, E-ISSN 1476-5403, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1485-1500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterial agent responsible for ocular infections and sexually transmitted diseases. It has been postulated that Chlamydia inhibits apoptosis in host cells to maintain an intact replicative niche until sufficient infectious progeny can be generated. Here we report that, while cells infected with C. trachomatis are protected from apoptosis at early and mid-stages of infection, they remain susceptible to the induction of other cell death modalities. By monitoring the fate of infected cells by time-lapse video microscopy and by analyzing host plasma membrane integrity and the activity of caspases, we determined that C. trachomatis-infected cells exposed to pro-apoptotic stimuli predominately died by a mechanism resembling necrosis. This necrotic death of infected cells occurred with kinetics similar to the induction of apoptosis in uninfected cells, indicating that C. trachomatis fails to considerably prolong the lifespan of its host cell when exposed to pro-apoptotic insults. Inhibitors of bacterial protein synthesis partially blocked necrotic death of infected cells, suggesting that the switch from apoptosis to necrosis relies on an active contribution of the bacteria. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated induction of necrosis in cells infected with C. trachomatis was not dependent on canonical regulators of necroptosis, such as RIPK1, RIPK3, or MLKL, yet was blocked by inhibition or depletion of CASP8. These results suggest that alternative signaling pathways regulate necrotic death in the context of C. trachomatis infections. Finally, consistent with the inability of C. trachomatis to preserve host cell viability, necrosis resulting from pro-apoptotic conditions significantly impaired production of infectious progeny. Taken together, our findings suggest that Chlamydia's anti-apoptotic activities are not sufficient to protect the pathogen's replicative niche.

  • 22.
    Jiang, Hui
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Xue, Xiaoyu
    Panda, Swarupa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Kawale, Ajinkya
    Hooy, Richard M.
    Liang, Fengshan
    Sohn, Jungsan
    Sung, Patrick
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chromatin-bound cGAS is an inhibitor of DNA repair and hence accelerates genome destabilization and cell death2019In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 38, no 21, article id e102718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR) is indispensable for genome integrity and cell survival but if unrestrained can result in undesired chromosomal rearrangements. The regulatory mechanisms of HR are not fully understood. Cyclic GMP‐AMP synthase (cGAS) is best known as a cytosolic innate immune sensor critical for the outcome of infections, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Here, we report that cGAS is primarily a chromatin‐bound protein that inhibits DNA repair by HR, thereby accelerating genome destabilization, micronucleus generation, and cell death under conditions of genomic stress. This function is independent of the canonical STING‐dependent innate immune activation and is physiologically relevant for irradiation‐induced depletion of bone marrow cells in mice. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that inhibition of HR repair by cGAS is linked to its ability to self‐oligomerize, causing compaction of bound template dsDNA into a higher‐ordered state less amenable to strand invasion by RAD51‐coated ssDNA filaments. This previously unknown role of cGAS has implications for understanding its involvement in genome instability‐associated disorders including cancer.

  • 23.
    Kumar, Keshav
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Chromatographic analysis of peptidoglycan samples with the aid of a chemometric technique: introducing a novel analytical procedure to classify bacterial cell wall collection2019In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 1671-1679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The technical development of liquid chromatography has provided the necessary sensitivity to characterise peptidoglycan samples. However, the analysis of large numbers of complex chromatographic data sets without the aid of a proper chemometric technique is a laborious task, carrying a high risk of losing important biochemical information. The present work describes the development of a simple analytical procedure using self-organising map (SOM) analysis to analyse the large number of complex chromatographic data sets from bacterial peptidoglycan samples. SOM analysis essentially maps the samples to a hexagonal sheet based on their compositional similarity, and thus provides an approach to classify the bacterial cell wall collection in an unsupervised manner. The utility of the proposed approach was successfully validated by analysing peptidoglycan samples belonging to the Alphaproteobacterium class. The classification results achieved with SOM analysis were found to correlate well with their relative similarity in peptidoglycan compositions. In summary, the SOM analysis-based analytical procedure is shown to be useful towards automatising the analyses of chromatographic data sets of peptidoglycan samples from bacterial collections.

  • 24. Bernardo-Garcia, Noelia
    et al.
    Sánchez-Murcia, Pedro A.
    Espaillat, Akbar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Martínez-Caballero, Siseth
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Hermoso, Juan A.
    Gago, Federico
    Cold-induced aldimine bond cleavage by Tris in Bacillus subtilis alanine racemase2019In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 17, no 17, p. 4350-4358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) is a versatile cofactor involved in a large variety of enzymatic processes. Most of PLP-catalysed reactions, such as those of alanine racemases (AlaRs), present a common resting state in which the PLP is covalently bound to an active-site lysine to form an internal aldimine. The crystal structure of BsAlaR grown in the presence of Tris lacks this covalent linkage and the PLP cofactor appears deformylated. However, loss of activity in a Tris buffer only occurred after the solution was frozen prior to carrying out the enzymatic assay. This evidence strongly suggests that Tris can access the active site at subzero temperatures and behave as an alternate racemase substrate leading to mechanism-based enzyme inactivation, a hypothesis that is supported by additional X-ray structures and theoretical results from QM/ MM calculations. Taken together, our findings highlight a possibly underappreciated role for a common buffer component widely used in biochemical and biophysical experiments.

  • 25.
    Jiang, Hui
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Panda, Swarupa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Comet and micronucleus assays for analyzing DNA damage and genome integrity2019In: DNA SENSORS AND INFLAMMASOMES / [ed] Sohn, J, ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC , 2019, p. 299-307Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection of DNA damage in cells is fundamental for the study of DNA repair and genome-instability associated processes including carcinogenesis. Many studies often rely on cytotoxicity assays to estimate genotoxicity. However, measurements of cytotoxicity, a delayed outcome requiring high threshold genotoxicity to induce, does not provide information about the subtle, early genotoxic effects relevant for mechanistic understanding of DNA repair processes. Here describe how to combine two simple procedures for monitoring the presence of DNA damage in individual eukaryotic cells using: (1) the Comet assay for measuring initial DNA breaks and (2) the Micronucleus assay for detecting delayed outcome DNA breaks in dividing cells. We discuss the principles, experimental design considerations and troubleshooting tips for optimizing these methods. They require standard molecular biology instruments and a fluorescent microscope.

  • 26. Cavanagh, Jorunn Pauline
    et al.
    Pain, Maria
    Askarian, Fatemeh
    Bruun, Jack-Ansgar
    Urbarova, Ilona
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Schrnidt, Frank
    Johannessen, Mona
    Comparative exoproteome profiling of an invasive and a commensal Staphylococcus haemolyticus isolate2019In: Journal of Proteomics, ISSN 1874-3919, E-ISSN 1876-7737, Vol. 197, p. 106-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staphylococcus haemolyticus is a skin commensal emerging as an opportunistic pathogen. Nosocomial isolates of S. haemolyticus are the most antibiotic resistant members of the coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS), but information about other S. haemolyticus virulence factors is scarce. Bacterial membrane vesicles (MVs) are one mediator of virulence by enabling secretion and long distance delivery of bacterial effector molecules while protecting the cargo from proteolytic degradation from the environment. We wanted to determine if the MV protein cargo of S. haemolyticus is strain specific and enriched in certain MV associated proteins compared to the totalsecretome.

    The present study shows that both clinical and commensal S. haemolyticus isolates produce membrane vesicles. The MV cargo of both strains was enriched in proteins involved in adhesion and acquisition of iron. The MV cargo of the clinical strain was further enriched in antimicrobial resistance proteins.

    Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD010389.

    Biological significance: Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus haemolyticus are usually multidrug resistant, their main virulence factor is formation of biofilms, both factors leading to infections that are difficult to treat. We show that both clinical and commensal S. haemolyticusisolates produce membrane vesicles. Identification of staphylococcal membrane vesicles can potentially be used in novel approaches to combat staphylococcal infections, such as development of vaccines.

  • 27.
    Tükenmez, Hasan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Edström, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Kalsum, Sadaf
    Braian, Clara
    Ummanni, Ramesh
    Lindberg, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Chemical Biology Consortium Sweden (CBCS).
    Sundin, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lerm, Maria
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Larsson, Christer
    Corticosteroids protect infected cells against mycobacterial killing in vitro2019In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 511, no 1, p. 117-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of corticosteroids on human physiology is complex and their use in tuberculosis patients remains controversial. In a high-throughput screening approach designed to discover virulence inhibitors, several corticosteroids were found to prevent cytolysis of fibroblasts infected with mycobacteria. Further experiments with Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed anti-cytolytic activity in the 10 nM range, but no effect on bacterial growth or survival in the absence of host cells at 20 mu M. The results from a panel of corticosteroids with various affinities to the glucocorticoid- and mineralocorticoid receptors indicate that the inhibition of cytolysis most likely is mediated through the glucocorticoid receptor. Using live-imaging of M. tuberculosis-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages, we also show that corticosteroids to some extent control intracellular bacteria. In vitro systems with reduced complexity are to further study and understand the interactions between bacterial infection, immune defense and cell signaling. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 28.
    Lopes, José Pedro
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Stylianou, Marios
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Backman, Emelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Holmberg, Sandra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Ekoff, Maria
    Nilsson, Gunnar
    Urban, Constantin F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Cryptococcus neoformans Induces MCP-1 Release and Delays the Death of Human Mast Cells2019In: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 9, article id 289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cryptococcosis, caused by the basidiomycete Cryptococcus neoformans, is a life-threatening disease affecting approximately one million people per year worldwide. Infection can occur when C. neoformans cells are inhaled by immunocompromised people. In order to establish infection, the yeast must bypass recognition and clearance by immune cells guarding the tissue. Using in vitro infections, we characterized the role of mast cells (MCs) in cryptococcosis. We found that MCs recognize C. neoformans and release inflammatory mediators such as tryptase and cytokines. From the latter group MCs released mainly CCL-2/MCP-1, a strong chemoattractant for monocytic cells. We demonstrated that supernatants of infected MCs recruit monocytes but not neutrophils. During infection with C. neoformans, MCs have a limited ability to kill the yeast depending on the serotype. C. neoformans, in turn, modulates the lifespan of MCs both, by presence of its polysaccharide capsule and by secreting soluble modulators. Taken together, MCs might have important contributions to fungal clearance during early stages of cryptocococis where these cells regulate recruitment of monocytes to mucosal tissues.

  • 29.
    Muthu, Magesh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Nordström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Current Status and Future Prospects of Clinically Exploiting Cancer-specific Metabolism: Why Is Tumor Metabolism Not More Extensively Translated into Clinical Targets and Biomarkers?2019In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 20, no 6, article id 1385Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor cells exhibit a specialized metabolism supporting their superior ability for rapid proliferation, migration, and apoptotic evasion. It is reasonable to assume that the specific metabolic needs of the tumor cells can offer an array of therapeutic windows as pharmacological disturbance may derail the biochemical mechanisms necessary for maintaining the tumor characteristics, while being less important for normally proliferating cells. In addition, the specialized metabolism may leave a unique metabolic signature which could be used clinically for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. Quantitative global metabolic profiling (metabolomics) has evolved over the last two decades. However, despite the technology's present ability to measure 1000s of endogenous metabolites in various clinical or biological specimens, there are essentially no examples of metabolomics investigations being translated into actual utility in the cancer clinic. This review investigates the current efforts of using metabolomics as a tool for translation of tumor metabolism into the clinic and further seeks to outline paths for increasing the momentum of using tumor metabolism as a biomarker and drug target opportunity.

  • 30.
    Tran, Phong
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wanrooij, Paulina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lorenzon, Paolo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Sharma, Sushma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Thelander, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nilsson, Anna Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anna-Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Medini, Paolo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    von Hofsten, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Stål, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Chabes, Andrei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    De novo dNTP production is essential for normal postnatal murine heart development2019In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, article id jbc.RA119.009492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The building blocks of DNA, dNTPs, can be produced de novo or can be salvaged from deoxyribonucleosides. However, to what extent the absence of de novo dNTP production can be compensated for by the salvage pathway is unknown. Here, we eliminated de novo dNTP synthesis in the mouse heart and skeletal muscle by inactivating ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a key enzyme for the de novo production of dNTPs, at embryonic day 13. All other tissues had normal de novo dNTP synthesis and theoretically could supply heart and skeletal muscle with deoxyribonucleosides needed for dNTP production by salvage. We observed that the dNTP and NTP pools in wild-type postnatal hearts are unexpectedly asymmetric, with unusually high dGTP and GTP levels compared with those in whole mouse embryos or murine cell cultures. We found that RNR inactivation in heart led to strongly decreased dGTP and increased dCTP, dTTP, and dATP pools; aberrant DNA replication; defective expression of muscle-specific proteins; progressive heart abnormalities; disturbance of the cardiac conduction system; and lethality between the second and fourth weeks after birth. We conclude that dNTP salvage cannot substitute for de novo dNTP synthesis in the heart and that cardiomyocytes and myocytes initiate DNA replication despite an inadequate dNTP supply. We discuss the possible reasons for the observed asymmetry in dNTP and NTP pools in wildtype hearts.

  • 31.
    Seibt, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Deciphering control of Mechano-Transcription Activators of σ54-RNA polymerase2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To survive and proliferate, bacteria have to respond to a plethora of fluctuating signals within their habitats. Transcriptional control is one crucial entry point for such signal-responsive adaption responses. In this thesis I present new insights into the signal-responsive control of two specific transcriptional regulators that belong to a specialized class of mechano-transcriptional regulators. These regulators employ ATP-hydrolysis to engage and remodel σ54-RNA polymerase, which allows transcriptional initiation from the promoters they control. In the first part of my thesis I present findings on DmpR – the obligate activator of genes involved in (methyl)phenol catabolism by Pseudomonas putida. DmpR is a sensory-regulator that can only transition to its active multimeric form upon binding a phenolic compound and ATP. Previous work has established that binding of phenolic effectors by the N-terminal domain of DmpR relieves inter-domain repression of its central ATPase domain and further that a structured inter-domain linker between the phenolic- and ATP-binding domains is involved in coupling these processes. However, the mechanism underlying this coupling remained enigmatic. Here I present evidence that a tyrosine residue of the inter-domain linker (Y233) serves as a gatekeeper to constrain ATP-hydrolysis and phenolic-responsive transcriptional activation by DmpR. A model is presented in which binding of phenolics relocates Y233 from the ATP-binding site to synchronise signal-reception with multimerisation to provide appropriate sensitivity of the transcriptional response. Given that Y233 counterparts are present in many ligand-responsive mechano-transcriptional regulators, the model is likely to be pertinent for numerous members of this family. The finding that an alanine substitution of Y233 enhances transcriptional responses adds a new approach to manipulating the sensitivity of this class of proteins and thereby generate hyper-sensitive detectors of aromatic pollutants for use in safe guarding the environment.

    The second part of my thesis concerns VCA0117 – a master regulator of the type VI contractile nanomachinery of Vibrio cholerae, which it utilizes to introduce toxic proteins into both bacterial and eukaryotic cells. These type VI-mediated properties enable V. cholerae to establish infections and to thrive in niches co-occupied by predators and competing bacteria. VCA0117 is strictly required for functionality of the type VI system through its role in controlling production of a key type VI structural protein called Hcp, which is encoded within two small s54-dependent operons. This regulatory role is conserved in both pandemic and non-pandemic V. cholerae strains. However, while some strains come pre-equipped with a functional system, others do not, and require specific growth conditions of low temperature and high osmolarity for type VI expression. Within this work, integration of these regulatory growth signals was traced to the activity of the promoter controlling a large operon in which many components of the machinery and VCA0117 is itself encoded. This in turn elevates the levels of VCA0117, which is all that is required to overcome the need for the specialized growth conditions of low temperature and/or high osmolarity. A model is presented in which signal integration via the activity of the large operon promoter to elevate levels of VCA0117 ultimately dictates a sufficient supply of the missing Hcp component required for completion of a functional type VI machine. Repercussions of the proposed quantity-based regulatory circuit of VCA0117 for generating bacterial sub-populations that are differentially “fit” for different environmental eventualities are discussed.

  • 32.
    Massai, Francesco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Saleeb, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Doruk, Tugrul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Development, Optimization, and Validation of a High Throughput Screening Assay for Identification of Tat and Type II Secretion Inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa2019In: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 9, article id 250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotics are becoming less effective in treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antimicrobial therapies based on the inhibition of specific virulence-related traits, as opposed to growth inhibitors, constitute an innovative and appealing approach to tackle the threat of P. aeruginosa infections. The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa, and constitutes a promising target for the development of anti-pseudomonal drugs. In this study we developed and optimized a whole-cell, one-well assay, based on native phospholipase C activity, to identify compounds active against the Tat system. Statistical robustness, sensitivity and consequently suitability for high-throughput screening (HTS) were confirmed by a dry run/pre-screening test scoring a Z' of 0.82 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 49. Using this assay, we evaluated ca. 40,000 molecules and identified 59 initial hits as possible Tat inhibitors. Since phospholipase C is exported into the periplasm by Tat, and subsequently translocated across the outer membrane by the type II secretion system (T2SS), our assay could also identify T2SS inhibitors. To validate our hits and discriminate between compounds that inhibited either Tat or T2SS, two separate counter assays were developed and optimized. Finally, three Tat inhibitors and one T2SS inhibitor were confirmed by means of dose-response analysis and additional counter and confirming assays. Although none of the identified inhibitors was suitable as a lead compound for drug development, this study validates our assay as a simple, efficient, and HTS compatible method for the identification of Tat and T2SS inhibitors.

  • 33.
    Chabes, Andrei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    dNTPs and maintenance of genome stability2019In: FEBS Open Bio, E-ISSN 2211-5463, Vol. 9, p. 21-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Zhang, Hanqing
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Söderholm, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Sandblad, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Wiklund, Krister
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    DSeg: a dynamic image segmentation program to extract backbone patterns for filamentous bacteria and hyphae structures2019In: Microscopy and Microanalysis, ISSN 1431-9276, E-ISSN 1435-8115, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 711-719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of numerous filamentous structures in an image is often limited by the ability of algorithms to accurately segment complex structures or structures within a dense population. It is even more problematic if these structures continuously grow when recording a time-series of images. To overcome these issues we present DSeg; an image analysis program designed to process time-series image data, as well as single images, to segment filamentous structures. The program includes a robust binary level-set algorithm modified to use size constraints, edge intensity, and past information. We verify our algorithms using synthetic data, differential interference contrast images of filamentous prokaryotes, and transmission electron microscopy images of bacterial adhesion fimbriae. DSeg includes automatic segmentation, tools for analysis, and drift correction, and outputs statistical data such as persistence length, growth rate, and growth direction. The program is available at Sourceforge.

  • 35.
    Francis, Matthew S
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).