umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12345 1 - 50 of 241
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Allard, Christina
    et al.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Hjortfors, Lis-Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences.
    Ledman, Anna-Lill
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Löf, Annette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Johansson Lönn, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Nordin, Gabriella
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Norlin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Outakoski, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Reimerson, Elsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Moa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Storm Mienna, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Svonni, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Vinka, Mikael
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Rasbiologiskt språkbruk i statens rättsprocess mot sameby2015In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Statens hantering av forskningsresultat i rättsprocessen med Girjas sameby utgör ett hot mot Sverige som rättsstat och kunskapsnation. Åratal av svensk och internationell forskning underkänns och man använder ett språkbruk som skulle kunna vara hämtat från rasbiologins tid. Nu måste staten ta sitt ansvar och börja agera som en demokratisk rättsstat, skriver 59 forskare.

  • 2. Anderson, Ian
    et al.
    Robson, Bridget
    Connolly, Michele
    Al-Yaman, Fadwa
    Bjertness, Espen
    King, Alexandra
    Tynan, Michael
    Madden, Richard
    Bang, Abhay
    Coimbra, Carlos E. A., Jr.
    Pesantes, Maria Amalia
    Amigo, Hugo
    Andronov, Sergei
    Armien, Blas
    Obando, Daniel Ayala
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Bhatti, Zaid Shakoor
    Bhutta, Zulfi Qar Ahmed
    Bjerregaard, Peter
    Bjertness, Marius B.
    Briceno-Leon, Roberto
    Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild
    Bustos, Patricia
    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi
    Chu, Jiayou
    Deji, .
    Gouda, Jitendra
    Harikumar, Rachakulla
    Htay, Thein Thein
    Htet, Aung Soe
    Izugbara, Chimaraoke
    Kamaka, Martina
    King, Malcolm
    Kodavanti, Mallikharjuna Rao
    Lara, Macarena
    Laxmaiah, Avula
    Lema, Claudia
    Taborda, Ana Maria Leon
    Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan
    Lobanov, Andrey
    Melhus, Marita
    Meshram, Indrapal
    Miranda, J. Jaime
    Mu, Thet Thet
    Nagalla, Balkrishna
    Nimmathota, Arlappa
    Popov, Andrey Ivanovich
    Poveda, Ana Maria Penuela
    Ram, Faujdar
    Reich, Hannah
    Santos, Ricardo V.
    Sein, Aye Aye
    Shekhar, Chander
    Sherpa, Lhamo Y.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Tanywe, Asahngwa
    Ugwu, Chidi
    Ugwu, Fabian
    Vapattanawong, Patama
    Wan, Xia
    Welch, James R.
    Yang, Gonghuan
    Yang, Zhaoqing
    Yap, Leslie
    Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, no 10040, p. 131-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark populations, but have been restricted in their coverage of countries or the range of health indicators. Our objective is to describe the health and social status of Indigenous and tribal peoples relative to benchmark populations from a sample of countries.

    Methods: Collaborators with expertise in Indigenous health data systems were identified for each country. Data were obtained for population, life expectancy at birth, infant mortality, low and high birthweight, maternal mortality, nutritional status, educational attainment, and economic status. Data sources consisted of governmental data, data from non-governmental organisations such as UNICEF, and other research. Absolute and relative differences were calculated.

    Findings: Our data (23 countries, 28 populations) provide evidence of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous peoples than for non-Indigenous populations. However, this is not uniformly the case, and the size of the rate difference varies. We document poorer outcomes for Indigenous populations for: life expectancy at birth for 16 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1 year in 15 populations; infant mortality rate for 18 of 19 populations with a rate difference greater than one per 1000 livebirths in 16 populations; maternal mortality in ten populations; low birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in three populations; high birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in one population; child malnutrition for ten of 16 populations with a difference greater than 10% in five populations; child obesity for eight of 12 populations with a difference greater than 5% in four populations; adult obesity for seven of 13 populations with a difference greater than 10% in four populations; educational attainment for 26 of 27 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 24 populations; and economic status for 15 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 14 populations.

    Interpretation: We systematically collated data across a broader sample of countries and indicators than done in previous studies. Taking into account the UN Sustainable Development Goals, we recommend that national governments develop targeted policy responses to Indigenous health, improving access to health services, and Indigenous data within national surveillance systems.

  • 3.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    A few remarks on identity, indigenous health and colonization2015In: Under the same sun: parallel issues and mutual challenges for San and Sami peoples and research / [ed] Peter Sköld, Moa Sandström and Maitseo Bolaane, Umeå: Vaartoe/Centre for Sami Research (CeSam), Umeå University , 2015, 1, p. 147-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Abandoning "the Other": Statistical Enumeration of Swedish Sami, 1700 to 1945 and Beyond2010In: Berichte zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte, ISSN 0170-6233, E-ISSN 1522-2365, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 263-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has one of the world's most eminent and exhaustive records of statistical information on its population. As early as the eighteenth century, ethnic notations were being made in parish registers throughout the country, and by the early nineteenth century a specific category for the Sami population had been added to the forms used to collect data for the Tabellverket (National Population Statistics). Beginning in 1860, the Sami were also counted in the first official census of the Swedish state. Nonetheless – and in contrast to many other countries – Sweden today lacks separate statistical information not only about its sole recognized indigenous population but also about other ethnic groups. The present paper investigates Sweden's attempts to enumerate its indigenous Sami population prior to World War II and the cessation of ethnic enumeration after the war. How have the Sami been identified and enumerated? How have statistical categories been constructed, and how have they changed over time? The aim of this essay is not to assess the validity of the demographic sources. Instead the paper will explore the historical, social, and cultural factors that have had a bearing on how a dominant administrative structure has dealt with the statistical construct of an indigenous population.

  • 5.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Continuity or change?: science and Sami during the 20th century2006In: Minority policies, culture & science: papers I from the conference the use and abuse of history in the Barents region, Luleå: Luleå University of Technology , 2006, p. 113-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Den svenska poliohistorien2009In: Allt du behöver veta om postpolio: en guide för dig som själv har haft polio eller arbetar inom vården / [ed] Lena Udd, Sundbyberg: Riksförbundet för trafik-, olycksfalls- och polioskadade (RTP) , 2009, p. 10-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    ‘Do not eat those apples; they’ve been on the ground!’: – polio epidemics and preventive measures, Sweden 1880s-1940s2009In: Asclepio. Revista de Historia de la Medicina y de la Ciencia, ISSN 0210-4466, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 23-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses how Swedish scientists, physicians and public health officers tried to combat the polio epidemics in the pre-vaccine era. It shows that once polio was considered as an epidemic disease the preventive measures used were based on the hindrance of other infectious diseases. It also illustrates how epidemiological and laboratory studies to some degree affected the thoughts of how polio should be prevented, and that Swedish ideas and experiences differed fromthose put forward in the USA.

  • 8.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Från barnförlamade till polioskadade2004In: Befolkningshistoriska perspektiv: Festskrift till Lars-Göran Tedebrand, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2004, p. 279-292Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Förutfattade meningar: urfolk i polioforskningen2009In: Thule: Kungl. Skytteanska samfundets årsbok / [ed] Jacobsson, Roger, Umeå: Två Förläggare , 2009, p. 53-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    'In the National Registry, all people are equal': Sami in Swedish statistical sources2011In: Indigenous peoples and demography: the complex relation between identity and statistics / [ed] Per Axelsson and Peter Sköld, Oxford and New York: Berghahn Books, 2011, 1, p. 117-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Indigenous identity in Demography2007Other (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Kontinuitet eller förändring?: livsvetenskapernas undersökningar av befolkningen i Sápmi under andra hälften av 1900-talet2005In: Igår, idag, imorgon: samerna, politiken och vetenskapen, Umeå: Centrum för samisk forskning, Umeå universitet , 2005, p. 63-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Kyrkan, folkbokföringen och samerna2016In: De historiska relationerna mellan Svenska kyrkan och samerna: en vetenskaplig antologi, bd 2 / [ed] Daniel Lindmark och Olle Sundström, Skellefteå: Artos & Norma bokförlag, 2016, 1, p. 915-942Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Kyrkans och statens kategoriseringar2016In: Samiska rötter: släktforska i svenska Sápmi / [ed] Per Axelsson, Elisabeth Engberg, Patrik Lantto & Maria J. Wisselgren, Sveriges släktforskarförbund , 2016, p. 19-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Patterns of Polio: Incidence and Mortality at the National Level in Sweden 1905-19602001In: Nordic Demography in History and Present-Day Society / [ed] Lars-Göran Tedebrand and Peter Sköld, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2001, p. 309-326Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Polioepidemier och postpolio2012In: Utanförskapets historia: om funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder / [ed] Kristina Engwall och Stig Larsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 73-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Preconceived opinions: Iñupiat and Swedish Sami populations in polio research2012In: Rivers to cross: Sami land use and the human dimension / [ed] Peter Sköld & Krister Stoor, Umeå: Vaartoe, Centrum för samisk forskning, Umeå universitet , 2012, p. 169-177Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Recension av David Thorséns avhandling Aidsepidemin I Sverige2013In: Lychnos, ISSN 0076-1648Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    The Cutter Incident and the Development of a Swedish Polio Vaccine, 1952-19572012In: Dynamis. Acta Hispanica ad Medicinae Scientarumque Historiam Illustrandam, ISSN 0211-9536, E-ISSN 2340-7948, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 311-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The creation of two different vaccines to eradicate polio stands out as one of modern science most important accomplishments. The current article examines Swedish polio vaccine research, the vaccination campaign and especially how the Cutter incident came to affect Swedish Science, scientists and society in the 1950s. Sweden is one of the few countries that came to produce its own inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) in the 1950s, a type of vaccine they never abandoned. This article highlights the sometimes conflicting approaches between medical science on one hand and media and public on the other. The Swedish researchers did not agree with Jonas Salk’s methods for producing a safe vaccine and had reserved attitudes when the Salk vaccine was announced, something that Swedish media disapproved of. After the Cutter incident media’s representation of Swedish polio scientists became far more positive. The article also shows the development and distribution of a Swedish IPV and that, contrary to some other countries, Sweden did not doubt all American manufacturers and imported Salk IPV for the first polio vaccination campaign.

  • 20.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Urfolkshälsa: utmanande  och svårfångad2015In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 726-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines Swedish health research regarding the Indigenous Sami people and the lack of epidemiological data. A historical overview underlines that Swedish research is hampered by Sami people having been the subject of studies by the National Institute of Racial Biology between 1920 and 1950. Public health research has mainly taken place during the last 20 years. There are no current epidemiological studies and this is linked to the fact that Swedish official statistics do not report on ethnic groups in the country. Ethnic statistics is a sensative issue and new ethical principles need to be worked out where the Sami, as constitutionally recognized indigenous people, are allowed to decide whether they want to be part of official statistics, and if so, what statistics would be relevant and how it should be collected.

  • 21.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Åldrande & livsvillkor: långsiktiga stöd till stark internationell forskningsmiljö vid Umeå Universitet2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Engberg, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Lantto, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Wisselgren, Maria J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Inledning2016In: Samiska Rötter: släktforska i svenska Sápmi / [ed] Per Axelsson, Elisabeth Engberg, Patrik Lantto & Maria J. Wisselgren, Solna: Sveriges släktforskarförbund , 2016, p. 5-7Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Engberg, ElisabethUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).Lantto, PatrikUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.Wisselgren, Maria J.Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Samiska rötter: släktforska i svenska Sápmi2016Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Kukutai, Tahu
    Kippen, Rebecca
    Indigenous Wellbeing and Colonisation: Editorial2016In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 7-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Kukutai, Tahu
    National Institute of Demographic and Economic Analysis, University of Waikato.
    Kippen, Rebecca
    School of Rural Health, Monash University, Bendigo, Australia.
    The field of Indigenous health and the role of colonisation and history2016In: Journal of Population Research, ISSN 1443-2447, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The workshop leading to this special issue is part of an international, interdisciplinary project 'Indigenous health in transition' led by Per Axelsson, Tahu Kukutai and Rebecca Kippen. We thank the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation and the Swedish Research Council for funding this project; and Vaartoe/Centre for Sami Research at Umeå University, the Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University, and the Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities for providing additional support for the workshop. We also thank the workshop participants, article authors, article reviewers, and the Journal of Population Research.

  • 26.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Matos, Paulo
    Vos, Jelmer
    Introduction2017In: Anais de história de além‑mar, ISSN 0874‑9671, Vol. 15, p. 11-18Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, PeterUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Ett land, ett folk: Sápmi i historia och nutid2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, PeterUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Indigenous peoples and demography: the complex relation between identity and statistics2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When researchers want to study indigenous populations they are dependent upon the highly variable way in which states or territories enumerate, categorize, and differentiate indigenous people. In this volume, anthropologists, historians, demographers, and sociologists have come together for the first time to examine the historical and contemporary construct of indigenous people in a number of fascinating geographical contexts around the world, including Canada, the United States, Colombia, Russia, Scandinavia, the Balkans, and the United Kingdom. Using historical and demographical evidence, the contributors explore the creation and validity of categories for enumerating indigenous populations; the use and misuse of ethnic markers, micro-demographic investigations, and demographic databases; and thereby show how the situation varies substantially between countries.

  • 29.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Indigenous populations and vulnerability.: Characterizing vulnerability in a Sami context2006In: Annales de Demographie Historique, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 115-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Among the most vulnerable populations of today are the indigenous peoples. They share the experience of colonization with severe implications. Historically thousands of indigenous cultures have ceased to exist. The current article outlines and discusses the conditions from the past to the present that make an indigenous people like the Swedish Sami vulnerable. Until the early twentieth century the Sami were in some respects a demographically vulnerable population. Infants and child mortality were dramatically high, yet the fear of extinction that prevailed among Swedish scientists until the 1940s were never realistic. The Swedish Sami population of today is not living on the brink of extinction but there are still circumstances that are the result of historical events contributing to them being more vulnerable than the majority population of Sweden. The Sami has been reduced due to demographic, socio-economic, cultural and political interference. We argue that the Sami vulnerability of the past, present and future involves changes in statistics, language, traditional economy, religion, relocation/reservation, cultural diversity, educational system, and denial of the right to cultural and political self-determination. These factors all play important roles for the contextualization of indigenous vulnerability and should be considered when studying vulnerability among all indigenous populations.

  • 30.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Inledning2005In: Ett land, ett folk: Sápmi i historia och nutid, Umeå: Centrum för samisk forskning, Umeå universitet , 2005, p. 7-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Introduction2011In: Indigenous peoples and demography: the complex relation between identity and statistics / [ed] Per Axelsson and Peter Sköld, Oxford and New York: Berghahn Books, 2011, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Samisk forskning – eftersatt och efterfrågad2006In: Tvärsnitt: Humanistisk och samhällsvetenskaplig forskning, ISSN 0348-7997, Vol. 1, p. 18-22Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Anderson, David, G.
    University of Tromsö.
    Ziker, John
    Boise State University.
    Epilogue: from indigenous demographics to an indigenous demography2011In: Indigenous peoples and demography: the complex relation between identity and statistics / [ed] Per Axelsson and Peter Sköld, Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2011, p. 295-308Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Lena, Karlsson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Len, Smith
    Australian National University, Canberra.
    Indigenous infant mortality in Sweden: the key to the health transition2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sami of northern Scandinavia have experienced a positive health development that has brought them from a high-mortality situation two hundred years ago to their present-day low-mortality profile. Their experience is not shared by other indigenous peoples around the world. This study is concerned with infant mortality, a key issue in the health transition process. Long-term infant mortality trends are analyzed in order to compare Sami and non-Sami groups in the area. Data is obtained from the world-unique Northern Population Data Base at Umeå university, and consist of digitized 18th and 19th-century parish records. These complete life biographies include ethnic markers and enable longitudinal studies of causes of death, differences in sex, age-distribution, stillbirths and legitimacy status. The results are discussed from the perspective of the source quality, methodological considerations, the health transition generally in Sweden, and the overall Sami health transition

  • 35.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Sweden: the Sami2016In: A global snapshot of indigenous and tribal peoples' health: the Lancet–Lowitja Institute collaboration / [ed] Kate Silburn, Hannah Reich & Ian Anderson, Carlton South, Victoria, Australia: The Lowitja Institute , 2016, , p. 2p. 46-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Teodoro de Matos, PauloSilveira e Sousa, Paulo
    The Demography of the Portuguese Empire: Sources, methods and results, 1776– 18222017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Wisselgren, Maria J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Sweden in 1930 and the 1930 census2016In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 61-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary goal of censuses has always been to collect reliable information on the state’s population and provide a basis for governmental decision-making. This study examines the categories used in the 1930 census and links them to the context in which they were generated. We treat the census as a tool of state power, which can be discerned from the definitions of its categories and the way in which statistics are collected and used. The guiding question of the study was “how does the 1930 census differ from previous censuses and how can these differences and changes be explained?” We find that as in earlier censuses, Statistics Sweden used extracts from the parish books on the individual level to collect information for the 1930 census, but also used diverse supplementary sources including tax registers, income tax returns and language surveys. Thus, unlike in most countries, Sweden did not send out census takers or questionnaires to the population. Many of the new or updated variables we see in the 1930 census such as income, wealth, and number of children born, can be related to the political and social debate concerning the poor working class and the establishment of the welfare state. The inclusion of categories such as ethnicity, religion, and foreign nationality can be seen as part of a normative approach wanting to control, monitor and correct deviant elements of the Swedish population. Sweden has several extraordinary longitudinal population databases built on the country’s excellent parish registers dating back to the 18th century. While the Swedish censuses have rarely been used as sources of data for historical analysis, this work demonstrates that the 1930 census has great potential to support new research.

  • 38.
    Belancic, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Eva, Lindgren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Discourses of functional bilingualism in the Sami curriculum in Sweden2017In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sami are Indigenous languages spoken by the Sami people in the northern parts of Scandinavia and Russia. All Sami languages are endangered because of historically aggressive assimilation policies. Currently Sami communities are working actively with language revitalisation processes. This article examines pupils’ access to knowledge in and about Sami languages and functional bilingualism in Sami and Swedish within the curriculum for the Sami schools in Sweden. Through a multifaceted lens of functional linguistic analysis, Bloom’s revised taxonomy of knowledge types and processes, and Bernstein’s concepts of vertical and horizontal discourse we examine the learning outcomes in the Sami and Swedish syllabi. The findings show an unequal balance between the two languages with the Sami syllabus containing fewer knowledge types, cognitive processes, verb processes, a stronger focus on oracy, and a stronger horizontal discourse than the Swedish syllabus. We conclude that the discourses about functional bilingualism that underpin these policy documents is contradictory and does not support Sami to be a fully functional language for all domains of society.

  • 39.
    Belancic, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Outakoski, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Westum, Asbjørg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sullivan, Kirk
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Nordsamiska i och utanför skolan: språkanvändning och attityder2017In: Samisk kamp: kulturförmedling och rättviserörelse / [ed] Marianne Liliequist och Coppélie Cocq, Umeå: Bokförlaget h:ström - Text & Kultur, 2017, p. 252-279Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40. Bergkvist, Per Henrik
    et al.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kling, Sofia
    Silviken, Anne
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Stoor, Jon Petter
    Breaking the silence: suicide prevention through storytelling among indigenous Sami2016In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 75, p. 56-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Broadbent, Noel D.
    et al.
    Lantto, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Terms of engagement: An Arctic perspective on the narratives and politics of global climate change2009In: Anthropology and Climate Change: From Encounters to Actions, Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press , 2009, p. 341-355Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Edvinsson, SörenUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.Ericsson, TomUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.Sköld, PeterUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Befolkningshistoriska perspektiv: Festskrift till Lars-Göran Tedebrand2004Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Alternativa vägar till släkthistorien2016In: Samiska rötter: släktforska i svenska Sápmi / [ed] Per Axelsson, Elisabeth Engberg, Patrik Lantto & Maria J. Wisselgren; Sveriges släktforskarförbund; CEDAR - Enheten för demografi och åldrandeforskning; Vaartoe - Centrum för samisk forskning, Sveriges släktforskarförbund , 2016, p. 53-63Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Histories of reindeer husbandry resilience: land use and social networks of reindeer husbandry in Swedish Sápmi 1740-19202015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Against a background of ongoing and predicted climatic and environmental change facing humans on a global level, this thesis combines historical perspectives with theories of social resilience in a study of reindeer husbandry in Swedish Sápmi, from the late 18th century to the early 20th century. The thesis includes four individual studies that examine the topic from different angles, connected together by reoccurring elements of social resilience. The first paper analyses the adaptive capacity of reindeer husbandry communities in the northernmost part of Swedish Sápmi during the 19th to early 20th century, using materials from the Sami bailiffs’ archives, governors’ reports and documentation from official committees. The second paper is based on similar materials and explores livelihood diversity of reindeer husbandry in southern and northern regions of Swedish Sápmi from 1860 to 1920. The third paper examines the social networks of reindeer husbandry and includes an analysis on how these are represented in demographic sources at the turn of the 20th century. The fourth and final paper examines taxation lands as objects of place-attachment in a south Sami reindeer husbandry context from 1740 to 1870.

    The thesis demonstrates that communities and families practiced highly flexible herding in terms of what pasture area they used, when and how they used it and with whom. In order to maintain this flexibility, communities needed authority to manage their own livelihoods and a diverse and interconnected landscape. The results further show that reindeer husbandry was a dynamic and diverse livelihood, well into the 20th century. Fishing, hunting, trapping or farming was part of many reindeer herding families’ livelihoods. By tethering aspects of diversity to norms and ideals within the communities included in the study, I argue that farming can be understood as both an enforced adaptation and as an adaptive capacity depending on the ideals within the community in question.

    The thesis supports the notions that reindeer husbandry since long has faced many challenges, including: border closings; competing land uses; disturbance from settlers; enforced regulations and laws concerning reindeer husbandry; and restrictions of livelihood diversity. Furthermore, these challenges were not only sources of disturbances in their own right, but they also restricted the adaptive capacity of reindeer herding communities.

  • 45.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Markanvändning i Vilhelmina norra sameby: Girijaure lappskatteland 1740–19192014In: Sydsamer - Landskap och historia: Ett dokumentationsprojekt på sydsamiskt område under åren 2012-2014 / [ed] Erik Norberg och Ulf Stefan Winka, Östersund: Gaaltje , 2014, p. 116-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Family matters: representation of Swedish Sámi households at the turn of the nineteenth century2013In: About the hearth: perspectives on the home, hearth, and household in the circumpolar north / [ed] David G. Anderson, Robert P. Wishart, Virginie Vaté, Oxford and New York: Berghahn Books, 2013, p. 103-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Reindeer management during the colonization of Sami lands: A long-term perspective of vulnerability and adaptation strategies2011In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 1095-1105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reindeer husbandry’s strong connection to the land, together with the ongoing climate-change debate, has generated growing interest in its socio-ecological resilience and vulnerability. The ability of indigenous societies and their activities to respond to change is widely recognized to be dependent on several factors, such as socioeconomic forces and aspects of governance, all of which have long historical backgrounds. However, although historians constantly address questions about human societies, there have been very few historical studies on their resilience, vulnerability and adaptation strategies. Here, using historical so­urces, we analyze the vulnerability of reindeer husbandry (and the Sami societies that depended on it) in Sweden during the 19th century. We demonstrate that although reindeer management was a much more diverse enterprise at that time than it is now, the major adaptation strategy and constraining forces were similar to those of today. The foremost adaptation strategy was, and still is, the flexible use of pasture area, and the clearest constraints during the 19th century were the loss of authority over the land and the imposed regulation of reindeer management – both of which were strongly connected to the process of colonization.    

  • 48.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Social organization of reindeer husbandry: representations of household and siida structures in demographic material at the turn of the 20th centuryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 49. Callaghan, Terry V.
    et al.
    Johansson, Margareta
    Brown, Ross D.
    Groisman, Pavel Ya.
    Labba, Niklas
    Radionov, Vladimir
    Barry, Roger G.
    Blangy, Sylvie
    Bradley, Raymond S.
    Bulygina, Olga N.
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Colman, Jonathan
    Essery, Richard L.H.
    Forbes, Bruce C.
    Forchhammer, Mads C.
    Frolov, Dimitry M.
    Golubev, Vladimir N.
    Grenfell, Thomas C.
    Honrath, Richard E.
    Juday, Glenn P.
    Melloh, Rae
    Meshcherskaya, Anna V.
    Petrushina, Marina N.
    Phoenix, Gareth K.
    Pomeroy, John
    Rautio, Arja
    Razuvaev, Vyacheslav N.
    Robinson, David A.
    Romanov, Peter
    Schmidt, Niels M.
    Serreze, Mark C.
    Shevchenko, Vladimir
    Shiklomanov, Alexander I.
    Shindell, Drew
    Shmakin, Andrey B.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sokratov, Sergey A.
    Sturm, Matthew
    Warren, Stephen
    Woo, Ming-ko
    Wood, Eric F.
    Yang, Daquing
    Changing snow cover and its impacts2011In: Snow, Water, Ice and Permafrost in the Arctic (SWIPA): Climate Change and the Cryosphere, Oslo: Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, 2011, p. 4:1-4:58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50. Callaghan, Terry V.
    et al.
    Johansson, Margareta
    Brown, Ross D.
    Groisman, Pavel Ya
    Labba, Niklas
    Radionov, Vladimir
    Bradley, Raymond S.
    Blangy, Sylvie
    Bulygina, Olga N.
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Colman, Jonathan E.
    Essery, Richard L. H.
    Forbes, Bruce C.
    Forchhammer, Mads C.
    Golubev, Vladimir N.
    Honrath, Richard E.
    Juday, Glenn P.
    Meshcherskaya, Anna V.
    Phoenix, Gareth K.
    Pomeroy, John
    Rautio, Arja
    Robinson, David A.
    Schmidt, Niels M.
    Serreze, Mark C.
    Shevchenko, Vladimir P.
    Shiklomanov, Alexander I.
    Shmakin, Andrey B.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sturm, Matthew
    Woo, Ming-ko
    Wood, Eric F.
    Multiple effects of changes in arctic snow cover2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, p. 32-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Snow cover plays a major role in the climate, hydrological and ecological systems of the Arctic and other regions through its influence on the surface energy balance (e.g. reflectivity), water balance (e.g. water storage and release), thermal regimes (e.g. insulation), vegetation and trace gas fluxes. Feedbacks to the climate system have global consequences. The livelihoods and well-being of Arctic residents and many services for the wider population depend on snow conditions so changes have important consequences. Already, changing snow conditions, particularly reduced summer soil moisture, winter thaw events and rain-on-snow conditions have negatively affected commercial forestry, reindeer herding, some wild animal populations and vegetation. Reductions in snow cover are also adversely impacting indigenous peoples' access to traditional foods with negative impacts on human health and well-being. However, there are likely to be some benefits from a changing Arctic snow regime such as more even run-off from melting snow that favours hydropower operations.

12345 1 - 50 of 241
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf