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  • 1.
    Eliasson, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Emotional abuse in children’s sport – coaches and children’s perspectives2019In: In proceedings of 16th EASS Conference, Bø, 2019, Norway, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Child protection has risen rapidly at the Swedish sport policy agenda in recent years as in other European countries. However, despite the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child it has been shown that children are not protected enough from being abused in sport. There is a lack of research on emotionally harmful behaviours in children’s sport, though more prevalent compared to other forms of abuse for example sexual abuse. The aim was to study the existence, experiences and effects of emotional abuse among 13-18 years old Swedish athletes and coaches. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews with 21 participants, 15 children and 5 coaches. The results show that emotional abuse occurs both between athletes, and between coaches and athletes. The most commonly forms of emotional abuse were verbal abuse, non-verbal abuse, neglect and lack of attention. However, the abuse reported were often were linked to children’s sport performance.

  • 2.
    Eliasson, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Fler Flickor i Innebandy: Ett forskningsprojekt om flickor som slutat spela innebandy2014In: Förening för svensk beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning, SVEBI, forsknings- och utbildningskonferens 2014, Kristianstad, Sweden, SVEBI , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many girls and boys quit sport in their teens. The reasons for this has eluded scientists and sports organizations for many years. This study was performed on behalf of the Swedish Floorball Association with the aim to understand why girls quit floorball during their teenage years and to increase knowledge about what sport clubs can do to prevent girls from quitting. Special focus was directed towards the disengagement process which the girls undergoes when they take the decision to quit their sport participation. The study is based on data from 24 semi-structured interviews with 12 girls aged 13-18 years and with one parent from each of the girls (n=12). The results showed that the disengagement process can take from a few months up to two years before the girl takes the final decision. A combination of different factors was found as the most common main reason to quit, and six critical factors were identified as crucial for the decision. The observed critical factors was; an increased focus on sport performance and results, changes in the team's formation, new coaches and changes in the coach's attitudes, interest in any other activity or sport, lack of time and high demands on themselves. Often a girl had quit due to a combination of three to four of these factors. The results indicated that the critical factors connected to the girls' decision often was related to changes from the way it was earlier in younger years. Furthermore, the results showed that parents were involved in the girls’ disengagement process, while representatives from the sport clubs were almost absent. Therefore, the representatives of sport clubs have limited knowledge about who the girls are and why they are thinking about quitting the sport. This means representatives are less able to adopt accurate strategies or to implement appropriate interventions to reduce the drop-out rate. One message to the sport organisations is therefore to develop strategies for dealing with the members’ thoughts and feelings about their sport participation and be especially aware of how changes in sport, in a combination with other critical factors, may affect the athletes’.

  • 3.
    Eliasson, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Hur är det egentligen att vara föräldratränare och tränarbarn?: 2018In: Centrum för idrottsforskning 30 års-jubileumskonferens: Idrottsforskning 2018 – för en hållbar barn- och elitidrott. Stockholm, 15-16 oktober 2018 / [ed] Centrum för idrottsforskning, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Eliasson, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Lindkvist, Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Barns upplevelser av emotionella övergrepp inom idrott2018In: Idrottsforskning.seArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Eliasson, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Lindkvist, Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Barns upplevelser av emotionella övergrepp inom idrott2019In: Idrott och hälsa, ISSN 1653-1124, no 1, p. 18-21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I en ny studie vittnar flickor och pojkar om hur emotionella övergrepp kommer till uttryck inom svensk barnidrott. Detta påverkar barnen negativt och strider mot såväl barnkonventionen som idrottens riktlinjer. En orsak är ett negativt prestationsinriktat förhållningssätt som normaliserar destruktiv kritik, orättvis behandling och mobbning.

  • 6.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Idrottsrörelsens demokratifostrande: ett historiskt perspektiv2018In: Idrott, historia & samhälle, ISSN 0280-2775, no 3–4, p. 42-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses how the Swedish sports movement’s democratic processes – and democratic fostering mission – has been described in policies from the late 19th century until the beginning of the 21st century. The strong and long-standing rhetoric of the sports movement as a ‘school in democracy’ is the background for this analysis. I particularly draw attention to the club level of the sports movement and how democracy has been discussed in that context. The analysis draws on previous research and analyses, including data such as government reports, sport manifest declarations and magazines. Theoretically, I utilise Ahrne and Papakosta’s resource mobilization theory, as applied to non-profit membership organizations. One of the article’s main findings is that 'democracy' and 'popular movement' were concepts that the leading representatives of the sports movement failed to use in the late-1800s and up until the 1920s. This was related to the fact that many leaders in the Swedish sports movement were of a bourgeois background and were strongly skeptical about parliamentary democracy (including general and equal voting rights, which were implemented in Sweden in 1921). Later on, since the 1970s, there has been an emphasising of the importance of the democratic decision-making processes within the sports movement and its democratic fostering dimensions. In accordance with Ahrne’s and Papakosta’s resource mobilization theory, my analysis shows that by the early 21st century the sports movement’s democratic institutions and processes had become a symbolic asset, and an effective tool in the struggle for Swedish democracy.

  • 7.
    Tervo, Taru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Nyström, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. School of Sport Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Injuries in Swedish floorball players: A nationwide matched cohort study2019In: Cogent Medicine, ISSN 2331-205X, Vol. 6, article id 1673087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate injury incidence and patterns in female and male floorball players of different ages compared with matched controls. This study involved all floorball players in Sweden and licensed during 2010–2012, and matched controls selected from Sweden’s Total Population Register. Injury diagnoses were acquired from national health care registers. The cohort comprised 148,372 players and 614,678 controls, with the median age 13 (range, 6‒69) years. In most age groups, players were at increased risk of traumatic injury, particularly knee and eye injuries. The incidence of cruciate ligament injury increased steeply from the ages of 13 years in girls and 16 years in boys, and was more than 7 times higher in female players aged ≥ 16 years than in controls. The risk of eye injury for floorball players compared to controls was increased from the age of 10 years in male players and approximately doubled from the age of 13 years; in adult female players this risk was more than 6 times higher than in controls. Development and implementation of injury prevention measures are essential so that floorball players can safely practice their sport. Given the increased risk of injuries seen also in young players, such measures should be applied in all age categories.

  • 8.
    Åström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    Ferry, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Sport Sciences.
    The influence of teacher education among pre-service teacher's in developing practical knowledge2019In: Book of Abstracts AIESEP International Conference. Building Bridges for Physical Activity and Sport, New York: Adelphi University, Garden City , 2019, p. 153-153Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to plan, interact and reflect on teaching, pre-service teachers (PSTs) use practical knowledge and personal beliefs as a framework (Levin & Hee, 2008). Practical knowledge refers to the complex sets of understanding that teachers use to shape and direct their teaching (Elbaz, 1981). In this study, we focus on the practical knowledge PSTs develop about their teaching and learning during their first PEH subject matter course of physical education teacher education (PETE) program. The practical knowledge they construct, the sources this derives from, and if there are differences between men and women, are areas that will be illuminated in this study. Data consists of interviews with 71 first-years PSTs from three cohorts building on earlier written assignments in which PSTs, were supposed to describe ten significant didactical milestones (DMs, practical knowledge) that would guide their future teaching. In the interviews, the PSTs were asked to specify the sources of their DM´s. The analysis of the interviews was both qualitative with content analysis, and quantitative for comparisons of frequencies regarding their sources. The results show that the sources of their DMs can be categorised into four different areas that influence their practical knowledge; general education studies, specific PE courses, earlier teaching-/coaching experiences, personal athlete-/student experiences. The main influence among the students in this study are related to content given through general education studies and the specific PE subject matter course. There is some significant differences between women and men’s sources. Women in a higher degree specify sources from the PE subject matter course and men in a higher degree specify sources from their earlier personal experiences. These results shows that practical knowledge is a highly socially constructed process and considerations regarding PSTs earlier experiences need to be discussed and challenged during PETE.

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