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  • 1. Agugiaro, G.
    et al.
    Remondino, F.
    Girardi, G.
    von Schwerin, J.
    Richards-Rissetto, Heather
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    De Amicis, R.
    A web-based interactive tool for multi-resolution 3d models of a maya archaeological site2011Inngår i: 4TH ISPRS INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP 3D-ARCH 2011: 3D VIRTUAL RECONSTRUCTION AND VISUALIZATION OF COMPLEX ARCHITECTURES / [ed] Remondino, F; ElHakim, S, 2011, nr W16, 23-30 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous technological advances in surveying, computing and digital-content delivery are strongly contributing to a change in the way Cultural Heritage is "perceived": new tools and methodologies for documentation, reconstruction and research are being created to assist not only scholars, but also to reach more potential users (e.g. students and tourists) willing to access more detailed information about art history and archaeology. 3D computer-simulated models, sometimes set in virtual landscapes, offer for example the chance to explore possible hypothetical reconstructions, while on-line GIS resources can help interactive analyses of relationships and change over space and time. While for some research purposes a traditional 2D approach may suffice, this is not the case for more complex analyses concerning spatial and temporal features of architecture, like for example the relationship of architecture and landscape, visibility studies etc. The project aims therefore at creating a tool, called "QueryArch3D" tool, which enables the web-based visualisation and queries of an interactive, multi-resolution 3D model in the framework of Cultural Heritage. More specifically, a complete Maya archaeological site, located in Copan (Honduras), has been chosen as case study to test and demonstrate the platform's capabilities. Much of the site has been surveyed and modelled at different levels of detail (LoD) and the geometric model has been semantically segmented and integrated with attribute data gathered from several external data sources. The paper describes the characteristics of the research work, along with its implementation issues and the initial results of the developed prototype. [GRAPHICS] .

  • 2. Alm, Göran
    et al.
    Houltz, Anders
    Johansson, Björn Axel
    Snickars, Pelle
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Stendahl, Jenny
    I världsutställningarnas tid: kungahus, näringsliv & medier2017Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 3. Amelang, Katrin
    et al.
    Anastasiadou-Christophidou, Violetta
    Constantinou, Costas S.
    Johansson, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Lundin, Susanne
    Beck, Stefan
    Learning to eat strawberries in a disciplined way: normalization practices following organ transplantation2011Inngår i: Ethnologia Europaea, ISSN 0425-4597, Vol. 41, nr 2, 54-70 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Berättaren och berättelsen: En studie av ett gränsområde2012Inngår i: Språkets gränser - och verklighetens: Perspektiv på begreppet gräns / [ed] Daniel Andersson & Lars-Erik Edlund, Umeå: Institutionen för språkstudier, Umeå universitet , 2012, 17-32 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Från kolonisation till gruvexploatering: nyttoperspektiv på naturen i Sápmi förr och nu2016Inngår i: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 1, 42-49 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Narrating climate change: conventionalized narratives in concordance and conflict2016Inngår i: Narrative works, ISSN 1925-0622, Vol. 6, nr 2, 1-27 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we take a narrative approach to Swedish media texts regarding farming, forestry, and Sami livelihoods. The main purpose is to illuminate how a master narrative on climate change is shaped, activated, and put into practice in different ways in different settings and contexts. The study discusses the complex interplay between different levels of narratives and the narrative dynamics that influence and shape collective representations of climate change. We discern a narrative level that does not explicitly challenge the master narrative, but operationalizes it in close relation to cultural contexts and specific goals, resulting in what we call conventionalized narratives.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Ro, trygghet och tröst: naturen som sammanhang2014Inngår i: Naturen för mig: nutida röster och kulturella perspektiv / [ed] Lina Midholm, Katarina Saltzman, Göteborg: Institutet för språk och folkminnen, 2014, 183-190 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 8.
    Arthur, Paul
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Digital Biography: Capturing Lives Online2009Inngår i: a/b: Auto/Biography Studies, ISSN 0898-9575, Vol. 24, nr 1, 74-92 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 9.
    Arvidsson, Alf
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper.
    Blomberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper.
    Carlquist, Jonas
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Stenberg, Peder
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper.
    Svensson, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Computer games as meeting places and as fiction2008Inngår i: Arv. Scandinavian Yearbook of Folklore, ISSN 0066-8176, 47-59 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 10.
    Arvidsson, Viktor
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS). Swedish Center for Digital Innovation.
    Foka, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Digital gender: perspective, phenomena, practice2015Inngår i: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, nr 4Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research on gender online has made important land gains but under-theorizes the Internet as a passive, fixed, and somewhat insubstantial space or context. By contrast, this special issue draws on new material thinking to put into questions the very notion of “cyberspace” as a distinct realm. In this vein, the contents of this issue critically examine how the Internet and related digital technologies actively “work” to maintain or transform systems of oppression, as displayed, for example, in the digital doing(s) of gender. They also show how digital technologies and related concepts can be used to challenge current understandings of race, class, and gender and to produce and provoke new forms of knowledge. While the contents of this issue are drawn from different fields and display great diversity, the individual contributions of each author helps to chart out three potent venues for future Internet research: namely digital gender as perspective, phenomena, and practice.

  • 11.
    Asaro, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    From mechanisms of adaptation to intelligence amplifiers: the philosophy of W. Ross Ashby2008Inngår i: The mechanical mind in history / [ed] Philip Husbands, Owen Holland and Michael Wheeler, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2008, 149-184 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 12.
    Asaro, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Filosofi och lingvistik.
    Heinz von Foerster and the Bio-Computing Movements of the 1960s2007Inngår i: An Unfinished Revolution?: Heinz von Foerster and the Biological Computer Laboratory 1958-1976 / [ed] Albert Müller, Karl H. Müller, Edition Echoraum , 2007Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 13.
    Asaro, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    How Just Could a Robot War Be?2007Inngår i: Proceedings of the 2007 European Computing And Philosophy Conference / [ed] Philip Brey, Adam Briggle & Katinka Waelbers, Amsterdam: IOS Publishers , 2007Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 14.
    Asaro, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, HUMlab. Filosofi och lingvistik.
    Whatever Happened to Cybernetics?2007Inngår i: Monochrom Yearbook 2007, 2007Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 15.
    Asaro, Peter M.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    A Body to Kick, but Still No Soul to Damn: Legal Perspectives on Robotics2012Inngår i: Robot Ethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Robotics / [ed] Patrick Lin, Keith Abney and George A. Bekey, CAMBRIDGE: MIT Press, 2012, 169-186 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 16.
    Barrett, James
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Frankenstein’s Monster Comes Home: The ‘Two Cultures’ in Remix2013Inngår i: Authorship, ISSN 2034-4643, Vol. 2, nr 2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley (1818) is the starting point for this reading of remix in relation to authorship and its implications for creative work. The monster in Frankenstein has no single author, or father, and is damned by his mixed parentage as much as by his inability to recreate himself. Alone, he falls into the waste as a product of the divide between poetry and science. The ‘two cultures’ coined by C. P. Snow (1956) address this same divide and lament its dominance in mid twentieth-century intellectual life. But contemporary remix culture that relies on digital media closes this gap as poets now write code and artists are technicians. In my close reading of five remixes I show that origin is no longer relevant in the mixed material realization of processes that are performed or ‘re-authored’ in reception. In these remixes the creator reinterprets by changing the context of remixed elements in the works. The result is textual hybrids that are remixed further in reception.

  • 17.
    Barrett, James
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Narratives of Creation and Space:: Pilgrimage, Aboriginal and Digital2008Inngår i: Format, ISSN 0867-2555, nr 55, 18-19 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    I approach digital media via brief examinations of spatial and narrative discourse networks not often associated with the digital. This approach is meant to suggest that digital media is a product and a producer of a dynamic realignment of cultural assumptions globally, such as what is considered to be 'narrative'. The cultural fields I discuss in relation to digital media are the performance of pilgrimage and some of the story telling systems of the Australian Aboriginal nations. In relation to pilgrimage the 9th century Buddhist stupa of Borobudur on the Indonesian island of Java is examined as an example of a spatial hypermediation that immerses the pilgrim in a story manifest through interactions. The Aboriginal story systems examined move across media forms (spoken word, song, body paint, sculpture, bark painting) to present a participatory narrative grounded in culturally specific understandings of space and place.

    My use of the term 'digital' refers to media systems that rely on digital technologies. The major features of digital technologies relevant here is the effectiveness of the technology at constructing spatial relations in representations and the demand of the direct participation of the users as co-creators of what is represented.

     

  • 18.
    Barrett, James
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Reading with the Body:: interpreting three dimensional media as narrative2011Inngår i: The projected and prophetic: humanity in cyberculture, cyberspace, and science fiction / [ed] Jordan J. Copeland, Oxford UK: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2011, 1, 21-31 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    This chapter argues that virtual online worlds are sites for the realization of narrative, in a form of reading that is posthuman and performative. The in-world avatar is the embodiment of an interpreting agent in the virtual world. Such devices accomplish a number of functions in terms of narrative realisation. The avatar contributes to the realisation of narrative through the navigation of the spatial attributes, the setting up of perspective in terms of Point of View (POV) in the reading, and as a character agent in the narrative architecture of the virtual world. Such characteristics are in the cybernetic relationship between the virtual world as a text, and the responses that can be made to it in reception. Architecture becomes the grammar of reading in the virtual world, with design and code, copyright and address directing narrative. The body of the avatar and the body of the person operating it are joined across the spaces of the digital and the physical in the navigation of the virtual three-dimensional.

  • 19.
    Barrett, James
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Rhetoric of the Holy in the Online Virtual Environment of Second Life2010Inngår i: Changing societies – values, religions, and education: A selection of papers from a conference at Umeå University, June 2009 / [ed] Karin Sporre and Gudrun Svedberg, Umeå: Umeå School of Education , 2010, nr 7, 19-24 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses three examples of rhetorical holiness from the online virtual world of Second Life. The rhetorical holiness is compared to the representation of beliefs and practices in physical settings. By examining representation of the holy in Second Life it is possible to discuss the shift from older to new media forms in established and therefore comparative contexts. How these movements reflect and affect practices and beliefs is argued as highlighting networks of power and meaning.

  • 20.
    Barrett, James
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Virtual worlds and indigenous narratives2013Inngår i: The immersive Internet: reflections on the entangling of the virtual with society, politics and the economy / [ed] Robin Teigland and Dominic Power, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, First, 77-91 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter introduces trans-cultural comparisons of narrative. The comparison is based on close readings of four Australian Aboriginal narratives for their portrayal of the body, place and identity. From the close readings a comparison is introduced concerning narrative and how embodiment, place and identity function in virtual worlds.  By paying respectful attention to the Aboriginal narratives, a sustainable model for narrative is introduced for virtual worlds. Co-creation, navigation and spatial mediation are central to both narrative systems, not as fiction but from experience and knowledge. This brief comparative study of narrative introduces sustainable practices from the ancient Australian Aboriginal traditions as relevant for understanding online virtual worlds as sites of narrative.

  • 21.
    Barrett, James
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Virtual worlds, machinima and cooperation over borders2013Inngår i: Sens Public: International Web Journal, ISSN 2104-3272Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperation over borders between individuals and groups is possible using online three-dimensional virtual worlds. This cooperation occurs in the production of art, research, teaching and learning, and performance as well as in building social, professional and personal contexts. The borders that are crossed can be geopolitical, generational, spatial and embodied. In order to maintain coherence for people to meet, talk, build, write, perform and exchange in virtual worlds, a sense and understanding of place is required. Such human activities as meeting are reliant on a shared space and place. This chapter integrates the idea of sharing places in examples of how virtual worlds can provide common spaces and places from a series of projects involving art, documentation, teaching and communication. By using examples of one artist’s project and several machinima – videos made using screen-capture software on computers, to film places and avatar actors in virtual worlds – I argue these virtual worlds can enable cooperation over a variety of borders through sharing.

  • 22.
    Barrett, James
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Gelfgren, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    En görandets humaniora: skapande i virtuella världar som pedagogiskt verktyg2010Inngår i: Undervisning på tvären : student- och lärarerfarenheter: den nionde universitetspedagogiska konferensen 25-26 februari 2009 / [ed] Erik Lindenius, Umeå: Umeå Universitet , 2010, 59-77 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the possibilities for the creative use of virtual worlds as tools for learning. Initially it describes the starting points and motivations for this work. It goes on to report the experience of a course in which students in the museum studies program created exhibits in the virtual three-dimensional world of Second Life. The purpose was primarily to provide the students with competence in digital visualization and presentation techniques, but also to give them the tools to combine theoretical perspectives with practical work, and thereby stimulate creative thinking and practice. The experience shows that students, above the intial goals, also gained insight into themselves through community processes, group dynamics, the individual's own role in a working group, in relation to language processing, and the laws of copyright.

  • 23.
    Barrett, James
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Gelfgren, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Learning Places: a Case Study of Collaborative Pedagogy Using Online Virtual Worlds2011Inngår i: Multi-User Virtual Environments for the Classroom: Practical Approaches to Teaching in Virtual Worlds / [ed] Giovanni Vincenti & James Braman, Hershey: IGI Global , 2011, 31-46 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter, based on a set of developed teaching scenarios, discusses how virtual worlds, in particular Second Life, can be used in student centered pedagogy; intertwining theory and practice, emphasizing process-thinking, critical perspectives, and strengthen the confidence and independence of the student. Drawing upon experiences from traditional education, Web 2.0-tools, and problem based pedagogy grounded in project work, social media, engineering, and digital humanities, this chapter presents a pedagogy based upon the concepts of participatory culture, and co-creation on the part of students in the learning process. The authors have been involved in developing the core curriculum for a term-long (four month) course for Museum Studies. A problem based, student centered pedagogy is both integrated and contrasted with traditional classroom settings, that are also part of the planning, implementation, and assessment stages of the course. Based upon the practical experience of conducting this course, the article critically discusses ICT and problem oriented learning on a general level – including the benefits and disadvantages for the student and for the teachers. How this approach to learning, from the experiences in virtual worlds, can fit in to the established structure of learning goals, lectures, examination, and assessment is questioned in the chapter, based on the experiences gathered from teaching the course.

  • 24.
    Barrett, James
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, Institutionen för språkstudier. Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, HUMlab.
    Gelfgren, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, HUMlab.
    Spacing Creation: The HUMlab Second Life Project2009Inngår i: Learning and Teaching in the Virtual World of Second Life, Trondheim: Tapir Academic Press , 2009, 167-183 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is both a summary and a glimpse of the future regarding the twelve months of activity in Second Life by the digital humanities lab and studio HUMlab at Umeå University. Art and cooperation have been the emphasis in the early stages of the HUMlab Second Life project. In the few months prior to the authoring of this chapter things began to move quite rapidly for HUMlab in Second Life with numerous projects emerging in relation to the large HUMlab Island. Through a constructivist pedagogical model, and lots of trial and error many lessons have been learnt by all involved. Some of the more interesting learning experiences are related in this chapter.

  • 25.
    Barrett, James
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Jenna, Ng
    University of York.
    A Pedegogy of Craft: Teaching culture analysis with machinima2013Inngår i: Understanding Machinima: Essays on Filmmaking in virtual worlds / [ed] Jenna Ng, New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013, First, 227-244 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Machinima films are commonly associated with various other media forms such as games, television, cinema, theatre and music videos. Sprung from gameplay, machinima originated as gaming “demos” – data logs which can be played back on a game engine to re-live past events in a game world, typically used to re-play gamers’ high jinks or record performances (Lowood 2005; Lowood 2006; Nitsche 2007) – in a process already cinematic in its Lumiére Brothers-esque recording of game reality (Burke 2012). Such “high-performance play” (Lowood 2005, 11) morphed into narrative cinema with The Rangers’s hacking of Quake (id Games 1994) to make Diary of a Camper in October 1996 (Lowood 2006), as the gamers appropriated the game’s camera perspective (from FPS to an independent viewpoint), edited disparate shots and formulated visual narrative with its sequences. As machinima evolved, other media forms drove its format, language and aesthetics. Well-known machinima such as Red vs Blue and Bill and John, for example, adapt the episodic format of comedy television and rely on theatrical comic timing and voice acting, even to a certain Brechtian absurdism (Avers), for their success. Michael Nitsche directly links machinima with live performance “acted out inside the virtual world and presented in different formats to the audience.” (Nitsche, Film Live) Other scholars see works such as The Edge of Remorse (Hancock and Ingram 362) and Rise of the Living Dead (Pigott 2011) as particularly cinematic. Elements of older media are not only integrated, but are subverted: Jeffrey Bardzell discusses a “resistance stance” in machinima that “seeks to subvert the reality of the game or subordinate it to the vision or meanings that the machinimator seeks to express” (Bardzell 2011, 208).

    There is thus already much scholarship in studying machinima with respect to screen media and performance. Yet, one aspect of machinima that has not been discussed as much so far is how machinima is also very much a made object, composed both as a technology and as a thing. In making machinima, game technologies are modified, subverted, adapted, even re-created.[i] However, that form of making is merely one part of the story – creating machinima also involves drawing up and building virtual objects, creating and dressing avatars (often with custom-made clothes, accessories and skins), designing or selecting sets, writing scripts and recording acting voices. In that respect, machinima is also a thing – an object – constructed through a series of processes and fashioned with a whole set of skills. This crafting of machinima, in the sense of it being formed as a complex digital artefact, is often overshadowed by its more dominating importance of it being a media object. We propose that prioritizing process over object not only presents an alternative perspective to understanding machinima, but also deflects attention onto the contingency of media and, by extension, new methods of making and extracting meaning. As Nicholas Thoburn argues, media is transformed as “they enter into new external relations, new ecologies – and traversed by a multiplicity of forces and struggles” (2012, 817). Shifting the theoretical focus to the making of media taps into this fluid placing of media in its flux of relations and ecologies so that we may further understand how the creating of media itself can become a space of political and social transformation.

    At first glance, the connection between machinima and craft appears tenuous. As Oliver Morton, editor-in-chief of Wired magazine (Europe), first observed in 1995, computer technologies remove the aspect of “hands-on” making in craftwork. (Dormer 1997, 137) The common notion of craft involves a tangible object – “the thing made by human hands” (Paz) – such as a pottered water jug or a handwoven basket, invoking sensuality, physicality, and the organic. Craft also implies elements of physical skill, of “cumbersome manual techniques” (Turim, 51) which gives rise to a slow, tactile and responsive process of creation. Images from Denis Diderot’s Encyclopédie, for example, depict craftsmen hunched at large tables, bent over their tools in workshop-like environments, hands busily working away at unfinished products. On the other hand, machinima, like all digital objects, is fundamentally immaterial. It may be contained in something tangible such as a DVD (indeed, the CD-ROM accompanying Machinima for Dummies contains, among others, some of the authors’ “top ten Machinima films”) or a thumb drive containing a demo file, both of which may, in different ways, provide access to the game movies they store. However, its basic ontology – as a film – is binary code, strings of zeros and ones, which as an artefact or object do not take any humanly recognizable material form. Furthermore, with so many computer processes in the making of machinima – moving avatars, recording onscreen captures, editing digitally, uploading and distributing online – there appears to be little “hands-on” making, save for perhaps the prodigious controlling of a computer mouse. How, then, might machinima be seen as craftwork?

    Yet, we see this linkage as an important one. The connection between making and understanding is a close and well-known one, whereby it is acknowledged that we often understand something best by actually making it. Machinima as craft thus formulates also a means to the learning of knowledge and skills. As we will argue, the process of making imparts valuable skills and places learning in different frameworks, re-formulating concepts and ideas so as to make them more memorable and allowing for more effective analysis. In a wider scale, machinima thus also offers pedagogy the possibility of making – and learning – in numerous media contexts, such as film, music video, theatre, design, architecture and performance, and in relatively cheap and efficient ways, without the need for costly equipment, such as physical cameras, or complicated logistics of onset filming and recording.

    This chapter proceeds as follows. We first discuss how machinima may be deemed to be craft through canvassing its definition, before examining the characteristics of making machinima and comparing them to those for traditional craftwork. The next section explicates the connection between craft and teaching, primarily as it is used in HUMlab, Umeå University. We then describe a case study from the lab which uses precisely those qualities of craft in machinima as a teaching method for a second-year media and culture course, Cultural Analysis. In the process, we also examine these questions: what were the motivations of using the aspect of “making” in machinima as part of the course? How was it done? What did it achieve?

    [i] Although this is being increasingly qualified with machinima-specific software such as The Movies and Moviestorm, and with embedded machinima software in games such as Halo.

  • 26. Bergman, Kerstin
    et al.
    Bäckström, PerClaesson, ChristianDahlberg, LeifForslid, TorbjörnFranzén, CarinCullhed, AnnaHelgesson, StefanHenrikson, PaulaIngvarsson, JonasJohansson, AndersJohansson, ChristerLindhé, CeciliaUmeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.Lysell, RolandMöller, HåkanNovén, BengtOrlov, JaninaSjöholm, CeciliaSundén, JennyUllén, Magnus
    Codex and Code: Aestethcis, Language and Politics in an Age of Digital Media, NORLIT 2009, Stockholm, August 6-9, 20092010Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The conference Codex and Code: Aesthetics, Language and Politics in an Age of Digital Media (NorLit 2009)was held at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, August 6–9, 2009. The conference was organized by the Nordic Association for Comparative Literature (NorLit); the Department of Culture and Communication, Linköping University; the School of Computer Science and Communication, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH); the Department of Comparative Literature, Stockholm University; the Department of Culture and Communication, Södertörn University College; and the Department of Comparative Literature, Uppsala University.

        The aim of the conference was to develop the study of Comparative Literature through Nordic collaboration both in its own discipline and in Modern Language and Cultural studies. As the title for the conference suggests, the principal question for the conference was the challenge that the study of literature encounters in an age of digitalization and globalization. It was our aim to encourage discussion of how literary studies respond to the ongoing changes in media and technology, politics and economy. Many have argued that the Humanities currently are in a state of crisis. We believe that the discipline seldom has found itself in such an interesting and fruitful historical moment. Several of these questions have surfaced during earlier media system changes, in particular during Romanticism and Modernism, which provided the conference with an historical frame. The conference Codex and Code also addressed questions of authenticity and originality, identity and gender, literary genres and reading practices, media and materiality, culture and popular culture, language and history, world literature, work aesthetics, translations, and canon formation.

        The conference Codex and Code wanted to stimulate interdisciplinary scholarly research of the literary in a broad sense. The conference was open to scholars in Comparative Literature and in Classical and Modern Languages, Aesthetics, Media and Communication studies, Film and Theatre studies, Philosophy and adjacent disciplines. The conference was organized around a number of thematic sessions in which researchers and scholars presented and discussed papers.

        The conference has received generous financial support from the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation, Magnus Bergwall foundation, Granholms foundation, Linköping University, School of Computer Science and Communication, Royal Institute of Technology, Svenska litteratursällskapet; the Swedish Academy, Swedish Science Council, and Vitterhetsakademien.

  • 27.
    Blomberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, Kultur och medier. HUMlab.
    Spelanalytiska dimensioner2005Inngår i: SuperPLAYArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 28.
    Blomberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, Kultur och medier. HUMlab.
    Spelmissbruk eller ordmissbruk2005Inngår i: SuperPLAYArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 29.
    Blomberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, Kultur och medier. HUMlab.
    Spelsamlandets drivkrafter2005Inngår i: SuperPLAYArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 30.
    Blomberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, Kultur och medier. HUMlab.
    Så bevisas spelvåldets inverkan2005Inngår i: SuperPLAYArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 31.
    Blomberg, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, Kultur och medier. HUMlab.
    Är spel konst: och vem bryr sig?2005Inngår i: SuperPLAYArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 32. Borg, Alexandra
    et al.
    Pelle, Snickars
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Bokmediets omvandling: en lägesrapport2016Inngår i: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 13, nr 3, 1-23 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Rapport från ett nyligen avslutat forsknings- och samtalsprojekt: "Kod[ex]. Bokmediets omvandling".

  • 33.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    SEAD - The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database. Inter-linking multiproxy environmental data with archaeological investigations and ecology.2013Inngår i: CAA2012, Proceedings of the 40th Annual Conference of Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Southampton, England. / [ed] Graeme Earl, Tim Sly, Angeliki Chrysanthi, Patricia Murrieta-Flores, Constantinos Papadopoulos, Iza Romanowska & David Wheatley, Amsterdam, 2013, 320-331 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume of data on past environmental and climate changes, as well as human interactions with these, has long since passed the level where it is manageable outside of large scale database systems. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database project aims to not only store and disseminate such data, but also provide tools for querying and analysing them, whilst maintaining a close connection with the archaeological and ecological data that are essential for their comprehensive interpretation. Large scale, geographically and chronologically unrestricted databases provide us with essentially unlimited scope for putting individual sites into a broader context and applying locally collated data to the investigation of earth system level changes. By providing integrated access to data from a variety of proxies, including plant macrofossils, pollen, insects and geochemistry, along with dating evidence, more complex questions can be answered where any single proxy would not be able to provide comprehensive answers.

  • 34.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    The Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package (BugsCEP) database: 1000 sites and half a million fossils later2014Inngår i: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 341, 272-282 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bugs database project started in the late 1980s as what would now be considered a relatively simple system, albeit advanced for its time, linking fossil beetle species lists to modern habitat and distribution information. Since then, Bugs has grown into a complex database of fossils records, habitat and distribution data, dating and climate reference data wrapped into an advanced software analysis package. At the time of writing, the database contains raw data and metadata for 1124 sites, and Russell Coope directly contributed to the analysis of over 154 (14%) of them, some 98790 identifications published in 231 publications. Such quantifications are infeasible without databases, and the analytical power of combining a database of modern and fossil insects with analysis tools is potentially immense for numerous areas of science ranging from conservation to Quaternary geology.

    BugsCEP, The Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package, is the latest incarnation of the Bugs database project. Released in 2007, the database is continually added too and is available for free download from http://www.bugscep.com. The software tools include quantitative habitat reconstruction and visualisation, correlation matrices, MCR climate reconstruction, searching by habitat and retrieving, among other things, a list of taxa known from the selected habitat types. It also provides a system for entering, storing and managing palaeoentomological data as well as a number of expert system like reporting facilities.

    Work is underway to create an online version of BugsCEP, implemented through the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD) project (http://www.sead.se). The aim is to provide more direct access to the latest data, a community orientated updating system, and integration with other proxy data. Eventually, the tools available in the offline BugsCEP will be duplicated and Bugs will be entirely in the web.

    This paper summarises aspects of the current scope, capabilities and applications of the BugsCEP database and software, with special reference to and quantifications of the contributions of Russell Coope to the field of palaeoentomology as represented in the database. The paper also serves to illustrate the potential for the use of BugsCEP in biographical studies, and discusses some of the issues relating to the use of large scale sources of quantitative data.

    All datasets used in this article are available through the current version of BugsCEP available at http://www.bugscep.com.

  • 35.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    BugsCEP, an entomological database twenty-five years on2014Inngår i: Antenna (Journal of the Royal Entomological Society), ISSN 0140-1890, Vol. 38, nr 1, 21-28 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 36.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Eriksson, Erik J.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD)2014Inngår i: The Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2014, 7076-7085 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental archaeology encompasses a wide range of scientific methods for analyzing the results of past human activities, environments, climates and perhaps most importantly, the relationships between these. Many of these methods are referred to as proxy analyses, denoting the illumination of the past as interpreted through the evidence of fossil organisms or properties. These lines of evidence, or proxy data sources, are assumed to reflect past conditions by way of their dependence on them. For example, crops will only grow within a specific climate range; organic waste will lead to increased soil phosphate levels and burning increases magnetic susceptibility. Whilst it is easier to store, manage and analyze the data produced by these methods individually, there is much to be gained from multi-proxy integration at the raw data level. Despite this methodological diversity, the common factors of space, time and context allow us to compare and integrate the results of analyses. This is, however, easier said than done, and without efficient data handling systems the data rapidly become unmanageable. SEAD represents one solution to this problem, and forms a node in an international web of open access paleoenvironmental and archaeological databases which are driving archaeological science into new realms of more complex, multi-site, multi-proxy analyses and meta-analyses. This article sets out to describe the system, the scientific implications of which are covered in Buckland et al. 2010.

  • 37.
    Buckland, Philip I
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Erik J
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Engelmark, Roger
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Svensson, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Buckland, Paul
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Edinbrough University, UK.
    Olofsson, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Integrating human dimensions of arctic palaeoenvironmental science: SEAD - the strategic environmental archaeology database2011Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 38, nr 2, 345-351 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental change has a human dimension, and has had so for at least the last 10 000 years. The prehistoric impact of people on the Arctic landscape has occasionally left visible traces, such as house and field structures. More often than not, however, the only evidence available is at the microscopic or geochemical level, such as fossil insect and seed assemblages or changes in the physical and chemical properties of soils and sediments. These records are the subject of SEAD, a multidisciplinary database and software project currently underway at Umeå University, Sweden, which aims to create an online database and set of tools for investigating these traces, as part of an international research infrastructure for palaeoecology and environmental archaeology.

  • 38.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Erik J.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    SEAD - The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database: Progress Report Spring 20142014Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This report provides an overview of the progress and results of the VR:KFI infrastructure projects 2007-7494 and (825-)2010-5976. It should be considered as a status report in an on-going long-term research infrastructure development project.

  • 39.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Hammarlund, Dan
    Lund University.
    Hjärthner-Holdar, Eva
    Swedish National Historical Museums.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University.
    Lindahl, Anders
    Lund University.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University.
    The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database: a resource for international, multiproxy and transdisciplinary studies of environmental and climatic change2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate and environmental change are global challenges which require global data and infrastructure to investigate. These challenges also require a multi-proxy approach, integrating evidence from Quaternary science and archaeology with information from studies on modern ecology and physical processes among other disciplines. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD http://www.sead.se) is a Swedish based international research e-infrastructure for storing, managing, analysing and disseminating palaeoenvironmental data from an almost unlimited number of analysis methods. The system currently makes available raw data from over 1500 sites (>5300 datasets) and the analysis of Quaternary fossil insects, plant macrofossils, pollen, geochemistry and sediment physical properties, dendrochronology and wood anatomy, ceramic geochemistry and bones, along with numerous dating methods. This capacity will be expanded in the near future to include isotopes, multi-spectral and archaeo-metalurgical data. SEAD also includes expandable climate and environment calibration datasets, a complete bibliography and extensive metadata and services for linking these data to other resources. All data is available as Open Access through http://qsead.sead.se and downloadable software.

     

    SEAD is maintained and managed at the Environmental Archaeology Lab and HUMlab at Umea University, Sweden. Development and data ingestion is progressing in cooperation with The Laboratory for Ceramic Research and the National Laboratory for Wood Anatomy and Dendrochronology at Lund University, Sweden, the Archaeological Research Laboratory, Stockholm University, the Geoarchaeological Laboratory, Swedish National Historical Museums Agency and several international partners and research projects. Current plans include expanding its capacity to serve as a data source for any system and integration with the Swedish National Heritage Board's information systems.

     

    SEAD is partnered with the Neotoma palaeoecology database (http://www.neotomadb.org) and a new initiative for building cyberinfrastructure for transdisciplinary research and visualization of the long-term human ecodynamics of the North Atlantic funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

  • 40.
    Carpenter, Ele
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Activist tendencies in craft2010Inngår i: Art, Activism and Recuperation, Bristol: Arnolfini , 2010, nr 3Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 41.
    Chapman, Adam
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Foka, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab. Centre for gender studies, University of Oslo.
    Westin, Jonathan
    What is historical game studies?2017Inngår i: Rethinking history, ISSN 1364-2529, E-ISSN 1470-1154, Vol. 21, nr 3, 358-371 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42. Cheong, Pauline Hope
    et al.
    Fischer-Nielsen, PeterGelfgren, StefanUmeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.Ess, Charles
    Digital Religion, Social Media and Culture: Perspectives, Practices and Futures2012Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 43.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Anthropological places, digital spaces, and imaginary scapes: packaging a digital Sámiland2013Inngår i: Folklore: the journal of the Folklore Society, ISSN 0015-587X, E-ISSN 1469-8315, Vol. 124, nr 1, 1-14 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article, which focuses on the Sámi, the indigenous people of Fenno-Scandinavia, investigates the production of place in digital environments. Place-making practices are approached through the study of expressive culture. This article also discusses the consequences of these practices for linguistic and cultural revitalization and for the articulation of Sámi identity.

  • 44.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Att berätta och återberätta: intervjuer, narrativ interaktion och berättigande2014Inngår i: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 23, nr 4, 22-29 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 45.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Att omdefiniera expertis: de samiska språken i digitala miljöer2017Inngår i: Samisk kamp: kulturförmedling och rättviserörelse / [ed] Marianne Liliequist och Coppélie Cocq, Umeå: Bokförlaget h:ström - Text & Kultur, 2017Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 46.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Danish Folktales, Legends, & Other Stories. 2015Inngår i: Arv. Scandinavian Yearbook of Folklore, ISSN 0066-8176, Vol. 71, 209-210 s.Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 47.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Exploitation or Preservation? Your Choice! Digital Modes of Expressing Perceptions of Nature and the Land: Digital Modes of Expressing Perceptions of Nature and the Land2016Inngår i: The Environment in the Age of the Internet: Activists, Communication, and the Digital Landscape / [ed] Heike Graf, Open Book Publishers, 2016, 53-74 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 48.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Folklore och identitetsskapande: Vi och Dem i nordsamisk berättartradition2010Inngår i: Samer som "den andre", samer om "den andre": identitet och etnicitet i nordiska kulturmöten / [ed] Else Mundal & Håkan Rydving, Umeå: Umeå Universitet , 2010Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 49.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Forskningshistoriskt perspektiv på insamlingen av samiskt arkivmateria 2010Inngår i: Svenska landsmål och svenskt folkliv, ISSN 0347-1837, Vol. 133Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 50.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    From the Árran to the Internet: Sami Storytelling in Digital Environments2013Inngår i: Oral Tradition, ISSN 0883-5365, E-ISSN 1542-4308, Vol. 28, nr 1Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    By examining instances of adaptation of Sami tales and legends to digital environments, this essay investigates new premises and challenges for the emergence of traditional narratives. The Internet is approached as a place of creation and negotiation for traditional storytelling, and this study illustrates how the potential of the Internet must be nuanced and interpreted in relation to offline practices regarding such materials and traditions.

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