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  • 1.
    Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Unit of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Dept of Diagnostics and Public Health, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; Equal contribution as first authors.
    Calciano, Lucia
    Unit of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Dept of Diagnostics and Public Health, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; Equal contribution as first authors.
    Johannessen, Ane
    Centre for International Health, Dept of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Benediktsdóttir, Bryndis
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen
    Dept of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Bråbäck, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Dharmage, Shyamali C.
    Allergy and Lung Health Unit, School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Gómez Real, Francisco
    Dept of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Dept of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Holloway, John W.
    Human Development and Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Holm, Mathias
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Dept of Medical Sciences: Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jõgi, Nils O.
    Dept of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Lung Clinic, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.
    Jõgi, Rain
    Lung Clinic, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Dept of Medical Sciences: Clinical Physiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Unit of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Dept of Diagnostics and Public Health, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
    Martínez-Moratalla Rovira, Jesús
    Servicio de Neumología, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete (CHUA), Servicio de Salud de Castilla-La Mancha (SESCAM), Albacete, Spain.
    Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis
    Dept of Nursing, University of Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
    Schlünssen, Vivi
    Dept of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Torén, Kjell
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Faculty of Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Equal contribution as last authors.
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Centre for International Health, Dept of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Equal contribution as last authors.
    Prenatal and prepubertal exposures to tobacco smoke in men may cause lower lung function in future offspring: a three-generation study using a causal modelling approach2021In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 58, no 4, article id 2002791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanistic research suggests that lifestyle and environmental factors impact respiratory health across generations by epigenetic changes transmitted through male germ cells. Evidence from studies on humans is very limited.We investigated multigeneration causal associations to estimate the causal effects of tobacco smoking on lung function within the paternal line. We analysed data from 383 adult offspring (age 18-47 years; 52.0% female) and their 274 fathers, who had participated in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS)/Respiratory Health in Northern Europe, Spain and Australia (RHINESSA) generation study and had provided valid measures of pre-bronchodilator lung function. Two counterfactual-based, multilevel mediation models were developed with: paternal grandmothers' smoking in pregnancy and fathers' smoking initiation in prepuberty as exposures; fathers' forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC), or FEV1/FVC z-scores as potential mediators (proxies of unobserved biological mechanisms that are true mediators); and offspring's FEV1 and FVC, or FEV1/FVC z-scores as outcomes. All effects were summarised as differences (Δ) in expected z-scores related to fathers' and grandmothers' smoking history.Fathers' smoking initiation in prepuberty had a negative direct effect on both offspring's FEV1 (Δz-score -0.36, 95% CI -0.63- -0.10) and FVC (-0.50, 95% CI -0.80- -0.20) compared with fathers' never smoking. Paternal grandmothers' smoking in pregnancy had a negative direct effect on fathers' FEV1/FVC (-0.57, 95% CI -1.09- -0.05) and a negative indirect effect on offspring's FEV1/FVC (-0.12, 95% CI -0.21- -0.03) compared with grandmothers' not smoking before fathers' birth nor during fathers' childhood.Fathers' smoking in prepuberty and paternal grandmothers' smoking in pregnancy may cause lower lung function in offspring. Our results support the concept that lifestyle-related exposures during these susceptibility periods influence the health of future generations.

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  • 2. Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Calciano, Lucia
    Johannessen, Ane
    Portas, Laura
    Benediktsdóttir, Bryndis
    Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen
    Bråbäck, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Carsin, Anne-Elie
    Dharmage, Shyamali C.
    Dratva, Julia
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gomez Real, Francisco
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Holloway, John W.
    Holm, Mathias
    Janson, Christer
    Jögi, Rain
    Leynaert, Bénédicte
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Martínez-Moratalla Rovira, Jesús
    Raherison, Chantal
    Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis
    Schlünssen, Vivi
    Bono, Roberto
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Demoly, Pascal
    Dorado Arenas, Sandra
    Nowak, Dennis
    Pin, Isabelle
    Weyler, Joost
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Svanes, Cecilie
    A three-generation study on the association of tobacco smoking with asthma2018In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 1106-1117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mothers' smoking during pregnancy increases asthma risk in their offspring. There is some evidence that grandmothers' smoking may have a similar effect, and biological plausibility that fathers' smoking during adolescence may influence offspring's health through transmittable epigenetic changes in sperm precursor cells. We evaluated the three-generation associations of tobacco smoking with asthma.

    Methods: Between 2010 and 2013, at the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III clinical interview, 2233 mothers and 1964 fathers from 26 centres reported whether their offspring (aged ≤51 years) had ever had asthma and whether it had coexisted with nasal allergies or not. Mothers and fathers also provided information on their parents' (grandparents) and their own asthma, education and smoking history. Multilevel mediation models within a multicentre three-generation framework were fitted separately within the maternal (4666 offspring) and paternal (4192 offspring) lines.

    Results: Fathers' smoking before they were 15 [relative risk ratio (RRR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01-2.01] and mothers' smoking during pregnancy (RRR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.01-1.59) were associated with asthma without nasal allergies in their offspring. Grandmothers' smoking during pregnancy was associated with asthma in their daughters [odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.17-2.06] and with asthma with nasal allergies in their grandchildren within the maternal line (RRR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02-1.55).

    Conclusions: Fathers' smoking during early adolescence and grandmothers' and mothers' smoking during pregnancy may independently increase asthma risk in offspring. Thus, risk factors for asthma should be sought in both parents and before conception.

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  • 3. Adam, Martin
    et al.
    Schikowski, Tamara
    Carsin, Anne Elie
    Cai, Yutong
    Jacquemin, Benedicte
    Sanchez, Margaux
    Vierkötter, Andrea
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Keidel, Dirk
    Sugiri, Dorothee
    Al Kanani, Zaina
    Nadif, Rachel
    Siroux, Valérie
    Hardy, Rebecca
    Kuh, Diana
    Rochat, Thierry
    Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Villani, Simona
    Phuleria, Harish Chandra
    Birk, Matthias
    Cyrys, Josef
    Cirach, Marta
    de Nazelle, Audrey
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Declerq, Christophe
    Bono, Roberto
    Piccioni, Pavilio
    Quass, Ulrich
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Pin, Isabelle
    Beelen, Rob
    Hoek, Gerard
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Schindler, Christian
    Sunyer, Jordi
    Krämer, Ursula
    Kauffmann, Francine
    Hansell, Anna L
    Künzli, Nino
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Adult lung function and long-term air pollution exposure. ESCAPE: a multicentre cohort study and meta-analysis2015In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 38-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chronic impact of ambient air pollutants on lung function in adults is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution with lung function in adult participants from five cohorts in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Residential exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was modelled and traffic indicators were assessed in a standardised manner. The spirometric parameters forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) from 7613 subjects were considered as outcomes. Cohort-specific results were combined using meta-analysis. We did not observe an association of air pollution with longitudinal change in lung function, but we observed that a 10 μg·m(-3) increase in NO2 exposure was associated with lower levels of FEV1 (-14.0 mL, 95%CI -25.8- -2.1) and FVC (-14.9 mL, 95% CI -28.7- -1.1). An increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, but not other PM metrics (PM2.5, coarse fraction of PM, PM absorbance), was associated with a lower level of FEV1 (-44.6 mL, 95% CI -85.4- -3.8) and FVC (-59.0 mL, 95% CI -112.3- -5.6). The associations were particularly strong in obese persons. This study adds to the evidence for an adverse association of ambient air pollution with lung function in adults at very low levels in Europe.

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  • 4. Adrian, L.
    et al.
    Svanes, C.
    Johannessen, A.
    Lodge, C.
    Bertelsen, R.
    Dratva, J.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gislason, T.
    Benedikstdottir, B.
    Holm, M.
    Jogi, R.
    Modig, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Norback, D.
    Omenaas, E.
    Real, F.
    Schlunssen, V
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Skorge, T.
    Timm, S.
    Wieslander, G.
    Janson, C.
    Dharmage, S.
    Early life parental exposure to cats and dogs reduces the risk of allergic disease in their children: possible intergenerational effect2014In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 69, no Supplement: 99, p. 577-578Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Al-Shamkhi, N.
    et al.
    Alving, K.
    Dahlen, S. E.
    Hedlin, G.
    Middelveld, R.
    Bjerg, A.
    Ekerljung, L.
    Olin, A. C.
    Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Janson, C.
    Malinovschi, A.
    Important non-disease-related determinants of exhaled nitric oxide levels in mild asthma: results from the Swedish GA(2)LEN study2016In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 46, no 9, p. 1185-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has a potential clinical role in asthma management. Constitutive factors such as age, height and male gender, as well as individual characteristics, as IgE sensitisation and smoking, affect levels of FeNO in population-based studies. However their effect on FeNO in subjects with asthma has been scarcely studied.

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects on FeNO of these commonly regarded determinants, as demonstrated in healthy subjects, as well as menarche age and parental smoking, in a population of asthmatics.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: FeNO was measured in 557 subjects with asthma from the Swedish GA2LEN study. Allergic sensitisation was assessed by skin prick tests to most common aeroallergens. Upper airway comorbidities, smoking habits, smoking exposure during childhood, hormonal status (for women) were questionnaire-assessed.

    RESULTS: Male gender (p<0.001), greater height (p<0.001) and sensitisation to both perennial allergens and pollen (p<0.001) related to higher FeNO levels. Current smoking (p<0.001) and having both parents smoking during childhood, vs having neither (p<0.001) or only one parent smoking (p=0.002), related to lower FeNO. Women with menarche between 9-11 years of age had lower FeNO than those with menarche between 12-14 years of age (p = 0.03) or 15-17 years of age (p=0.003).

    CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Interpreting FeNO levels in clinical practice is complex and constitutional determinants, as well as smoking and IgE sensitization, are of importance in asthmatic subjects and should be accounted for when interpreting FeNO levels. Furthermore, menarche age and parental smoking during childhood and their effects on lowering FeNO deserve further studies.

  • 6. Amaral, André F S
    et al.
    Newson, Roger B
    Abramson, Michael J
    Antó, Josep M
    Bono, Roberto
    Corsico, Angelo G
    de Marco, Roberto
    Demoly, Pascal
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Huerta, Ismael
    Janson, Christer
    Jõgi, Rain
    Kim, Jeong-Lim
    Maldonado, José
    Martinez-Moratalla Rovira, Jesús
    Neukirch, Catherine
    Nowak, Dennis
    Pin, Isabelle
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Raherison-Semjen, Chantal
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Urrutia Landa, Isabel
    van Ree, Ronald
    Versteeg, Serge A
    Weyler, Joost
    Zock, Jan-Paul
    Burney, Peter G J
    Jarvis, Deborah L
    Changes in IgE sensitization and total IgE levels over 20 years of follow-up2016In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 137, no 6, p. 1788-1795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of sensitization in older adults, but few longitudinal studies have examined whether this is an aging or a year-of-birth cohort effect.

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess changes in sensitization and total IgE levels in a cohort of European adults as they aged over a 20-year period.

    METHODS: Levels of serum specific IgE to common aeroallergens (house dust mite, cat, and grass) and total IgE levels were measured in 3206 adults from 25 centers in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey on 3 occasions over 20 years. Changes in sensitization and total IgE levels were analyzed by using regression analysis corrected for potential differences in laboratory equipment and by using inverse sampling probability weights to account for nonresponse.

    RESULTS: Over the 20-year follow-up, the prevalence of sensitization to at least 1 of the 3 allergens decreased from 29.4% to 24.8% (-4.6%; 95% CI, -7.0% to -2.1%). The prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite (-4.3%; 95% CI, -6.0% to -2.6%) and cat (-2.1%; 95% CI, -3.6% to -0.7%) decreased more than sensitization to grass (-0.6%; 95% CI, -2.5% to 1.3%). Age-specific prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite and cat did not differ between year-of-birth cohorts, but sensitization to grass was most prevalent in the most recent ones. Overall, total IgE levels decreased significantly (geometric mean ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.58-0.68) at all ages in all year-of-birth cohorts.

    CONCLUSION: Aging was associated with lower levels of sensitization, especially to house dust mite and cat, after the age of 20 years.

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  • 7. Analitis, A
    et al.
    Katsouyanni, K
    Biggeri, A
    Baccini, M
    Forsberg, B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Enviromental Medicine.
    Bisanti, L
    Kirchmayer, U
    Ballester, F
    Cadum, E
    Goodman, P G
    Hojs, A
    Sunyer, J
    Tiittanen, P
    Michelozzi, P
    Effects of cold weather on mortality: results from 15 European cities within the PHEWE project.2008In: American journal of epidemiology, ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 168, no 12, p. 1397-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weather-related health effects have attracted renewed interest because of the observed and predicted climate change. The authors studied the short-term effects of cold weather on mortality in 15 European cities. The effects of minimum apparent temperature on cause- and age-specific daily mortality were assessed for the cold season (October-March) by using data from 1990-2000. For city-specific analysis, the authors used Poisson regression and distributed lag models, controlling for potential confounders. Meta-regression models summarized the results and explored heterogeneity. A 1 degrees C decrease in temperature was associated with a 1.35% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 1.53) increase in the daily number of total natural deaths and a 1.72% (95% CI: 1.44, 2.01), 3.30% (95% CI: 2.61, 3.99), and 1.25% (95% CI: 0.77, 1.73) increase in cardiovascular, respiratory, and cerebrovascular deaths, respectively. The increase was greater for the older age groups. The cold effect was found to be greater in warmer (southern) cities and persisted up to 23 days, with no evidence of mortality displacement. Cold-related mortality is an important public health problem across Europe. It should not be underestimated by public health authorities because of the recent focus on heat-wave episodes.

  • 8. Andersen, Zorana J.
    et al.
    Pedersen, Marie
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Galassi, Claudia
    Jørgensen, Jeanette T.
    Nilsson Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Oftedal, Bente
    Aasvang, Gunn Marit
    Schwarze, Per
    Pyko, Andrei
    Pershagen, Göran
    Korek, Michal
    De Faire, Ulf
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Eriksen, Kirsten T.
    Poulsen, Aslak H.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Vaclavik Bräuner, Elvira
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Jaensch, Andrea
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Lang, Alois
    Wang, Meng
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Grioni, Sara
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Migliore, Enrica
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Sokhi, Ranjeet
    Keuken, Menno
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Beelen, Rob
    Vineis, Paolo
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Long-term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Incidence of Brain Tumor: the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 420-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological evidence on the association between ambient air pollution and brain tumor risk is sparse and inconsistent.

    Methods: In 12 cohorts from 6 European countries, individual estimates of annual mean air pollution levels at the baseline residence were estimated by standardized land-use regression models developed within the ESCAPE and TRANSPHORM projects: particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5, ≤10, and 2.5–10 μm in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx) and elemental composition of PM. We estimated cohort-specific associations of air pollutant concentrations and traffic intensity with total, malignant, and nonmalignant brain tumor, in separate Cox regression models, adjusting for risk factors, and pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analyses.

    Results: Of 282194 subjects from 12 cohorts, 466 developed malignant brain tumors during 12 years of follow-up. Six of the cohorts also had data on nonmalignant brain tumor, where among 106786 subjects, 366 developed brain tumor: 176 nonmalignant and 190 malignant. We found a positive, statistically nonsignificant association between malignant brain tumor and PM2.5 absorbance (hazard ratio and 95% CI: 1.67; 0.89–3.14 per 10–5/m3), and weak positive or null associations with the other pollutants. Hazard ratio for PM2.5 absorbance (1.01; 0.38–2.71 per 10–5/m3) and all other pollutants were lower for nonmalignant than for malignant brain tumors.

    Conclusion: We found suggestive evidence of an association between long-term exposure to PM2.5 absorbance indicating traffic-related air pollution and malignant brain tumors, and no association with overall or nonmalignant brain tumors.

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  • 9. Andersen, Zorana J.
    et al.
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Pedersen, Marie
    Galassi, Claudia
    Jørgensen, Jeanette T.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Oftedal, Bente
    Aasvang, Gunn Marit
    Aamodt, Geir
    Pyko, Andrei
    Pershagen, Göran
    Korek, Michal
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Eriksen, Kirsten T.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Plusquin, Michelle
    Key, Timothy J.
    Jaensch, Andrea
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Lang, Alois
    Wang, Meng
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Fournier, Agnes
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Baglietto, Laura
    Grioni, Sara
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Migliore, Enrica
    Tamayo-Uria, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Sokhi, Ranjeet
    Keuken, Menno
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Beelen, Rob
    Vineis, Paolo
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in 15 European cohorts within the ESCAPE project2017In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 125, no 10, article id 107005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence on the association between ambient air pollution and breast cancer risk is inconsistent.

    OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in European women.

    METHODS: In 15 cohorts from nine European countries, individual estimates of air pollution levels at the residence were estimated by standardized land-use regression models developed within the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) and Transport related Air Pollution and Health impacts – Integrated Methodologies for Assessing Particulate Matter (TRANSPHORM) projects: particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5μm, ≤10μm, and 2.5–10μm in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse, respectively); PM2.5 absorbance; nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx); traffic intensity; and elemental composition of PM. We estimated cohort-specific associations between breast cancer and air pollutants using Cox regression models, adjusting for major lifestyle risk factors, and pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analyses.

    RESULTS: Of 74,750 postmenopausal women included in the study, 3,612 developed breast cancer during 991,353 person-years of follow-up. We found positive and statistically insignificant associations between breast cancer and PM2.5 {hazard ratio (HR)=1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77, 1.51] per 5 μg/m(3)}, PM10 [1.07 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.30) per 10 μg/m(3)], PMcoarse[1.20 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.49 per 5 μg/m(3)], and NO(2) [1.02 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.07 per 10 μg/m(3)], and a statistically significant association with NOx [1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.08) per 20 μg/m(3), p=0.04].

    CONCLUSIONS: We found suggestive evidence of an association between ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in European women.

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  • 10.
    Andersson, John
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    PM2.5 exposure and olfactory functions2022In: International Journal of Environmental Health Research, ISSN 0960-3123, E-ISSN 1369-1619, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 2484-2495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing evidence indicates that air pollution can negatively impact cognitive functions. The olfactory system is interesting in this context as it is directly exposed to pollutants and also associated with cognitive functions. The aim of this study was to investigate long- and short-term PM2.5 exposure in association with olfactory functions. Scores from odor tests were obtained from the Betula project - a longitudinal cohort study. Estimates of annual mean PM2.5 concentrations at the participants' residential address were obtained from a dispersion-model. Daily mean PM2.5 concentrations were obtained from a measuring station close to the test location. We found a positive association between long-term PM2.5 exposure and odor identification, i.e. exposure was associated with a better ability to identify odors. We also found an interaction effect between PM2.5 and age on odor identification. We found no associations between any PM2.5 exposure and odor detection or between short-term PM2.5 exposure and olfactory functions.

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  • 11.
    Andersson, John
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sundström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Road traffic noise, air pollution, and risk of dementia: results from the Betula project2018In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 166, p. 334-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is growing evidence for a negative impact of traffic-related air pollution on risk of dementia. However, the contribution of noise exposure to this association has been rarely examined.

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the individual and combined effect of noise and air pollution on risk of dementia.

    Methods: Data on dementia incidence over a 15 year period was obtained from the Betula project, a longitudinal study on health and ageing. Estimates of annual mean levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the participants’ residential address were obtained using a land-use regression model. Modelled data provided road traffic noise levels (Leq. 24 h) at the participants’ residential address at baseline. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR).

    Results: Of 1721 participants at baseline, 302 developed dementia during the follow up period. Exposure to noise levels (Leq. 24 h) > 55 dB had no significant effect on dementia risk (HR 0.95; CI: 0.57, 1.57). Residing in the two highest quartiles of NOx exposure was associated with an increased risk of dementia. The risk associated with NOx was not modified by adjusting for noise. Moreover, we found no significant interaction effects between NOx and road traffic noise on dementia risk.

    Conclusion: We found no evidence that exposure to road traffic noise, either independently or in combination with traffic air pollution, was associated with risk of dementia in our study area. Our results suggest that pollution should be considered the main component in the association between traffic related exposures and dementia.

  • 12.
    Andersson, John
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sundström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Department of Research and Development, Sundsvall Hospital, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Segersson, David
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), Norrköping, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Pm2.5 and dementia in a low exposure setting: the influence of odor identification ability and APOE2023In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 679-689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Growing evidence show that long term exposure to air pollution increases the risk of dementia.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate associations between PM2.5 exposure and dementia in a low exposure area, and to investigate the role of olfaction and the APOE ε4 allele in these associations.

    Methods: Data were drawn from the Betula project, a longitudinal study on aging, memory, and dementia in Sweden. Odor identification ability was assessed using the Scandinavian Odor Identification Test (SOIT). Annual mean PM2.5 concentrations were obtained from a dispersion-model and matched at the participants’ residential address. Proportional hazard regression was used to calculate hazard ratios.

    Results: Of 1,846 participants, 348 developed dementia during the 21-year follow-up period. The average annual mean PM2.5 exposure at baseline was 6.77 µg/m3, which is 1.77 µg/m3 above the WHO definition of clean air. In a fully adjusted model (adjusted for age, sex, APOE, SOIT, cardiovascular diseases and risk factors, and education) each 1 µg/m3 difference in annual mean PM2.5-concentration was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.23 for dementia (95% CI: 1.01–1.50). Analyses stratified by APOE status (ε4 carriers versus non-carriers), and odor identification ability (high versus low), showed associations only for ε4 carriers, and for low performance on odor identification ability.

    Conclusion: PM2.5 was associated with an increased risk of dementia in this low pollution setting. The associations between PM2.5 and dementia seemed stronger in APOE carriers and those with below average odor identification ability.

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  • 13.
    Andersson, Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Oudin Åström, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Pettersson-Strömbäck, Anita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Åström, Christofer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Med värme ihågkommen2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this project has been to use an interview study and literature survey to show how the outdoor environment, public facilities and housing can be designed to reduce the risk for elderly and persons with disabilities to die prematurely during heat waves. The goal is to raise awareness and interest in the adaptation of the environment and buildings of the persons responsible for planning, housing stock, social service, health care and homes for elderly.

    Cities are generally warmer and less windy than the surrounding landscape. The urban "warmer climate" is mainly due to the greater heat storage that can be found in buildings, streets, sidewalks, etc., limited vegetation that can shade and release moisture and activities such as traffic and domestic heating, which generate heat. During heat waves the increase in mortality is larger in cities. To live alone, be confined to bed and stay on the top floor has been shown to be additional risk factors.

    Measures to reduce the city's urban heat island and effects on humans are sometimes divided into "soft measures" (information, warning systems for heat waves, interventions for vulnerable groups), "green actions" (make the city a greener environment) and “technical measures” (shaded structures, changes of the walls, refrigeration /air conditioning indoors, etc.), which all are complementary. In some countries, the care homes for elderly should have a common room that can be kept cool even during heat waves.

    The aim of the interview study was to describe how personnel in the elderly care experience these problems in Sweden. The data collection method was 20 semi structured interviews with elderly care

    Sid 3 (49)

    personnel in Botkyrka municipality during October 2011. Content analysis was performed on the transcribed interview data and categories and subcategories were created on repeated themes in the text. The conclusions suggest intensified education for and information to personnel in the elderly care sector and that already in the planning of new homes for elderly the personnel's knowledge and experience of the needs among the elderly should be taken into account. 

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  • 14.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden..
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden.
    Nordberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hagenbjörk, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Kåre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN studies, Luleå, Sweden.
    Early life swimming pool exposure and asthma onset in children: a case-control study2018In: Environmental Health, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 17, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Trichloramine exposure in indoor swimming pools has been suggested to cause asthma in children. We aimed to investigate the risk of asthma onset among children in relation to individual trichloramine exposure.

    METHODS: A longitudinal nested case-control study of 337 children with asthma (cases) and 633 controls aged 16-17 years was performed within a population-based cohort from The Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden studies (OLIN). Year of asthma onset and exposure time at different ages were obtained in telephone interviews. Trichloramine concentrations in the pool buildings were measured. Skin prick test results for inhalant allergens were available from previous examinations of the cohort. The risk for asthma was analyzed in relation to the cumulative trichloramine exposure before onset of asthma.

    RESULTS: Swimming pool exposure in early life was associated with a significantly higher risk of pre-school asthma onset. A dose-response relationship between swimming pool exposure and asthma was indicated in children with asthma onset at 1 year of age. Children who were both sensitized and exposed had a particularly high risk.

    CONCLUSIONS: Early life exposure to chlorinated swimming pool environments was associated with pre-school asthma onset.

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  • 15.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Bjerg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    The clinical expression of asthma in schoolchildren has changed between 1996 and 20062010In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 859-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have reported diverging trends in the prevalence of asthma and wheeze. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical expression of childhood asthma in 1996 and 2006 by studying asthma morbidity, treatment, and environmental exposures in school children with physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze, respectively. All children enrolled in first or second grade (7-8 yr-old) in three municipalities in northern Sweden were invited to a questionnaire study in 1996 and 2006, respectively. In 1996, 3430 (97%) participated; and in 2006, 2585 (96%) participated. The same parental completed questionnaire, including the ISAAC questions, was used in both surveys. Physician-diagnosed asthma was reported at 5.7% in 1996 and 7.4% in 2006. A significantly greater proportion of children with asthma were using inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in 2006, 67% vs. 55% in 1996. This increase was parallel to a major decrease in severe asthma symptoms such as disturbed sleep because of wheeze (49% vs. 38%) and troublesome asthma (21% vs. 11%). The prevalence of current wheeze among the asthmatics decreased significantly; however, this was seen only among children not using ICS. Parental smoking decreased significantly as did the proportion living in damp buildings. In conclusion, although asthma remains a major public health issue in school age children, children with asthma had less respiratory symptoms and a better asthma control in 2006 compared to 1996. This parallels with an increase in treatment with ICS, more beneficial environmental conditions, and an increased diagnostic intensity resulting in a larger proportion of children with mild symptoms being diagnosed as having asthma.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Luleå.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Luleå.
    Bjerg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Luleå ; Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, Göteborgs universitet.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    The OLIN Studies, Luleå ; Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, Göteborgs universitet.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Luleå.
    Remission and Persistence of Asthma Followed From 7 to 19 Years of Age2013In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 132, no 2, p. E435-E442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To date, a limited number of population-based studies have prospectively evaluated the remission of childhood asthma. This work was intended to study the remission and persistence of childhood asthma and related factors. METHODS: In 1996, a questionnaire was distributed to the parents of all children aged 7 to 8 years in 3 municipalities in northern Sweden, and 3430 (97%) participated. After a validation study, 248 children were identified as having asthma; these children were reassessed annually until age 19 years when 205 (83%) remained. During the follow-up period lung function, bronchial challenge testing, and skin prick tests were performed. Remission was defined as no use of asthma medication and no wheeze during the past 12 months as reported at endpoint and in the 2 annual surveys preceding endpoint (ie, for >= 3 years). RESULTS: At age 19 years, 21% were in remission, 38% had periodic asthma, and 41% persistent asthma. Remission was more common among boys. Sensitization to furred animals and a more severe asthma (asthma score >= 2) at age 7 to 8 years were both inversely associated with remission, odds ratio 0.14 (95% confidence interval 0.04-0.55) and 0.19 (0.07-0.54), respectively. Among children with these 2 characteristics, 82% had persistent asthma during adolescence. Asthma heredity, damp housing, rural living, and smoking were not associated with remission. CONCLUSIONS: The probability of remission of childhood asthma from age 7- to 8-years to age 19 years was largely determined by sensitization status, particularly sensitization to animals, asthma severity, and female gender, factors all inversely related to remission.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnéa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Bjerg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Lundbäck, B
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Persistence and remission of asthma followed from 7 to 19 years of ageManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Hedman, Linnéa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Nordberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Eriksson, Kåre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Swimming pool attendance is related to asthma among atopic school children: a population-based study2015In: Environmental Health, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 14, no 14, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: By-products of water disinfectants have been suggested to cause asthma, especially in atopic children. However, studies on indoor swimming pool attendance and asthma in children have presented conflicting results. The present study examined the relationship between indoor swimming pool attendance and asthma among sensitized and non-sensitized children aged 11-12 years.

    Methods: An extended ISAAC questionnaire was sent to the families of all children attending fifth or sixth grade, aged 11-12 years, in two municipalities in Northern Sweden in 2010. A total of 1866 participated (96% of those invited) in the questionnaire study and 1652 (89%) also participated in skin prick testing for 10 standard airborne allergens. Asthma was defined as physician-diagnosed asthma in combination with wheeze or use of asthma medication in the last 12 months. Current swimming pool attendance was reported as >= 1/week or <1/week. Logistic regression models were used for data analysis.

    Results: The prevalence of current asthma was 8.9% (10.0% of boys; 7.9% of girls) and 14% had attended indoor pools >= 1/week. Children currently attending swimming pools >= 1/week had an increased risk of current asthma. Stratified analyses for allergic sensitization adjusted for sex, parental smoking, parental asthma, and damp housing, showed a statistically significant association for current asthma only among sensitized subjects (OR 95% CI 1.90 1.09-3.32). No association was found between current pool attendance and wheeze, sensitization, rhinitis or eczema.

    Conclusions: The present study supports the proposed link between indoor swimming pool attendance and asthma in sensitized children.

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  • 19.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Modig, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Heavy vehicle traffic is related to wheeze among schoolchildren: a population-based study in an area with low traffic flows2011In: Environmental Health, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 10, no 91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An association between traffic air pollution and respiratory symptoms among children has been reported. However, the effects of traffic air pollution on asthma and wheeze have been very sparsely studied in areas with low traffic intensity in cold climate with poor dispersion. We evaluated the impact of vehicle traffic on childhood asthma and wheeze by objective exposure assessment.

    Methods: As a part of the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies, a questionnaire was sent to the families of all children attending first or second grade in Luleå (72,000 inhabitants) in Northern Sweden in 2006. The age of the children was 7-8 years and the participation rate was 98% (n = 1357). Skin prick tests were performed in 1224 (89%) children. The home addresses were given geographical coordinates and traffic counts were obtained from the local traffic authorities. A proximity model of average daily traffic and average daily heavy vehicle traffic within 200 meters from each participant's home address was used. The associations between traffic exposure and asthma and wheeze, respectively, were analysed in an adjusted multiple logistic regression model.

    Results: Exposure to high traffic flows was uncommon in the study area; only 15% of the children lived within 200 meters from a road with a traffic flow of ≥8000 vehicles per day. Living closer than 200 meters from a road with ≥500 heavy vehicles daily was associated with current wheeze, odds ratio 1.7 (confidence interval 1.0-2.7). A dose-response relation was indicated. An increased risk of asthma was also seen, however not significant, odds ratio 1.5 (confidence interval 0.8-2.9). Stratified analyses revealed that the effect of traffic exposure was restricted to the non-sensitized phenotype of asthma and wheeze. The agreement between self-reported traffic exposure and objective measurements of exposure was moderate.

    Conclusions: This study showed that already at low levels of exposure, vehicle traffic is related to an increased risk of wheeze among children. Thus, the global burden of traffic air pollution may be underestimated.

  • 20. Armstrong, Ben
    et al.
    Sera, Francesco
    Vicedo-Cabrera, Ana Maria
    Abrutzky, Rosana
    Oudin Åström, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Bell, Michelle L
    Chen, Bing-Yu
    de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coelho, Micheline
    Correa, Patricia Matus
    Dang, Tran Ngoc
    Diaz, Magali Hurtado
    Dung, Do Van
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Goodman, Patrick
    Guo, Yue-Liang Leon
    Guo, Yuming
    Hashizume, Masahiro
    Honda, Yasushi
    Indermitte, Ene
    Íñiguez, Carmen
    Kan, Haidong
    Kim, Ho
    Kyselý, Jan
    Lavigne, Eric
    Michelozzi, Paola
    Orru, Hans
    Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia..
    Ortega, Nicolás Valdés
    Pascal, Mathilde
    Ragettli, Martina S
    Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento
    Schwartz, Joel
    Scortichini, Matteo
    Seposo, Xerxes
    Tobias, Aurelio
    Tong, Shilu
    Urban, Aleš
    De la Cruz Valencia, César
    Zanobetti, Antonella
    Zeka, Ariana
    Gasparrini, Antonio
    The Role of Humidity in Associations of High Temperature with Mortality: A Multicountry, Multicity Study2019In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 127, no 9, article id 097007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is strong experimental evidence that physiologic stress from high temperatures is greater if humidity is higher. However, heat indices developed to allow for this have not consistently predicted mortality better than dry-bulb temperature.

    Objectives: We aimed to clarify the potential contribution of humidity an addition to temperature in predicting daily mortality in summer by using a large multicountry dataset.

    Methods: In 445 cities in 24 countries, we fit a time-series regression model for summer mortality with a distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) for temperature (up to lag 3) and supplemented this with a range of terms for relative humidity (RH) and its interaction with temperature. City-specific associations were summarized using meta-analytic techniques.

    Results: Adding a linear term for RH to the temperature term improved fit slightly, with an increase of 23% in RH (the 99th percentile anomaly) associated with a 1.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8, 1.3] decrease in mortality. Allowing curvature in the RH term or adding terms for interaction of RH with temperature did not improve the model fit. The humidity-related decreased risk was made up of a positive coefficient at lag 0 outweighed by negative coefficients at lags of 1–3 d. Key results were broadly robust to small model changes and replacing RH with absolute measures of humidity. Replacing temperature with apparent temperature, a metric combining humidity and temperature, reduced goodness of fit slightly.

    Discussion:The absence of a positive association of humidity with mortality in summer in this large multinational study is counter to expectations from physiologic studies, though consistent with previous epidemiologic studies finding little evidence for improved prediction by heat indices. The result that there was a small negative average association of humidity with mortality should be interpreted cautiously; the lag structure has unclear interpretation and suggests the need for future work to clarify.

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  • 21.
    Aström, Daniel Oudin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Ageing & Living Condit Programme, Umeå University.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Acute Fatal Effects of Short-Lasting Extreme Temperatures in Stockholm, Sweden: Evidence Across a Century of Change.2013In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 820-829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Climate change is projected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events. Short-term effects of extreme hot and cold weather and their effects on mortality have been thoroughly documented, as have epidemiologic and demographic changes throughout the 20th century. We investigated whether sensitivity to episodes of extreme heat and cold has changed in Stockholm, Sweden, from the beginning of the 20th century until the present.

    METHODS: We collected daily mortality and temperature data for the period 1901-2009 for present-day Stockholm County, Sweden. Heat extremes were defined as days for which the 2-day moving average of mean temperature was above the 98th percentile; cold extremes were defined as days for which the 26-day moving average was below the 2nd percentile. The relationship between extreme hot/cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, stratified by decade, sex, and age, was investigated through time series modeling, adjusting for time trends.

    RESULTS: Total daily mortality was higher during heat extremes in all decades, with a declining trend over time in the relative risk associated with heat extremes, leveling off during the last three decades. The relative risk of mortality was higher during cold extremes for the entire period, with a more dispersed pattern across decades. Unlike for heat extremes, there was no decline in the mortality with cold extremes over time.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although the relative risk of mortality during extreme temperature events appears to have fallen, such events still pose a threat to public health.

  • 22. Ayres, JG
    et al.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Annesi-Maesano, I
    Dey, R
    Ebi, KL
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Helms, PJ
    Medina-Ramón, M
    Windt, M
    Forastiere, F
    Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement2009In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following a 2-day workshop held in Leuven (Belgium) in March 2008. Key areas of concern for the respiratory community arising from climate change are discussed and recommendations made to address gaps in knowledge. The most important recommendation was the development of more accurate predictive models for predicting the impact of climate change on respiratory health. Respiratory healthcare workers also have an advocatory role in persuading governments and the European Union to maintain awareness and appropriate actions with respect to climate change, and these areas are also discussed in the position statement.

  • 23.
    Baccini, M.
    et al.
    Department of Statistics G. Parenti, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; Biostatistics Unit, ISPO Cancer Prevention and Research Institute, Florence, Italy; Department of Statistics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
    Kosatsky, T.
    Environmental Health Division, BC Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, Canada; Global Change and Health, WHO Regional Office for Europe, Rome, Italy; WHO Regional Office for Europe, Rome, Italy.
    Analitis, A.
    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Anderson, H.R.
    Division of Community Health Sciences, MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, St. George's, University of London, London, United Kingdom; Division of Community Health Sciences, St. George’s, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    D'Ovidio, M.
    Department of Epidemiology, Local Health Authority Rome e, Rome, Italy.
    Menne, B.
    Global Change and Health, WHO Regional Office for Europe, Rome, Italy; WHO Regional Office for Europe, Rome, Italy.
    Michelozzi, P.
    Department of Epidemiology, Local Health Authority Rome e, Rome, Italy; Department of Epidemiology, Local Health Authority RM/E, Rome, Italy.
    Biggeri, A.
    Department of Statistics G. Parenti, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; Biostatistics Unit, ISPO Cancer Prevention and Research Institute, Florence, Italy; Department of Statistics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
    Kirchmayer, U.
    Department of Epidemiology, Local Health Authority RM/E, Rome, Italy.
    de’Donato, F.
    Department of Epidemiology, Local Health Authority RM/E, Rome, Italy.
    D’Ovidio, M.
    Department of Epidemiology, Local Health Authority RM/E, Rome, Italy.
    D’Ippoliti, D.
    Department of Epidemiology, Local Health Authority RM/E, Rome, Italy.
    Marino, C.
    Department of Epidemiology, Local Health Authority RM/E, Rome, Italy.
    McGregor, G.
    School of Geography, Geology and Environmental Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Accetta, G.
    Biostatistics Unit, ISPO Cancer Prevention and Research Institute, Florence, Italy.
    Katsouyanni, K.
    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Kassomenos, P.
    Department of Astrogeophysics, University of Joannina, Joannina, Greece.
    Sunyer, J.
    Municipal Medical Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain.
    Atkinson, R.
    Division of Community Health Sciences, St. George’s, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Medina, S.
    National Institute for Public Health Surveillance, Saint Maurice, France.
    Paldy, A.
    National Centre of Public Health, Institute of Environmental Health, Budapest, Hungary.
    Bisanti, L.
    Department of Epidemiology Health Authority Milan, Milan, Italy.
    Cadum, G.
    Regional Environmental Protection Agency of Piedmont, Grugliasco, Italy.
    Kriz, B.
    Department of Epidemiology, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Hojs, A.
    Department of Environmental Health, Institute of Public Health, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Clancy, L.
    St. James’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
    Goodman, P.
    St. James’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Pekkanen, J.
    Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
    Woityniak, B.
    Department of Medical Statistics, National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland.
    Jolliffe, I.
    Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
    Jendritzky, G.
    German Meteorology Service, Freiburg, Germany.
    Blazejczyk, K.
    Department of Climatology, Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, Warszawa, Poland.
    Huth, R.
    Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Cegnar, T.
    Climatological Department, Meteorological Office, Environmental Agency, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Schindler, C.
    Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Ballester, F.
    Valencia School of Health Studies, Valencia, Spain.
    Monceau, G.
    French Meteorology Service, Roissy Charles De Gaulle, France.
    Kalkstein, L.S.
    Department of Geography and Regional Studies, University of Miami, Miami, United States.
    Impact of heat on mortality in 15 european cities: attributable deaths under different weather scenarios2011In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 64-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High ambient summer temperatures have been shown to influence daily mortality in cities across Europe. Quantification of the population mortality burden attributable to heat is crucial to the development of adaptive approaches. The impact of summer heat on mortality for 15 European cities during the 1990s was evaluated, under hypothetical temperature scenarios warmer and cooler than the mean and under future scenarios derived from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES).

    Methods: A Monte Carlo approach was used to estimate the number of deaths attributable to heat for each city. These estimates rely on the results of a Bayesian random-effects meta-analysis that combines city-specific heat-mortality functions.

    Results: The number of heat-attributable deaths per summer ranged from 0 in Dublin to 423 in Paris. The mean attributable fraction of deaths was around 2%. The highest impact was in three Mediterranean cities (Barcelona, Rome and Valencia) and in two continental cities (Paris and Budapest). The largest impact was on persons over 75 years; however, in some cities, important proportions of heat-attributable deaths were also found for younger adults. Heat-attributable deaths markedly increased under warming scenarios. The impact under SRES scenarios was slightly lower or comparable to the impact during the observed hottest year.

    Conclusions: Current high summer ambient temperatures have an important impact on European population health. This impact is expected to increase in the future, according to the projected increase of mean ambient temperatures and frequency, intensity and duration of heat waves.

  • 24. Baccini, Michela
    et al.
    Biggeri, Annibale
    Accetta, Gabriele
    Kosatsky, Tom
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Analitis, Antonis
    Anderson, H Ross
    Bisanti, Luigi
    D'Ippoliti, Daniela
    Danova, Jana
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Enviromental Medicine.
    Medina, Sylvia
    Paldy, Anna
    Rabczenko, Daniel
    Schindler, Christian
    Michelozzi, Paola
    Heat effects on mortality in 15 European cities.2008In: Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 711-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies show that high temperatures are related to mortality, but little is known about the exposure-response function and the lagged effect of heat. We report the associations between daily maximum apparent temperature and daily deaths during the warm season in 15 European cities. METHODS: The city-specific analyses were based on generalized estimating equations and the city-specific results were combined in a Bayesian random effects meta-analysis. We specified distributed lag models in studying the delayed effect of exposure. Time-varying coefficient models were used to check the assumption of a constant heat effect over the warm season. RESULTS: The city-specific exposure-response functions have a V shape, with a change-point that varied among cities. The meta-analytic estimate of the threshold was 29.4 degrees C for Mediterranean cities and 23.3 degrees C for north-continental cities. The estimated overall change in all natural mortality associated with a 1 degrees C increase in maximum apparent temperature above the city-specific threshold was 3.12% (95% credibility interval = 0.60% to 5.72%) in the Mediterranean region and 1.84% (0.06% to 3.64%) in the north-continental region. Stronger associations were found between heat and mortality from respiratory diseases, and with mortality in the elderly. CONCLUSIONS: There is an important mortality effect of heat across Europe. The effect is evident from June through August; it is limited to the first week following temperature excess, with evidence of mortality displacement. There is some suggestion of a higher effect of early season exposures. Acclimatization and individual susceptibility need further investigation as possible explanations for the observed heterogeneity among cities.

  • 25. Bedada, Getahun Bero
    et al.
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Götschi, Thomas
    Downs, Sara H
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Enviromental Medicine.
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Luczynska, Christina
    Soon, Argo
    Sunyer, Jordi
    Toren, Kjell
    Künzli, Nino
    Urban background particulate matter and allergic sensitization in adults of ECRHS II.2007In: Int J Hyg Environ Health, ISSN 1438-4639, Vol. 210, no 6, p. 691-700Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Fischer, Paul
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark
    Vineis, Paolo
    Xun, Wei W
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Modig, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Havulinna, Aki S
    Lanki, Timo
    Turunen, Anu
    Oftedal, Bente
    Nystad, Wenche
    Nafstad, Per
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Ostenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Penell, Johanna
    Korek, Michal
    Pershagen, Göran
    Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup
    Overvad, Kim
    Ellermann, Thomas
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Peeters, Petra H
    Meliefste, Kees
    Wang, Meng
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Sugiri, Dorothea
    Krämer, Ursula
    Heinrich, Joachim
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Key, Timothy
    Peters, Annette
    Hampel, Regina
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ineichen, Alex
    Schaffner, Emmanuel
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Künzli, Nino
    Schindler, Christian
    Schikowski, Tamara
    Adam, Martin
    Phuleria, Harish
    Vilier, Alice
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Declercq, Christophe
    Grioni, Sara
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Galassi, Claudia
    Migliore, Enrica
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Tamayo, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Effects of long-term exposure to air pollution on natural-cause mortality: an analysis of 22 European cohorts within the multicentre ESCAPE project2014In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 383, no 9919, p. 785-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Few studies on long-term exposure to air pollution and mortality have been reported from Europe. Within the multicentre European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), we aimed to investigate the association between natural-cause mortality and long-term exposure to several air pollutants.

    METHODS: We used data from 22 European cohort studies, which created a total study population of 367 251 participants. All cohorts were general population samples, although some were restricted to one sex only. With a strictly standardised protocol, we assessed residential exposure to air pollutants as annual average concentrations of particulate matter (PM) with diameters of less than 2·5 μm (PM2·5), less than 10 μm (PM10), and between 10 μm and 2·5 μm (PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, and annual average concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx), with land use regression models. We also investigated two traffic intensity variables-traffic intensity on the nearest road (vehicles per day) and total traffic load on all major roads within a 100 m buffer. We did cohort-specific statistical analyses using confounder models with increasing adjustment for confounder variables, and Cox proportional hazards models with a common protocol. We obtained pooled effect estimates through a random-effects meta-analysis.

    FINDINGS: The total study population consisted of 367 251 participants who contributed 5 118 039 person-years at risk (average follow-up 13·9 years), of whom 29 076 died from a natural cause during follow-up. A significantly increased hazard ratio (HR) for PM2·5 of 1·07 (95% CI 1·02-1·13) per 5 μg/m(3) was recorded. No heterogeneity was noted between individual cohort effect estimates (I(2) p value=0·95). HRs for PM2·5 remained significantly raised even when we included only participants exposed to pollutant concentrations lower than the European annual mean limit value of 25 μg/m(3) (HR 1·06, 95% CI 1·00-1·12) or below 20 μg/m(3) (1·07, 1·01-1·13).

    INTERPRETATION: Long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution was associated with natural-cause mortality, even within concentration ranges well below the present European annual mean limit value.

    FUNDING: European Community's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2011).

  • 27. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic
    Xun, Wei W
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Houthuijs, Danny
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Lanki, Timo
    Yli-Tuomi, Tarja
    Oftedal, Bente
    Aamodt, Geir
    Nafstad, Per
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Penell, Johanna
    Korek, Michal
    Pyko, Andrei
    Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Becker, Thomas
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Bots, Michiel
    Meliefste, Kees
    Wang, Meng
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Sugiri, Dorothea
    Krämer, Ursula
    Heinrich, Joachim
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Key, Timothy
    Peters, Annette
    Cyrys, Josef
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ineichen, Alex
    Schaffner, Emmanuel
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Dratva, Julia
    Ducret-Stich, Regina
    Vilier, Alice
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Stempfelet, Morgane
    Grioni, Sara
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Galassi, Claudia
    Migliore, Enrica
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Tamayo, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Vineis, Paolo
    Hoek, Gerard
    Long-term exposure to air pollution and cardiovascular mortality: an analysis of 22 European cohorts2014In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Air pollution has been associated with cardiovascular mortality, but it remains unclear as to whether specific pollutants are related to specific cardiovascular causes of death. Within the multicenter European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), we investigated the associations of long-term exposure to several air pollutants with all cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, as well as with specific cardiovascular causes of death.

    METHODS: Data from 22 European cohort studies were used. Using a standardized protocol, study area-specific air pollution exposure at the residential address was characterized as annual average concentrations of the following: nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx); particles with diameters of less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), less than 10 μm (PM10), and 10 μm to 2.5 μm (PMcoarse); PM2.5 absorbance estimated by land-use regression models; and traffic indicators. We applied cohort-specific Cox proportional hazards models using a standardized protocol. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to obtain pooled effect estimates.

    RESULTS: The total study population consisted of 367,383 participants, with 9994 deaths from CVD (including 4,992 from ischemic heart disease, 2264 from myocardial infarction, and 2484 from cerebrovascular disease). All hazard ratios were approximately 1.0, except for particle mass and cerebrovascular disease mortality; for PM2.5, the hazard ratio was 1.21 (95% confidence interval = 0.87-1.69) per 5 μg/m and for PM10, 1.22 (0.91-1.63) per 10 μg/m.

    CONCLUSION: In a joint analysis of data from 22 European cohorts, most hazard ratios for the association of air pollutants with mortality from overall CVD and with specific CVDs were approximately 1.0, with the exception of particulate mass and cerebrovascular disease mortality for which there was suggestive evidence for an association.

  • 28. Bengtsson, Caroline
    et al.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Jonsson, Lars
    Holmström, Mats
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    Hedner, Jan
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Janson, Christer
    Chronic rhinosinusitis impairs sleep quality: results of the GA(2)LEN study2017In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 40, no 1, article id zsw021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To analyse the prevalence of sleep problems in subjects with CRS and to determine whether the disease severity of CRS affects sleep quality.

    METHODS: Questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. Questions on CRS, asthma, allergic rhinitis, co-morbidities, tobacco use, educational level and physical activity were included. CRS was defined according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EPOS) epidemiological criteria. The disease severity of CRS was defined by the number of reported CRS symptoms. Sleep quality was assessed using the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Of the 26 647 subjects, 2249 (8.4%) had CRS. Reported sleep problems were 50-90% more common among subjects with CRS compared with those without or the total population. The prevalence of reported sleep problems increased in conjunction with the severity of CRS. After adjusting for gender, BMI, age, tobacco use, asthma, somatic diseases, physical activity level and educational level, participants with four symptoms of CRS (compared with subjects without CRS symptoms) displayed a higher risk of snoring (adj. OR (95% CI): 3.13 (2.22-4.41)), difficulties inducing sleep (3.98 (2.94-5.40)), difficulties maintaining sleep (3.44 (2.55-4.64)), early morning awakening (4.71 (3.47-6.38)) and excessive daytime sleepiness (4.56 (3.36-6.18)). The addition of persistent allergic rhinitis to CRS further increased the risk of sleep problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sleep problems are highly prevalent among subjects with CRS. The disease severity of CRS negatively affects sleep quality.

  • 29. Bero Bedada, Getahun
    et al.
    Raza, Auriba
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lind, Tomas
    Ljungman, Petter
    Pershagen, Göran
    Bellander, Tom
    Short-term Exposure to Ozone and Mortality in Subjects With and Without Previous Cardiovascular Disease2016In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 663-669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to ground level ozone (O3) is a public health problem associated with a range of risks across population subgroups. Our aim was to investigate the role of previous cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in mortality related to short-term O3 exposure.

    METHODS: Deaths between 1990 and 2010 in Stockholm County were matched with previous hospitalizations in Swedish registries. An urban background monitoring station provided hourly values of air quality data, from which we calculated 8-hour running averages and daily 8-hour maximum. We analyzed associations between daily O3 concentrations and mortality among persons with and without previous CVD hospitalization with a generalized additive model adjusted for time trend, influenza, and weather. We also performed two-pollutant models.

    RESULTS: There were 302,283 nontrauma-related deaths, out of which 196,916 had previous CVD hospitalization. The mean concentration of daily maximum 8-hour O3 was 62.9 μg/m. An average 10 μg/m increase in the same and preceding day was associated with an increased mortality of 1.72% (95% confidence interval: 0.44%, 3.02%) in those with prior admission for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), which was more than three times higher than for those with no previous AMI (0.50, 95% confidence interval: 0.10%, 0.89%, P value for interaction 0.098). The association between O3 and mortality remained essentially unchanged in two-pollutant models with NO2, NOx, and PM10.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that short-term exposure to O3 is associated with increased mortality in those with a previous hospitalization for AMI.

  • 30. Bjerg, Anders
    et al.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Eriksson, Jonas
    Olafsdóttir, Inga Sif
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Franklin, Karl A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Larsson, Kjell
    Lötvall, Jan
    Torén, Kjell
    Dahlén, Sven-Erik
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Janson, Christer
    Higher risk of wheeze in female than male smokers: results from the Swedish GA(2)LEN study2013In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, article id e54137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women who smoke have higher risk of lung function impairment, COPD and lung cancer than smoking men. An influence of sex hormones has been demonstrated, but the mechanisms are unclear and the associations often subject to confounding. This was a study of wheeze in relation to smoking and sex with adjustment for important confounders.

    Methods: In 2008 the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN) questionnaire was mailed to 45.000 Swedes (age 16–75 years), and 26.851 (60%) participated. “Any wheeze”: any wheeze during the last 12 months. “Asthmatic wheeze”: wheeze with breathlessness apart from colds.

    Results: Any wheeze and asthmatic wheeze was reported by 17.3% and 7.1% of women, vs. 15.8% and 6.1% of men (both p<0.001). Although smoking prevalence was similar in both sexes, men had greater cumulative exposure, 16.2 pack-years vs. 12.8 in women (p<0.001). Most other exposures and characteristics associated with wheeze were significantly overrepresented in men. Adjusted for these potential confounders and pack-years, current smoking was a stronger risk factor for any wheeze in women aged <53 years, adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.85 (1.56–2.19) vs. 1.60 (1.30–1.96) in men. Cumulative smoke exposure and current smoking each interacted significantly with female sex, aOR 1.02 per pack-year (p<0.01) and aOR 1.28 (p = 0.04) respectively. Female compared to male current smokers also had greater risk of asthmatic wheeze, aOR 1.53 vs. 1.03, interaction aOR 1.52 (p = 0.02). These interactions were not seen in age ≥53 years.

    Discussion: In addition to the increased risk of COPD and lung cancer female, compared to male, smokers are at greater risk of significant wheezing symptoms in younger age. This became clearer after adjustment for important confounders including cumulative smoke exposure. Estrogen has previously been shown to increase the bioactivation of several compounds in tobacco smoke, which may enhance smoke-induced airway inflammation in fertile women.