Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 86
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Almevall, Albin Dahlin
    et al.
    Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden; Department of Healthcare, Region Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Öhlin, Jerry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Nordmark, Sofi
    Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Associations between everyday physical activity and morale in older adults2022In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, Vol. 48, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies that objectively investigate patterns of everyday physical activity in relation to well-being and that use measures specific to older adults are scarce. This study aimed to explore objectively measured everyday physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to a morale measure specifically constructed for older adults. A total of 77 persons (42 women, 35 men) aged 80 years or older (84.3 ± 3.8) wore an accelerometer device for at least 5 days. Morale was measured with the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS). PGCMS scores were significantly positively associated with number of steps, time spent stepping, and time spent stepping at >75 steps per minute. Sedentary behavior did not associate with PGCMS. Promoting PA in the form of walking at any intensity–or even spending time in an upright position—and in any quantity may be important for morale, or vice versa, or the influence may be bidirectional.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Almevall, Ariel
    et al.
    Department of Health, Education and Technology, Division of Nursing and Medical Technology, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Dahlin Almevall, Albin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Öhlin, Jerry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Department of Health, Education and Technology, Division of Nursing and Medical Technology, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostics and Intervention.
    Self-rated health in old age, related factors and survival: A 20-Year longitudinal study within the Silver-MONICA cohort2024In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 122, article id 105392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Self-rated health (SRH) offers insights into the evolving health demographics of an ageing population.

    Aim: To assess change in SRH from old age to very old age and their associations with health and well-being factors, and to investigate the association between SRH and survival.

    Methods: All participants in the MONICA 1999 re-examination born before 1940 (n = 1595) were included in the Silver-MONICA baseline cohort. The Silver-MONICA follow-up started in 2016 included participants in the Silver-MONICA baseline cohort aged 80 years or older. Data on SRH was available for 1561 participants at baseline with 446 of them also participating in the follow-up. The follow-up examination included a wide variety of measurements and tests.

    Findings: Most participants rated their health as "Quite good" (54.5 %) at baseline. Over the study period, 42.6 % had stable SRH, 40.6 % had declined, and 16.8 % had improved. Changes in SRH were at follow-up significantly associated with age, pain, nutrition, cognition, walking aid use, self-paced gait speed, lower extremity strength, independence in activities of daily living, weekly physical exercise, outdoor activity, participation in organized activities, visiting others, morale, and depressive symptoms. SRH at baseline was significantly associated with survival (p < 0.05).

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates associations between changes in SRH and a multitude of health- and wellbeing-related factors, as well as a relation between survival and SRH, accentuating their relevance within the ageing population.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Amgarth-Duff, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Technology Sydney, IMPACCT (Improving Palliative, Aged and Chronic Care through Clinical Research and Translation), Sydney, NSW, Australia; Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Western Australia.
    Hosie, Annemarie
    University of Technology Sydney, IMPACCT (Improving Palliative, Aged and Chronic Care through Clinical Research and Translation), Sydney, NSW, Australia; The University of Notre Dame Australia, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia; St Vincent’s Health Network Sydney, The Cunningham Centre for Palliative Care, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia.
    Caplan, Gideon A.
    Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia; Department of Geriatric Medicine, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia.
    Adamis, Dimitrios
    Sligo Mental Health Services, Clarion Road, Sligo, Ireland.
    Watne, Leiv Otto
    Oslo Delirium Research Group, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Cunningham, Colm
    Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute; Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College, Dublin.
    Oh, Esther S.
    John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Wang, Sophia
    Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Lindroth, Heidi
    Mayo Clinic, Department of Nursing, Division of Nursing Research, Rochester, MN, USA; Indiana University, School of Medicine, Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, USA; Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute, USA.
    Sanders, Robert D.
    University of Sydney, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Girard, Timothy D.
    University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Steiner, Luzius A.
    Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Basel and Department of Clinical Research, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha M.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, Boston, Massacheusetts, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massacheusetts, USA; Harvard T.H Chan, School of Public Health, Boston, Massacheusetts, USA.
    Agar, Meera
    University of Technology Sydney, IMPACCT (Improving Palliative, Aged and Chronic Care through Clinical Research and Translation), Sydney, NSW, Australia; South West Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia.
    Reporting essentials for DElirium bioMarker studies (REDEEMS): explanation and elaboration2022In: Delirium Communications, ISSN 2959-104XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite many studies of potential delirium biomarkers, delirium pathophysiology remains unclear. Evidence shows that the quality of reporting delirium biomarker studies is sub-optimal. Better reporting of delirium biomarker studies is needed to understand delirium pathophysiology better. To improve robustness, transparency and uniformity of delirium biomarker study reports, the REDEEMS (Reporting Essentials for DElirium bioMarker Studies) guideline was developed by an international group of delirium researchers through a three-stage process, including a systematic review, a three-round Delphi study, and a follow-up consensus meeting. This process resulted in a 9-item guideline to inform delirium fluid biomarker studies. To enhance implementation of the REDEEMS guideline, this Explanation and Elaboration paper provides a detailed explanation of each item. We anticipate that the REDEEMS guideline will help to accelerate our understanding of delirium pathophysiology by improving the reporting of delirium biomarker research and, consequently the capacity to synthesise results across studies.

  • 4. Bellelli, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Mazzola, Paolo
    Morandi, Alessandro
    Bruni, Adriana
    Carnevali, Lucio
    Corsi, Maurizio
    Zatti, Giovanni
    Zambon, Antonella
    Corrao, Giovanni
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Annoni, Giorgio
    Duration of Postoperative Delirium Is an Independent Predictor of 6-Month Mortality in Older Adults After Hip Fracture2014In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 62, no 7, p. 1335-1340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the association between number of days with delirium and 6-month mortality in elderly adults after hip fracture surgery. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with 6-month follow-up. SETTING: Orthogeriatric Unit (OGU). PARTICIPANTS: Individuals (mean age = 84.3 +/- 6.4) admitted to the OGU between October 2011 and April 2013 with hip fracture (N = 199). MEASUREMENTS: Postoperative delirium (POD) was assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method algorithm and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, criteria. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to evaluate the association between POD of and 6-month mortality after surgery, after adjustment for covariates including age, prefracture residence, Katz activity of daily living score, New Mobility score, diagnosis of prefracture dementia, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, albumin serum levels, Charlson Comorbidity Index, and length of OGU stay. RESULTS: Fifty-seven participants (28.6%) developed POD. In the 6-month period after surgery, 35 (17.6%) participants died: 16 of 57 (28.1%) with POD and 19 / of 142 (13.4%) with no POD. The average duration of POD was 2.0 +/- 3.2 days for participants who died and 0.7 +/- 1.8 days for those who survived (P < .001). After adjusting for covariates, each day of POD in the OGU increased the hazard of dying at 6 months by 17% (hazard ratio = 1.17, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-1.28). CONCLUSION: In older adults undergoing hip fracture surgery, duration of POD is an important prognostic factor for 6-month mortality. Efforts to reduce duration of POD are therefore crucial for these individuals.

  • 5.
    Bergfrid, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Weidung, Bodil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatric Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Having plans for the future in very old people2024In: The International Journal of Aging & Human Development, ISSN 0091-4150, E-ISSN 1541-3535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of having plans for the future among very old people and the factors associated with having such plans. A longitudinal population-based study with home visits for 85-, 90-, and ≥95-year-old participants in Sweden and Finland was used. Multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional-hazards regression models with a maximum 5-year follow-up period were used. The prevalence of having plans for the future was 18.6% (174/936). More men than women and more people living in Sweden than in Finland had plans for the future. In multivariate models, having plans for the future was associated with speaking Swedish, being dentate, and living in the community in the total sample; speaking Swedish and being dentate among women; and speaking Swedish, having a lower Geriatric Depression Scale score, and urban residence among men. Having plans for the future was associated univariately, but not multivariately, with increased survival.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Berggren, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Karlsson, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Englund, Undis
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nordstöm, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Effects of geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation on complications and readmissions after hip fracture: a randomized controlled trial2019In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 64-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This pre-planned secondary analysis of geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation, which was initially found to shorten the postoperative length of stay in hospital for older individuals following hip fracture, investigated whether such rehabilitation reduced the numbers of complications, readmissions, and total days spent in hospital after discharge during a 12-month follow-up period compared with conventional geriatric care and rehabilitation.

    Design: Randomized controlled trial.

    Setting: Geriatric department, participants' residential care facilities, and ordinary housing.

    Subjects: Individuals aged ⩾70 years with acute hip fracture (n = 205) were included.

    Intervention: Geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation was individually designed and aimed at early discharge with the intention to prevent, detect, and treat complications after discharge.

    Main measures: Complications, readmissions, and days spent in hospital were registered from patients' digital records and interviews conducted during hospitalization and at 3- and 12-month follow-up visits.

    Results: No significant difference in outcomes was observed. Between discharge and the 12-month follow-up, among participants in the geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation group (n = 106) and control group (n = 93), 57 (53.8%) and 44 (47.3%) had complications (P = 0.443), 46 (43.4%) and 38 (40.9%) fell (P = 0.828), and 38 (35.8%) and 27 (29.0%) were readmitted to hospital (P = 0.383); the median total days spent in hospital were 11.5 and 11.0 (P = 0.353), respectively.

    Conclusion: Geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation for older individuals following hip fracture resulted in similar proportions of complications, readmissions, and total days spent in hospital after discharge compared with conventional geriatric care and rehabilitation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Berggren, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Englund, Undis
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Co-morbidities, complications and causes of death among people with femoral neck fracture: a three-year follow-up study2016In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The poor outcome after a hip fracture is not fully understood. The aim of the study was to describe the prevalence of co-morbidities, complications and causes of death and to investigate factors that are able to predict mortality in old people with femoral neck fracture. Methods: Data was obtained from a randomized, controlled trial with a 3-year follow-up at Umea University Hospital, Sweden, which included 199 consecutive patients with femoral neck fracture, aged >= 70 years. The participants were assessed during hospitalization and in their homes 4, 12 and 36 months after surgery. Medical records and death certificates were analysed. Results: Multivariate analysis revealed that cancer, dependence in P-ADL (Personal Activities of Daily Living), cardiovascular disease, dementia at baseline or pulmonary emboli or cardiac failure during hospitalization were all independent predictors of 3-year mortality. Seventy-nine out of 199 participants (40 %) died within 3 years. Cardiovascular events (24 %), dementia (23 %), hip-fracture (19 %) and cancer (13 %) were the most common primary causes of death. In total, 136 participants suffered at least one urinary tract infection; 114 suffered 542 falls and 37 sustained 56 new fractures, including 13 hip fractures, during follow-up. Conclusion: Old people with femoral neck fracture have multiple co-morbidities and suffer numerous complications. Thus randomized intervention studies should focus on prevention of complications that might be avoidable such as infections, heart diseases, falls and fractures.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Berggren, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Evaluation of a fall-prevention program in older people after femoral neck fracture: a one-year follow-up2008In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 801-809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A randomized, controlled fall-prevention study including 199 patients operated on for femoral neck fracture reduced inpatient falls and injuries. No statistically significant effects of the intervention program could be detected after discharge. It seems that fall-prevention must be part of everyday life in fall-prone old people. Introduction This study evaluates whether a postoperative multidisciplinary, multifactorial fall-prevention program performed by a geriatric team that reduced inpatient falls and injuries had any continuing effect after discharge. The intervention consisted of staff education, systematic assessment and treatment of fall risk factors and vitamin D and calcium supplementation. Methods The randomized, controlled trial with a one-year follow-up at Umea University Hospital, Sweden, included 199 patients operated on for femoral neck fracture, aged >= 70 years. Results After one year 44 participants had fallen 138 times in the intervention group compared with 55 participants and 191 falls in the control group. The crude postoperative fall incidence was 4.16/1,000 days in the intervention group vs. 6.43/1,000 days in the control group. The incidence rate ratio was 0.64 (95% CI: 0.40-1.02, p = 0.063). Seven new fractures occurred in the intervention group and 11 in the control group. Conclusion A team applying comprehensive geriatric assessment and rehabilitation, including prevention and treatment of fall-risk factors, reduced inpatient falls and injuries, but no statistically significant effects of the program could be detected after discharge. It seems that fall-prevention must be part of everyday life in fall-prone elderly.

  • 9.
    Boman, Erika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nylander, Malin
    Oja, Josefine
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Transanal Irrigation for People With Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction: An Integrative Literature Review2022In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 211-230Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transanal irrigation has been introduced as a complement to standard bowel care for people with neurogenic bowel dysfunction. There is no contemporary integrative review of the effectiveness and feasibility of transanal irrigation from a holistic nursing perspective, only fragments of evidence to date. The aim was to investigate the effectiveness and feasibility of transanal irrigation for people with neurogenic bowel dysfunction. An integrative literature review was conducted. Nineteen studies were included. According to the results, transanal irrigation can reduce difficulties associated with defecation, episodes of incontinence, and the time needed for evacuation and bowel care. Transanal irrigation can increase general satisfaction with bowel habits and quality of life and decrease level of dependency. However, there are practical problems to overcome and adverse effects to manage. Discontinuation is relatively common. The results support the effectiveness of transanal irrigation, but feasibility is inconclusive. Users, including caregivers, report practical problems, and compliance was not always easy to achieve. It is important that users, including caregivers, are well informed and supported during transanal irrigation treatment, especially during introduction. The quality of the studies found was generally weak; therefore, high-quality quantitative and qualitative studies are needed on the topic.

  • 10.
    Burman, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Carlsson, Maine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Is malnutrition a risk factor for incident urinary tract infection among older people in residential care facilities?2018In: Journal of Nursing Home Research, ISSN 2496-0799, Vol. 4, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Malnutrition and urinary tract infections (UTI) are common among older people living in residential care facilities.

    Objectives: To determine whether malnutrition is a risk factor for incident urinary tract infection in people aged ≥65 years living in residential care facilities.

    Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective cohort study of people living in residential care facilities in northern Sweden (N=373). Data from the Frail Older People-Activity and Nutrition and Umeå Dementia and Exercise studies were used.

    Measurements: Malnutrition was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). Risk factors for UTI were explored using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses. Maximum follow-up time was 9 months.

    Results: The incidence of UTI was 460/1000 person-years; 85/276=30.8% of women and 16/97=16.5% of men contracted UTIs. History of UTI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.804, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.824–4.311), heart failure (HR 2.101, 95% CI 1.368–3.225), hypertension (HR 1.656, 95% CI 1.095–2.504), and low Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score (HR 0.937, 95% CI 0.892–0.985) were associated independently with higher risk of incident UTI in multivariate analyses. Malnutrition was not associated with UTI in the whole sample or in women; MNA score was associated with UTI in men in univariate analysis (HR 0.841, 95% CI 0.750–0.944).

    Conclusion: The incidence of UTI was high in residential care facilities and individuals with histories of UTI, heart failure, hypertension, or cognitive impairment were more likely to be affected. Malnutrition was not a risk factor for UTI in the whole sample or in women, but may constitute a risk for UTI among men.

  • 11.
    Burman, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Obesity may increase survival, regardless of nutritional status: a Swedish cohort study in nursing homes2022In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To investigate the associations between the body mass index (BMI), Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF) scores, and 2-year mortality.

    Methods: A nationwide cohort study using data from a national quality register of older (age ≥ 65 years) nursing home residents (N = 47,686). Individuals were categorized according to BMI as underweight (< 18.5 kg/m2), normal-weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0-29.9 kg/m2), and obese (class I, 30.0-34.9 kg/m2; class II, 35.0-39.9 kg/m2; class III, ≥ 40.0 kg/m2). Participants' nutritional status were categorized as good (MNA-SF score 12-14), at risk of malnutrition (MNA-SF score 8-11), or malnutrition (MNA-SF score 0-7). Associations with mortality were analysed using Cox proportional-hazards models.

    Results: At baseline, 16.0% had obesity, and 14.6% were malnourished. During 2 years of follow-up, 23,335 (48.9%) individuals died. Compared with normal-weight individuals, mortality was greater among underweight individuals [hazard ratio (HR) 1.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.55-1.69] and lesser among individuals with class I (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.60-0.66), class II (HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.56-0.68), and class III (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.69-0.94) obesity. Compared with individuals with good nutritional status, mortality was increased for those with malnutrition (HR 2.98,95% CI 2.87-3.10). Lower mortality among obese individuals was also seen in subgroups defined according to MNA-SF scores.

    Conclusions: Among older nursing home residents, obesity, including severe obesity, was associated with lower 2-year mortality. Higher BMIs were associated with better survival, regardless of nutritional status according to MNA-SF.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Burman, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Öhlin, Jerry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Prevalence of obesity and malnutrition in four cohorts of very old adults, 2000–20172022In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Springer Link, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 706-713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Investigate trends in the prevalence of obesity and malnutrition among very old adults (age ≥ 85 years) between 2000 and 2017.

    Design, Setting, Participants, Measurements: A study with data from the Umeå 85+/Gerontological regional database population-based cohort study of very old adults in northern Sweden. Every 5 years from 2000–2002 to 2015–2017, comprehensive assessments of participants were performed during home visits (N=1602). Body mass index (BMI) classified participants as underweight (<18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0–29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥30.0 kg/m2). Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) scores classified participants as malnourished (0 to <17), at risk of malnutrition (17–23.5), and having good nutritional status (24–30). Prevalence and trends were examined using analysis of variance and chi-squared tests, including subgroup analyses of nursing home residents.

    Results: Between 2000–2002 and 2015–2017, the mean BMI increased from 24.8± 4.7 to 26.0± 4.7 kg/m2. The prevalence of obesity and underweight were 13.4% and 7.6%, respectively, in 2000–2002 and 18.3% and 3.0%, respectively, in 2015–2017. The mean MNA score increased between 2000–2002 and 2010–2012 (from 23.2± 4.7 to 24.2± 3.6), and had decreased (to 23.3± 4.2) by 2015–2017. The prevalence of malnutrition was 12.2%, 5.1%, and 8.7% in 2000–2002, 2010–2012, and 2015–2017, respectively. Subgroup analyses revealed similar BMI and MNA score patterns among nursing home residents.

    Conclusions: Among very old adults, the mean BMI and prevalence of obesity seemed to increase between 2000–2002 and 2015–2017. Meanwhile, the nutritional status (according to MNA scores) seemed to improve between 2000–2002 and 2010–2012, it declined by 2015–2017.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Burman, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Säätelä, S.
    Novia University of Applied Sciences, Vasa, Finland.
    Carlsson, Maine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Body Mass Index, Mini Nutritional Assessment, and their Association with Five-Year Mortality in Very Old People2015In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 461-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: to investigate the prevalence of malnutrition and the association between Body Mass Index (BMI), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and five-year mortality in a representative population of very old (>85 years) people.

    DESIGN: A prospective cohort study.

    SETTING: A population-based study of very old people in northern Sweden and western Finland, living in institutional care or in the community.

    PARTICIPANTS: Out of 1195 potential participants, 832 were included (mean age 90.2±4.6 years).

    MEASUREMENTS: Nutritional status was assessed using BMI and MNA and the association of those two variables with five-year mortality was analyzed.

    RESULTS: The mean BMI value for the whole population was 25.1±4.5 kg/m2, with no difference between genders (P=0.938). The mean MNA score was 22.5±4.6 for the whole sample, and it was lower for women than for men (P<0.001). Thirteen percent were malnourished (MNA<17) and 40.3% at risk of malnutrition (MNA 17-23.5) according to MNA. Also, 34.8% of those with a MNA score <17 still had a BMI value ≥22.2 kg/m2. A BMI value <22.2 kg/m2 and a MNA score<17 were associated with lower survival. The association with mortality seemed to be J-shaped for BMI, and linear for MNA.

    CONCLUSIONS: Malnutrition according to MNA was common, but a substantial portion of those with a low MNA score still had a high BMI value, and vice versa. The association with mortality appeared to be J-shaped for BMI, and linear for MNA. The MNA seems to be a good measurement of malnutrition in very old people, and BMI might be misleading and could underestimate the prevalence of malnutrition, especially in women.

  • 14.
    Claesson Lingehall, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Svenmarker, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Appelblad, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Davidsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Holmner, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Wahba, Alexander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Norwegian University of Circulation and Medical Imagining, Trondheim, Norway.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Is a hyperosmolar pump prime for cardiopulmonary bypass a risk factor for postoperative delirium?: A double blinded randomised controlled trial2023In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 57, no 1, article id 2186326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Postoperative delirium (POD) is common after cardiac surgery. We have previously identified plasma sodium concentration and the volume of infused fluids during surgery as possible risk factors. Both are linked to the selection and composition of the pump prime used for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Present study aims to examine whether hyperosmolality increases the risk for POD.

    Design: Patients ≥65 years (n = 195) scheduled for cardiac surgery were prospectively enrolled into this double blinded randomised clinical trial. Study group received a pump prime containing mannitol and ringer-acetate (966 mOsmol) (n = 98) vs. ringer-acetate (388 mOsmol) (n = 97) in the control group. Postoperative delirium was defined according to DSM-5 criteria based on a test-battery pre- and postoperatively (days 1–3). Plasma osmolality was measured on five occasions and coordinated with the POD assessments. The primary outcome was the POD incidence related to hyperosmolality as the secondary outcome.

    Results: The incidence of POD was 36% in the study group and 34% in the control group, without intergroup difference (p=.59). The plasma osmolality was significantly higher in the study group, both on days 1 and 3 and after CPB (p<.001). Post hoc analysis indicated that high osmolality levels increased the risk for delirium on day 1 by 9% (odds ratio (OR) 1.09, 95% CI 1.03–1.15) and by 10% on day 3 (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.04–1.16).

    Conclusions: Use of a prime solution with high osmolality did not increase the incidence of POD. However, the influence of hyperosmolality as a risk factor for POD warrants further investigation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Claesson Lingehall, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Cardiothoracic Surgery Division, Heart Center.
    Smulter, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Cardiothoracic Surgery Division, Heart Center.
    Engström, Karl Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Cardiothoracic Surgery Division, Heart Center.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Nursing, The Strategic Research Programme in Care Sciences, Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science, Orthopedic Surgery, University of Umeå.
    Validation of the Swedish version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale used in patients 70 years and older undergoing cardiac surgery2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 19-20, p. 2858-2866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Validation of the Swedish version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale as a screening tool for nurses to use to detect postoperative delirium in patients 70 years and older undergoing cardiac surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Delirium is common among old patients after cardiac surgery. Underdiagnosis and poor documentation of postoperative delirium is problematic, and nurses often misread the signs.

    DESIGN: A prospective observational study.

    METHODS: Patients (n = 142) scheduled for cardiac surgery were assessed three times daily by the nursing staff using the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale. Nursing Delirium Screening Scale was compared with the Mini Mental State Examination and the Organic Brains Syndrome Scale, evaluated day one and day four postoperatively. Delirium was diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - DSM-IV-TR criteria.

    RESULTS: A larger proportion of patients were diagnosed with delirium according to the Mini Mental State Examination and Organic Brains Syndrome Scale compared with the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale, both on day one and day four. The Nursing Delirium Screening Scale protocol identified the majority of hyperactive and mixed delirium patients, whereas several with hypoactive delirium were unrecognised.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale was easily incorporated into clinical care and showed high sensitivity in detecting hyperactive symptoms of delirium. However, in the routine use by nurses, the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale had low sensitivity in detecting hypoactive delirium, the most prevalent form of delirium after cardiac surgery. Nursing Delirium Screening Scale probably has to be combined with cognitive testing to detect hypoactive delirium.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses play a key role in detecting delirium. The Nursing Delirium Screening Scale was easy incorporated instrument for clinical practice and identified the majority of hyperactive and mixed delirium, but several of the patients with hypoactive delirium were unrecognised. Training of assessment and cognitive testing seems to be necessary to detect hypoactive delirium.

  • 16.
    Claesson Lingehall, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Smulter, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lindahl, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Engström, Karl Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Dementia after postoperative delirium in older people who have undergone cardiac surgery: a longitudinal cohort studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Claesson Lingehall, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Smulter, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences. Cardiothoracic Surgery Division, Heart Center.
    Lindahl, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Engström, Karl Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Preoperative Cognitive Performance and Postoperative Delirium Are independently Associated With Future Dementia in Older People Who Have Undergone Cardiac Surgery: A Longitudinal Cohort Study2017In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 1295-1303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate if postoperative delirium was associated with the development of dementia within 5 years after cardiac surgery.

    Design: Longitudinal cohort study.

    Setting: Cardiothoracic Division, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.

    Patients: Patients aged 70 years old or older (n = 114) scheduled for routine cardiac procedures with cardiopulmonary bypass without documented dementia were enrolled in 2009.

    Intervention: Structured assessments were performed preoperatively, 1 and 4 days after extubation, and 1, 3, and 5 years postoperatively.

    Measurements and Main Results: Patients were assessed comprehensively, including cognitive and physical function, coexisting medical conditions, demographic characteristics, and medications. Diagnoses of delirium, depression, and dementia were made according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision criteria. During the 5-year period, 30 of 114 participants (26.3%) developed dementia. Postoperative delirium had occurred in 87% of those who later developed dementia. A multivariable logistic regression model showed a lower preoperative Mini-Mental State Examination score (p < 0.001; odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54–0.84) and the occurrence of postoperative delirium (p = 0.002; odds ratio, 7.57; 95% CI, 2.15–26.65) were associated with dementia occurrence.

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that older patients with reduced preoperative cognitive functions or who develop postoperative delirium are at risk of developing dementia within 5 years after cardiac surgery. Cognitive functions should be screened for preoperatively, those who develop postoperative delirium should be followed up to enable early detection of dementia symptoms, and management should be implemented.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Claesson Lingehall, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Smulter, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindahl, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Experiences of undergoing cardiac surgery among older people diagnosed with postoperative delirium: one year follow-up2015In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is common among old people and many undergo cardiac surgery. Scientific knowledge is available on cardiac surgery from several perspectives. However, we found few studies focusing on older patients' experiences of cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to illuminate experiences of undergoing cardiac surgery among older people diagnosed with postoperative delirium, a one year follow-up.

    METHODS: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 49 participants (aged ≥70 years) diagnosed with delirium after cardiac surgery. Data were collected in Sweden during 2010 through individual, semi-structured interviews in participants' homes one year after surgery. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Four themes with sub-themes were formulated: Feeling drained of viability includes having a body under attack, losing strength and being close to death. Feeling trapped in a weird world describes participants having hallucinations, being in a nightmare and being remorseful for their behavior. Being met with disrespect includes feeling disappointed, being forced, and feeling like cargo. On the other hand, Feeling safe, including being in supportive hands and feeling grateful, points to participants' experiences of good care and the gift of getting a second chance in life.

    CONCLUSIONS: Even one year after cardiac surgery, participants described in detail feelings of extreme vulnerability and frailty. They also had felt completely in the hands of the health care professionals. Participants described experiences of hallucinations and nightmares during hospitalization. Cardiac surgery was a unique, fearful, traumatic and unpleasant experience yet could also include pleasant or rewarding aspects. It seems that health care professionals need deeper knowledge on postoperative delirium in order to prevent, detect and treat delirium to avoid and relieve the suffering these experiences might cause.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Conradsson, Mia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Usefulness of the Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item version among very old people with and without cognitive impairment2013In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 81p. 638-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this population-based study was to investigate the usefulness of the Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item version (GDS-15) to assess depressive symptoms among very old people with differing levels of cognitive function.

    Methods: The 834 participants were aged 85 and over. Feasibility of GDS-15 was evaluated as the proportion of people who completed the scale. Concurrent criterion validity was evaluated by calculating correlations between GDS-15 and Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS). PGCMS measures psychological wellbeing which is closely related with depressive symptoms. Correlations were calculated within groups according to cognitive function assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE); 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-27, and 28-30, using Pearson's two-sided correlation and compared using Fisher r-to-z transformation. Internal consistency of the GDS-15 was evaluated by calculating Cronbach's in each group.

    Results: In total, 651 (78%) of the 834 participants completed the GDS-15. For the two MMSE-groups with scores of <10, the proportion who completed GDS-15 were 1% and 42%, respectively, compared to 65-95% in the MMSE-groups with scores of 10. Cronbach's in each MMSE-group ranged from 0.636 (MMSE 28-30) to 0.821 (MMSE 5-9). The level of correlation between GDS-15 and PGCMS did not significantly differ between MMSE-groups with scores of 5-27 compared to the MMSE-group with scores of 28-30.

    Conclusions: The GDS-15 seems to have an overall usefulness to assess depressive symptoms among very old people with an MMSE score of 10 or more. More studies are needed to strengthen the validity of GDS-15 among older people with MMSE scores of 10-14. For older people with MMSE scores lower than 10, there is a need to develop and validate other measurements.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Do urinary tract infections affect morale among very old women?2010In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 8, p. 73-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As UTI seems to be independently associated with low morale or poor subjective wellbeing, there needs to be more focus on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of UTI in old women.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Prevalence and factors associated with urinary tract infections (UTIs) in very old women2010In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 132-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) and associated factors among very old women. In a cross-sectional, population-based study in Sweden and Finland, 532 women were asked to participate and 395 (74.2%) were possible to evaluate for UTI. Data were collected from structured interviews and assessments made during home visits, from medical charts, caregivers and relatives. UTI diagnosis documented in medical records during the preceding 1 and 5 years was registered. About one-third (117/395, 29.6%) were diagnosed as having suffered from at least one UTI in the preceding year and 60% in the preceding 5 years. In a multivariate logistic regression model, UTI in the preceding year, was associated with vertebral fractures (odds ratio (OR) = 3.2; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.4-7.1), incontinence (OR = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.8-4.5), inflammatory rheumatic disease (OR = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.4-5.7) and multi-infarct dementia (OR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.3-4.5). UTI is a major public health problem in very old women and were independently associated with vertebral fractures, urinary incontinence, inflammatory rheumatic disease and multi-infarct dementia which might indicate that UTI is not a harmless disease.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Urinary tract infection in very old women is associated with delirium2011In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 496-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to investigate whether urinary tract infection (UTI) in a representative sample of 85-, 90- and >/=95-year-old women is associated with delirium.

    Methods: In 504 out of 643 women (78.4%) it was possible to evaluate UTI and delirium. Assessments such as the Organic Brain Syndrome (OBS) Scale, the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS-15) and the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) were performed during home visits. Delirium, dementia and depression were diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria. A diagnosed, symptomatic UTI with or without ongoing treatment, documented in medical records or detected in association with the assessments, was registered.

    Results: Eighty-seven of 504 women (17.2%), were diagnosed as having a UTI with or without ongoing treatment when they were assessed, and almost half of them (44.8%) were diagnosed to be delirious or having had episodes of delirium during the past month. One hundred and thirty-seven of the 504 women (27.2%) were delirious or had had episodes of delirium during the past month and 39 (28.5%) of them were diagnosed to have a UTI. In a multivariate logistic regression model, delirium was significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease (OR = 5.8), multi-infarct dementia (OR = 5.4), depression (OR = 3.1), heart failure (OR = 2.3) and urinary tract infection (OR = 1.9).Conclusions: A large proportion of very old women with UTI suffered from delirium which might indicate that UTI is a common cause of delirium. There should be more focus on detecting, preventing and treating UTI to avoid unnecessary suffering among old women.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    Högskolan i Buskerud, Norge.
    Older women's experiences of suffering from urinary tract infections2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 9-10, p. 1385-1394Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe and explore older women's experiences of having had repeated urinary tract infections (UTIs).

    Background: UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections among older women. Approximately one-third of very old women suffer from at least one UTI each year. Despite the high incidence of UTI, little is known about the impact of UTI on health and daily life in older women.

    Design: A qualitative descriptive design.

    Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with 20 Swedish women aged 67–96 years who suffered from repeated UTIs the preceding year. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Two main themes were identified: being in a state of manageable suffering and depending on alleviation. Being in a state of manageable suffering was described in terms of experiencing physical and psychological health problems, struggling to deal with the illness and being restricted in daily life. Depending on alleviation was illustrated in terms of having access to relief but also receiving inadequate care.

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that UTIs are a serious health problem among older women that not only affects both physical and mental health but also has serious social consequences. The women in this study described the physical and psychological health problems, struggling to deal with the illness, being restricted in daily life, depending on access to relief and receiving inadequate care.

    Relevance to clinical practice: It is important to improve the knowledge about how UTI affects the health of older women. This knowledge may help nurses develop strategies to support these women. One important part in the supportive strategies is that nurses can educate these women in self-care.

  • 24. European Delirium Association,
    et al.
    American Delirium Society,
    The DSM-5 criteria, level of arousal and delirium diagnosis: inclusiveness is safer2014In: BMC Medicine, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Delirium is a common and serious problem among acutely unwell persons. Although linked to higher rates of mortality, institutionalisation and dementia, it remains underdiagnosed. Careful consideration of its phenomenology is warranted to improve detection and therefore mitigate some of its clinical impact. The publication of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-5) provides an opportunity to examine the constructs underlying delirium as a clinical entity.

    DISCUSSION: Altered consciousness has been regarded as a core feature of delirium; the fact that consciousness itself should be physiologically disrupted due to acute illness attests to its clinical urgency. DSM-5 now operationalises 'consciousness' as 'changes in attention'. It should be recognised that attention relates to content of consciousness, but arousal corresponds to level of consciousness. Reduced arousal is also associated with adverse outcomes. Attention and arousal are hierarchically related; level of arousal must be sufficient before attention can be reasonably tested.

    SUMMARY: Our conceptualisation of delirium must extend beyond what can be assessed through cognitive testing (attention) and accept that altered arousal is fundamental. Understanding the DSM-5 criteria explicitly in this way offers the most inclusive and clinically safe interpretation.

  • 25.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Delirium. A Swedish perspective.2010In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 374-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incidence and duration of delirium is probably the best measurement of the quality of acute hospital care of old people. A patient with delirium is always seen as a diagnostic challenge to the geriatric team since the only effective treatment is to prevent, detect and treat the underlying causes of delirium. Predisposing and precipitating factors has to be dealt with simultaneously and the best conditions for the recovery of the brain have to be created. New threats to the brain have to be prevented and harmful medication should be avoided. Long-term follow-up of the patient with delirium is necessary since delirium can be the first symptom of a preclinical dementia.

  • 26.
    Johansson, Sanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    A clinically feasible short version of the 15-item geriatric depression scale extracted using item response theory in a sample of adults aged 85 years and older2022In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 431-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To extract the items most suitable for a short version of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) in a sample of adults aged ≥ 85 years using item response theory (IRT).

    Method: This population-based cross-sectional study included 651 individuals aged ≥ 85 years from the Umeå 85+/GErontological Regional DAtabase (GERDA) study. Participants were either community dwelling (approximately 70%) or resided in institutional care (approximately 30%) in northern Sweden and western Finland in 2000–2002 and 2005–2007. The psychometric properties of GDS-15 items were investigated using an IRT-based approach to find items most closely corresponding to the GDS-15 cut off value of ≥5 points. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the performance of the proposed short version with that of previously proposed short GDS versions.

    Results: GDS-15 items 3, 8, 12, and 13 best differentiated respondents’ levels of depressive symptoms corresponding to the GDS-15 cut off value of ≥5, regardless of age or sex, and thus comprise the proposed short version of the scale (GDS-4 GERDA). For the identification of individuals with depression (total GDS-15 score ≥ 5), the GDS-4 GERDA with a cut-off score of ≥2 had 92.9% sensitivity and 85.0% specificity.

    Conclusion: The GDS-4 GERDA could be used as an optimized short version of the GDS-15 to screen for depression among adults aged ≥ 85 years.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Jonsson, Fanny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Association between the COVID-19 pandemic and mental health in very old people in Sweden2024In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 4, article id e0299098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, Sweden implemented social distancing measures to reduce infection rates. However, the recommendation meant to protect individuals particularly at risk may have had negative consequences. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on very old Swedish peoples' mental health and factors associated with a decline in mental health.

    Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among previous participants of the SilverMONICA (MONItoring of Trends and Determinants of CArdiovascular disease) study. Of 394 eligible participants, 257 (65.2%) agreed to participate. Of these, 250 individuals reported mental health impact from COVID-19. Structured telephone interviews were carried out during the spring of 2021. Data were analysed using the χ2 test, t-test, and binary logistic regression.

    Results: Of 250 individuals (mean age: 85.5 ± 3.3 years, 54.0% women), 75 (30.0%) reported a negative impact on mental health, while 175 (70.0%) reported either a positive impact (n = 4) or no impact at all (n = 171). In the binary logistic regression model, factors associated with a decline in mental health included loneliness (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) (3.87 [1.83-8.17]) and difficulty adhering to social distancing recommendations (5.10 [1.92-13.53]). High morale was associated with positive or no impact on mental health (0.37 [0.17-0.82]).

    Conclusions: A high percentage of very old people reported a negative impact on mental health from the COVID-19 pandemic, primarily from loneliness and difficulty adhering to social distancing measures, while high morale seemed to be a protective factor.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Karlsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Berggren, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Effects of Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation on Walking Ability and Length of Hospital Stay After Hip Fracture: A Randomized Controlled Trial2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 464.e9-464.e15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate if Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation could improve walking ability for older people with hip fracture compared with conventional geriatric care and rehabilitation. A secondary aim was to investigate the postoperative length of hospital stay (LOS).

    Design: Randomized controlled trial.

    Setting: Geriatric ward, ordinary housing, and residential care facilities.

    Participants: People operated on for a hip fracture (n = 205), aged 70 or older, including those with cognitive impairment, and living in the north of Sweden.

    Intervention: Home rehabilitation with the aim of early hospital discharge that was individually designed and carried out by an interdisciplinary team for a maximum of 10 weeks. Special priority was given to prevention of falls, independence in daily activities, and walking ability both indoors and outdoors.

    Measurements: Walking ability and the use of walking device was assessed in an interview during the hospital stay. These assessments were repeated along with gait speed measurements at 3- and 12-month follow-up. The length of the hospital stay after the hip fracture was recorded.

    Results: No significant differences were observed in walking ability, use of walking device, and gait speed at the 3- and 12-month follow-up between the groups. At 12 months, 56.3% of the intervention group and 57.7% of the control group had regained or improved their prefracture walking ability. The median postoperative LOS in the geriatric ward was 6 days shorter for the intervention group (P = .003).

    Conclusion: Participants receiving Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation regained walking ability in the short-and long-term similar to those receiving conventional geriatric care and rehabilitation according to a multifactorial rehabilitation program. The intervention group had a significantly shorter postoperative LOS in the hospital.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Karlsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Berggren, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture in People with Dementia-A Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial2020In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 15, p. 1575-1586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate if the effects of geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation after hip fracture were different among people with dementia compared to those without dementia and to describe the overall outcome after hip fracture in people with dementia. Patients and Methods: A post hoc subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial was conducted including 205 people with hip fracture, aged >70, living in ordinary housing or residential care facilities. Early discharge followed by individually designed interdisciplinary home rehabilitation for a maximum of 10 weeks was compared to in-hospital geriatric care according to a multifactorial rehabilitation program. Outcomes were hospital length of stay (LOS), readmissions, falls, mortality, performance in activities of daily living (ADL), and walking ability. Results: Interdisciplinary home rehabilitation vs in-hospital care had comparable effects on falls and mortality between discharge and 12 months and on ADL and walking ability at 3 and 12 months regardless of whether the participants had dementia or not (P 0.05 for all). Among participants with dementia, postoperative LOS was a median of 18 days (interquartile range [IQR] 14-30) in the home rehabilitation group vs 23 days (IQR 15-30) in the control group (P=0.254) with comparable numbers of readmissions after discharge. Dementia was associated with increased risk of falling (odds ratio [OR] 3.86; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.05-7.27; P<0.001) and increased mortality (OR 4.20; 95% CI 1.79-9.92, P=0.001) between discharge and 12 months and with greater dependence in ADL and walking at 3 and 12 months compared to participants without dementia (P<0.001 for all). Conclusion: The effects of geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation vs in-hospital geriatric care did not differ in participants with and without dementia. However, the statistical power of this subgroup analysis was likely insufficient to detect differences between the groups. Dementia was associated with a substantial negative impact on the outcomes following the hip fracture. Our findings support offering interdisciplinary home rehabilitation after hip fracture to people with dementia.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Karlsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Berggren, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Effects of Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation on Independence in Activities of Daily Living in Older People With Hip Fracture: A Randomized Controlled Trial2020In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 101, no 4, p. 571-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early discharge followed by geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation for older people with hip fracture on independence in activities of daily living (ADL) compared with inhospital geriatric care according to a multifactorial rehabilitation program.

    Design: Planned analysis of a randomized controlled trial with 3- and 12-month follow-ups.

    Setting: Geriatric ward, ordinary housing, and residential care facilities.

    Participants: Of 466 people screened for eligibility, participants (N=205) with acute hip fracture, aged 70 years or older, including those with cognitive impairment and those living in residential care facilities, were randomized to intervention or control groups.

    Intervention: Individually designed interdisciplinary home rehabilitation for a maximum of 10 weeks. The intervention aimed at early hospital discharge and focused on prevention of falls, independence in daily activities, and walking ability indoors and outdoors.

    Main Outcome Measures: Independence in ADL was measured using the Barthel ADL Index, and the ADL Staircase including the Katz ADL Index during hospital stay (prefracture performance) and at the follow-up visits in the participants’ homes.

    Results: There were no significant differences in ADL performance between the groups, and they recovered their prefracture level of independence in personal and instrumental ADL comparably. At 12 months, 33 (41.3%) in the intervention group vs 33 (41.8%) in the control group (P=.99) had regained or improved their prefracture ADL performance according to the Barthel ADL Index, and 27 (37.0%) vs 36 (48.6%) according to the ADL Staircase (P=.207).

    Conclusions: In older people with hip fracture, early discharge followed by geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation resulted in a comparable recovery of independence in ADL at 3 and 12 months as inhospital geriatric care and rehabilitation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31.
    Karlsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Older adults' perspectives on rehabilitation and recovery one year after a hip fracture – a qualitative study2022In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In order to improve quality of care and recovery after hip fracture we need to include the perspectives of the individual older adults when evaluating different rehabilitation interventions. The aim of this study was therefore to explore older adults’ experiences of their rehabilitation after a hip fracture and of the recovery process during the 12 months following the fracture. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 older adults (70–91 years of age) who had participated in a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effects of early discharge followed by geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation compared to in-hospital care according to a multifactorial rehabilitation program. Ten participants from each group were interviewed shortly after the one-year follow-up when the study was completed. Data were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis resulted in four themes: Moving towards recovery with the help of others; Getting to know a new me; Striving for independence despite obstacles; and Adapting to an altered but acceptable life. The participants emphasised the importance of having access to rehabilitation that was provided by skilled staff, and support from family members and friends for well-being and recovery. They experienced a change in their self-image but strove for independence despite struggling with complications and functional limitations and used adaptive strategies to find contentment in their lives. Conclusions: Rehabilitation interventions provided by competent health care professionals, as well as support from family members and friends, were emphasised as crucial for satisfactory recovery. Participants’ experiences further highlight the importance of targeting both physical and psychological impacts after a hip fracture. To improve recovery, rehabilitation providers should customise future interventions to suit each individual´s wishes and needs and provide rehabilitation in various settings throughout the recovery process. Trial registration: The trial is registered at Current Controlled Trials Ltd, ICRCTN 15738119. Date of registration 16/06/2008, retrospectively registered.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Kollberg, Sandra E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Häggström, Ann-Cristin E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Claesson Lingehall, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Accuracy of visually estimated blood loss in surgical sponges by members of the surgical team2019In: AANA Journal, ISSN 0094-6354, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 277-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important that operating room personnel monitor the correct amount of blood loss during surgery in order to properly replace lost volume. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of operating room personnel in visually estimating blood loss in surgical sponges. We performed an observational study with comparative descriptive design at a university hospital including all members of the surgical team. In total, 163 observations were completed. The participants estimated the amount of blood in surgical sponges in 4 stations with varying amounts of blood and/or numbers of sponges. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed rank, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests. Both overestimations and underestimations occurred. Underestimations dominated and tended to increase with major amounts of blood. Operating room personnel miscalculated the amount of blood by a median value of 30% regardless of profession, years of experience, and self-assessed ability about visual estimation. This study highlights that assessments of patients’ conditions can be partially based on methods often demonstrated to be inaccurate. Inaccurate visual estimation of blood loss might endanger patient safety.

  • 33.
    Lampinen, Josefine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Occupational Therapy.
    Conradsson, Mia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nyqvist, Fredrica
    Faculty of Education and Welfare Studies, Social Policy, Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Occupational Therapy.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Loneliness among very old people with and without dementia: prevalence and associated factors in a representative sample2022In: European Journal of Ageing, ISSN 1613-9372, E-ISSN 1613-9380, Vol. 19, p. 1441-1453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loneliness and dementia are common among very old (aged ≥ 80 years) people, but whether the prevalence of loneliness differs between very old people with and without dementia is unknown and few studies have investigated associated factors. The aims of the present study were to compare the prevalence of loneliness between people with and without dementia in a representative sample of very old people, and to investigate factors associated with loneliness in the two groups separately. This population-based study was conducted with data on 1176 people aged 85, 90, and ≥ 95 years (mean age 89.0 ± 4.47 years) from the Umeå 85 + /Gerontological Regional Database study conducted in northern Sweden, during year 2000–2017. Structured interviews and assessments were conducted during home visits. Loneliness was assessed using the question “Do you ever feel lonely?.” Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with loneliness in participants with and without dementia. The prevalence of loneliness did not differ between people with and without dementia (50.9% and 46.0%, respectively; p = 0.13). Seven and 24 of 35 variables were univariately associated with the experience of loneliness in participants with and without dementia, respectively. In the final models, living alone and having depressive symptoms were associated with the experience of loneliness in both study groups. In participants without dementia, living in a nursing home was associated with the experience of less loneliness. These findings contribute with important knowledge when developing strategies to reduce loneliness in this growing age group.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Occupational Therapy. School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    A focus groups study of staff team experiences of providing interdisciplinary rehabilitation for people with dementia and their caregivers: a co-creative journey2023In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]