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  • 1. Anderson, M
    et al.
    Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Ranggård, L
    Tsilingaridis, G
    Mejàre, I
    Detection of approximal caries in 5-year-old Swedish children2005In: Caries Research, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to assess how accurately some commonly used risk factors/risk markers (predictors) for caries development could identify children with and without approximal caries as judged from bitewing radiography. 267 consecutive 5-year-old children from two Swedish cities participated. Three experienced dentists examined the children. The predictors were the overall dmfs value (canines and molars), the number of occlusal dmfs, the frequency of intake of between meal sugary products, visible plaque on free smooth surfaces of second primary molars, toothbrushing habits, and (before bitewing examination) an overall judgement by the examining dentist. The mean dmfs without bitewing examination (BW) was 0.40 (SD = 1.22). Twelve percent of the children had at least one dentin lesion and 33 % at least one enamel lesion that were detected from BW only. The gain from adding BW to clinical examination amounted to a mean of 1.2 approximal enamel and/or dentin lesions. Results: The ability to correctly identify children with approximal caries from the predictors was limited; sensitivity ranged from 0.27 to 0.75 and specificity ranged from 0.41 to 0.93. The single best predictor was the dentist's overall judgement with an average precision of 73 %; average sensitivity for the presence of enamel and dentin lesions was 0.48 and for the presence of dentin lesions 0.66. The rest of the predictors added little to the predictive power. It is concluded that 33 % of the 5-year-olds, representing a low caries prevalence population, benefited from BW. The ability to identify these children from the predictors was, however, limited.

  • 2.
    Arnadottir, Solveig A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. School of Health Sciences, University of Akureyri, Iceland .
    Gunnarsdottir, Elin D
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Determinants of self-rated health in old age: a population-based, cross-sectional study using the international classification of functioning2011In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. 670-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-rated health (SRH) is a widely used indicator of general health and multiple studies have supported the predictive validity of SRH in older populations concerning future health, functional decline, disability, and mortality. The aim of this study was to use the theoretical framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to create a better understanding of factors associated with SRH among community-dwelling older people in urban and rural areas.

    Methods: The study design was population-based and cross-sectional. Participants were 185 Icelanders, randomly selected from a national registry, community-dwelling, 65-88 years old, 63% urban residents, and 52% men. Participants were asked: "In general, would you say your health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?" Associations with SRH were analyzed with ordinal logistic regression. Explanatory variables represented aspects of body functions, activities, participation, environmental factors and personal factors components of the ICF.

    Results: Univariate analysis revealed that SRH was significantly associated with all analyzed ICF components through 16 out of 18 explanatory variables. Multivariate analysis, however, demonstrated that SRH had an independent association with five variables representing ICF body functions, activities, and personal factors components: The likelihood of a better SRH increased with advanced lower extremity capacity (adjusted odds ratio [adjOR] = 1.05, < 0.001), upper extremity capacity (adjOR = 1.13, = 0.040), household physical activity (adjOR = 1.01, = 0.016), and older age (adjOR = 1.09, = 0.006); but decreased with more depressive symptoms (adjOR = 0.79, < 0.001).

    Conclusions: The results highlight a collection of ICF body functions, activities and personal factors associated with higher SRH among community-dwelling older people. Some of these, such as physical capacity, depressive symptoms, and habitual physical activity are of particular interest due to their potential for change through public health interventions. The use of ICF conceptual framework and widely accepted standardized assessments should make these results comparable and relevant in an international context.

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    Determinants of self-rated health in old age: a population-based, cross-sectional study using the international classification of functioning
  • 3.
    Arnadottir, Solveig A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gunnarsdottir, Elin D
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Participation frequency and perceived participation restrictions at older age: applying the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 23-24, p. 2208-2216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To identify variables from different components of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) associated with older people's participation frequency and perceived participation restrictions. Method: Participants (N = 186) were community-living, 65-88 years old and 52% men. The dependent variables, participation frequency (linear regression) and perceived participation restrictions (logistic regression), were measured using The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument. Independent variables were selected from various ICF components. Results: Higher participation frequency was associated with living in urban rather than rural community (beta = 2.8, p < 0.001), physically active lifestyle (beta = 4.6, p < 0.001) and higher cognitive function (beta = 0.3, p = 0.009). Lower participation frequency was associated with being older (beta = -0.2, p = 0.002) and depressive symptoms (beta = -0.2, p = 0.029). Older adults living in urban areas, having more advanced lower extremities capacity, or that were employed had higher odds of less perceived participation restrictions (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 5.5, p = 0.001; OR = 1.09, p < 0.001; OR = 3.7, p = 0.011; respectively). In contrast, the odds of less perceived participation restriction decreased as depressive symptoms increased (OR = 0.8, p = 0.011). Conclusions: Our results highlight the importance of capturing and understanding both frequency and restriction aspects of older persons' participation. ICF may be a helpful reference to map factors associated with participation and to study further potentially modifiable influencing factors such as depressive symptoms and advanced lower extremity capacity.

  • 4.
    Arnadottir, Solveig
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gunnarsdottir, E
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Self-rated health: a valid outcome in geriatric physical therapy?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Asklund, Ina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Nyström, E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Sjöström, M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Umefjord, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Treatment of stress urinary incontinence via a smartphone application: a randomised controlled trial2015In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, ISSN 0733-2467, E-ISSN 1520-6777, Vol. 34, no Supplement 3 Meeting Abstract 16, p. S40-S42Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Asklund, Ina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Nyström, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Sjöström, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Umefjord, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Mobile app for treatment of stress urinary incontinence: a randomized controlled trial2017In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, ISSN 0733-2467, E-ISSN 1520-6777, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 1369-1376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect of a mobile app treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women.

    METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, conducted 2013-2014 in Sweden. Community-dwelling adult women with ≥1 SUI episode/week recruited through our website and randomized to app treatment (n = 62) or control group (postponed treatment, n = 61). One participant from each group was lost to follow-up. Intervention was the mobile app Tät(®) with a treatment program focused on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), and information about SUI and lifestyle factors. Primary outcomes, 3 months after randomization: symptom severity (International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form [ICIQ-UI SF]); and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life [ICIQ-LUTSqol]).

    RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-three women were included (mean age 44.7), with moderate/severe SUI (97.5%, 120/123), mean ICIQ-UI SF score 11.1 (SD 2.8) and mean ICIQ-LUTSqol score 34.4 (SD 6.1) at baseline. At follow-up, the app group reported improvements in symptom severity (mean ICIQ-UI SF score reduction: 3.9, 95% confidence interval 3.0-4.7) and condition-specific quality of life (mean ICIQ-LUTSqol score reduction: 4.8, 3.4-6.2) and the groups were significantly different (mean ICIQ-UI SF score difference: -3.2, -4.3to -2.1; mean ICIQ-LUTSqol score difference: -4.6, -7.8 to -1.4). In the app group, 98.4% (60/61) performed PFMT at follow-up, and 41.0% (25/61) performed it daily.

    CONCLUSIONS: The mobile app treatment was effective for women with SUI and yielded clinically relevant improvements. This app may increase access to first-line treatment and adherence to PFMT.

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  • 7.
    Berglin, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Sundin, Ulf
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Van Venrooij, Walther J
    Klareskog, Lars
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    A combination of autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) and HLA-DRB1 locus antigens is strongly associated with future onset of rheumatoid arthritis2004In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 6, no 4, p. R303-R308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) and rheumatoid factors (RFs) have been demonstrated to predate the onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by years. A nested case–control study was performed within the Northern Sweden Health and Disease study cohort to analyse the presence of shared epitope (SE) genes, defined as HLA-DRB1*0404 or DRB1*0401, and of anti-CCP antibodies and RFs in individuals who subsequently developed RA. Patients with RA were identified from among blood donors whose samples had been collected years before the onset of symptoms. Controls matched for age, sex, and date of sampling were selected randomly from the same cohort. The SE genes were identified by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers. Anti-CCP2 antibodies and RFs were determined using enzyme immunoassays. Fifty-nine individuals with RA were identified as blood donors, with a median antedating time of 2.0 years (interquartile range 0.9–3.9 years) before presenting with symptoms of RA. The sensitivity for SE as a diagnostic indicator for RA was 60% and the specificity was 64%. The corresponding figures for anti-CCP antibodies were 37% and 98%, and for RFs, 17–42% and 94%, respectively. In a logistic regression analysis, SE (odds ratio [OR] = 2.35), anti-CCP antibodies (OR = 15.9), and IgA-RF (OR = 6.8) significantly predicted RA. In a combination model analysis, anti-CCP antibodies combined with SE had the highest OR (66.8, 95% confidence interval 8.3–539.4) in predicting RA, compared with anti-CCP antibodies without SE (OR = 25.01, 95% confidence interval 2.8–222.2) or SE without anti-CCP antibodies (OR = 1.9, 95% confidence interval 0.9–4.2). This study showed that the presence of anti-CCP antibodies together with SE gene carriage is associated with a very high relative risk for future development of RA.

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  • 8.
    Bergström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Fracture mechanisms and fracture pattern in men and women aged 50 years and older: a study of a 12-year population-based injury register, Umeå, Sweden2008In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 1267-1273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: In a study of a 12-year population-based injury register, Umeå, Sweden, we analyzed the fracture mechanisms and fracture pattern in men and women 50 years and older. Low-energy trauma was responsible for the major and costliest part of the fracture panorama, but the pattern differs between age groups.

    Introduction: Osteoporosis-related fracture is a major health problem: the number of hip fractures is expected to double to 2030. While osteoporosis is one of many risk factors, trauma is almost always involved. Therefore, we analyzed injury mechanisms in patients aged over 50.

    Methods: We registered injury mechanism, cause, diagnosis in all trauma patients at Umeå University hospital, Sweden. This population-based register (1993–2004) comprises a total of 113,668 injuries (29,189 fractures). Patients ≥50 years contributed to 13,279 fractures.

    Results: Low-energy trauma (fall <1 m) caused 53% of all fractures ≥50 years and older. In those over 75 low-energy trauma caused >80%. The seasonal variation of fractures was maximally 25%. With increasing age, proximal fractures became more common, in both upper and lower extremities. Proximal locations predominate in older age groups.

    Conclusions: Low-energy trauma was responsible for the largest and costliest part of the fracture panorama. In fact, almost all fractures in middle-aged and old people were caused by low-energy mechanisms; thus, most fractures in these patients have a fragility component, and the contribution of osteoporosis-related fractures is more important than previously thought. A better understanding of injury mechanisms also in low-energy trauma is a prerequisite for preventive interventions.

  • 9.
    Bergström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Pettersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    The hip fracture incidence curve is shifting to the right: a forecast of the age-quake2009In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 80, no 5, p. 520-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The number of hip fractures has doubled in the last 30–40 years in many countries. Age-adjusted incidence has been reported to be decreasing in Europe and North America, but is there a decreasing trend in all age groups? Patients and methods This population-based study included all hip-fracture patients over 50 years of age (a total of 2,919 individuals, 31% of whom were men) admitted to Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, from 1993 through 2005. Results The incidence of hip fracture declined between the periods 1993–1996 and 2001–2005: from 706 to 625 hip fractures per 105 women and from 390 to 317 hip fractures per 105 men. However, there was a 114% increase in the number of fractures in women aged 90 or older (12 and 25 hip fractures/year, respectively, in the two time periods). For the period 2001–05, women ≥ 90 years of age accounted for almost the same numbers of hip fractures as women aged 75–79 (27 fractures/year). The rate increased during this period, from 2,700 per 105 women to 3,900 per 105 women > 90 years. In men there were declining trends for both relative and absolute numbers. Interpretation Although age-adjusted incidence declined in the population > 50 years of age, absolute fracture rate and incidence increased in the very old. Women over 90 now have the same absolute number of hip fractures every year as women aged 75–79 years. There was a right-shift in hip fracture distribution towards the oldest old, probably due to an increased number of octo/nonagenarians, a new population of particularly frail old people that hardly existed earlier. Better health among septuagenarians may also have delayed the age at which fractures occurred. This changing pattern will strain orthopedic and geriatric resources even more.

  • 10.
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Research Unit Medicine-Geriatric Clinic, Skellefteå County Hospital, SE-931 86 Skellefteå, Sweden..
    Lönnberg, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Flawed conclusions on the Vasterbotten Intervention Program by San Sebastian et .al2019In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An evaluation of Vasterbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) was recently conducted by San Sebastian et al. (BMC Public Health 19:202, 2019). Evaluation of health care interventions of this kind require 1) an understanding of both the design and the nature of the intervention, 2) correct definition of the target population, and 3) careful choice of the appropriate evaluation method. In this correspondence, we review the approach used by San Sebastian et al. as relates to these three criteria. Within this framework, we suggest important explanations for why the conclusions drawn by these authors contradict a large body of research on the effectiveness of the VIP.

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  • 11.
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lönnberg, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Impact of a combined community and primary care prevention strategy on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: a cohort analysis based on 1 million person-years of follow-up in Västerbotten County, Sweden, during 1990-20062015In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 12, article id e009651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) by comparing all eligible individuals (target group impact) according to the intention-to-treat principle and VIP participants with the general Swedish population.

    DESIGN: Dynamic cohort study.

    SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: All individuals aged 40, 50 or 60 years, residing in Västerbotten County, Sweden, between 1990 and 2006 (N=101 918) were followed from their first opportunity to participate in the VIP until age 75, study end point or prior death.

    INTERVENTION: The VIP is a systematic, long-term, county-wide cardiovascular disease (CVD) intervention that is performed within the primary healthcare setting and combines individual and population approaches. The core component is a health dialogue based on a physical examination and a comprehensive questionnaire at the ages of 40, 50 and 60 years.

    PRIMARY OUTCOMES: All-cause and CVD mortality.

    RESULTS: For the target group, there were 5646 deaths observed over 1 054 607 person-years. Compared to Sweden at large, the standardised all-cause mortality ratio was 90.6% (95% CI 88.2% to 93.0%): for women 87.9% (95% CI 84.1% to 91.7%) and for men 92.2% (95% CI 89.2% to 95.3%). For CVD, the ratio was 95.0% (95% CI 90.7% to 99.4%): for women 90.4% (95% CI 82.6% to 98.7%) and for men 96.8% (95% CI 91.7 to 102.0). For participants, subject to further impact as well as selection, when compared to Sweden at large, the standardised all-cause mortality ratio was 66.3% (95% CI 63.7% to 69.0%), whereas the CVD ratio was 68.9% (95% CI 64.2% to 73.9%). For the target group as well as for the participants, standardised mortality ratios for all-cause mortality were reduced within all educational strata.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that the VIP model of CVD prevention is able to impact on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality when evaluated according to the intention-to-treat principle.

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  • 12.
    Boström, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hörnsten, Asa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Role clarity and role conflict among Swedish diabetes specialist nurses2013In: Primary care diabetes, ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 207-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To explore diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs)' perceptions of their role in terms of clarity, conflict and other psychosocial work aspects.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among DSNs in a county in northern Sweden. The DSNs answered the Nordic Questionnaire of Psychological and Social Factors at Work (QPS Nordic) about psychosocial aspects of their work. Statistical analysis compared DSNs with a reference group of different health professionals. Correlations between role clarity, role conflict, and other variables were analysed.

    RESULTS: The DSNs perceived more, and higher, job demands, including quantitative, decision-making and learning demands, but also more positive challenges at work compared with the reference group. Role clarity correlated with experiences of health promotion, perception of mastery, co-worker support, and empowering leadership, while role conflict correlated with quantitative and learning demands.

    CONCLUSIONS: The DSNs perceived high demands but also positive challenges in their work. Their role expectations correlated with several psychosocial work aspects. It is important that DSNs should be presented with positive challenges as meaningful incentives for further role development and enhanced mastery of their work.

  • 13. Carlsson, Annica
    et al.
    Svensson, Åke
    Anderson, Chris D
    Baranovskaya, Irina
    Hindsén-Stenström, Monica
    Holt, Ingebjörg
    Meding, Birgitta
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Gånemo, Agneta
    Scoring of hand eczema: good reliability of hand eczema extent score2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 193-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is good agreement between dermatological staff and patients using the Hand Eczema Extent Score (HEES). The aim of this study was to assess inter- and intra-observer reliability of the HEES in dermatologists and intra-observer reliability of the HEES in patients with hand eczema. Six dermatologists assessed 18 patients twice. Only the hands of the patients were visible to the assessors. Patients performed a self-assessment twice. Inter- and intra-observer reliability was tested with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean HEES score for all dermatologists' assessments was 21.0 (range 3.6-46.3). The corresponding mean scores for all patients' own assessments were 24.9 (range 4.0-54.0). Inter-observer reliability in the dermatologists' observations ICC classification was very good, median value 0.82 (range 0.56-0.92). The overall intra-observer reliability for the 6 dermatologists' ICC classification was very good (range 0.88-0.94). Intra-observer reliability in the patients' 2 self-assessments ICC classification was very good (ICC 0.95). In conclusion, HEES is a reliable tool for both dermatologists and patients to grade the extent of hand eczema.

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  • 14.
    Dahlqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Dahlqvist, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Marklund, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Ortodontics.
    Berggren, Diana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Franklin, Karl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Physical findings in the upper airways related to obstructive sleep apnea in men and women2007In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 127, no 6, p. 623-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONCLUSIONS:There are gender differences when it comes to the risk factors for sleep apnea. Large tonsils, a high tongue and a wide uvula are risk factors for sleep apnea in men, while large tonsils and a retrognathic mandible are risk factors in women. Upper airway abnormalities including mandibular retrognathia are, however, unable to predict sleep apnea among snorers being investigated for suspected sleep apnea.

    OBJECTIVES: To identify gender-specific risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea and the diagnostic performance from physical upper airway examinations among snoring men and women investigated because of suspected sleep apnea.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: The dimensions of the uvula, tonsils, velopharynx and tongue, and nasal septal deviation, mandibular position, neck circumference, weight, and height were systematically scored in 801 consecutive snoring patients (596 men and 205 women), who had been referred for a primary sleep apnea recording.

    RESULTS: In men, large tonsils, a high tongue, and a wide uvula were independent factors associated with an apnea-hyopnea index of > 15. In women, large tonsils and mandibular retrognathia were independent factors associated with an apnea-hypopnea index of > 15. The positive predictive values for upper airway abnormalities ranged between 0.20 and 0.25 in men and between 0.09 and 0.15 in women.

  • 15.
    Dapi N., Léonie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Energy and nutrient intake in relation to sex and socioeconomic status among adolescents in urban Cameroon, Africa2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 904-913Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess energy and nutrient intakes and physical activity of adolescents in urban Cameroon according to sex and socio-economic status (SES).

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional study with adolescents randomly selected from schools in low-, middle- and high-SES areas. Weight and height were measured and information about food intake and physical activity was obtained through repeated individual 24 h recalls. Under- and over-reporting of energy intake and inadequacy of nutrient intake were assessed.

    SETTING: Yaoundé, Cameroon.

    SUBJECTS: Boys and girls aged 12-16 years (n 227).

    RESULTS: Boys had a lower BMI and reported higher energy expenditures and physical activity levels (PAL) than girls. Under-reporting of energy intake was large among boys and girls regardless of PAL; boys under-reported more than girls. Among those with low PAL, over-reporting of energy intake was common. Over 50 % of boys and girls had protein below the recommendations. The intake of fat varied; 26 % of the adolescents were below and 25 % were above the recommendations. Inadequate intakes of vitamin B1, vitamin B3 and Fe were more common among girls, while boys more often had inadequate intake of vitamin A. Adolescents with low SES were more likely to be below the recommendations for fat and vitamins B2, B3, B6 and B12 than those with high SES.

    CONCLUSIONS: A high proportion of boys and girls reported inadequate intakes. However under- and over-reporting were also very common. Boys under-reported energy intake more than girls and inadequate nutrient intake was more frequently reported by adolescents with low SES than by those with high SES.

  • 16.
    Desta, Menelik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Hägglöf, Bruno
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Kebede, Derege
    Alem, Atalay
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    The Reporting Questionnaire for Children (RQC) as a valid and simple child mental health screening instrument in EthiopiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Dewi, Fatwa Sari Tetra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Public Health Division, Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hakimi, Mohammad
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    An increase in risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Yogyakarta, Indonesia: a comparison of two cross-sectional surveys2015In: Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, ISSN 0125-1562, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 775-785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to describe changes in risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) over a five year period in urban Indonesia. In 2004 (n=3,205) and 2009 (n=2,467) we conducted cross-sectional surveys of residents in Yogjakarta City, Indonesia evaluating risk factors for CVD. Smoking habits, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, blood pressure, weight, and height were recorded. The results of these 2 surveys conducted 5 years apart were then compared. The risk for having a CVD event was also calculated. Behavioral CVD risk factors were more common among men. The predicted risk of having a CVD event increased from 8.4% to 11.3% among men between 2004 and 2009. Effective measures need to be taken to change these behaviors among men in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

  • 18.
    Dewi, Fatwa Sari Tetra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Public Health Division, Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Marlinawati, V. Utari
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    A community intervention for behaviour modification: an experience to control cardiovascular diseases in Yogyakarta, Indonesia2013In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, article id 1043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-communicable Disease (NCD) is increasingly burdening developing countries including Indonesia. However only a few intervention studies on NCD control in developing countries are reported. This study aims to report experiences from the development of a community-based pilot intervention to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD), as initial part of a future extended PRORIVA program (Program to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Yogyakarta, Indonesia) in an urban area within Jogjakarta, Indonesia.

    Methods: The study is quasi-experimental and based on a mixed design involving both quantitative and qualitative methods. Four communities were selected as intervention areas and one community was selected as a referent area. A community-empowerment approach was utilized to motivate community to develop health promotion activities. Data on knowledge and attitudes with regard to CVD risk factors, smoking, physical inactivity, and fruit and vegetable were collected using the WHO STEPwise questionnaire. 980 people in the intervention areas and 151 people in the referent area participated in the pre-test. In the post-test 883 respondents were re-measured from the intervention areas and 144 respondents from the referent area. The qualitative data were collected using written meeting records (80), facilitator reports (5), free-listing (112) and in-depth interviews (4). Those data were analysed to contribute a deeper understanding of how the population perceived the intervention.

    Results: Frequency and participation rates of activities were higher in the low socioeconomic status (SES) communities than in the high SES communities (40 and 13 activities respectively). The proportion of having high knowledge increased significantly from 56% to 70% among men in the intervention communities. The qualitative study shows that respondents thought PRORIVA improved their awareness of CVD and encouraged them to experiment healthier behaviours. PRORIVA was perceived as a useful program and was expected for the continuation. Citizens of low SES communities thought PRORIVA was a “cheerful” program.

    Conclusion: A community-empowerment approach can encourage community participation which in turn may improve the citizen’s knowledge of the danger impact of CVD. Thus, a bottom-up approach may improve citizens’ acceptance of a program, and be a feasible way to prevent and control CVD in urban communities within a low income country.

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  • 19.
    Dewi, Fatwa Sari Tetra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hakimi, Mohammad
    Center for Health and Nutrition Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Mobilising a disadvantaged community for a cardiovascular intervention: designing PRORIVA in Yogyakarta, Indonesia2010In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 3, p. 4661-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a burden for developing countries, yet few CVD intervention studies have been conducted in developing countries such as Indonesia. This paper outlines the process of designing a community intervention programme to reduce CVD risk factors, and discusses experiences with regard to design issues for a small-scale intervention.

    DESIGN PROCESS: THE DESIGN PROCESS FOR THE PRESENT COMMUNITY INTERVENTION CONSISTED OF SIX STAGES: (1) a baseline risk factor survey, (2) design of a small-scale intervention by using both baseline survey and qualitative data, (3) implementation of the small-scale intervention, (4) evaluation of the small-scale intervention and design of a broader CVD intervention in the Yogyakarta municipality, (5) implementation of the broader intervention and (6) evaluation of the broader CVD intervention. According to the baseline survey, 60% of the men were smokers, more than 30% of the population had insufficient fruit and vegetable intake and more than 30% of the population were physically inactive, this is why a small-scale population intervention approach was chosen, guided both by the findings in the quantitative and the qualitative study.

    EXPERIENCES: A quasi-experimental study was designed with a control group and pre- and post-testing. In the small-scale intervention, two sub-districts were selected and randomly assigned as intervention and control areas. Within them, six intervention settings (two sub-villages, two schools and two workplaces) and three control settings (a sub-village, a school and a workplace) were selected. Health promotion activities targeting the whole community were implemented in the intervention area. During the evaluation, more activities were performed in the low socioeconomic status sub-village and at the civil workplace.

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    Mobilising a disadvantaged community for a cardiovascular intervention: designing PRORIVA in Yogyakarta, Indonesia
  • 20. Ekman, Inger
    et al.
    Granger, Bradi
    Swedberg, Karl
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Measuring shortness of breath in heart failure (SOB-HF): development and validation of a new dyspnoea assessment tool2011In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 838-845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To validate a previously developed instrument for measurement of breathlessness in patients with acute heart failure (HF). Methods and results We tested descriptors of breathlessness among 190 patients seeking care at the emergency department (ED) for acute shortness of breath. Out of 115 patients with confirmed HF, 107 (94%) had dyspnoea as their main symptom. There were no significant differences between those patients with HF and those who were not diagnosed as heart failure (NHF) (n = 75) in the descriptors of breathlessness, although patients with HF scored significantly (P = 0.03) higher on a visual analogue scale (VAS). In addition, they had significantly (P = 0.03) higher breathing frequency than NHF patients and they were significantly (P < 0.001) more likely to be treated with >40 mg furosemide. Conclusion Assessment of acute dyspnoea using a VAS is useful in distinguishing HF from NHF, and may be a more valid approach as compared with using descriptors of intensity of breathlessness in the acute setting.

  • 21.
    Elgh, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Domellöf, Magdalena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Edström, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Cognitive function in early Parkinson's disease: a population-based study2009In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 1278-1284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The study aims to describe the frequency, pattern and determinants of cognitive function in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD); to compare patients with impaired cognition to patients with intact cognition; and to compare to matched healthy controls.

    METHODS: Patients were identified in a longitudinal population based study of idiopathic non-drug induced parkinsonism. Eighty-eight newly diagnosed patients with PD and no dementia were included during a four year period. The patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment.

    RESULTS: Patients performed significantly worse than healthy controls in a majority of neuropsychological tests. Test results in attention, psychomotor function, episodic memory (free recall), executive function and category fluency were significantly lower in the patient group. Comparison with normative data revealed that 30% of the patients had deficits in > or =1 cognitive domain (episodic memory, executive function and verbal function). Seventy per cent of the patients had normal performance. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III sub scores; speech, facial expression, rigidity and bradykinesia were significantly higher, and disease duration shorter amongst the cognitively impaired than amongst the cognitively intact patients. Tremor showed no difference. Education level was an independent predictor of dysfunction in patients with > or =2 cognitive domains affected.

    CONCLUSION: Cognitive dysfunction is common in untreated patients in early PD, affecting attention, psychomotor function, episodic memory, executive function and category fluency. Education level was an independent predictor of severe cognitive dysfunction.

  • 22.
    Emmelin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Pol-ethical considerations in public health.: The views of Swedish health care politicians1999In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 124-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Public health policy is often concerned with the conflicting values emanating from the individually formulated ethics for curative care and more collectively oriented ethics. In this study we have focused on the pol-ethical considerations involved in Swedish health care politicians' assessment of public health measures. Methods: We described a hypothetical situation in a questionnaire, where a community has a 50% excess mortality for disease X, compared to the national average. Scientific disagreements were identified and discussed. The respondents gave their preference for a specific intervention strategy and considered, on a graded scale, 17 different value statements related to ethical principles and intervention strategies. Results: Only one out of 451 politicians preferred the alternative ‘no intervention’. The majority preferred an intervention including active involvement of primary health care. There was overall strong support for equity and beneficence. A factor analysis gave a model for the association between ethical values, political affiliation and choice of intervention strategies. The relative weights of autonomy and equity were strongly related to political affiliation. Conclusions: Among Swedish health care politicians there is consensus about the value of performing interventions in public health when the problem is large, even if there is some uncertainty about the consequences. Their overall strong support for equity and beneficence implies that these principles are crucial when formulating policies for interventions. Politicians need to state their ethical standpoint explicitly so that we as citizens can judge their decisions and actions based on our own political ideology and support for basic ethical principles.

  • 23.
    Emmelin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Nafziger, Anne N
    Clinical Pharmacology Research Center and Department of Adult and Pediatric Medicine, Bassett Healthcare,.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Cardiovascular risk factor burden has a stronger association with self-rated poor health in adults in the US than in Sweden, especially for the lower educated.2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 140-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is an ongoing debate about the importance of biomedical and sociodemographic risk factors in the prediction of self-rated health. Objectives: To compare the association of sociodemographic and cardiovascular risk factors and self-rated health in Sweden and the US. Design: Data from two population-based cross-sectional health surveys, one in Sweden and one in the US. Subjects: The surveys included questionnaire and measured data from 5,461 adults in Sweden and 7,643 in the US. Participants were between 35 and 65 years of age. Results: The odds ratios for poor self-rated health for the included cardiovascular risk factors were greater in the US. Low education was significantly more prevalent among those with self-rated poor health in the US, but not in Sweden. Using Swedes with high education as reference group (OR51), adults in the US with low education and 2+ risk factors had a greater than threefold risk (OR56.3) of self-rated poor health compared with Swedish low-educated adults with the same risk factor burden (OR51.9). The better-educated US adults with 2+ risk factors were significantly more likely to report poor health (OR53.4) compared with their Swedish counterparts (OR52.4). Conclusions: The interaction between risk factors, education, and self-rated health suggests a frightening picture, especially for the US. Public health interventions for reducing cardiovascular risk factors need to include both population and individual measures. Taking people’s overall evaluation of their health into account when assessing total health risk is important.

  • 24.
    Emmelin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Self-rated ill-health strengthens the effect of biomedical risk factors in predicting stroke especially for men: An incident case referent study2003In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 887-896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine how self-rated ill-health interacts with biomedical stroke risk factors in predicting stroke and to explore differences between men and women and educational groups. DESIGN: An incident case-referent study where the study subjects had participated in a prior health survey. SETTING: Nested within the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP) and the Northern Sweden MONICA cohorts. SUBJECTS: The 473 stroke cases had two referents per case, matched for age, sex and residence, from the same study cohorts. RESULTS: Self-rated ill-health independently increased the risk of stroke, specifically for men. The interaction effect between self-rated health and biomedical risk factor load was greater for men than for women. The attributable proportion due to interaction between having a risk factor load of 2+ and self-rated ill-health was 42% for men and 15% for women. Better-educated individuals with self-rated ill-health and two or more of the biomedical risk factors had a higher risk of stroke than the less educated. Calculations of the respective contribution to the stroke cases of self-rated health, hypertension and smoking showed that self-rated ill-health had a role in 20% of the cases and could alone explain more than one-third of the cases among those who rated their health as bad, more so for men than for women. CONCLUSIONS: The results underscore the importance of including both a gender and a social perspective in discussing the role of self-rated health as a predictor of disease outcome. Physicians must be more gender sensitive when discussing their patient's own evaluation of health in relation to biomedical risk factors.

  • 25.
    Emmelin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    To be seen, confirmed and involved - a ten year follow-up of perceived health and cardiovascular risk factors in a Swedish community intervention programme2007In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 7, p. 190-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Public health interventions are directed towards social systems and it is difficult to foresee all consequences. While targeted outcomes may be positively influenced, interventions may at worst be counterproductive. To include self-reported health in an evaluation is one way of addressing possible side-effects. This study is based on a 10 year follow-up of a cardiovascular community intervention programme in northern Sweden. METHODS: Both quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to address the interaction between changes in self-rated health and risk factor load. Qualitative interviews contributed to an analysis of how the outcome was influenced by health related norms and attitudes. RESULTS: Most people maintained a low risk factor load and a positive perception of health. However, more people improved than deteriorated their situation regarding both perceived health and risk factor load. "Ideal types" of attitude sets towards the programme, generated from the interviews, helped to interpret an observed polarisation for men and the lower educated. CONCLUSION: Our observation of a socially and gender differentiated intervention effect suggests a need to test new intervention strategies. Future community interventions may benefit from targeting more directly those who in combination with high risk factor load perceive their health as bad and to make all participants feel seen, confirmed and involved.

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    To be seen, confirmed and involved - a ten year follow-up of perceived health and cardiovascular risk factors in a Swedish community intervention programme
  • 26.
    Enberg, Birgit
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Sundelin, Gunnevi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Work satisfaction, career preferences and unpaid household work among recently graduated health-care professionals: a gender perspective2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 169-177Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ahlm, Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Bygren, Lars Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Johansson, Lars Age
    Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare.
    Olofsson, Bert-Ove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Accuracy of death certificates of cardiovascular disease in a community intervention in Sweden.2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 883-889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to investigate the possibility to evaluate the mortality pattern in a community intervention programme against cardiovascular disease by official death certificates.

    Methods: For all deceased in the intervention area (Norsjö), the accuracy of the official death certificates were compared with matched controls in the rest of Västerbotten. The official causes of death were compared with new certificates, based on the last clinical record, issued by three of the authors, and coded by one of the authors, all four accordingly blinded.

    Results: The degree of agreement between the official underlying causes of death in "cardiovascular disease" (CVD) and the re-evaluated certificates was not found to differ between Norsjö and the rest of Västerbotten. The agreement was 87% and 88% at chapter level, respectively, but only 55% and 55% at 4-digit level, respectively. The reclassification resulted in a 1% decrease of "cardiovascular deaths" in both Norsjö and the rest of Västerbotten.

    Conclusions: The disagreements in the reclassification of cause of death were equal but large in both directions. The official death certificates should be used with caution to evaluate CVD in small community intervention programmes, and restricted to the chapter level and total populations.

  • 28.
    Ferry, Sven A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Holm, Stig E
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Lundholm, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Monsen, Tor J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    The natural course of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection in women illustrated by a randomized placebo controlled study.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 296-301Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ferry, Sven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Holm, Stig E
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Lundholm, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Monsen, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Clinical and bacteriological outcome of different doses and duration of pivmecillinam compared with placebo therapy of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection in women: the LUTIW project.2007In: Scand J Prim Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 49-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Fors, Ronny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Persson, Maurits
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Bergström, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Stymne, Birgitta
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Lifestyle and nickel allergy in a Swedish adolescent population: effects of piercing, tattooing and orthodontic appliances2012In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 664-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of life-style practices in adolescents and their association with nickel allergy. Upper secondary school pupils (n = 4,376; 15-23 years) were patch-tested for nickel aller-gy, follow-ing completion of a questionnaire (answered by 6,095). Almost 86% girls and 21% of boys reported piercing. More girls (6%) than boys (3%) had a tattoo. Twenty-six percent of the girls and 18% of the boys were regular smokers. Vegetarian/vegan diets were reported by 20% of girls and by 6% of boys. Piercing, female gender, and vocational programme increased the risk of nickel allergy, whereas orthodontic appliance treat-ment prior to piercing reduced the risk of nickel allergy. Pupils in vocational programmes had the highest prevalence of nickel allergy. Lifestyle behaviours are interconnected and cluster in subgroups of adolescents. Female sex, piercing and choice of educational programme are prominent lifestyle markers. A trend shift is observed, where more girls than boys report tattooing.

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    Lifestyle and nickel allergy in a Swedish adolescent population: effects of piercing, tattooing and orthodontic appliances
  • 31.
    Fors, Ronny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Persson, Maurits
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Bergström, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Stymne, Birgitta
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro .
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Nickel allergy: prevalence in a population of Swedish youths from patch test and questionnaire data2008In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of body piercing and orthodontic treatment has increased during recent decades. Such changes in lifestyle may influence the occurrence of nickel allergy.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of nickel allergy in a Swedish youth population.

    Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 6095 adolescents answered a questionnaire on their lifestyle and medical history, and 4439 consented to patch testing for contact allergy. Patch test results were adjusted for dropouts by a missing value analysis.

    Results: The prevalence of self-reported dermatitis from contact with metal items was 14.8%. Patch testing showed nickel sensitization in 9.9% of the subjects, and in significantly more girls than boys, 13.3% versus 2.5%, respectively. Taking the dropout into account, the estimated true prevalence of nickel sensitivity evaluated by test reading at D4 is 11.8% in girls and 1.6% in boys.

    Conclusions: The prevalence of nickel sensitization was higher for girls and slightly lower for boys compared with previous Swedish data. Self-reported information on metal dermatitis as an estimate of nickel allergy has low validity. When possible, missing value analysis should be performed to account for dropouts.

  • 32.
    Fors, Ronny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Ortodontics.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Persson, Maurits
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Ortodontics.
    Nickel allergy in relation to piercing and orthodontic appliances: a population study2012In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 342-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Studies have shown conflicting results on the association between nickel exposure from orthodontic appliances and nickel sensitization.

    Objectives & Method. In a cross-sectional study, we investigated the association between nickel sensitization and exposure to orthodontic appliances and piercings. 4376 adolescents were patch tested following a questionnaire asking for earlier piercing and orthodontic treatment. Exposure to orthodontic appliances was verified in dental records.

    Results. Questionnaire data demonstrated a reduced risk of nickel sensitization when orthodontic treatment preceded piercing (OR 0.46; CI 0.27–0.78). Data from dental records demonstrated similar results (OR 0.61, CI 0.36–1.02), but statistical significance was lost when adjusting for background factors. Exposure to full, fixed appliances with NiTi-containing alloys (OR 0.31, CI 0.10–0.98) as well as a pooled ‘high nickel-releasing’ appliance group (OR 0.56, CI 0.32–0.97) prior to piercing was associated with a significantly reduced risk of nickel sensitization.

    Conclusion. High nickel-containing orthodontic appliances preceding piercing reduces the risk of nickel sensitization by a factor 1.5–2. The risk reduction is associated with estimated nickel release of the appliance and length of treatment. Sex, age at piercing and number of piercings are also important risk indicators. Research on the role of dental materials in the development of immunological tolerance is needed.

  • 33.
    Franklin, Karl A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Sahlin, Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Sleep apnoea is a common occurrence in females2013In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 610-615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is primarily regarded as a male disorder, presenting with snoring, daytime sleepiness and cardiovascular disease. We aimed to determine the frequency of sleep apnoea among females in the general population. We investigated 400 females from a population-based random sample of 10,000 females aged 20-70 yrs. They answered a questionnaire and performed overnight polysomnography. OSA (apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) >= 5) was found in 50% (95% CI 45-55%) of females aged 20-70 yrs. Sleep apnoea was related to age, obesity and hypertension, but not to daytime sleepiness. Severe sleep apnoea (AHI >= 30) was present in 14% (95% CI 8.1-21%) of females aged 55-70 yrs and in 31% (95% CI 12-50%) of obese females with a body mass index of >= 30 kg.m(-2) aged 55-70 yrs. Sleep apnoea with daytime sleepiness and sleep apnoea with hypertension were observed as two different phenotypes of OSA. OSA occurs in 50% of females aged 20-70 yrs. 20% of females have moderate and 6% severe sleep apnoea. Sleep apnoea in females is related to age, obesity and hypertension, but not to daytime sleepiness. When searching for sleep apnoea in females, females with hypertension or obesity should be investigated.

  • 34.
    Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Jansson, Lilian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Injured road users' experience of care in the emergency department2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 726-734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the patients' perceptions of quality of care (QoC) in an emergency department (ED) and to analyse associations between patients' background characteristics and estimated QoC.

    BACKGROUND: Each year 1.4 out of every 100 inhabitants are injured in the traffic environment and receive care at the ED. No study has yet analysed different injured road users' perceived QoC, or how important they rate different caring dimensions.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional study at the ED, in the University Hospital in Umeå, Sweden.

    METHOD: A stratified consecutive sample of 166 car occupants, 200 cyclists and 199 pedestrians, aged 18-70 years, all injured in the traffic environment. Data were collected from medical records and from a mail survey using a short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire, modified for ED use. The statistical methods used included Mann-Whitney's U-test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and multiple logistic regression.

    RESULTS: The perceived QoC and the subjective importance of the corresponding QoC dimensions were rated at the 'better' half of the rating scale, with no differences between the different road user categories. The most prominent factors associated with a positive perceived QoC rating were a short waiting time, moderate or serious injuries and high age as well as high educational level of the injury victim. For the subjective importance, a short waiting time was rated as the most important but slight differences were seen, related to education and sex.

    CONCLUSION: The association patterns between the areas of perceived reality and subjective importance indicated that expectations were higher than perceived QoC, suggesting that patients expected somewhat higher QoC than they received.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Information on factors causing long waiting times, adapted to patients' age, sex and educational level, may reduce dissatisfaction among long waiting patients, especially among those with minor injuries.

  • 35.
    Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Injured road users' health-related quality of life after telephone intervention: a randomised controlled trial.2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether nursing intervention via telephone follow-up can affect health-related quality of life among road users in the postinjury phase.

    Background: Injuries in the traffic environment often cause both physical impairment and psychological trauma. Therefore, it is important to investigate whether nursing via telephone follow-up after discharge could affect health-related quality of life among injured road users.

    Design: A randomised controlled study.

    Method: Between April 2003–April 2005, car occupants, cyclists and pedestrians, aged 18–70 years, all injured in the traffic environment, were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 288) or control group (n = 280). All patients were initially managed by one emergency department with the intervention group being followed up by nurse led telephone follow-up three weeks after discharge, while the control group did not receive any telephone follow-up. Data were collected from a mail survey using the non-disease-specific health-related quality of life instrument EQ5D, at baseline and after six months.

    Results: In general, the intervention group rated significantly higher health-related quality of life than the control group. This difference was most pronounced in the group of those provided with advice as part of telephone follow-up and significantly for the general health status. Car occupants gained most advantage from the nursing telephone follow-up, with significantly lower problems in the dimensions of pain/discomfort and usual activities.

    Conclusion: Nursing intervention via telephone follow-up was effective at increasing the health-related quality of life of injured road users. Early identification of the concerns of the injured and specific advice provided by the intervening nurse seems to be of greatest weight. Thus, more research is needed regarding the usefulness of early support and the advantage of this from a health economic perspective.

    Relevance to clinical practice: There is a need for changes in attitudes and working routines to identify individuals with low health-related quality of life and to give more extensive support from this point of view.

  • 36.
    Glas, Bo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Levin, Jan-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Sunesson, Anna-Lena
    Variability of personal chemical exposure in eight office buildings in Sweden2004In: Journal of Exposure Analysis And Environmental Epidemiology, ISSN 1053-4245, E-ISSN 1476-5519, Vol. 14, no Suppl 1, p. S49-S57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Glas, Bo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Sunesson, Anna-Lena
    A novel approach to evaluation of adsorbents for sampling indoor volatile organic compounds associated with symptom reports2008In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 1297-1303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses problems that complicate attempts to compare methods when several factors may be associated with an effect, but it is not known which factors are relevant. Chemicals that may contribute to 'sick building syndrome' (SBS), and thus should be sampled in investigations of SBS, are not currently known. A study was undertaken to compare the utility of three adsorbents (Carbopack B, Chromosorb 106 and Tenax TA) for detecting differences in personal chemical exposure to volatile organic compounds in indoor air, between persons with and without SBS symptoms (cases and controls). On the basis of office workers' responses to a questionnaire, 15 cases and 15 controls were chosen. They simultaneously carried diffusive samplers with adsorbents during a week at work, and the acquired samples were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The adsorbents were then compared in terms of their ability to separate cases and controls in partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models. This method of comparison takes into account detected differences in chemical exposure between cases and controls measured with the different adsorbents. Tenax TA gave the best PLS-DA models for separating cases and controls, but a combination of measurements with Tenax TA and Carbopack B gave better PLS-DA models than models based on measurements from either adsorbent alone. Adding measurements from Chromosorb 106 did not improve the results.

  • 38.
    Glas, Bo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Science