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  • 1.
    Cowman, Krista
    et al.
    University of Lincoln.
    Javette Koefoed, Nina
    Aarhus University.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Introduction2014In: Gender in urban Europe: sites of political activity and citizenship, 1750-1900 / [ed] Krista Cowman, Nina Javette Koefoed, Åsa Karlsson Sjögren, New York: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Cowman, Krista
    et al.
    University of Lincoln.
    Javette Koefoed, Nina
    Aarhus University.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Introduction to Section I2014In: Gender in urban Europe: sites of political activity and citizenship, 1750-1900, London: Routledge, 2014, Vol. 19, p. 15-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Cowman, Krista
    et al.
    University of Lincoln.
    Javette Koefoed, Nina
    Aarhus University.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Introduction to Section II2014In: Gender in urban Europe: Sites of political activity and citizenship, 1750-1900, London: Routledge, 2014, Vol. 19, p. 75-76Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Cowman, Krista
    et al.
    University of Lincoln.
    Koefoed, Nina Javette
    Aarhus University.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Introduction to Section III2014In: Gender in urban Europe: sites of political activity and citizenship, 1750-1900, London: Routledge, 2014, Vol. 19, p. 143-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Introduction2018In: Revisiting gender in European history, 1400-1800 / [ed] Elise M. Dermineur, Åsa Karlsson Sjögren, Virginia Langum, New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scholarly notion of gender has only recently been framed. In the aftermath of World War II, a series of social demands and protests emerged which shook the Western world. These movements placed social and political inequality at the core of their struggle. In particular, feminist movements, collectively called the second wave, blossomed throughout the Western world in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s. Their powerful socio-political dimension and dynamism quickly attracted worldwide attention. This chapter also presents an overview of this book. The book covers various regions in Europe in different time periods at all levels of society. It covers a wide socio-professional spectrum, from elite women to female artisans, domestics and peasant women. The book redresses a lack of scholarship on gender and 'the dark or unofficial side of the preindustrial economy'. It examines the illness experience articulated by two late medieval mystical writers through the possibilities afforded by medicine and religious culture.

  • 6.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Citizenship, poor relief and the politics of gender in Swedish cities and towns at the turn of the nineteenth century2014In: Gender in urban Europe: sites of political activity and citizenship, 1750-1900 / [ed] Krista Cowman, Nina Javette Koefoed, Åsa Karlsson Sjögren, New York: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 147-161Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Den ofrälse offentligheten: politisk kultur under frihetstidens senare del2004In: Historisk Tidskrift för Finland, ISSN 0046-7596, E-ISSN 2343-2888, Vol. 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Desirable qualifications and undesirable behaviour: teachers in Swedish schools for poor children2018In: Early professional women in Northern Europe, ca 1650-1850 / [ed] Johanna Ilmakunnas, Marjatta Rahikainen and Kirsi Vainio Korhonen, Oxon and New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 197-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Frihetstid, rösträttsstrid: män, kvinnor och rösträtt i frihetstidens svensk-finska städer2003In: Hans och hennes: genus och egendom i Sverige från vikingatid till nutid / [ed] Maria Ågren, Uppsala: Historiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet , 2003, p. 167-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Från giftermål till vigsel - från ett till två kött?: Om äktenskapet och förståelsen av kön, ca. 1650-18002003In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 35-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Gender and Urban Land in Swedish towns2013In: Female Agency in the Urban Economy: Gender in European Towns, 1640-1830 / [ed] Deborah Simonton and Anne Montenach, New York: Routledge, 2013, p. 171-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Historia, kvinnohistoria, genushistoria2002In: Genusvägar: en antologi om genusforskning / [ed] Britt-Marie Thurén, Malmö: Liber, 2002, 1, p. 115-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Hopes and fears of marriage: violence, ownership and power in early eighteenth-centrury Sweden2009In: Hopes and fears for the future in early modern Sweden, 1500-1800, Helsinki: Finnish Literature Society , 2009, 1, p. 184-205Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Hustruns rättsliga ställning i svenska städer under stormaktstiden1997In: Kjønn, makt, samfunn i Norden i et historisk perspektiv: konferensrapport fra det 5. nordiske kvinnehistorikermøte, Klækken 08.-11.08.96 / [ed] Berit Gullikstad og Kari Heitman, Dragvoll: Senter for Kvinneforskning, NTNU, Universitetet i Trondheim , 1997Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Inledning: Kvinnor och politik i det tidigmoderna Norden2007In: Kvinnor och politik i det tidigmoderna Norden, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Kommentar1997In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 61-64Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Kvinnan, staden och rätten under 1600-talet1995In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 115, no 4, p. 536-559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Kvinnor i Gävle rådstugurätt på 1630-talet1993In: OKNYTT. Tidskrift för Johan Nordlander-sällskapet, ISSN 0349-1706, no 1-2, p. 1-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Kvinnor och politik i det tidigmoderna Norden2007In: Kvinnor och politik i det tidigmoderna Norden, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Kvinnors rätt i stormaktstidens Gävle1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present dissertation is to investigate the judicial status of townswomen in 17th- centuiy Sweden. How is the gender system reproduced during this period? Did any decisive changes in gender relations take place, and if so, how should they be understood?

    Both secular and church legislation is studied, along with the deliberations of the legal commission of 1686. The investigation of actual legal practice concentrates on the municipal court of Gävle.

    Differences between town and country as far as inheritance and marital property are concerned in­dicate that the married couple was seen as the central unit in the urban environment, while the male members of the family, particularly those belonging to the paternal line, had greater importance in the countryside.

    Women could be prosecuted for the crimes they committed. In special cases, women were allowed to act as witnesses, and in practice, they were allowed to witness in criminal cases. Unmarried women appeared in salary conflicts and criminal cases, while affluent unmarried women did not appear bef­ore the court.

    Wives were under the legal guardianship of their husbands, but the law gave women the right to en­ter into contracts and appear in court in certain instances. They could buy and sell, enter into debt, hire and dismiss servants. The legal capacity of the wife was dependent upon her husband's. As a rule, affluent wives did not appear in court. The husband administered his wife's property, though her con­sent was required in land transactions.

    Widows "reacted" more often than they acted as far as concerns property. They were prevented from influencing the rules of the economic game in which they were involved. During the 17th cen­tury, affluent widows were increasingly represented by male delegates, which can be explained by the professionalization of the courts. This meant that the women actually seen and heard in court by the end of the century were often destitute and criminal.

    Church orthodoxy implied that the "double standard" was weaker during the 17th-century than it was both before and after. Men as well as women turned to the courts to defend themselves against de­famation of their sexual character.

    Matrimony was the basis for controlling women. It was in their best interests to marry, in order to establish a household, raise children and achieve the status of married woman. Matrimony was im­portant to men, too, in order to make contacts and create a network, acquire property, and establish a household. Marriage was basically hierarchical, though built on an idea of consensus.

    The implements available to the legal system for restraining wife-beating were very blunt. Matri­mony was the responsibility of the church. Here, one spoke rather of the "obligations" a man had tow­ard his wife — who was his own "flesh" — than defined exactly when a man crossed over the boundary of the acceptable. The woman's own actions — fulfilling her marital duties and remaining subordinate to her husband — were also significant for the rulings of the court.

  • 21.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Kvinnors röst i sekelskiftets städer: kommunal rösträtt före den allmänna rösträtten2008In: Att göra historia: vänbok till Christina Florin, Stockholm: Institutet för Framtidsstudier , 2008, p. 21-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Kvinnors rösträtt före Kvinnans rösträtt2006In: Thule, ISSN 0280-8692, no 19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Marie Lindstedt Cronberg, Med våldsam hand2011In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 131, no 2, p. 403-405Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Matrimony, property and power: marriage settlements in Sweden 1870-19202011In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 443-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores marriage settlements in national political debate and legal usage in three Swedish towns, c. 1870–1920. During this period one of the central issues for the Swedish women's movement was to abolish the legalized male dominance within marriage. Despite some ambiguities towards marriage settlements, the women's movement tried to encourage women to write up contracts before marriage, as a way to both protect their property and to achieve more power within marriage. Traditionally, marriage settlements were exceptions in Swedish legal practice, but they became somewhat more common during the period under investigation. This development could be explained by the population increase and industrialization, but only partially. The analysis of the initiators, their social background and civil status as well as the change of contents in the marriage settlements are interpreted not only as reflections of economic change, but as evidence of female agency and emancipation.

  • 25.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Männen, kvinnorna och rösträtten: medborgarskap och representation 1723-18662006Book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Negotiating charity: emotions, gender, and poor relief in Sweden at the turn of the 19th century2016In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 332-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies the role of emotions as charity and poor relief expanded in late 18th- and early 19th-century Sweden, with a special focus on how fundraising was expressed in the local media. It was important for the local press to include almsgivers and to mobilize their ability to give when a more well-organized poor relief managed by men of the expanding middle class developed. The needs of the poor and the charity that were described and discussed were almost always dealing with the socalled 'worthy' poor. It was important that the almsgivers gave voluntarily and with joy. This was necessary for both women and men. Furthermore, it was important for both sexes, irrespective of whether the gifts consisted of money or goods, to give from the Christian heart and thought with honesty, tenderness, pity, and consideration. These emotions were expressed within a local community in which the main responsibility for charity and poor relief was local, and in which the local press in this way contributed to shaping an emotional community. Emotions towards the poor were reciprocal, and the so-called unworthy poor, or ungrateful poor, aroused negative emotions. Many of the donors in these cases were anonymously and gender-neutrally described. Class relations were more significant than divisions based on sex.

  • 27.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Poor girls' schooling and transitions of gender and class2018In: Revisiting gender in European history, 1400-1800 / [ed] Elise M. Dermineur, Åsa Karlsson Sjögren, Virginia Langum, New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 78-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The only girls who attended schools in late eighteenth-century Sweden were poor, and they went to the same schools as poor boys. From being included in the mixed-sex schools, a shift occurred in early 1800 that saw the establishment of schools specifically for poor girls. This development is investigated in the chapter. The chapter analyzes a process of integration and segregation of the sexes in schools for poor children in order to understand how shifts in conceptions of gender intersected with changing social and economic societal relations of poverty and class. During a formative period when class society developed at the cost of older hierarchies, and when gender was undergoing reconstruction, poor girls played a role. During a few years, when poor girls attended established boys' schools, they challenged the schools in many ways. Poor girls had to be segregated from boys, but not for the same reasons as the middle and upper classes. They should not learn too much, in terms of either practical or theoretical skills. Gender, age and class intersected, to the disadvantage of the poor school girls. The segregation of the sexes led in just a few years to the foundation of specific girls' schools for poor girls. The division of the sexes was never fully established however, and mixed-sex schools were still organized and later on institutionalized in the elementary schools.

  • 28.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Privatlivet blev politik när gifta kvinnor blev myndiga2011In: Tvärsnitt, ISSN 0348-7997, Vol. 11, no 3-4, p. 72-75Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    rec. av Alstahaug på Helgeland 1000-1750.: Dass-dynastiet og presteskapet iscensätter sig selv2009In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 104, no 1, p. 64-66Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Recension av Scandinavia in the Age of Revolution. Nordic Political Culture 1740-1820, eds. Pasi Ihalainen et. al.2012In: Historiallinen Aikakauskirja, ISSN 0018-2362, no 4Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Riksdagsdebatten om lika arvsrätt 18342001In: Genusperspektiv i historia: metodövningar / [ed] Magnus Perlestam, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2001, p. 113-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Röster från kvinnliga historiker: recension av Boris, Eileen & Chaudhuri, Nupur (red.), Voices of women historians: the personal, the political, the professional2000In: Kvinnovetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 0348-8365, no 1, p. 75-77Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 33. Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Stadskvinnors sociala relationer under tidigmodern tid2004In: Historisk tidskrift, ISSN 0345-469X, no 4, p. 712-720Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Stadskvinnors sociala relationer under tidigmodern tid: opponentrecension av Solveig Fagerlund, Handel och vandel. Vardagslivets sociala struktur ur ett kvinnoperspektiv. Helsingborg 1680-17092004In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 712-720Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Suffrage and married women's rights: political strategies within the Swedish womens's movement 1870-19202012In: Women's history magazine, no 1, p. 13-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sunt förnuft och skattebetalarens kön: Skattebetalarnas förening i 1960-talets sambeskattningsdebatt2016In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 70-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how the Swedish Taxpayers' Association acted and reacted with regard to the political question of joint or individual taxation in Sweden during the 1960s, addressing how expressions of the taxpayer transformed, how the taxpayer was gendered and how the relationship between state, households and individuals changed. The theoretical and methodological approach is based on Carol Lee Bacchi's use of discourse theory on political issues, focusing on perceptions of gender and taxpaying. Individual taxation was introduced in Sweden in 1971. Through other reforms, such as social security and child care, the Nordic countries laid the foundation for changing the relationships between state and individuals, as well as between the sexes. Previous research has studied different actors who worked for and against the tax reform; however, right-wing organizations are not studied to the same extent as liberal or social democratic organizations. The Swedish Taxpayers' Association is characterized as non-socialist, whose goal was to cut taxes and scrutinize how taxpayers' money was used by state and local governments. In the early 1960s, there was an obvious norm of the taxpayer as male. If married, he was the breadwinner and his wife was not seen an economic subject. If she worked, both the joint taxation and other costs, such as for maids, were put on top of her income. Despite the male norm, the family or the mother were connected to children. When the issue appeared on the political agenda, the information changed and women were now conceivable as both taxpayers and wage earners. However, the male breadwinner norm was still dominant. From now on, the critique focused on the progressive elements in the tax system. The information material had to be revised in 1965, as a reform of voluntary individual taxation was introduced. Especially for families with high double incomes, it now became beneficial to use individual taxation, and thereby the idea of the woman as an individual economic unit developed further. The association accepted the reform of 1970, also due to the needs of the business sector. Conservative arguments concerning family faded away during these years, whereas the norm of the taxpayer was still male.

  • 37.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Synen på brott och kön genom historien2000In: Brott och straff: en antologi / [ed] Föreningen skyddsvärnet i Stockholm, Stockholm: Fören. Skyddsvärnet i samarbete med ABF Stockholm , 2000, p. 92-105Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Taxpaying, poor relief and citizenship: democratization from a gender perspective2013In: Tracing the women-friendly welfare state: gendered politics of everyday life in Sweden / [ed] Åsa Gunnarsson, Göteborg Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2013, p. 17-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Voting as an act of estate or voting as an act of class?: voting women in Swedish towns, c. 1720-19202017In: The Routledge history handbook of gender and the urban experience / [ed] Deborah Simonton, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 233-244Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Voting women before women's suffrage in Sweden 1720-18702009In: Suffrage, Gender and Citizenship: International Perspectives on Parliamentary Reforms / [ed] Irma Sulkunen, Seija-Leena Nevala-Nurmi, Pirjo Markkola, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2009, p. 56-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Women's voices in Swedish towns and cities at the turn of the Twentieth Century: municipal franchise, polling, eligibility and strategies for universal suffrage2012In: Women's History Review, ISSN 0961-2025, E-ISSN 1747-583X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 379-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines women's polling and eligibility in the municipal elections in Swedish cities and towns in the decades round the 1900 turn of the century. The aim is to present the patterns of suffrage, voting behaviours and representation that emerge from statistics produced by the women's movement and to discuss how these relate to the women's movement's strategies for women's political citizenship and national suffrage. The results are furthermore analysed in comparison with eighteenth-century conditions, when legally competent women who paid taxes could vote in some elections.

  • 42.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Ägande och makt: Giftorätt och kontroll av gifta kvinnors egendom under 1600-talet fram till 1734 års lag1999In: Ægteskab i Norden fra Saxo til i dag / [ed] Kari Melby, Anu Pylkkänen og Bente Rosenbeck, Köpenhamn: Nordisk ministerråd , 1999Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Larsson, Esbjörn
    Rimm, Stefan
    Agents and Subjects: schooling and Conceptions of Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century Sweden2019In: History of Education, ISSN 0046-760X, E-ISSN 1464-5130, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 297-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to analyse how the emerging Swedish school system in the early nineteenth century can be understood within the context of a gradual break-up of the estate society and its replacement with a class society in which citizenship was an important foundation. This is done through the discussion of the conceptions of citizenship on two levels. The first is the national level, focusing the national debate on education, and the second is the local level, investigating the local schools and the school setting. The main result is that the conceptions of citizenship in the school context were formed along two major lines: an inclusive social and civil citizenship and an exclusive, active and political citizenship. Consequently, the emerging Swedish school system simultaneously fostered these two citizenship conceptions, which coexisted in an educational system that was able to cast pupils as either subjects (comprehensive citizenship) or agents (designated citizenship).

  • 44.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Lindström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Beslutsvägar och kulturella skiljelinjer i förindustriella städer2005In: Laboratorium för folk och kultur, ISSN 0787-5576, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Lindström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Från väljare till valbara: kvinnor och lokalpolitik ur ett långt tidsperspektiv2018In: Rösträttens århundrade: kampen, utvecklingen och framtiden för demokratin i Sverige / [ed] Ulrika Holgersson och Lena Wängnerud, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2018, p. 129-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Lindström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Oikeita, todellisia porvareita?: luokka, sukupuoli ja kieli vapauden ajan kaupunkien poliittisessa kulttuurissa2006In: Kahden puolen Pohjanlathea. 1, Ihmisiä, yhteisöjä ja aatteita Ruotsissa ja Suomedda 1500-luvulta 1900 luvulle., 2006Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Lindström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Rum för röstande: om kön, klass och valdeltagande vid stadsfullmäktigevalen i Gävle 1910 och 19122011In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 36-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to apply gender perspective to a wide-ranging study of different actors’ dealings during the Gavle City Council elections of 1910 and 1912 in order to analyse local political culture in the wake of the 1909 reforms to the Local Government Act. Taking as the starting-point the idea of political culture and the actions of various key figures at the time of the election, the focus is on the gendering of Swedish politics once women’s suffrage had been introduced. The results are based on an intersectional analysis of the electorate’s behaviour, using electoral rolls, population registers, and press reports. The study includes local women’s organization’s strategies to increase women’s political participation, as well as the part played by the local branches of the political parties. Seen in the national context, Gavle was unusual - three women won seats on the City Council in 1910, in the run-up to which the local Society for Women’s Suffrage had run a spirited campaign to ensure that the women candidates got to stand in safe seats. All the newspapers in 1910 carried exhortations to voters of both sex to exercise their votes, and several newspapers reported an enthusiastic election turn-out amongst women.

    Two years later the Society for Women’s Suffrage had split, losing some of its influence in the process. Before the 1912 election, moreover, no women were selected to stand for a safe seats, and the newspapers’ reporting of the election tended to render the female electorate invisible, which in itself gave a somewhat misleading picture of the situation, bearing in mind that in the event similar numbers of women would vote in this election as had done in the previous one. Otherwise, in terms of the actual turn-out, it is noticeable that the male and female electorate adhered to the same social pattern - the rich, as always, voted in far greater numbers than those with few votes (municipal suffrage was income-based in such a way as an individual could have two or more votes in the same election). Yet there were also some noticeable differences between the sexes. The majority of the female electorate were unmarried women with few votes; a majority of the men who turned out to vote were married and well established. Since all the political parties without exception put up male candidates in the 1912 election, and chose to address their propaganda to a gender-neutral electorate, they tapped a fundamental characteristic of political culture that had deep historical roots. We would therefore argue that the actions of the local branch of the Society for Women’s Suffrage prior to the 1910 election were crucial in establishing the fact of women as political citizens.

  • 48.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Lindström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Rätta borgare?: klass, kön och språk i frihetstidens urbana politiska kultur2005In: Svenskt i Finland - finskt i Sverige. 1, Dialog och särart: människor, samhällen och idéer från Gustav Vasa till nutid, Atlantis, Stockholm , 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Lindström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Widows, Ownership and Political Culture: Sweden 1650-18002004In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 29, no 3/4, p. 241-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will analyse and discuss the widow's political participation during the second half of the early modern period. We focus on political elections and what possibilities that laid open for peasant and burgher widows to exert their influence at the elections.1 [Formula: See Text] We would like to thank Hanne Marie Johansen and others that participated in the workshop Enkefolk i skandinavisk historie …, Bergen in October 2003 and colleagues in the Department of Historical Studies, Umeå for valuable comments on earlier versions of this paper.

  • 50. Koefoed, Nina
    et al.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Conference report: Gender, Town and Citizenship ca 1770-1870.: The making of the Modern Town in Umeå, Sweden from 24th to 26th May 2011, organised by Gender in the European Town Network2011In: Informationen zur modernen Stadtgeschichte, ISSN 0340-1774, no 2, p. 120-121Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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