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  • 1. Allard, Christina
    et al.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Hjortfors, Lis-Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences.
    Ledman, Anna-Lill
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Löf, Annette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Johansson Lönn, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Nordin, Gabriella
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Norlin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Outakoski, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Reimerson, Elsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Moa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Storm Mienna, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Svonni, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Vinka, Mikael
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Rasbiologiskt språkbruk i statens rättsprocess mot sameby2015In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Statens hantering av forskningsresultat i rättsprocessen med Girjas sameby utgör ett hot mot Sverige som rättsstat och kunskapsnation. Åratal av svensk och internationell forskning underkänns och man använder ett språkbruk som skulle kunna vara hämtat från rasbiologins tid. Nu måste staten ta sitt ansvar och börja agera som en demokratisk rättsstat, skriver 59 forskare.

  • 2.
    Allard, Christina
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle.
    Reimerson, Elsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Contrasting nature, contrasting rights: concluding remarks2017In: Indigenous rights in modern landscapes: Nordic conservation regimes in global context / [ed] Lars Elenius, Christina Allard & Camilla Sandström, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 216-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3. Angelstam, P
    et al.
    Elbakidze, M
    Axelsson, R
    Lopatin, E
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Thörnblom, J
    Dixelius, M
    Gorchakov, V
    Kovriga, L
    Learning for sustainable forest management: Europé´s East and West as a Landscape laboratory2007Other (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Beland Lindahl, Karin
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Sténs, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro universitet.
    Ranius, Thomas
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    The Swedish forestry model: more of everything?2017In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 77, p. 44-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "The Swedish forestry model" refers to the forest regime that evolved following the 1993 revision of the Swedish Forestry Act. It is key to Swedish forest politics and used to capture the essence of a sustainable way of managing forests. However, the ideas, institutions and practices comprising the model have not been comprehensively analyzed previously. Addressing this knowledge gap, we use frame analysis and a Pathways approach to investigate the underlying governance model, focusing on the way policy problems are addressed, goals, implementation procedures, outcomes and the resulting pathways to sustainability. We suggest that the institutionally embedded response to pressing sustainability challenges and increasing demands is expansion, inclusion and integration: more of everything. The more-of-everything pathway is influenced by ideas of ecological modernization and the optimistic view that existing resources can be increased. Our findings suggest that in effect it prioritizes the economic dimension of sustainability. While broadening out policy formulation it closes down the range of alternative outputs, a shortcoming that hampers its capacity to respond to current sustainability challenges. Consequently, there is a need for a broad public debate regarding not only the role of forests in future society, but also the operationalization of sustainable development.

  • 5.
    Bergman, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Hellström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Regeringsbildningen efter riksdagsvalet 20182018In: Snabbtänkt: reflektioner från valet 2018 av ledande forskare / [ed] Lars Nord, Marie Grusell, Niklas Bolin & Kajsa Falasca, Sundsvall: DEMICOM, Mittuniversitetet , 2018, p. 21-22Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Bergman, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Mot höger och mot vänster: Skillnaderna mellan de politiska blocken tycks i själva verket ha ökat2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Camilla, Sandström
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Public-private partnerships in a Swedish rural context: A policy tool for the authorities to achieve sustainable rural development?2017In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 49, p. 58-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) have become a popular tool for governing rural development in a European context. PPPs are often presented as significant solutions for increasing both the effectiveness (problem-solving capacity) and the legitimacy of sustainable rural governance in terms of participation and accountability. In Sweden, where PPPs have played a marginal role, due to the EU cohesion policy they are now gaining ground as a model for the governance and management of natural resources in rural areas. Previous research shows that the state remains crucial in governing the process of governance through partnerships, especially in a rural as opposed to an urban context, where the state plays an ongoing role in initiating, structuring, financing and regulating partnerships. Is this an example of the state trying to counterbalance the increased power of the private sector, or the opposite – that is, an attempt to reduce social exclusion and increase participation by promoting the interest of private actors in local development processes? Our study examines the critical role of the state in these partnerships. We focus on authorities in charge of natural resource management and rural development and assess the enabling role of the authorities in rural areas with a weak or dispersed private sector. Empirical data is collected via group interviews at a workshop in which key representatives from the authorities participated. We identify a number of potential challenges associated to PPPs in a rural context, and in light of this we clarify how the authorities engage in different types of partnership arrangements, as well as their capacity to facilitate these partnerships in attempt to enhance sustainable rural development.

  • 8.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nygaard, Vigdis
    Riseth, Jan Åge
    Camilla, Sandström
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The institutionalisation of Sami interest in municipal comprehensive planning – a comparison between Norway and Sweden.2020In: International Indigenous Policy Journal, ISSN 1916-5781, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lindqvist, Sara
    SLU.
    Kvastegård, Emma
    SLU.
    (How) Can adaptive moose management contribute to sustainable rural development?2013In: Welcome to the Anthropocene! The Nordic Environmental Social Science Conference, 11‐13 June 2013: Abstracts / [ed] Boon, T.E., Anker, H.T., Lund, D.H., Sehested, K., University of Copenhagen , 2013, p. 154-154Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of adaptive management (AM) is widely advocated as an alternative to traditional top-down management of natural resources around the world. In Sweden, however, AM has only recently been introduced to manage moose. Based on the analytical framework, developed by Pieter Glasbergen (2011), we study the AM of moose as a case of a partnership arrangement within the field of wildlife governance. We put particular attention on how adaptive moose management enables sustainable rural development, since hunting is considered to be an important source of recreation and livelihood in Swedish rural areas. We identify a number of challenges associated to the involved stakeholders’ abilities, willingness and understanding to implement the induced management system. We also emphasis the interactions between the different stakeholders on both vertical and horizontal levels, as well as the tradeoffs the new ecosystem based adaptive local management system generates for rural and urban areas.

  • 10.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lindqvist, Sara
    SLU.
    Kvastegård, Emma
    SLU.
    Partnerships implementing ecosystem-based moose management in Sweden2014In: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, ISSN 2151-3732, E-ISSN 2151-3740, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 228-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is undergoing an extensive transformation from single species management towards ecosystem-based management. This study analyses the implementation of the new moose management system, focusing on the newly formed partnerships at ecosystem level (the moose management areas) and their potential to ease conflicts between participants and develop into sustainable collaborations that enable ecosystem-based management. Empirical evidence was obtained from semi-structured interviews with involved actors (hunters, landowners, wildlife managers and forest consultants) in five Swedish counties. Several challenges, based on the participants’ abilities, willingness and understanding needed to implement the new management system, were identified. Lack of funding, unclear roles and responsibilities appear to be the most serious issues. If these are not properly solved, then they have the potential to hamper and aggravate the implementation of the new management system, that is, the ecosystem-based management, as well as the partnership arrangement.

  • 11.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lindqvist, Sara
    SLU.
    Kvastegård, Emma
    SLU.
    The agency-structure dialectic in moose management: communication as precondition for and outcome of adaptive co-management2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sjögren, Jörgen
    Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Johan
    Department of Forestry Management, Forestry Research Institute of Sweden (Skogsforsk), Uppsala.
    Nordin, Annika
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    A struggling collaborative process: revisiting the woodland key habitat concept in Swedish forests2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term woodland key habitat (WKH) was launched in Sweden in 1990. Definitions for the concept have changed over the years, and today the WKH concept and its application are issues of debate in Sweden. Consequently, the Swedish Forestry Agency (SFA) initiated a collaborative process including forest stakeholders with the purpose to clarify the application and develop the inventory methodology of WKH. We have studied, by means of interviews and observations, participant perceptions of how endogenous and exogenous factors affect the collaborative process. During our research, we identified three game changers: the pause in WKH registration in northwestern Sweden that caused several participants to drop out of the process; budget allocations for new nationwide WKH inventories that put the process on hold; and formal instructions from the government that came nine months later and essentially re-initiated the collaborative process. Altogether, this not only affected the participants’ abilities, understanding and willingness to participate, but also the overall legitimacy of the process – indicating the difficulty of conducting policy development in collaborative form, especially when it is highly politicized since it impact on the participants’ anticipation of the process and its end results.

  • 13.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Thellbro, Camilla
    Stjernström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Svensson, Johan
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Per
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Between protocol and reality: Swedish municipal comprehensive planning2018In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 35-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial planning using a landscape approach has been recognized as being essential for reconciling ecological, cultural and socioeconomic dimensions in sustainable development (SuD). Although embraced as a concept, there is a lack of planning tools capable of incorporating multi-level, multifunctional and multi-sectoral perspectives, especially in a rural context. The departure point in this paper is the legal requirements for municipal comprehensive planning (MCP) in Sweden and an e-mail survey about incentives, stakeholder involvement, policy integration and implementation in MCP in all 15 Swedish mountain municipalities. The purpose of this explorative study is to examine whether MCP could be a tool in planning for SuD. Results indicate a general lack of resources and a low status of MCP that affect, and even limit, stakeholder involvement, policy integration and implementation. However, legal requirements for MCP are targeted at SuD, and municipal personnel responsible for planning appreciate the potential of MCP. Therefore, there is potential to develop the MCP into an effective landscape planning tool. To accomplish this, the status of an active planning process has to be raised, the mandate of the local planning agency has to be secured, and residents and land users have to be involved throughout the planning process.

  • 14.
    Blomgren, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sahovic, Dzenan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Utmaningar och framtida möjligheter2015In: 50 år med Statsvetenskap i Umeå / [ed] Anders Lidström och Gunnel Gustafsson, Umeå: Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Umeå universitet , 2015, p. 85-92Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15. Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Widmark, Camilla
    Andersson, Mats
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Measuring Transaction Costs for Pastoralists in Multiple Land Use Situations: Reindeer Husbandry in Northern Sweden2015In: Land Economics, ISSN 0023-7639, E-ISSN 1543-8325, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 704-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of transaction costs in multiple land use situations is helpful in policymaking and land use management, especially in natural resource management situations where interdependence prevails. By using reindeer herding forestry land use management as an example, the aim of this study is to analyze transaction costs among stakeholders in a comanagement situation. The results demonstrate that a key variable driving transaction costs is the presence of a "land use plan for reindeer husbandry," which is an interesting paradox as reindeer herders pursue the development of these land use plans even though this drives their transaction costs.

  • 16. Dressel, Sabrina
    et al.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Mapping social-ecological systems to understand the challenges underlying wildlife management2018In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 84, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A holistic understanding of the complex interactions between humans, wildlife, and habitats is essential for the design of sustainable wildlife policies. This challenging task requires innovative and interdisciplinary research approaches. Using the newly implemented ecosystem-based management of moose (Alces alces) in Sweden as a case, we applied Ostrom’s social-ecological system (SES) framework to analyse the challenges that wildlife management faces throughout the country. We combined data derived from natural and social science research to operationalize the framework in a quantitative way; an approach that enabled a spatially explicit analysis on the national and regional levels. This study aimed to discover patterns in the social-ecological context of Swedish moose management. Identifying these patterns can provide input for an in-depth evaluation of the institutional fit of the current system and subsequently for national policy development. Our SES maps suggest that there are spatial variations in factors challenging moose management. In some areas, ecological aspects such as the co-occurrence of carnivores and other ungulate species burdens future management, while in other regions challenges are shaped by governance aspects, e.g. diverse property rights. These findings demonstrate that the new management system must apply adaptive learning principles to respond to local context attributes in order to be successful. Our innovative approach provides a valuable tool for the assessment of other natural resource management issues and the avoidance of panacea traps, especially when repeated over time.

  • 17.
    Dressel, Sabrina
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet .
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet .
    A meta-analysis of studies on attitudes toward bears and wolves across Europe 1976–20122015In: Conservation Biology, ISSN 0888-8892, E-ISSN 1523-1739, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 565-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ranges of wolves (Canis lupus) and bears (Ursus arctos) across Europe have expanded recently, and it is important to assess public attitudes toward this expansion because responses toward these species vary widely. General attitudes toward an object are good predictors of broad behavioral patterns; thus, attitudes toward wolves and bears can be used as indicators to assess the social foundation for future conservation efforts. However, most attitude surveys toward bears and wolves are limited in scope, both temporally and spatially, and provide only a snapshot of attitudes. To extend the results of individual surveys over a much larger temporal and geographical range so as to identify transnational patterns and changes in attitudes toward bears and wolves over time, we conducted a meta-analysis. Our analysis included 105 quantitative surveys conducted in 24 countries from 1976 to 2012. Across Europe, people's attitudes were more positive toward bears than wolves. Attitudes toward bears became more positive over time, but attitudes toward wolves seemed to become less favorable the longer people coexisted with them. Younger and more educated people had more positive attitudes toward wolves and bears than people who had experienced damage from these species, and farmers and hunters had less positive attitudes toward wolves than the general public. For bears attitudes among social groups did not differ. To inform conservation of large carnivores, we recommend that standardized longitudinal surveys be established to monitor changes in attitudes over time relative to carnivore population development. Our results emphasize the need for interdisciplinary research in this field and more advanced explanatory models capable of capturing individual and societal responses to changes in large carnivore policy and management.

  • 18. Ebenhard, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Berg, Åke
    de Jong, Johnny
    Egnell, Gustaf
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Fåglar och bioenergi: Redovisning av projekt med stöd från Energimyndigheten enligt beslut Dnr 2017-001741, projektnr 44185-1.2019Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Preface to forest conflicts: a growing research field2013In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 33, p. 3-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Elbakidze, M
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Angelstam, PK
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University.
    Axelsson, R
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Multi-stakeholder collaboration in Russian and Swedish model forest initiatives: adaptive governance toward sustainable forest management?2010In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building the adaptive capacity of interlinked social and ecological systems is assumed to improve implementation of sustainable forest management (SFM) policies. One mechanism is collaborative learning by continuous evaluation, communication, and transdisciplinary knowledge production. The Model Forest (MF) concept, developed in Canada, is intended to encourage all dimensions of sustainable development through collaboration among stakeholders of forest resources in a geographical area. Because the MF approach encompasses both social and ecological systems, it can be seen as a process aimed at improving adaptive capacity to deal with uncertainty and change. We analyzed multi-stakeholder approaches used in four MF initiatives representing social–ecological systems with different governance legacies and economic histories in the northwest of the Russian Federation (Komi MF and Pskov MF) and in Sweden (Vilhelmina MF and the Foundation Säfsen Forests in the Bergslagen region). To describe the motivations behind development of the initiative and the governance systems, we used qualitative open-ended interviews and analyzed reports and official documents. The initial driving forces for establishing new local governance arrangements were different in all four cases. All MFs were characterized by multi-level and multi-sector collaboration. However, the distribution of power among stakeholders ranged from clearly top down in the Russian Federation to largely bottom up in Sweden. All MF initiatives shared three main challenges: (a) to develop governance arrangements that include representative actors and stakeholders, (b) to combine top-down and bottom-up approaches to governance, and (c) to coordinate different sectors’ modes of landscape governance. We conclude that, in principle, the MF concept is a promising approach to multi-stakeholder collaboration. However, to understand the local and regional dimensions of sustainability, and the level of adaptability of such multi-stakeholder collaboration initiatives, empirical studies of outcomes are needed. To assess the adaptive capacity, the states and trends of economic, ecological, social, and cultural dimensions in actual landscapes need to be linked to how the multi-stakeholder collaboration develops and performs over the long term.

  • 21. Elbakidze, Marine
    et al.
    Angelstam, Per
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Stryamets, Natalie
    Crow, Sarah
    Axelsson, Robert
    Stryamets, Galyna
    Yamelynets, Taras
    Biosphere Reserves for conservation and development in Ukraine?: Legal recognition and establishment of the Roztochya initiative2013In: Environmental Conservation, ISSN 0376-8929, E-ISSN 1469-4387, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Biosphere Reserve (BR) concept is an approach that simultaneously reconciles and promotes conservation of natural and cultural diversity, environmentally and socioculturally sustainable economic development, and research. This study focuses on the legal recognition of the BR concept as a tool for sustainable development (SD) in Ukraine, and what impact legislation has had on BR implementation. The BR concept has been incorporated into Ukrainian nature conservation legislation. However, interviews with locals engaged with the Roztochya BR initiative revealed that the aim to promote sustainability through stakeholder collaboration was poorly implemented. Legislative misplacement of the BR concept created misunderstandings among local people during the emergence of the Roztochya BR initiative. BR implementation may be improved by (1) choosing national terminology describing the concept carefully, because this affects stakeholder perceptions, (2) ensuring that legislation for BRs has a multi-sectoral character, and (3) ensuring that those who implement BR initiatives have the understanding, knowledge and will to lead and facilitate SD as a collaborative social learning process towards ecological, economic, social and cultural sustainability.

  • 22.
    Elenius, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Allard, Christina
    Whose landscapes it anyway?: A multidisciplinary study on the concept of landscapes, and its potential to bridge the gap between social and ecological systems2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the paper is to explore, within a multidisciplinary context, in which way the relation between indigenous people and protected nature, such as national parks, are interpreted from the perspective of different theories with a holistic approach:

    • Is there a consistent theory that can explain the post-modern role of indigenous people within nature and landscape?

    • In which way can theories within different disciplines be combined in order to do multi-disciplinary research?

    • Which methods shall be used in order to achieve results?

    The researchers come from the disciplines of history, political science and law. Our case is the Sámi within the reindeer herding area of Norway, Sweden and Finland.

    From an historical perspective much of the winning from natural resources around the world is the result of the former colonial systems and Western dominion. In that way, the dynamics of landscapes is part of a global power system that is remote from the indigenous people, who lived in that landscape with their own perceptions of nature and natural resource management at the time when the colonists came to dominate. With the de-colonisation of power relations after the Second World War, the role of indigenous populations within nature has been reinterpreted, acknowledging social as well as cultural aspects of indigenous traditions and customary rights. In the same time the concept of "nature" has shifted to "landscape" and the concept of "wilderness" has changed to the more cultivated and urban notion of "park" for leisure activities (Hägerstrand 1991; Mels 1999; Svensson 2000; Saltzman 2001; Wramner&Nygård 2010). These changes comprise not only biophysical elements of nature, but also human (socio-cultural) elements including land uses and infrastructures, but also aesthetic values such as scenic beauty. One recent example of policy shift is the adoption of the European Landscape Convention from 2000 negotiated within the Council of Europe. In Sweden it enters into force in May 2011. It will form yet another tool for protecting nature and cultural areas, defined as "landscapes", touching upon judicial issues such as the rights to land and landscapes but also around political ideas on what type of activity that should be preserved or prioritized in the management of the landscape. In relation to this policy shift there is a vivid debate on how landscapes could be managed e.g. through partnerships between national and local level actors to better accommodate local resource uses.

    The negotiation between different agents and groups, on the utilisation of natural resources and landscapes, is complex. To grasp this complexity different theories must be used in research, and also the encounter of different disciplines (Grgas&Larsen 1994; Harvey 1996; Hornborg&Pálsson 2000; Gunderson & Holling 2002; Berkhout et.al 2003; Sörlin&Warde 2009). In order to investigate the area of northern Fennoscandinavia these theories of land use must be combined with theories about ethnicity and indigenous rights, since the Sámi has a specific legal status. However, the exact status

    and protection of the Sámi differs among the three countries. The understanding of their traditional land rights also differs, but in principle their customarily based rights are recognized, i.e. rights that are established by long-time possession and use. Concerning policy implementation related to resource uses in primarily remote areas, the legal rules comprise of a complex set of instruments regarding different aspects of nature conservation, physical planning and the Sámi traditional land use. This overlap consists on several levels; regionally, nationally and internationally. The EU law may be regarded as a part of national law since directives are implemented though national provisions and measures (Bengtsson 2004; Allard 2006). This is complicated even further by the fact that legislation and case law related to the Sámi vary in Norway, Sweden and Finland, thus also the connection between indigenous rights and the utilization of nature in a broad meaning (Sandell 2000; Beach 2000; Nyssönen 2004; Elenius 2006; Sandström 2008; Sande 2009). In this northern context a sustainable use of nature must also be connected to human rights values inscribed in a post-colonial discourse (Engerman&Metzer 2004; Igoe 2004; Elenius 2009).

    The paper is part of the multi-disciplinary Formas project "Indigenous rights and nature conservation in Fennoscandinavia" carried out 2010-2013 (Luleå University of Technology, Umeå University, Tromsö University). In the project three senior researchers (history, political science, law) and two doctoral candidates (history, political science) is investigating the parallel discources of indigenous rights and nature conservation within the reindeer herding area of Norway, Sweden and Finland.

  • 23.
    Ericson, Göran
    et al.
    Institutionen för vilt, fiske och miljö. SLU.
    Dahl, Fredrik
    Institutionen för vilt, fiske och miljö. SLU.
    Sandström, Camilla
    institutionen för vilt, fisk och miljö, SLU.
    Färre svenskar lämnar asfaltsdjungeln: En vanlig uppfattning är att svensken med sitt starka engagemang för naturen har stort intresse av att vara i skog och mark2009In: Miljötrender. Nyheter och resultat från SLU, ISSN 1403-4743, no 3, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Varje år genomför SLU-forskare en brevundersökning till ett representativt urval av den svenska befolkningen i åldern 16 – 65 år för att se om vår inställning till djur, natur och val av friluftsaktiviteter har förändrats1. År 1980 sa 92 procent av den svenska befolkningen att de var mycket eller ganska intresserade av att vara i ”skog och mark”. Förra året sa 82 procent av svenskarna samma sak. Det är en nedgång med tio procent på knappt trettio år, men fortfarande är en stor majoritet av svenskarna mentalt nära skog och mark. Hela 86 procent av de tillfrågade tycker att skyddade naturområden är avstressande miljöer.

  • 24. Ericsson, G
    et al.
    Eriksson, T
    Laitila, T
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Willebrand, T
    Öhlund, H
    Delrapport om jakt och fiske: omfattning, betydelse och förvaltning2005Report (Other academic)
  • 25. Ericsson, G
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Delrapport om svenskars inställning till rovdjurspolitik och -förvaltning2005Report (Other academic)
  • 26. Ericsson, G
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Bostedt, G
    The problem of spatial scale when studying human dimensions of a natural resource conflict: human and carnivores as a case study2006In: International Journal of Biodiversity, Science and Management 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Ericsson, G
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bostedt, G
    The problem of spatial scale when studying the human dimensions of av natural resource conflict: Humans and Wolves in Sweden2006In: The International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management, ISSN 1745-1590, no 4, p. 343-349Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ericsson, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Animal Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    The problem of spatial scale when studying human dimensions of a natural resource conflict: Human and wolves in Sweden2006In: The International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management, ISSN 1745-1590, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 343-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some surveys are performed at a spatial scale that hides the core of the problem. This is not a trivial problem if local members of the public and more distant respondents disagree over a certain issue. We contrast a Swedish national, proportional survey with corresponding regional and local surveys. We use three survey questions about wolves to illustrate the risk of extrapolation from proportional national surveys to areas where human and nature conservation issues are in conflict. As attitudes towards large carnivores generally tend to be favourable amongst the general public, but negative amongst those most likely to be adversely affected, surveys performed at a too large a spatial scale do not capture the problem or reveal disagreements between local and general public. This could lead to a conceptual mismatch between the spatial scales of, first, the natural resource problem and, second human population sampling. Our study in the mountain region of northern Sweden illustrates biases potentially introduced to controversial issues tied to local problems by using proportional national surveys. We suggest over-sampling in problem areas contrasted with proportional regional/national sampling, or proportional sampling matching the scale of problem, to identify the driving mechanisms and related variables.

  • 29. Ericsson, Göran
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Riley, Shawn J.
    Rural-urban heterogeneity in attitudes towards large carnivores in Sweden, 1974-20142018In: Large carnivore conservation and management: human dimensions / [ed] Tasos Hovardas, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 190-205Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The green revolution of the 1960s shaped current approaches to large carnivore conservation and paved the way for the successful conservation policy occurring today. Several legislative changes were introduced, and functionally extinct species went from being actively harvested to being fully protected. These changes went largely unnoticed until recently in most societies in Europe, since these countries had been largely devoid of wolves, bears, lynx and wolverines. The situation in Sweden was no exception. Members of the public had no first-hand experience of large carnivores, and the species first needed to become abundant before people could interact with them sufficiently. Large carnivores are now back, and this is accompanied by symbolic constructions that fuel strong and opposing demands for policy and management. Large carnivore conservation and management takes place in a highly contested political arena, and this is likely to continue unless better insights are gained about values at stake, what these values symbolise in terms of policy preferences and how these can be met. In this chapter, we will track large carnivore numbers and attitude trends and we will discuss implications in terms of governance challenges and new roles to be facilitated.

  • 30. Eriksson, Max
    et al.
    Hansson-Forman, Katarina
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Viltvårdsavgiften: En studie av svenskarnas vilja att betala det statliga jaktkortet2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Viltvårdsavgiften ska enligt Jaktförordningen (SFS 1987:905, 49 §) betalas av alla över 18 år som jagar i Sverige. Avgiften är 300 kr och gäller för ett jaktår, vilket omfattar tiden 1 juli–30 juni. Det statliga jaktkortet är ett kvitto på att denna avgift är betald. Under de senaste decennierna har antalet personer som löser det statliga jaktkortet minskat. I den här rapporten, som är ett utredningsuppdrag från Naturvårdsverket till Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU), undersöks varför antalet personer som löser jaktkort minskar, och om antalet jaktkortslösare som ägnar sig åt jakt också minskat över tid. Rapporten omfattar endast personer bosatta i Sverige.

  • 31.
    Eriksson, Max
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Umeå.
    Direct experience and attitude change towards bears and wolves2015In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 131-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how changes in the sizes of large carnivore populations affect the attitudes of the public is vital in order to mitigate social conflicts over large carnivore management issues. Using data from two Swedish postal surveys in 2004 and 2009, we examined the probable social effects of a continued increase in the Swedish populations of bear and wolf by comparing levels of direct experience of bears and wolves with public attitudes towards these animals. We report an increase in direct experience of bears and wolves, lower levels of acceptance of the existence of these animals, and a lower degree of support for the policy goals of both species in 2009 compared to 2004. We also find that these changes are more prominent in areas with local carnivore populations than in other areas of Sweden. Our results imply that attitudes towards bears and wolves are likely to become more negative as populations continue to grow. The uneven distributions of the carnivore populations are likely to generate more frequent social conflicts in the future as they could cause an increase in the attitudinal divide between those members of the Swedish public who have had direct experiences of carnivores and those who have not.

  • 32.
    Eriksson, Max
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Roos, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Value patterns and input legitimacy, in Swedish wolf governanceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33. Eriksson, T
    et al.
    Andersson, J
    Byström, P
    Hörnell-Willebrand, M
    Laitila, T
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Willebrand, T
    Fish and wildlife in the Swedish mountain region resources, use and management2006In: International Journal of Biodiversity, Science and Management 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Ezebilo, Eugene E
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Browsing damage by moose in Swedish forests: assessments by hunters and foresters2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 659-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, there is a longstanding conflict between the use of forests for timber production and game for hunting due to browsing damages on young forests. This study examines the assessments of two stakeholder groups regarding browsing damage by moose. The data originated from a mail survey that involved hunters and forest owners in Sweden. The samples were randomly selected from two national registers of hunters and forest owners, respectively. An ordered logit model was used to account for the assessments of severity of moose browsing damage. The results showed that on average, non-forest owning hunters rated the browsing damage on their main hunting ground lower than non-hunting forest owners rated the browsing damage on their forest estate. The respondents who both hunt and own forest had a rating that was intermediate between the former two groups. The ratings were mainly influenced by level of activity in improving game habitat, quantity of moose meat obtained, level of moose on forest estate and the importance of bagging game as well as forest estate size, hunting ground size, and the stakeholder group that the respondents belong. The findings can help in designing strategies for conflict resolution between forestry and hunting for moose.

  • 35.
    Fischer, Anke
    et al.
    Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group, The James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, UK och Frankfurt Zoological Society, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
    Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC-CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ciudad Real, Spain.
    Arroyo, Beatriz
    Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC-CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ciudad Real, Spain.
    Tadie, Degu
    Ethiopian Wildlife Conservation Authority, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Randall, Deborah
    Frankfurt Zoological Society, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Hailue, Fetene
    Ethiopian Wildlife Conservation Authority, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Lowassa, Asanterabi
    Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, Arusha, Tanzania.
    Msuha, Maurus
    Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, Arusha, Tanzania.
    Kereži, Vesna
    Biology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Reljić, Slaven
    Biology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Linnell, John
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim, Norway.
    Majić, Aleksandra
    Biology Department, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    On the multifunctionality of hunting: an institutional analysis of eight cases from Europe and Africa2013In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 531-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many contemporary societies, multiple functions are connected to hunting. Here, we use the concept of multifunctionality to investigate the role of hunting beyond its traditional function of supplying meat. Hunting may contribute, for example, to biodiversity conservation, recreation and the preservation of economies and cultures in rural areas. Our comparative analysis of hunting in eight study sites in Europe and Africa examines the tensions and trade-offs between these ecological, economic and social functions of hunting, and investigates the interplay between the institutions regulating these functions to better understand conflicts over hunting. Based on this analysis, we present institutional arrangements that have developed to address these challenges of multifunctionality, and explore the institutional change brought about by such arrangements. Finally, we discuss the implications of this study for policy and institutional design.

  • 36. Fischer, Markus
    et al.
    Rounsevell, Marc
    Torre-Marin Rando, Amor
    Mader, André
    Church, Andrew
    Elbakidze, Marine
    Elias, Viktoria
    Hahn, Thomas
    Harrison, Paula
    Hauck, Jennifer
    Martin-López, Berta
    Ring, Irene
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sousa Pinto, Isabelle
    Visconti, Piero
    Zimmermann, Nicklaus E.
    Christie, Mike
    The regional assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services for Europe and Central Asia: summary for policymakers2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Regional Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for Europe and Central Asia produced by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) provides a critical analysis of the state of knowledge regarding the importance, status, and trends of biodiversity and nature's contributions to people. The assessment analyses the direct and underlying causes for the observed changes in biodiversity and in nature's contributions to people, and the impact that these changes have on the quality of life of people. The assessment, finally, identifies a mix of governance options, policies and management practices that are currently available to reduce the loss of biodiversity and of nature's contributions to people in that region. The assessment addresses terrestrial, freshwater, and coastal biodiversity and covers current status and trends, going back in time several decades, and future projections, with a focus on the 2020-2050 period.

  • 37. Fischer, Markus
    et al.
    Rounsevell, Mark
    Torre-Marin Rando, Amor
    Mader, André
    Church, Andrew
    Elbakidze, Marine
    Elias, Victoria
    Hahn, Thomas
    Harrison, Paula A.
    Hauck, Jennifer
    Martín López, Berta
    Ring, Irene
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sousa Pinto, Isabel
    Visconti, Piero
    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.
    Christie, Mike
    The regional assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services for Europe and Central Asia: summary for policymakers2018In: The IPBES regional assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services for Europe and Central Asia / [ed] Mark Rounsevell, Markus Fischer, Amor Torre-Marin Rando and André Mader, Bonn: Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) , 2018, p. XV-XXIIIChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38. Gaillard, Marie-José
    et al.
    Kleinen, Thomas
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    Nielsen, AnneBirgitte
    Bergh, Johan
    Kaplan, Jed
    Poska, Anneli
    Sandström, Camilla
    Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Gustav
    Trondman, Anna-Kari
    Wramneby, Anna
    Causes of Regional Change—Land Cover2015In: Second Assessment of Climate Change for the Baltic Sea Basin, Springer, 2015, p. 453-477Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic land-cover change (ALCC) is one of the few climate forcings for which the net direction of the climate response over the last two centuries is still not known. The uncertainty is due to the often counteracting temperature responses to the many biogeophysical effects and to the biogeochemical versus biogeophysical effects. Palaeoecological studies show that the major transformation of the landscape by anthropogenic activities in the southern zone of the Baltic Sea basin occurred between 6000 and 3000/2500 cal year BP. The only modelling study of the biogeophysical effects of past ALCCs on regional climate in north-western Europe suggests that deforestation between 6000 and 200 cal year BP may have caused significant change in winter and summer temperature. There is no indication that deforestation in the Baltic Sea area since AD 1850 would have been a major cause of the recent climate warming in the region through a positive biogeochemical feedback. Several model studies suggest that boreal reforestation might not be an effective climate warming mitigation tool as it might lead to increased warming through biogeophysical processes.

  • 39. Hansen, Inger
    et al.
    Strand, Geir-Harald
    de Boon, Auvikki
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Impacts of Norwegian large carnivore management strategy on national grazing sector2019In: Journal of Mountain Science, ISSN 1672-6316, E-ISSN 1993-0321, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 2470-2483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing populations of large carnivores are leading to tension and conflicts with livestock production, a situation that potentially might escalate. In Norway the objective of the large carnivore policy is two-folded: to ensure viable carnivore populations and to secure a sustainable grazing industry. The main instrument is zonation, with carnivore management zones (CMZs) prioritized for reproduction of the large carnivore species separated from other areas prioritized for grazing livestock. The objective of this paper is to describe current knowledge about the impact of the zoning management strategy on the grazing industry. This is done by documenting status and changes in sheep production, losses of livestock to predating carnivores, and the use of grazing areas inside and outside the CMZs. CMZs offering protection for lynx, wolverine, bear and wolf cover 55% of the Norwegian mainland. 30% of the sheep and 50% of the Sami reindeer grazing areas are found inside the CMZs. Livestock (semi-domestic reindeer excluded) is using 59% of the available natural pasture areas outside the CMZs, but only 26% inside the CMZs. The lowest use of available grazing areas was found inside zones for wolves (12%) and brown bears (6%). Livestock in these zones are confined to fenced enclosures, mostly on the farm itself, or moved to pastures outside the management zone for summer grazing. Livestock losses increased in the affected regions during the period when carnivores were reestablished. Later, losses declined when CMZs were established and mitigation efforts were implemented in these zones. The bulk of sheep and reindeer killed by carnivores are now found in boundary areas within 50 km off the CMZs, where sheep are still grazing on open mountain and forest ranges. Therefore, instruments to protect livestock in areas close to the CMZs are also needed. The number of sheep declined inside the CMZs from 1999 to 2014, but increased outside the zones. The reduction in the absolute number of sheep in the CMZs is balanced by a similar increase outside, thus the total sheep production in Norway is maintained. We conclude that although of little consequence for the total food production in Norway, the economic and social impact of the large carnivore management strategy can be serious for local communities and individual farmers who are affected. There is a need for more exact carnivore population monitoring to quantify the carnivore pressure, better documentation of reindeer losses, and a clearer and stricter practicing of the zoning strategy. Increased involvement of social sciences is important in order to understand the human dimension of the carnivore conflicts.

  • 40.
    Hansson-Forman, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Reimerson, Elsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sjölander-Lindqvist, Annelie
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Governing Large Carnivores: Comparative Insights from Three Different Countries2018In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 837-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The governance of large carnivores are often surrounded by conflicts. Along with the difficulties of governing large carnivores through centralized, top-down governing and a general shift toward participatory approaches in natural resource governance, this has led many countries to establish various collaborative measures in large carnivore governance - often presented as catch-all solutions to problems of legitimacy, democratic deficit and effectiveness. However, the field of large carnivore governance currently lacks a coherent understanding of strenghts and weaknesses of different kinds of collaborative arrangements. In this paper, we address this knowledge gap. Using the framework of modes of governance to categorize and compare the governance of large carnivores in Norway, Sweden and Finland, we discuss the potential and limitations of various governance modes and identify gaps in contemporary research literature. The main conclusion is that all three governance systems need to incorporate more interactive governance elements.

  • 41.
    Holmgren, Lina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Protected area governance in Sweden: new modes of governance or business as usual?2017In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores whether ambitions to open up the traditional Swedish model of top-down conservation methods to local influences are indicative of an actual transition in governance of Swedish national park policy (NPP), and examines whether such a shift entails an increase in local influence over local interests and needs. Methodologically, we analyse a combination of governance types and incorporate theoretical definitions of power and accountability. The establishment of new governance arrangements – where power is shared, interactions promoted and accountability is directed downwards – indicates that Sweden's NPP is undergoing a change in its mode of governance. This change also seems to include ceding some influence to local interests, and the possibility of combining conservation with the utilisation of certain natural resources. The results of our research also provide valuable insights into when the establishment of shared-governance arrangements are likely to succeed; in short, this seems more likely when there are established sectors sited in a robust legal framework and where strong international commitments potentially play a role. In conclusion, we contend that when seeking diversified governance arrangements it is not enough simply to take local practices and customs into consideration – they have to be strengthened.

  • 42.
    Horstkotte, Tim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Exploring the multiple use of boreal landscapes: the importance of social-ecological diversity for mobility and flexibility2014In: Human Ecology, ISSN 0300-7839, E-ISSN 1572-9915, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 671-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable multiple use of landscapes can be a challenging task for the stakeholders involved, especially when they have competing interests with respect to natural resource management. In this paper we analyze the consequences associated with “landscape diversity”, including the interactions between environmental, administrative and societal factors. As a case study, we describe winter land use for reindeer husbandry in the boreal forest in Northern Sweden, a resource that is also used for commercial timber production. We show how and why the interactions between the three factors associated with landscape diversity affect reindeer herding and the options for responding to change. Multi-dimensional landscape diversity can either (i) promote flexibility in the face of change in the form of mobility or (ii) create fragmentation that restricts adaption to changes. This is a result of the dynamic patterns of diverse landscape structures, created by administrative and societal choices. Because such landscape patterns react differently to environmental variability within a season and between years, landscape functions adjusted to the dynamics of environmental variables could help to provide continuity of grazing resources in both space and time and ensure that reindeer husbandry remains resilient to changes. Because of the unequal distribution of power and capacity for decision making, social learning between the two stakeholders can help to balance trade-offs between both types of land user, allowing them to coexist in a landscape shaped by diverse values, priorities and management practices.

  • 43. Hovik, Sissel
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Trender och utmaningar i nordisk naturförvaltning2008In: Omstridd natur: Trender och utmaningar i nordisk naturförvaltning, Boréa, Umeå , 2008, p. 293-316Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Hovik, Sissel
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research, Oslo, Norway .
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Management of protected areas in Norway and Sweden: challenges in combining central governance and local participation2010In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 159-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neither Norway nor Sweden has fulfilled international commitments to the principles of direct public involvement in nature conservation, which involve (we believe) the state adopting an 'enabling' role, mobilizing governance resources to support decentralized decision-making while retaining powers to intervene when necessary to defend important minority interests or support international objectives. We analyse four attempts to establish nature conservation areas with substantial levels of direct public involvement in the two countries and argue that in each case, flaws in the setting of the areas' boundaries, the framework for participation and conflict resolution mechanisms have undermined public involvement. Hence, there is a need to design more effective, enabling rules to encourage local actor involvement in nature conservation and resolve any political issues that arise as a consequence of such involvement, before the international commitments can be fulfilled.

  • 45.
    Idenfors, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Hanberger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Centrum för Genusvetenskap, Uppsala Universitet.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    Centrum för Hälsa och Byggande, Kungliga Tekniska högskolan.
    När det brister: En studie av dammsäkerhet och säkerhetsarbete mot översvämningar längs Skellefte- och Umeälven2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport sammanfattar resultat från en studie om dammsäkerhet och säkerhetsarbete mot översvämningar längs två reglerade älvar i Västerbotten. Syftet med studien är att undersöka hur dammsäkerhetsarbetet, när det gäller dammbrott, säkerhetsarbete mot översvämningar och incidenter relaterade till nyttjandet av älvarna, är organiserat och fungerar längs Skellefte- och Umeälven. Övriga älvar i länet samt gruvdammar ingår inte i undersökningen. Det ansvar som Statens geotekniska institut (SGI), Sveriges meteorologiska och hydrologiska institut (SMHI), försvarsmakten, Boverket, Vägverket och polisen har för att förebygga och agera i samband med översvämningar behandlas inte heller i studien.

    Rapporten baseras på en litteraturöversikt rörande den senaste forskningen på området, dokumentstudier, intervjuer med säkerhetsansvariga vid Länsstyrelsen Västerbotten, Umeå, Vännäs, Lycksele och Skellefteå kommun, samt två vattenregleringsföretag.

    Studien tar sin utgångspunkt i begreppet mänsklig säkerhet och analyserar dammsäkerhet och säkerhetsarbete utifrån ett sociotekniskt perspektiv. Det innebär att varje teknisk konstruktion, varje tekniskt system, såsom vattenkraftverk och dammar, där olika tekniska instrument används för att kontrollera och reglera vattenflöden och producera elektricitet, också utgör sociala system. Det innebär att rapporten uppmärksammar deltagande och delaktighet som en central aspekt av säkerhetsarbetet.

    Utifrån resultaten drar studien följande slutsatser:

    • Dammsäkerhetsarbetet och säkerhetsarbetet mot översvämningar längs Skellefte- och Umeälven uppvisar brister ifråga om resurser, kompetens och insyn.
    • Dammsäkerhetsarbetet inkluderar inte allmänhetens säkerhet vid och på dammar (public safety around dams).
    • Det finns oklarheter rörande vem som har ansvar för dammsäkerhet och för säkerhetsarbete mot översvämningar.
    • Dammsäkerhetsarbetet i Västerbotten inkluderar endast i begränsad omfattning sociala aspekter, lokal kunskap tas inte tillvara, och allmänhet och rättighetsinnehavare ignoreras i stor utsträckning i säkerhetsarbetet.
    • Det är generellt svårt att bedöma effekter av säkerhetsarbetet kring dammar och längs älvarna, men klart är att pågående säkerhetsarbete, i form av till exempel enskilda projekt och övningar, ökar kunskaperna om risker och ansvar, samt stärker samverkan mellan olika aktörer.
    • Dammsäkerhet uppfattas främst handla om tekniska konstruktioner medan människa-maskin- natur och mellanmänskliga och organisatoriska säkerhetsaspekter hamnar i skymundan. 
  • 46. Johansson, Johanna
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lundmark, Tomas
    Inspired by structured decision making: a collaborative approach to the governance of multiple forest values2018In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 23, no 4, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 2000s, consensus-oriented decision making has become increasingly common in the management of natural resources because of the recognition that collaborative processes may enhance the legitimacy of decision making and facilitate effective implementation. Previous research has identified a number of problems with the design and practical facilitation of collaborative processes. Structured decision making (SDM) has been developed as an alternative suitable for decision making characterized by complexity, stakeholder controversy, and scientific uncertainty. Our aim was to investigate the feasibility and practical relevance of collaboration and dialogue inspired by SDM in the sphere of forest management. The methods used included analyses of meetings records and semistructured interviews with participating stakeholders and organizers of a collaborative process focused on improving the management of Swedish forests in the young forest phase. The results show that the SDM rationale of step-by-step teamwork, the involvement of experts, and guidance by an independent facilitator has a number of merits. These merits included the creation of genuine discussion with careful consideration of different interests and values, thus building trust among stakeholders and the Swedish Forest Agency. However, at the end of the process, some issues still remained unclear, including how the decision options would be made practically useful and accessible to forest owners. Furthermore, concerns were raised about the lack of novelty of the options. As a result, there was uncertainty about the extent to which the options would contribute to a more varied forest landscape given the multiple values involved. We conclude with some remarks on the potential future of engaging SDM in the forestry sector.

  • 47. Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Dressel, Sabrina
    Kvastegård, Emma
    Ericsson, Göran
    Fischer, Anke
    Kaltenborn, Bjørn P.
    Vaske, Jerry J.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Describing Human–Wildlife Interaction from a European Perspective2016In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, ISSN 1087-1209, E-ISSN 1533-158X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 158-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European researchers from both the natural and social sciences show growing interest in studying interactions between society and wildlife. A wealth of theoretical frameworks, concepts, and methods are used, but an integration of perspectives is lacking. This research note summarizes results from two workshops that included 63 delegates from 25 European countries, as well as a follow-up survey of 41 respondents. Two main theoretical approaches to the study of human?wildlife interactions were identified. One approach focuses on the collective societal level relying on theories of governance, social representation, deliberative procedures, and commons theory. The other approach targets individuals or groups, and is based on theories such as the cognitive hierarchy, theory of reasoned action, and theory of planned behavior. Interdisciplinary collaboration is needed to identify the best options for wildlife conservation and management in a more politically integrated Europe.

  • 48. Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Pedersen, Eja
    Ericsson, Göran
    Factors governing human fear of wolves: moderating effects of geographical location and standpoint on protected nature2016In: European Journal of Wildlife Research, ISSN 1612-4642, E-ISSN 1439-0574, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 749-760Article in journal (Refereed)