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  • 1.
    Johansson, Marcus J O
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Xu, Fu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Byström, Anders S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Elongator-a tRNA modifying complex that promotes efficient translational decoding2018In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1861, no 4, p. 401-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturally occurring modifications of the nucleosides in the anticodon region of tRNAs influence their translational decoding properties. Uridines present at the wobble position in eukaryotic cytoplasmic tRNAs often contain a 5-carbamoylmethyl (ncm5) or 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5) side-chain and sometimes also a 2-thio or 2'-O-methyl group. The first step in the formation of the ncm5 and mcm5 side-chains requires the conserved six-subunit Elongator complex. Although Elongator has been implicated in several different cellular processes, accumulating evidence suggests that its primary, and possibly only, cellular function is to promote modification of tRNAs. In this review, we discuss the biosynthesis and function of modified wobble uridines in eukaryotic cytoplasmic tRNAs, focusing on the in vivo role of Elongator-dependent modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 

  • 2.
    Karlsborn, Tony
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Tukenmez, Hasan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Mahmud, A K M Firoj
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Xu, Fu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Xu, Hao
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Byström, Anders S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Elongator, a conserved complex required for wobble uridine modifications in Eukaryotes2014In: RNA Biology, ISSN 1547-6286, E-ISSN 1555-8584, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 1519-1528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elongator is a 6 subunit protein complex highly conserved in eukaryotes. The role of this complex has been controversial as the pleiotropic phenotypes of Elongator mutants have implicated the complex in several cellular processes. However, in yeast there is convincing evidence that the primary and probably only role of this complex is in formation of the 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm(5)) and 5-carbamoylmethyl (ncm(5)) side chains on uridines at wobble position in tRNA. In this review we summarize the cellular processes that have been linked to the Elongator complex and discuss its role in tRNA modification and regulation of translation. We also describe additional gene products essential for formation of ncm(5) and mcm(5) side chains at U-34 and their influence on Elongator activity.

  • 3.
    Xu, Fu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Factors modulating tRNA biogenesis and function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase III as precursors that undergo multiple processing steps to form mature tRNAs. These steps include processing of the 5’ leader and 3’ trailer sequences, addition of a 3’ CCA tail, removal of introns, and formation of modified nucleosides. The mature tRNAs carry amino acids to the ribosome where proteins are synthesized. The aim of this thesis is to identify and characterize factors that influence tRNA biogenesis and function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Nonsense suppressor tRNAs are encoded by mutated tRNA genes and able to read stop codons. The SUP4 gene encodes such a suppressor tRNA that base-pairs with UAA stop codons. By screening for mutations that impair the nonsense suppression of the SUP4-encoded tRNA, we identified a loss-of-function mutation in the YPK9 gene. Inactivation of Ypk9p causes a reduction in the readthrough of UAA stop codon. We found that phenotypes of ypk9Δ cells including decreased UAA readthrough and sensitivity to Mn2+ are counteracted by increasing the cellular levels of putrescine, one type of polyamine. Importantly, cells lacking Ypk9p show reduced levels of putrescine. Our results suggest that the YPK9 gene product influences the cellular levels of putrescine, which plays a role in maintaining the fidelity of translation termination.

    The Elongator complex, consisting of Elp1p-Elp6p six proteins, catalyzes the formation of U34 modifications in the anticodon region of 11 tRNA species. Elongator mutants display pleiotropic phenotypes that are caused by decreased tRNA functionality. We found that the genetic background, largely due to a polymorphism at the SSD1 locus, influences the pleiotropic phenotypes of Elongator mutants.

    In a genetic screen for factors that are essential for the survival of cells encoding a destabilized tRNASerCGA, several gene products were identified. We demonstrate that mutations in these genes result in reduced levels of the destabilized tRNASerCGA, suggesting a role for these gene products in tRNASerCGA biosynthesis.

  • 4.
    Xu, Fu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Byström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Johansson, Marcus J. O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    SSD1 modifies phenotypes of Elongator mutants2019In: Current Genetics, ISSN 0172-8083, E-ISSN 1432-0983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The translational decoding properties of tRNAs are influenced by post-transcriptional modification of nucleosides in their anticodon region. The Elongator complex promotes the first step in the formation of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm(5)), 5-methoxycarbonylhydroxymethyl (mchm(5)), and 5-carbamoylmethyl (ncm(5)) groups on wobble uridine residues in eukaryotic cytosolic tRNAs. Elongator mutants in yeast, worms, plants, mice, and humans not only show a tRNA modification defect, but also a diverse range of additional phenotypes. Even though the phenotypes are almost certainly caused by the reduced functionality of the hypomodified tRNAs in translation, the basis for specific phenotypes is not well understood. Here, we discuss the recent finding that the phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Elongator mutants are modulated by the genetic background. This background-effect is largely due to the allelic variation at the SSD1 locus, which encodes an mRNA-binding protein involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. A nonsense ssd1 allele is found in several wild-type laboratory strains and the presence of this allele aggravates the stress-induced phenotypes of Elongator mutants. Moreover, other phenotypes, such as the histone acetylation and telomeric gene silencing defects, are dependent on the mutant ssd1 allele. Thus, SSD1 is a genetic modifier of the phenotypes of Elongator-deficient yeast cells.

  • 5.
    Xu, Fu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Byström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Johansson, Marcus J. O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    SSD1 suppresses phenotypes induced by the lack of Elongator-dependent tRNA modifications2019In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 15, no 8, article id e1008117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Elongator complex promotes formation of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5 ) and 5-carbamoylmethyl (ncm5 ) side-chains on uridines at the wobble position of cytosolic eukaryotic tRNAs. In all eukaryotic organisms tested to date, the inactivation of Elongator not only leads to the lack of mcm5 /ncm5 groups in tRNAs, but also a wide variety of additional phenotypes. Although the phenotypes are most likely caused by a translational defect induced by reduced functionality of the hypomodified tRNAs, the mechanism(s) underlying individual phenotypes are poorly understood. In this study, we show that the genetic background modulates the phenotypes induced by the lack of mcm5 /ncm5 groups in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that the stress-induced growth defects of Elongator mutants are stronger in the W303 than in the closely related S288C genetic background and that the phenotypic differences are caused by the known polymorphism at the locus for the mRNA binding protein Ssd1. Moreover, the mutant ssd1 allele found in W303 cells is required for the reported histone H3 acetylation and telomeric gene silencing defects of Elongator mutants. The difference at the SSD1 locus also partially explains why the simultaneous lack of mcm5 and 2- thio groups at wobble uridines is lethal in the W303 but not in the S288C background. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the SSD1 locus modulates phenotypes induced by the lack of Elongator-dependent tRNA modifications.

  • 6.
    Xu, Fu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Huang, Bo
    Saiardi, Adolfo
    Johansson, Marcus
    Byström, Anders
    Ypk9p influences putrescine levels and the fidelity of translation terminationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Xu, Fu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Zhou, Yang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Byström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Johansson, Marcus J. O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Identification of factors that promote biogenesis of tRNACGASer2018In: RNA Biology, ISSN 1547-6286, E-ISSN 1555-8584, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 1286-1294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A wide variety of factors are required for the conversion of pre-tRNA molecules into the mature tRNAs that function in translation. To identify factors influencing tRNA biogenesis, we previously performed a screen for strains carrying mutations that induce lethality when combined with a sup61-T47:2C allele, encoding a mutant form of tRNACGASer. Analyzes of two complementation groups led to the identification of Tan1 as a protein involved in formation of the modified nucleoside N4-acetylcytidine (ac4C) in tRNA and Bud13 as a factor controlling the levels of ac4C by promoting TAN1 pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we describe the remaining complementation groups and show that they include strains with mutations in genes for known tRNA biogenesis factors that modify (DUS2, MOD5 and TRM1), transport (LOS1), or aminoacylate (SES1) tRNACGASer. Other strains carried mutations in genes for factors involved in rRNA/mRNA synthesis (RPA49, RRN3 and MOT1) or magnesium uptake (ALR1). We show that mutations in not only DUS2, LOS1 and SES1 but also in RPA49, RRN3 and MOT1 cause a reduction in the levels of the altered tRNACGASer. These results indicate that Rpa49, Rrn3 and Mot1 directly or indirectly influence tRNACGASer biogenesis.

1 - 7 of 7
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