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  • 1. Allard, Christina
    et al.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Hjortfors, Lis-Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences.
    Ledman, Anna-Lill
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Löf, Annette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Johansson Lönn, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Nordin, Gabriella
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Norlin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Outakoski, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Reimerson, Elsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Moa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Stoor, Krister
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Storm Mienna, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Svonni, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Vinka, Mikael
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Rasbiologiskt språkbruk i statens rättsprocess mot sameby2015In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Statens hantering av forskningsresultat i rättsprocessen med Girjas sameby utgör ett hot mot Sverige som rättsstat och kunskapsnation. Åratal av svensk och internationell forskning underkänns och man använder ett språkbruk som skulle kunna vara hämtat från rasbiologins tid. Nu måste staten ta sitt ansvar och börja agera som en demokratisk rättsstat, skriver 59 forskare.

  • 2.
    Ledman, Anna-Lill
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Löf, Annette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sandström, Moa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sehlin Macneil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Åsa, Össbo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Lantto, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Vänd på perspektiven Umeå20142013In: Västerbottens Kuriren, ISSN 1104-0246Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Ledman, Anna-Lill
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sehlin Macneil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Saba Persson, Jenny
    Rättighetscentrum Västerbotten, Umeå, Sweden.
    Samiskt fokus en viktig markering för öppenhet2014In: Västerbottens Kuriren, ISSN 1104-0246Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Löf, Annette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Andersson, Tore
    Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Horstkotte, Tim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ledman, Anna-Lill
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sehlin Macneil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Össbo, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Okunskap om samisk kultur grogrund för strukturell diskriminering2013In: Västerbottens-Kuriren, ISSN 1104-0246Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Extractive Violence on Indigenous Country: sami and Aboriginal Views on Conflicts and Power Relations with Extractive Industries2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Asymmetrical conflicts and power relations between extractive industries and Indigenous groups often have devastating consequences for Indigenous peoples. Many Indigenous groups are struggling to maintain their lands as Indigenous perspectives on connection to Country are frequently undervalued or dismissed in favour of extractivist ideologies. While this conflicted interface has been researched in various parts of the world, studies exploring conflicts and power relations with extractive industries from Indigenous perspectives are few.

    This thesis is an international comparison aiming to illuminate situations of conflict and asymmetrical power relations caused by extractivism on Indigenous lands from new viewpoints. By drawing on two single case studies, the situations for Laevas reindeer herding Sami community in northern Sweden and Adnyamathanha Traditional Owners in South Australia are compared and contrasted. Yarning (a form of interviewing) is used as a method for data collection and in order to stay as true as possible to the research participants’ own words a number of direct quotes are used. The analysis employs peace researcher Johan Galtung’s concepts of cultural and structural violence as analytical tools to further explore the participants’ experiences of interactions with extractive industries and industrial proponents, including governments. In addition, the thesis introduces the concept of extractive violence as a complement to Galtung’s model. Extractive violence is defined as a form of direct violence against people and/or animals and nature caused by extractivism, which predominantly impacts peoples closely connected to land. The concepts of structural and cultural violence are understood as unjust societal structures and racist and discriminating attitudes respectively.

    A number of main themes could be identified in the research participants’ narratives. However, the most prominent on both continents was connections to Country and the threat that extractive violence posed to these connections.

    The results show that although the expressions of cultural, structural and extractive violence experienced by the two Indigenous communities varied, the impacts were strikingly similar. Both communities identified extractive violence, supported by structural and cultural violence, as threats to the continuation of their societies and entire cultures. Furthermore, the results suggest that in order to address violence against Indigenous peoples and achieve conflict transformation, Indigenous and decolonising perspectives should be heard and taken into account.

  • 6.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Forskning, utredning och medling: Frågan om medling i marktvister mellan renskötare och markägare i Sverige2006Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I början av 2006 utkom Gränsdragningskommissionen för renskötselområdets betänkande, Samernas sedvanemarker (SOU 2006:14). I utredningen inkluderades ett förslag om inrättandet av ett utrednings- och medlingsinstitut som skulle verka för att lösa marktvister mellan renskötare och markägare i Sverige. Mot bakgrund av detta förslag har Centrum för Samisk forskning vid Umeå universitet tagit fram en rapport kring frågorna om utredning och medling i marktvister.

  • 7.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Förtryck leder till lateralt våld2017In: Samefolket, ISSN 0346-0320, no 7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Let's name it: identifying cultural, structural and extractive violence in Indigenous and extractive industry relations2018In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 81-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article on conflict and power relations between extractive industries and Indigenous groups in Sweden and Australia draws on two case studies to compare situations for Laevas reindeer herding Sami community in Northern Sweden and Adnyamathanha Traditional Owners in South Australia. In this international comparison the analysis, based on the research participants’ narratives, employs Johan Galtung’s concepts of cultural and structural violence as analytical tools to further explore and contrast the participants’ experiences of interactions with extractive industries and industrial proponents. In addition, this study introduces extractive violence – defined as a form of direct violence but relating specifically to extractivism and Indigenous peoples – as a complement to Galtung’s model, known as the violence triangle. The results show that although the expressions of cultural, structural and extractive violence experienced by the two Indigenous communities varied, the impacts were strikingly similar. Both communities identified extractive violence, supported by structural and cultural violence, as threats to the continuation of their entire cultures. The study also shows that in order to address violence against Indigenous peoples, Indigenous and decolonising perspectives must be taken into account.

  • 9.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    On Equal Terms?: exploring Traditional Owners' Views Regarding Radioactive Waste Dumps on Adnyamathanha Country2016In: Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues, ISSN 1440-5202, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores Adnyamathanha Traditional Owners’ experiences of the South Australian Nuclear Fuel Cycle Royal Commission consultation process and the Australian Government’s nomination process for nuclear repository sites. The study investigates how structural and cultural violence is manifested in the relations between the Australian and South Australian Governments and members of the Adnyamathanha community. Structural violence includes power inequality, injustices and corruption built into social systems. Cultural violence means discriminatory attitudes and beliefs that justify and legitimise structural violence. The results show that structural violence is manifested in several ways including lack of information and language services as well as government representatives approaching individuals rather than the community. Cultural violence is demonstrated as discriminatory, colonial and racist attitudes and actions resulting in flawed consultation processes. The study concludes that in order to address structural and cultural violence Indigenous experiences and opinions must be heard and taken seriously.

  • 10.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Shafted: a case of cultural and structural violence in the power relations between a Sami community and a mining company in northern Sweden2015In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 45, p. 73-88Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the summer of 2013 a conflict between a mining company and a group of protesters took place in Gállok (Kallak) in northern Sweden. The conflict brought a long-standing debate to the surface about the so-called Swedish mining boom and its impact on both natural environments and the traditional Sami livelihood, reindeer herding. This article explores the power relations and structural and cultural violence experienced by members of a sameby (a Sami reindeer herding community) in its relations with the Swedish government-owned mining company LKAB. The study centres around the events that took place before and during the creation of an opinion piece, published in a Swedish national tabloid, involving both parties. The analysis uses two of the sameby members’ narratives to describe their experiences in order to investigate the power relations, which are then analysed using peace researcher Johan Galtung’s theories on structural and cultural violence. 

  • 11.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Undermining the resource ground: Extractive violence on Laevas and Adnyamathanha land2019In: Natural resource conflicts and sustainable development / [ed] E. Gunilla Almered Olsson and Pernille Gooch, Routledge, 2019, p. 99-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Asymmetric natural resource conflicts between extractive industries and Indigenous groups often have devastating consequences for Indigenous peoples. Due to colonial societal structures, where Indigenous perspectives on land management are frequently trivialised or ignored in favour of extractivist ideologies, many Indigenous groups are struggling to maintain their lands. This chapter draws on two case studies to compare situations of conflicts connected to natural resource exploitation, experienced by Laevas reindeer herding Sami community in northern Sweden and Adnyamathanha Traditional Owners in South Australia. The chapter builds on my PhD research where I introduced the concept of extractive violence as a complement to Galtung's violence triangle. Through building an analysis on concepts including connection to country, asymmetric conflict and extractive violence, deeper understandings of conflicts between extractive industries and Indigenous communities can be created. The chapter concludes that in order to achieve conflict transformation and address the violent structures many Indigenous groups are subjected to, the asymmetric power relations must be altered through the inclusion of Indigenous perspectives.

  • 12.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Vad är urfolksmetodologier?2014In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Inga, Niila
    Laevas čearru .
    Extraktivt våld och urfolks koppling till mark2019In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 42-51Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna artikel är en omarbetad version av en presentation som hölls av författarna vid konferensen La Responsabilité de Protéger. Écologie et Dignité (The responsibility to protect. Ecology and dignity) vid Université Laval i Quebec i början av oktober 2017. Kristina Sehlin MacNeil och Niila Inga lärde känna varandra som forskare och forskningsdeltagare under Kristinas avhandlingsarbete, vilket avslutades i februari 2017. De har sedan dess inbjudits att tala tillsammans vid en rad olika konferenser. Detta är deras första gemensamma publikation, samt den första artikeln på svenska som behandlar Sehlin MacNeils resultat från hennes avhandling Extractive Violence on Indigeneous Country (2017), där hon med utgång i begreppet ”Extraktivt våld” diskuterar om urfolks perspektiv på marken och på kopplingen mellan människa och mark.

  • 14.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Lawrence, Rebecca
    Stockholms universitet.
    Samiska frågor i gruvdebatten 2013: nya utrymmen för ohörda diskurser?2017In: Samisk kamp: kulturförmedling och rättviserörelse / [ed] Marianne Liliequist och Coppélie Cocq, Umeå: Bokförlaget h:ström - Text & Kultur, 2017, p. 140-161Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sommaren 2013 präglades Sápmi av den pågående gruvdebatten. Den svenska regeringens mineralstrategi hade lett till att gruvbolaget Jokkmokk Iron Mines AB (Jimab) fått tillstånd att bryta järnmalm i Gállok utanför Jokkmokk, något som delar av lokalbefolkningen, miljöaktivister, renskötare och andra samer ville bestrida. Resultatet blev en långdragen konflikt. Trots att konflikten i Gállok nådde långt utanför Sveriges gränser genom uppmärksammande i utländska medier, möttes den med ett relativt svalt intresse i de nationella medierna. Syftet med kapitlet är att, med utgångspunkt i de artiklar som publicerats i de fyra största nationella pressmedierna, Dagens Nyheter (DN), Svenska Dagbladet (SvD), Aftonbladet (AB) och Expressen belysa och analysera gruvdebatten och riksmediernas intresse i gruvfrågan.

  • 15.
    Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Marsh, Jillian
    University of South Australia.
    Indigenous research across continents: a comparison of ethically and culturally sound approaches to research in Australia and Sweden2015In: Finding the common ground: narratives, provocations and reflections from the 40 year celebration of batchelor institute / [ed] Henk Huijser, Robyn Ober, Sandy O’Sullivan, Eva McRae-Williams, Ruth Elvin, Batchelor NT: Batchelor Press , 2015, p. 119-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of opposition to, or absence of, ethical engagement in Indigenous research, researchers aremorally obligated to make a stand that ensures their engagement strategy and implementation plan uses an approach based on positionality, participation, mutual respect, and partnership. Whilst this may involve new challenges for the researcher, such an initiative maximises the likelihood of an empowering and culturally safe process for vulnerable participants, including inexperienced researchers. As two early career researchers, we reflect on our experiences amidst some of the challenges within Indigenous research. These challenges include ethical, methodological and structural issues. The main aims of this chapter are to advocate for practical and philosophical reform of Indigenous research ethics particularly in the context of decolonisation; ultimately to maximise the benefits of research primarily for community research participants, service providers, and policy makers as opposed to primarily for the academy. The authors' experiential and theoretical knowledge enables a critical understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of a decolonising research approach and how this guides the development of an appropriate ethics protocol. We acknowledge that research impacts on Indigenous peoples' lives, often in a negative or unintended manner, and its governance varies dramatically according to individual as well as institutional values that are steeped in Western thought including colonialism. This paper draws on scholarly theoretical knowledge of cultural protocols and the governance of ethical processes from international and local sources, as well as our own experiences in cross-cultural communication to articulate what we call a Decolonising Standpoint. We regard this as a necessary addition to the implementation of an Indigenous Standpoint in the context of research, which has provided a highly credible philosophy and practice for Indigenous researchers. We aim to create an additional and quite distinct position that non-Indigenous researchers can add to their repertoire of skills and knowledge in the context of Indigenous research.

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