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  • 1.
    Gregersdotter, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Isaksson, Malin
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Svensson, Maria Helena
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Åström, Berit
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Editorial: Textual Echoes2011Ingår i: Transformative Works and Cultures, ISSN 1941-2258, E-ISSN 1941-2258, nr 8Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 2.
    Hansson, Heidi
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Pettersson, Lennart
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Inledning2010Ingår i: Regionernas bilder: estetiska uttryck från och om periferin / [ed] Heidi Hansson, Maria Lindgren Leavenworth & Lennart Pettersson, Umeå: Print & Media , 2010, s. 7-14Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 3.
    Isaksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Gazing, initiating, desiring: alternative constructions of agency and sex in Twifics2011Ingår i: Interdisciplinary approaches to Twilight: studies in fiction, media and a contemporary cultural experience / [ed] Mariah Larsson & Ann Steiner, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2011, s. 127-142Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Isaksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Queera lustar: fan fiction i vampyrmiljö2009Ingår i: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, Vol. 39, nr 3-4, s. 23-37Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Queer Desires: Fan Fiction about Vampires and Slayers

    In this article we analyze a selection of fan fiction stories in which fans engage in an intertextual dialogue with a source text. As an Internet-published literary form, fan fiction (or fanfic) is fairly new and the relatively democratic means of publication have meant a dramatically increased production. However, the intertextual dialogue with the source text reveals connections between fanfic and previous forms of rewritings. It is therefore rather in terms of content that fan fiction can be said to represent new strategies when negotiating the source material.

    The six fanfics chosen for the analyses are of the slash and femslash varieties in which same-sex couples who are not romantically or sexually linked in the source text are paired. The fanfics take as their starting points Joss Whedon’s tv-series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and J. R. Ward’s romantic novels in the Black Dagger Brotherhood-series. Authors of femslash pair the two Slayers Buffy and Faith and authors of slash engage the characters Vishous and Butch in a homoerotic relationship. Aside from analyzing examples of the fanfic form, the selection of stories based on source texts centering on vampires means an opportunity to investigate the function of this literary trope. Its attraction for fanfic authors can be said to stem from the figure’s inherent possibilities of representing alternative, queer sexualities.

    By analyzing narrative strategies and selected themes we argue that the (fem)slash texts illustrate negotiations both with genre and gender conventions of the source texts and a resistance to the heteronormative structures of today’s popular culture.

  • 5.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    "A Life as Potent and Dangerous as Literature Itself": Intermediated Moves from Mrs. Dalloway to The Hours2010Ingår i: Journal of Popular Culture, ISSN 0022-3840, E-ISSN 1540-5931, Vol. 43, nr 3, s. 503-523Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyses an adaptation process in two steps, from Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs Dalloway, to Michael Cunningham’s novel The Hours, to Stephen Daldry’s film The Hours. Close readings are carried out with focus on three themes: haunting, identity and failure, which all exhibit different intertextual links between the texts. The theme of haunting, of repetition, is necessarily present in both versions of The Hours, since they as postmodern intertextual works rely heavily on their predecessor as well as on the creator of this predecessor. The theme of a woman’s whole life in a day is similarly a theme repeated from Mrs. Dalloway, and the novel itself surfaces repeatedly in both Cunningham’s and Daldry’s texts, sometimes as concrete inspiration, sometimes in the form of more oblique references. The thematic affinities between the women in The Hours are also connected to the theme of haunting, this time in the way their lives reflect and influence each other. Visually, this is illustrated by linking devices: flowers, sleeping positions and relationships to partners, to mention only the opening scenes. The water imagery—born from an echo of Mrs. Dalloway’s opening chapter—comes into the theme of haunting but takes on a powerful visual significance also in relation to the theme of failure where river water comes to represent Virginia’s choices in the writing process and how these have a direct effect on Mrs. Brown. It is argued that the move from quintessentially modernist fiction to postmodern polyphony, and the fact that Woolf is one of three central characters, has required different authenticating strategies in the film adaptation. Seemingly simple match cuts establish visual links between the central characters while simultaneously separating each woman into her own clearly identifiable space and context. Media specific modes of narration, such as set design, lighting and musical themes are similarly used to achieve polyphony. Subtle intertextual elements found in the guest text are transformed into visual linking devices, ensuring that Mrs. Dalloway remains a powerful element both in symbolic and concrete form, a result indicating that the symbiotic relationship is one of mutualism.

     

     

  • 6.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    A Truth Universally Acknowledged?: Pride and Prejudice and Mind-Reading Fans2015Ingår i: Storyworlds: A Journal of Narrative Studies, ISSN 1946-2204, Vol. 7, nr 2, s. 93-110Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Jane Austen’s 1813 novel Pride and Prejudice has been adapted numerous times: as stage productions, TV-series, films and even a musical. It has also occasioned a number of novelistic continuations in the form of sequels, prequels and mash-ups. Each narrative contributes in various ways to the archontic text of Pride and Prejudice (Derecho 2006), or enlarges the storyworld in which audiences are encouraged to immerse themselves (Herman 2003). Fan practices of different kinds illustrate how audience members have cognitively responded to the transmedial storyworld; to its consistent narrative elements, but also to the discrepancies and tensions that arise from conflicting narrative details, chains of events, and characterizations. With a starting point in cognitive theories dealing with Theory of Mind, and particularly the concomitant issue of embedded narratives (Palmer 2004), the article examines fan fiction from three online archives, The Republic of Pemberley, The Austen Interlude, and Archive of Our Own in order to illuminate forms of narrative immersion and to identify the story elements that elicit cognitive response. The Republic is a closely monitored site, i.e. fandom responses to storyworld elements are reigned in and the stories are expected to conform quite closely to themes, characterizations and the style of Austen’s writing. Analyses of narrative details and characterizations that are overrepresented in the stories nevertheless testify to how particular cues in the canon have given rise to intense cognitive and affective engagement. More resistive example stories, published at The Austen Interlude and Archive of Our Own rather work to negotiate and ‘correct’ the canon. Contrastive analyses thus illuminate how fans re-focus the canon archive or enlarge the storyworld.

  • 7.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Abnormal Fears: the Queer Arctic in Michelle Paver's Dark Matter2017Ingår i: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 26, nr 4, s. 462-472Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With focus on queer resistance emanating from place, this article examines Michelle Paver’s 2010 novel Dark Matter: A Ghost Story, set in the 1930s and telling the tale of an all-male expedition to Svalbard. The Arctic as depicted in travelogues and fiction has traditionally been embodied and gendered according to heteronormative models of interpretation as a formidable male adversary or a lethal female seductress; constructions that Paver’s fictional expedition members attempt to enforce as representatives of the norm. However, several aspects of the Arctic blur the boundaries between previously discreet categories, and offer resistance to the expedition’s normative assumptions. With a starting point in Sara Ahmed’s discussions about both spatial and existential orientation in Queer Phenomenology (2006), the article maps how the Arctic is imagined and perceived by Jack Miller, the novel’s protagonist, and how resistive features of the landscape and climate affect his ability to orient himself. Although hoping that the remote Svalbard will constitute a productive testing ground for a particular kind of inter-war, British masculinity, specificities of place represent a threatening transgression of what Jack perceives of as normal, which is brought to a climax by strange events he experiences in the isolated bay where the bulk of the text is set. This article consequently analyzes how the Arctic is initially constructed as a stable place, how geographical particularities then overturn possibilities for Jack’s orientation, and how supernatural occurrences finally violate boundaries between past and present, sane and mad. What Ahmed refers to as ‘queer moments’ that slant that subject’s perception of the world and, from a heteronormative perspective, need to be ‘straightened’ are in the novel produced by the actual as well as the supernatural Arctic. These queer moments distort perspectives, sometimes in highly productive ways, and highlight a continuous, geographically specific resistance to categorization.

  • 8.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Andrée på äventyr: Verklighet och spekulation i Vidar Berges Den hemlighetsfulla nordpolsön2018Ingår i: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, Vol. 3, s. 39-49Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    1897 lämnade Samuel August Andrée, Nils Strindberg och Knut Frænkel Svalbard i en ballong för att segla över Arktis, inmuta nordpolen genom att släppa ned en boj, och fortsätta mot det nordamerikanska fastlandet. Men ingenting mer hördes från de tre männen och 33 år senare hittades deras kroppar på Kvitöja i Svalbards övärld. Expeditionen omges av både dokumentära och fiktiva texter, bland de senare den i stort sett bortglömda romanen Den hemlighetsfulla nordpolsön av Vidar Berge. Publicerad 1902 tar romanen sin utgångspunkt i den verkliga ballonguppstigningen men rör sig därefter in i det spekulativa. Efter ett par dagar i luften tvingas Berges fiktiva rollfigurer Anders, Sindberg och Wænckel ned på en grön ö i det öppna polarhavet, där de träffar på vikingaättlingar och förhistoriska djur och genomgår en serie äventyr. I artikeln analyseras hur bristen på fakta avseende verklighetens expedition öppnar för hypotetiska scenarier som Berge förklarar med hjälp av mer eller mindre vetenskapliga diskussioner, samt hur arton- och det tidiga nittonhundratalets föreställningar om Arktis samspelar med och påverkar spekulativa inslag.

  • 9.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Canon Authors and Fannish Interaction2014Ingår i: Journal of Fandom Studies, ISSN 2046-6692, Vol. 2, nr 2, s. 127-145Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how the authors of two popular vampire canons, Stephenie Meyer and J. R. Ward, use extratextual spaces such as homepages and Insider Guides to communicate with their fans while simultaneously limiting these fans’ possibilities for concrete involvement. It is argued that Meyer and Ward are engaged in a continuous battle for control over meaning, but that their interaction with their own narratives has close affinities with fannish practices in general. Of particular saliency is Ward’s and Meyer’s insistence on character autonomy, which increases the immediacy of their fictional worlds, but paradoxically weakens the authorial control they otherwise strive to maintain.

  • 10.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Destinations and descriptions: acts of seeing in S.H. Kent's Gath to the Cedars and Within the Arctic Circle : acts of seeing in S.H. Kent's Gath to the Cedars and Within the Arctic Circle2011Ingår i: Studies in Travel Writing, ISSN 1364-5145, E-ISSN 1755-7550, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 293-310Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    British traveller S(usannah) H(enrietta) Kent's travelogues Gath to the Cedars (1874) and Within the Arctic Circle (1877) depict both spatial and figurative peripheries, constructed from a centre which enforces power over what is seen and reported. Kent's position as an imperial subject is visible in both texts in processes of Othering, and a further similarity between the travelogues is found in instances of reciprocity; when the encountered people gaze back, Kent takes recourse to both textual and physical strategies to regain control. Other representations of acts of seeing, however, reveal differences in how the destinations are discursively constructed. Itineraries and depictions of the East are determined by the Bible as a textual filter, and elevated views indicate the traveller's figurative control. The North is presented as an example of progressive modernity and despite following discursive practices when narrating sublime, picturesque and contained views, Kent's aim is to present the area as welcome to all. The oscillation between traveller and tourist, evident in Kent's descriptions as well as in her travelling persona, sheds light on both opportunities for and limitations to the writing of a travelogue towards the end of the nineteenth century.

  • 11.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Exotic Norths?: Representations of Northern Scandinavia in S. H. Kent's Within the Arctic Circle and Bayard Taylor's Northern Travel2010Ingår i: Nordlit, ISSN 1503-2086, Vol. 26, s. 1-14Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I analyse aspects connected to exoticism in Bayard Taylor’s Northern Travel (1858) and Susannah Henrietta Kent’s Within the Arctic Circle (1877). Despite gender differences and different seasons in which the travellers undertake their trips, there are similarities between the texts which indicate that discourses connected to the destination to an extent structure representations and determine what is to be rendered as exotic. The close readings are focused on Kent’s and Taylor’s depictions of Sami life, the cold, the perceived ‘backwardness’ of the area, the midnight sun and the northern lights. The analyses illustrate that two forms of exoticism feature in the travelogues; an exoticising exoticism figure aspects of the landscape and the people which are benevolently viewed and not in need of improvement or change, and an imperialist exoticism structure depictions of aspects which are seen as in need of amendment. Kent and Taylor express different aims with their journeys; the former to establish the area as a ‘safe’ destination for travellers of both genders and all ages, the latter to test his masculinity against the harsh climate. These different aims, as well as the time period which sees Scandinavia established as a tourist destination, thus threatening what was perceived as authentic travel experiences, are also discussed in the analyses of how both travellers vacillate between different exotic constructions of the North.

  • 12.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    "Hatred was also left outside": Journeys into the Cold in Le Guin's The Left Hand of Darkness2009Ingår i: Cold matters: cultural perceptions of snow, ice and cold / [ed] Heidi Hansson, Cathrine Norberg, Umeå, 2009, s. 141-155Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In Ursula K. Le Guin’s science fiction novel The Left Hand of Darkness cold is used on both literal and metaphorical levels as the main character, sent to the planet of Gethen, or Winter, undertakes an inner journey of self discovery. The first part of the article analyses the novel as a fictional travelogue to establish how the boundaries between Self and Other, between observer and studied, are constructed. Animal imagery, adaptation to the cold and the Gethenian’s androgynous sexuality are aspects at focus. The second part of the article centres more specifically on how the cold functions on several levels in the novel. The harsh climate initially works as a divider between Self and Other, and the central themes of fidelity and betrayal are connected to the cold on both literal and metaphorical levels. However, the essentializing aspects of the cold come to erase these and other binaries and enable the protagonist’s understanding of both himself and the encountered culture.

  • 13.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Ingress2010Ingår i: Regionernas bilder: estetiska uttryck från och om periferin / [ed] Heidi Hansson, Maria Lindgren Leavenworth & Lennart Pettersson, Umeå: Print & Media , 2010, s. 65-73Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 14.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Lover revamped: sexualities and romance in the black dagger brotherhood and slash fan fiction2009Ingår i: Extrapolation, ISSN 0014-5483, E-ISSN 2047-7708, Vol. 50, nr 3, s. 442-462Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Focus is on selected elements in J. R. Ward’s romantic vampire novels Lover Revealed and Lover Unbound which are read through three fan fiction stories of the slash variety. While subverting aspects such as the heteronorm through the male-male pairings, the fanfic authors are limited by the canon’s romance structure, evidenced by the creation of temporary spaces for transgressions of norms, and by tendencies to figure the homosexual encounters in heterosexual terms. Alternative sexualities and interrogations of contemporary fears are thus circumscribed by the romantic structures, in both the canon and in the fan fiction.

  • 15.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Paratextual navigation as a research method: fan fiction archives and reader instructions2016Ingår i: Research methods for reading digital data in the digital humanities / [ed] Gabriele Griffin and Matt Hayler, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016, s. 51-71Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, several critics have appropriated and extended Gérard Genette's delineation of the paratext (1987; 1997) in analyses of media specificity, of authoring functions, and of altered reading habits following new modes of textual production. This chapter utilizes the notion of the paratext as a means of addressing how to research particular online texts. It provides an account of one way of conducting such research by focusing on websites that archive fan fiction: online-published, most often pseudonymously authored stories which take a pre-existing fiction as a starting point, and on a few examples stories. It speaks to how Genette's traditional, narratological delineation can be usefully expanded and modified to account for particular methodological challenges when researching the virtual environments and when approaching isolated works within them. In Genette's definition, the paratext constitutes "a threshold … that offers the world at large the possibility of either stepping inside or turning back" (Paratexts 2). Despite the seeming concreteness of the threshold image he later goes on to specify that "'[t]he paratext,' properly speaking, does not exist; rather, one chooses to account in these terms for a certain number of practices and effects, for reasons of method and effectiveness” (Paratexts 343). Online publishing entails a particular form of thresholds with websites, online archives, fanfic-specific genres, categorizations and tags representing specific aspects of the paratext. The choice of publication venue, filing options at the selected site, and a host of more or less descriptive labels attached to the work thus signal what type of text form we are concerned with and what genre(s) it belongs to: preliminary indications for how it is to be approached and giving visitors to the sites options to either pursue reading the fanfic, or turn elsewhere. A sustained analysis of different paratextual functions, structuring the site as well as the presentation of fiction, thus profitably accounts for the particularity of the fanfic text form, as well as of the material mediation of the text. 

  • 16.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Reader, Please Follow Me: fan fiction, author instructions, and feedback2015Ingår i: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, ISSN 1404-1501, Vol. 13, nr 1, s. 100-127Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines forms of communication surrounding the publication and reception of fan fiction: on-line published stories working from an existing fictional universe. At focus are two fanfics that have Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice as s starting point, and their publication on the large site FanFiction.net. Already published in their entirety elsewhere, the daily chapter installments of the fanfics are designed to initiate contact with a new group of readers, reciprocated through readers leaving comments. This communication enables examinations of three aspects. Firstly, attention is paid to increasingly private conversations, indicative of a blend between several contemporary social practices. Secondly, the reception of the story’s logic and its downplaying of Austen’s complex renditions of cognitive processes is analyzed. Thirdly, more problematic ramifications of extended author commentary are interrogated, specifically how explicit instructions attempting to guide the approach to and reception of the fanfic results in forms of audience resistance. 

  • 17.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    The Art of Bookmaking: Selina Bunbury's Northern Journeys2008Ingår i: New Contexts: Re-Framing Nineteenth-Century Irish Women's Prose / [ed] Heidi Hansson, Cork: Cork Univerity Press , 2008, s. 55-77Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 18.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    The Paratext of Fan Fiction2015Ingår i: Narrative (Columbus, Ohio), ISSN 1063-3685, E-ISSN 1538-974X, Vol. 23, nr 1, s. 40-60Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article appropriates and extends Gérard Genette’s delineation of paratext in analyses of fan fiction, highlighting media specificity, authoring functions, and altered reading habits following new modes of textual production. Online-published, pseudonymously authored fan fictions, starting from an already existing fictional text and therefore overtly intertextual, represent an intermediary stage between print literature and complex, often multimodal, contemporary hypertexts. Through a case study, the article examines paratextual features such as filing options, tags, Author Notes, and an epitextual conversation between the fanfic author and her readers. Many of these features are particular to modes of online publishing and the fanfic text form and fulfill functions which differentiate them from paratexts in printed forms of literature. A thorough analysis of them contributes to a general understanding of the nature and function of the paratext and specifically provides insights into how it can help readers navigate the text form of fan fiction along with the specific affordances of the online creative environment.

  • 19.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    The Second Journey: Travelling in Literary Footsteps2010 (uppl. 2)Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The second journey is a contemporary journey made in the footsteps of an earlier traveller. The original travelogue, the first journey, functions as a map which guides second travellers not only to their geographical destinations, but also to a sense of authenticity. Although based on ideas of emulation, reiteration and cyclicality, the second journey transforms places which are already figuratively and literally mapped into new landscapes. This study situates second journeys in the textual and conceptual history preceding them, with focus on issues of authenticity, originality and intertextuality. Three case studies illustrate variations on the form. The first contains an analysis of a scientific second journey: Robert Swan and Roger Mear’s In the Footsteps of Scott. This project takes the second travellers along Robert Falcon Scott’s route through Antarctica to the South Pole. The second case study concerns female travellers in West Africa: Mary Kingsley travelling at the end of the nineteenth century and Caroline Alexander emulating the journey a century later in One Dry Season. The third variation on the second journey, a biographical project, is exemplified by Nicholas Rankin’s Dead Man’s Chest. Rankin travels in the footsteps of Robert Louis Stevenson through Europe, North America and to the Pacific Islands. The Second Journey: Travelling in Literary Footsteps sheds light on a largely neglected subgenre of travel literature. It is aimed towards readers with an interest in travel writing, in postmodern developments of the genre, and in how the central issues of originality and authenticity are negotiated in contemporary travel texts.

  • 20.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    The times of men, mysteries and monsters: The Terror and Franklin’s Last Expedition2010Ingår i: Arctic Discourses / [ed] Anka Ryall, Johan Schimanski, och Henning Howlid Wærp, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars , 2010, s. 199-217Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The mystery surrounding the last Franklin expedition and the absence of concrete information concerning the fate of its members have resulted in a number of fictionalizations. The chapter focuses on how the Arctic and a mystery central to the Western idea of the area are dealt with in Dan Simmons’ The Terror (2007).The novel is a curious mix of carefully researched facts and horror story in which the expedition members succumb to the cold, scurvy and lead poisoning, but are also hunted and killed by a fourteen-foot tall ice monster (later revealed to be a Tuunbaq). A focus on three coexisting time tracks illuminates how the few facts which remain are utilized to create a persuasive story and how the supernatural elements are integrated. Fictional time is the time of narration, unfolding as the novel progresses. The numerous references to actual events and the use of real-life characters situate the story in time and give it a certain authenticity: a temporal category which may be termed historical time. Finally, mythical time can be seen as coexisting with both real and historical time, and as something which unites the two. The Arctic setting (both geographical and cultural) is crucial to how mythic time is worked into the narrative, isolated as the area is from the surrounding world and of interest is also how Simmons continues a tradition of writing about the Arctic in the treatment of themes such as the cold, the isolation and the male, heroic persona.

  • 21.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Transmedial Narration and Fan Fiction: The Storyworld of The Vampire Diaries2014Ingår i: Storyworlds Across Media: Toward a Media-Conscious Narratology / [ed] Marie-Laure Ryan and Jan-Noël Thon, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2014, s. 315-331Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    “Transmedial Narration and Fan Fiction: The Storyworld of The Vampire Diaries” examines audience participation in transmedia franchises by focusing on unauthorized fan contributions to the transmedial storyworld of The Vampire Diaries in the form of fan fiction. The ‘official’ storyworld is in itself complex as the novels and TV series tell partly different stories. Contradictions and incompatibilities in fact become intrinsic to the storyworld itself, and incorporating unsanctioned products adds to the complexity and diversity of characterizations, plot lines, and themes. At focus in the close reading of four fan fictions is the ways in which the authors negotiate assignations and portrayals of good and evil, and how they criticize cultural norms influencing contemporary romance. It is argued that the concept of storyworld holds great potential for allowing a levelling of hierarchies between sanctioned and unsanctioned products. To re-think different contributions, especially in light of the contemporary stress on audience participation, is productive when seeing fan fiction as part of a larger archive of meaning-making.

  • 22.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Transmedial texts and serialized narratives2011Ingår i: Transformative Works and Cultures, ISSN 1941-2258, E-ISSN 1941-2258, Vol. 8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 23.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Variations, Subversions, and Endless Love: Fan Fiction and the Twilight Saga2011Ingår i: Bringing Light to Twilight: Perspectives on the Pop Culture Phenomenon / [ed] Giselle Liza Anatol, New York: Palgrave MacMillan , 2011, s. 69-81Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The popularity of Twilight has resulted in an unprecedented number of fan fictions (or fanfics); Internet-published stories in which fans engage in an intertextual dialogue with the source text. This huge fandom cannot be ignored in considerations of the source text and illustrates that readers are both active and critical readers.

    The chapter contains close reading analyses of a limited number of fanfics with focus on how narrative strategies and forms illustrate negotiations both with genre- and gender conventions of the source text. Gen-fanfic features maintained relationships but they are developed in ways which suggest negotiations of Twilight’s focus on sexual abstinence. Slash pairs same-sex couples from the source text and illustrates a resistance to heteronormative structures. In crossovers, authors combine characters and events from different fandoms (here Twilight and Buffy) and illuminate how various brands of vampirism conflict. AUs (Alternative Universes) explore what-if scenarios, delineating how fans critically examine the source text and offer other possibilities for character- and plot developments.

    The aim of the chapter is not to draw generalizing conclusions about fanfic, but rather to argue that the selected texts illustrate an active readership, and tendencies of resistance to and/or compliance with structures in Twilight, particularly tied to characterization and the themes of (blood)lust and sexual abstinence.

  • 24.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    “What are you?”: Fear, desire, and disgust in the Southern Vampire Mysteries and True Blood2012Ingår i: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 11, nr 3, s. 36-54Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines how fear, desire and disgust are mapped onto the liminal body of the vampire in the Southern Vampire Mysteries and True Blood. Of particular relevance are Sara Ahmed’s arguments in The Cultural Politics of Emotions that emotions are not biologically unavoidable, but rather evoked in meetings between bodies, and that the body’s surface is formed in the moment of contact, creating boundaries between Self and Other. Fear, desire and disgust thus stem from the tradition with which the vampire has been represented and vampires’ alignment with other marginalised groups enables comparative analyses of differences and similarities between vampire hate on the one hand, and racism, sexism and homophobia on the other.

  • 25.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Isaksson, Malin
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Fan fiction: skrivna läsningar2012Ingår i: Litteraturens nätverk: Berättande på internet / [ed] Christian Lenemark, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, s. 77-92Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 26.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Isaksson, Malin
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Fanged Fan Fiction: Variations on Twilight, True Blood and The Vampire Diaries2013 (uppl. 1. uppl.)Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Twilight, True Blood and The Vampire Diaries have sparked off intense fan activity and generated a large quantity of fan fiction: stories which test the limits of an already existing fictional work and explore gaps and discrepancies within it. Working from the idea that texts constitute archives, expanded and altered by each addition, close readings of a selection of fanfics illustrate particular transformative practices in the online environment. The central figure of the vampire is read through the lens of fanfic authors' contributions to the archives, particularly regarding how figuratively or literally refanged versions of the trope are used to subvert norms established in the source texts concerning depictions of sexuality, sexual practices, and monstrosity. Complex relationships between authorial power and subversion, between mainstream messages and individual interpretations, are examined through fanfic analyses, the findings contributing to discussions about contemporary literary creativity.

  • 27.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Isaksson, Malin
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    The Recuperated Bite and Issues of the Soul in Vampire Fan Fiction2011Ingår i: Fanpires: Audience Consumption of the Modern Vampire / [ed] Gareth Schott & Kirstine Moffat, Washington, DC: New Academia Publishing , 2011, s. 239-254Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 28.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Leavenworth, Van
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Fragmented fiction: storyworld construction and the quest for meaning in Justin Cronin’s The Passage2017Ingår i: Fafnir: Nordic Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy Research, ISSN 2342-2009, Vol. 4, nr 2, s. 22-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines Justin Cronin’s post-apocalyptic novel The Passage (2010), with emphasis on how literal and figurative forms of fragmentation and shifts between temporalities can affect the reader’s storyworld construction. Working from the assumption that expectations connected to genre are a pivotal part of the reader’s storyworld creation, the novel’s temporal settings, the pre-apocalyptic Time Before and the post-apocalyptic Time After, are analyzed with particular attention paid to the ontological distance between readers and characters produced by fragmentation and temporal shifts, to the collapse and reconstitution of cultural knowledge, and to how various text types contribute to a destabilization of narrative authority. The reader’s quest for meaning, collating information from various sources and temporalities to reconstruct or keep track of events, is mirrored by the characters’ world building in the post-apocalypse as they (re)assemble information and cultural knowledge. The storyworld evoked in the mind of the reader, expanding with new details and events, thus finds a concrete parallel in the characters’ (re)construction of the world. Since the latter process is collaborative, with characters having to pool resources to both survive and make sense of the world, and the former occurs within an individual meaning-making process, the organization of the novel occasions a sense of isolation in the reader, mirroring the overarching theme of the narrative.

  • 29.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Moderna språk. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Örnberg Berglund, Therese
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Moderna språk. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Utmaningar och möjligheter med nätbaserat lärande2008Ingår i: Utsikter, insikter, avsikter: universitetspedagogisk konferens i Umeå 27 – 28 februari 2007 / [ed] Mohammad Fazlhashemi och Thomas Fritz, Umeå: Universitetspedagogiskt Centrum, Umeå universitet , 2008, s. 283-292Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    När det hösten 2002 beslutades att införa en helt nätburen kurs i engelska sågs tre aspekter som särskilt utmanande. Man misstänkte att det kunde vara svårt att ge goda förutsättningar för studenterna att utveckla sin analytiska förmåga, att träna upp den muntliga kommunikativa kompetensen och att känna grupptillhörighet. I detta paper diskuteras hur dessa tre utmaningar med relativt enkla medel kunnat mötas, liksom hur den nya pedagogik som utvecklats för de nätburna kurserna i sin tur också influerat den traditionella campusundervisningen.

  • 30.
    Lindgren, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Moderna språk. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier. Engelska.
    Kulturmöten i Ruth Prawer Jhabvalas Travelers1996Ingår i: Villfarelsens blick: Essäer om resan som kultur, Symposion, Stockholm , 1996Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 31.
    Lindgren, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Moderna språk. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Male Explorers and Eccentric Creatures: Identities in Mary Kingsley’s Travels in West Africa1997Ingår i: From Runes to Romance: A Festschrift for Gunnar Persson on his Sixtieth Birthday, Swedish Science Press, Uppsala , 1997Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 32.
    Lindgren, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Moderna språk. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    The Second Journey: Travelling in Literary Footsteps2000Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In a time dominated by mass tourism and the search for what has been termed authenticity, travel narratives are again of academic interest. This study seeks to demonstrate how travel writers from the 1980s and 1990s increasingly turn to earlier texts for inspiration and guidance. The first texts, in this sense, work as both theoretical and practical maps for the second traveller who aims to emulate the experiences of the first traveller. The past is thus seen as a repository for authentic experiences.

    I outline the developments within travel, tourism and travel writing, in part to show that the arguments in this study stem from a number of academic fields, in part to account for the events and ideas leading up to the second journey narratives. The authenticity sought by second journey writers and tourists is defined as residing primarily in the past, and I discuss several strategies the writers employ to attain this desired authenticity: intertextuality being one of them. By referring to and quoting from the earlier text, a sense of authenticity is achieved. I also discuss issues of heroism, home, recognitions and disappointments.

    This study includes three case studies that illuminate different forms and aspects of second journeys. The first form shows how the scientific and adventurous journey has been seen as a predominantly male endeavour. Robert Falcon Scott, Robert Swan and Roger Mear's texts serve as examples here. The second form focuses on the solitary, female traveller, exemplified in texts by Mary Kingsley and Caroline Alexander. The third and final form demonstrates how the second journey can be used in biographical projects, using Robert Louis Stevenson and Nicholas Rankin as cases in point.

    Differences and similarities between these three forms, such as what kind of authenticity is desired and how the traveller goes about achieving it, how the writer uses the intertextual element, gender differences and shifting themes finally reveal that the travel text remains of current interest and that it can be developed in several ways to breathe new life into the genre of travel writing, despite critics' claims that there are no thoroughly authentic places left to travel to.

  • 33.
    Wintersparv, Spoke
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Sullivan, Kirk P. H.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Lindgren Leavenworth, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Teaching fiction in the age of measurability: Teachers’ perspectives on the hows and whats in Swedish L1 classrooms2019Ingår i: L1 Educational Studies in Language and Literature, ISSN 1578-6617, Vol. 19Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have shown a slow but steady change in reading habits among students in Swedish upper secondary schools. The frequency with which they read fiction on a daily basis has decreased and reading comprehension has declined. Consequently, Swedish politicians and school authorities have taken measures to reverse these trends. Fiction reading has traditionally been a part of the Swedish subject, but whereas the course syllabi in the upper secondary school stipulate that fiction be taught, they pay little attention to how. This study examines how teachers describe the process of literary education. In doing so, it suggests that monitoring students is central to teachers’ didactic decisions, and that both teachers and students regard printed books more highly than both audiobooks and e-books. The data was collected using two focus groups interviews with upper secondary school teachers of Swedish, seven female and five male, age 28 to 61. The analysis was grounded in a phenomenographic examination of experience, allowing themes to emerge through iterative coding. The findings show that the teachers’ view on literary education is associated with instrumentality and teacher-centered activities—the discussions circled around practical aspects, with no mention of teaching objectives, approaches, or literary experience.

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