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Eriksson, Liselotte
Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Stanfors, M., Karlsson, T., Andersson, L.-F. & Liselotte, E. (2024). Between voluntarism and compulsion: membership in mutual health insurance societies in Swedish manufacturing, c. 1900. Economic history review, 77(1), 244-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Between voluntarism and compulsion: membership in mutual health insurance societies in Swedish manufacturing, c. 1900
2024 (English)In: Economic history review, ISSN 0013-0117, E-ISSN 1468-0289, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 244-267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Membership in mutual health insurance societies spread among industrial workers in the late nineteenth century. We study determinants of such membership among male workers in Swedish manufacturing by using matched employer–employee data from three industries covering all workers (i.e. members and non-members, N > 12 000) and firms around 1900. We find remarkably high rates of membership overall, and especially among married workers. The association between marital status and health insurance suggests that selection into health insurance societies was ‘propitious’ rather than ‘adverse’. Many workers became members well before the age of 40 years, when their health began to deteriorate, and this coincided with the average age of first marriage for men, occurring in their late twenties. Being married and having membership was more marked in firms with voluntary membership and was important for the viability of the mix of voluntary and compulsory health insurance societies emerging in Nordic countries around 1900. Findings support the idea that health insurance can attract high levels of membership under voluntary schemes and suggest why it took so long before statutory health insurance covering sickness absence and workplace accidents was introduced in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
linear probability models, manufacturing industry, matched employer–employee data, mutual health insurance, Poisson regression models, Sweden
National Category
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212082 (URN)10.1111/ehr.13271 (DOI)001018082500001 ()2-s2.0-85163702261 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-01864
Available from: 2023-07-17 Created: 2023-07-17 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. F. & Liselotte, E. (2023). Household risk strategies during a pandemic – experiences from the 1918 influenza pandemic. Scandinavian Economic History Review, 71(1), 36-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Household risk strategies during a pandemic – experiences from the 1918 influenza pandemic
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 36-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2020, The COVID-19 crisis has put great pressure on the economy worldwide. Only time can tell whether the COVID-19 crisis will have permanent effects on corporate and household behaviour and how it will affect society at large. This article examines historical experiences of how households managed the financial consequences of rising mortality during the 1918 influenza pandemic. We find that the previous pandemic led to an immediate and major increase in primarily small-sum industrial life insurance policies designed for blue-collar workers. The increase in new policies did not, however, have a lasting effect. By the time the pandemic had faded, the number of policies had dropped to below pre-pandemic conditions. This historical experience underlines the fact that there are limits to the extent to which even a major shock, such as a pandemic, can lead to behavioural change among households as currently being predicted in relation to COVID-19.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Pandemic, household, insurance
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188928 (URN)10.1080/03585522.2021.1984294 (DOI)000711783500001 ()2-s2.0-85118272129 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0028
Available from: 2021-10-27 Created: 2021-10-27 Last updated: 2023-07-13Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. F., Liselotte, E. & Harris, B. (2023). Morbidity among working class men and women in early twentieth century Sweden. Umeå: Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Morbidity among working class men and women in early twentieth century Sweden
2023 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates gendered morbidity patterns by employing micro data derived from sickness records and membership ledgers on working class men and women in the early 20th century Sweden. We find that the main reason for gendered morbidity differences - that woman faced fewer, but longer sickness episodes than men – reflects gendered productive and reproductive activities. Men suffered from the large number of work-place accidents as workers in the production sector, while women faced major risks due to pregnancy, childbearing and related sickness. Women also suffered more from for diseases of the blood, diseases of the digestive & metabolic system and diseases the genitourinary than men. Both men and women faced shorter, but longer, sickness episodes in urban areas attributed to the underlying differences in morbidity causes during the epidemiological transition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2023. p. 40
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2023:30
Keywords
Social insurance, Health insurance, Accident insurance, Self-insurance, workplace accident, mutual aid, employers’ welfare
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-217487 (URN)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0028
Available from: 2023-12-05 Created: 2023-12-05 Last updated: 2024-04-02Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. F., Liselotte, E. & Lilljegren, J. (2023). Pre-welfare state provision and adverse selection: enrolment in a Swedish nationwide health insurance society. Financial History Review, 30(1), 74-99
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-welfare state provision and adverse selection: enrolment in a Swedish nationwide health insurance society
2023 (English)In: Financial History Review, ISSN 0968-5650, E-ISSN 1474-0052, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 74-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mutual benefit societies evolved as the major provider for sickness, accident and life insurance in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries on both sides of the Atlantic. One of the major problems facing insurers was the risk of adverse selection, i.e. that unhealthy individuals had more incentives than healthy individuals to insure when priced for the average risk. By empirically examining whether longevity among insured individuals in a nationwide mutual health society was different from a matched sample of uninsured individuals, we seek to identify the presence of adverse selection. We find no compelling evidence showing that unhealthy individuals were more likely to insure, or reasons to believe that problems related to adverse selection would have been a major reason for government intervention in the health insurance market in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2023
Keywords
adverse selection, mutual benefit societies, life insurance, Sweden, health insurance societies
National Category
Economic History Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201599 (URN)10.1017/s0968565022000130 (DOI)000897820500001 ()2-s2.0-85162269467 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0028
Available from: 2022-12-12 Created: 2022-12-12 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. F., Liselotte, E. & Harris, B. (2022). Did statutory insurance improve the welfare of Swedish workers?: The statutory workplace accident insurance act of 1916. Labor history, 63, 210-233
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Did statutory insurance improve the welfare of Swedish workers?: The statutory workplace accident insurance act of 1916
2022 (English)In: Labor history, ISSN 0023-656X, E-ISSN 1469-9702, Vol. 63, p. 210-233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Welfare researchers have regarded statutory accident insurance in 1916 as a starting point for the exceptional expansion of the Swedish welfare state. However, rather less attention has been paid to the roles played by mutual insurance societies and employer compensation schemes in offering voluntary welfare protection. We argue that voluntary welfare protection was an integral part of the early-twentieth century welfare system and played a crucial role in protecting workers in the case of sickness and accident. We also examine the limitations of these arrangements and explore the ways in which the design of the statutory scheme ensured that there was a continuing role for voluntary provision after the new Act came into operation. We also explore the impact of the scheme on wage levels, and show how its introduction eroded the wage premiums which had previously been earned by workers in high-risk industries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Social insurance, health insurance, accident insurance, self-insurance, workplace accident, mutual aid, employers’ welfare
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-195641 (URN)10.1080/0023656x.2022.2070734 (DOI)000804655300001 ()2-s2.0-85131370541 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-01864Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0028
Available from: 2022-06-02 Created: 2022-06-02 Last updated: 2022-11-28Bibliographically approved
Liselotte, E., Junkka, J., Sandström, G. & Vikström, L. (2022). Supply or demand? Institutionalization of the mentally ill in the emerging Swedish welfare state, 1900–59. History of Psychiatry, 33(2), 180-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supply or demand? Institutionalization of the mentally ill in the emerging Swedish welfare state, 1900–59
2022 (English)In: History of Psychiatry, ISSN 0957-154X, E-ISSN 1740-2360, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 180-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historical studies on the institutionalization of the mentally ill have primarily relied on data for institutionalized patients rather than the population at risk. Consequently, the underlying factors of institutionalization are unclear. Using Swedish longitudinal microdata from 1900–59 reporting mental disorders, we examine whether supply factors, such as distance to institutions and number of asylum beds, influenced the risk of institutionalization, in addition to demand factors such as access to family. Institutionalization risks were associated with the supply of beds and proximity to an asylum, but also dependent on families’ unmet demand for care of relatives. As the supply of mental care met this family-driven demand in the 1930s, the relative risk of institutionalization increased among those lacking family networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Asylum, confinement, institutionalization, mental illness, Sweden, 20th century
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Historical Demography; History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-195005 (URN)10.1177/0957154x221084976 (DOI)000798273900004 ()2-s2.0-85130323789 (Scopus ID)
Projects
MAW 2019.0003 / Risks and Loads from Disabilities and Later Life Outcomes
Available from: 2022-05-19 Created: 2022-05-19 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. F., Liselotte, E. & Nystedt, P. (2022). Workplace accidents and workers solidarity: mutual health insurance in early twentieth-century Sweden. Economic history review, 75(1), 203-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workplace accidents and workers solidarity: mutual health insurance in early twentieth-century Sweden
2022 (English)In: Economic history review, ISSN 0013-0117, E-ISSN 1468-0289, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 203-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the industrialization period, the rate of workplace-related accidents increased. Because of the lack of public insurance, mutual health insurance societies became the main providers of workplace accident insurance among workers. Due to large differences in accident risk, health insurance societies were potentially exposed to the risk of adverse selection, since they employed equal pricing for all members regardless of risk profile. This article investigates the impact of workplace accident risk on health insurance selection and outcomes. We employ household budget surveys encompassing urban workers in Sweden during the early twentieth century. We find evidence for a redistribution from low- to high-risk-exposed workers, as workplace accident risk had a significant and positive impact on receiving health insurance benefits, also when controlling for a variety of factors. Workers exposed to greater risks in the workplace were more likely to have health insurance but did not pay higher premiums. The redistribution from low- to high-risk-exposed workers was largely accepted and viewed as an act of solidarity between workers. Given that health insurance societies were aware of this redistribution, we argue for the presence of informed, rather than adverse, selection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186131 (URN)10.1111/ehr.13088 (DOI)000670712900001 ()2-s2.0-85109616410 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilMarianne and Marcus Wallenberg FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareThe Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation
Available from: 2021-07-14 Created: 2021-07-14 Last updated: 2024-04-02Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. F., Liselotte, E. & Lilljegren, J. (2021). Adverse selection in mutual benefit societies: an longitudinal approach. Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adverse selection in mutual benefit societies: an longitudinal approach
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Mutual benefit societies evolved as the major provider for illness, accident and burialinsurance in the late 19 th and early 20 th century in the Western world. One of themajor problems facing the insurers was the risk for adverse selection; that unhealthyindividuals had more incentive then healthy to insure when priced for the averagerisk. By empirically examine if the longevity among insured in mutual benefit societieswas different from uninsured, we seek to identify the presence of adverse section. Wefind no compelling evidence that unhealthy individuals was more likely to insure, orreasons to believe that adverse selection was behind the decline of mutual benefitsocieties in the twentieth century.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå universitet, 2021
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2021:6
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Population studies; Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181601 (URN)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0028
Available from: 2021-03-18 Created: 2021-03-18 Last updated: 2024-04-02Bibliographically approved
Liselotte, E., Junkka, J., Sandström, G. & Vikström, L. (2021). Supply or demand?: Institutionalization of the mentally ill in the emerging Swedish welfare state, 1900–1959. Umeå
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supply or demand?: Institutionalization of the mentally ill in the emerging Swedish welfare state, 1900–1959
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Historical studies on the institutionalization of the mentally ill have primarily relied on data on institutionalized patients rather than the population at risk. Consequently, the underlying factors of institutionalization are unclear. Using Swedish longitudinal microdata from 1900–1959 reporting mental disorders, we examine whether supply-side factors such as distance to institutions and number of asylum beds influenced the risk of institutionalization, in addition to demand-side factors such as access to family. Institutionalization risks were associated with the supply of beds and proximity to an asylum, but also dependent on families’ unmet demand for care of relatives. As the supply of mental care met this family-driven demand in the 1930s, the relative risk of institutionalization increased among those lacking family networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2021. p. 45
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2021:10
Keywords
Institutionalization, Sweden, mental illness, asylum, confinement
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186374 (URN)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125
Available from: 2021-07-25 Created: 2021-07-25 Last updated: 2021-07-26Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. F. & Liselotte, E. (2020). Household risk strategies during a pandemic: Experiences from the 1918 influenza pandemic. Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Household risk strategies during a pandemic: Experiences from the 1918 influenza pandemic
2020 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The corona crisis has during the year 2020 put large pressure on the economy. Only time can tell whether the corona crisis will have permanent effects on corporate and household behaviour and how it will affect society at large. This article examines historical experiences of how households managed the financial consequences of the rising mortality during the 1918 influenza pandemic. We find that the pandemic led to an immediate and major increase in primarily industrial life insurance policies on small sums designed for blue-collar workers. The increase in new policies did however not have a lasting effect. When the pandemic had faded over, the number of policies had dropped to bellow pre-pandemic conditions. This historical experience underlines that there are limits to the extent to which even a major shock, such as a pandemic, can lead to the kinds of behavioural change on which recent policies have been predicated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå University, 2020
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2020:3
National Category
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-176020 (URN)
Available from: 2020-10-16 Created: 2020-10-16 Last updated: 2020-10-19Bibliographically approved
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