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Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Axelsson, P., Sköld, P. & Sköld, G. (2021). Disruptions and diversions: the demographic consequences of natural disasters in sparsely populated areas. In: Dávid Karácsonyi, Andrew Taylor & Deanne Bird (Ed.), The demography of disasters: impacts for population and place (pp. 81-99). Cham: Springer
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Disruptions and diversions: the demographic consequences of natural disasters in sparsely populated areas
Vise andre…
2021 (engelsk)Inngår i: The demography of disasters: impacts for population and place / [ed] Dávid Karácsonyi, Andrew Taylor & Deanne Bird, Cham: Springer, 2021, s. 81-99Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

The Eight Ds model (Carson and Carson 2014) explains the unique characteristics of human and economic geography for sparsely populated areas (SPAs) as disconnected, discontinuous, diverse, detailed, dynamic, distant, dependent and delicate. According to the model, SPAs are subject to dramatic changes in demographic characteristics that result from both identifiable black swan events and less apparent tipping points in longer-term processes of demographic change (Carson et al. 2011). The conceptual foundations for this assertion are clear. Populations in SPAs can experience large and long-term impacts on the overall demographic structureas a result of decisions by a relatively small number of people. High levels of migration and mobility cause constant shifts in the demographic profile and prime SPAs to adapt to many different demographic states (Carson and Carson 2014). The Northern Territory of Australia, for example, experienced previously unseen waves of pre-retirement aged migrants in the past decade or so (Martel et al. 2013) as evidence of detailed but important changes to past trends. However, while dramatic demographic changes are conceptually possible and occasionally observable, there have been few attempts to examine the conditions under which such changes are likely to occur or not to occur. This is an important question particularly in relation to black swan events such as natural disasters because effective disaster management policy and planning is at least partially dependent on understanding who is affected and in what ways (Bird et al. 2013). 

The purpose of this chapter, therefore, is to begin the process of identifying the conditions under which dramatic demographic responses to natural disasters in SPAs might occur. In the process, we introduce two new 'Ds' with which to describe the nature of demographic change. We propose that natural disasters such as cyclones, floods, earthquakes, bushfires, landslides, avalanches and crop failures present the potential to disrupt or to divert demographic development.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Cham: Springer, 2021
Emneord
Flood, Cyclone, Famine, Sparsely populated, Eight Ds
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-175304 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-49920-4_5 (DOI)2-s2.0-85144145452 (Scopus ID)9783030499198 (ISBN)9783030499204 (ISBN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2020-09-24 Laget: 2020-09-24 Sist oppdatert: 2023-10-25bibliografisk kontrollert
Axelsson, P., Sköld, P. & Röver, C. (2019). Ethnic identity and resource rights in Sweden. In: E. Carina H. Keskitalo (Ed.), The politics of Arctic resources: change and continuity in the "Old North" of Northern Europe (pp. 119-139). London: Routledge
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Ethnic identity and resource rights in Sweden
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: The politics of Arctic resources: change and continuity in the "Old North" of Northern Europe / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, London: Routledge, 2019, s. 119-139Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Chapter 7 differs from the previous chapters, focusing on Sami issues as both an area of policy and as having implications for the reindeer husbandry sector (in Sweden pre-eminently and by regulation Sami-based). The chapter illustrates how changes from early Swedish policy respecting Sami rights shifted with external influences (or discourse) that aimed to separate the indigenous population from others. Concurrent policy changes since then have placed large groups outside the defined Sami group at each point in time, made the Sami out to be a more unitary and profession-based (reindeer husbandry) group than they actually are, and even prohibited the general population from taking part in reindeer herding (although this prohibition continues to be disregarded in some places to this day). Thereby, the chapter illustrates how present conflicts can be seen as resulting from policy legacies instituted based on assumptions made in the 1800s.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
London: Routledge, 2019
Serie
Transforming environmental politics and policy
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
historia
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160229 (URN)10.4324/9781315174969-7 (DOI)9781138040601 (ISBN)9781351705349 (ISBN)
Prosjekter
Knut och Alice Wallenberg MAW 2012.0222
Forskningsfinansiär
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-06-15 Laget: 2019-06-15 Sist oppdatert: 2021-06-10bibliografisk kontrollert
Sköld, P. (2018). The meeting of the Social and Human Working Group of IASC (SHWG). The Polar Journal, 8(2), 422-424
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The meeting of the Social and Human Working Group of IASC (SHWG)
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, Vol. 8, nr 2, s. 422-424Artikkel i tidsskrift, Editorial material (Annet vitenskapelig) Published
sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Routledge, 2018
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169130 (URN)10.1080/2154896X.2018.1544403 (DOI)2-s2.0-85057219012 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2020-03-20 Laget: 2020-03-20 Sist oppdatert: 2023-03-24bibliografisk kontrollert
Sköld, P. (2017). The Health Transition: A Challenge to Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic. In: Latola, K.; Savela, H. (Ed.), The Interconnected Arctic: UArctic Congress 2016. Paper presented at UArctic Congress, St. Petersburg, Russia, 12-16 September, 2016 (pp. 107-113). Paper presented at UArctic Congress, St. Petersburg, Russia, 12-16 September, 2016. Springer
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The Health Transition: A Challenge to Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic
2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: The Interconnected Arctic: UArctic Congress 2016, Springer, 2017, s. 107-113Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Good health and well-being is one of the most important sustainability goals of today. Unfortunately the goal faces many challenges that show an uneven distribution of health improvements, and of life-expectancy. This is a global problem, but also a specific threat to vast parts of the Arctic. Furthermore there is a strong correlation between climate change and health risks. On top of these challenges are disfavoured indigenous peoples, globally and in the Arctic. This chapter deals with health encounters in the North, with a focus on the Swedish health care organization, Sami health and research efforts.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Springer, 2017
Serie
Springer Polar Sciences, ISSN 2510-0475, E-ISSN 2510-0483
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163056 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-57532-2_11 (DOI)000469281900011 ()2-s2.0-85136415765 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-57531-5 (ISBN)978-3-319-57532-2 (ISBN)
Konferanse
UArctic Congress, St. Petersburg, Russia, 12-16 September, 2016
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-10-03 Laget: 2019-10-03 Sist oppdatert: 2023-10-17bibliografisk kontrollert
Bergkvist, P. H., Jacobsson, L., Kling, S., Silviken, A., Sköld, P. & Stoor, J. P. (2016). Breaking the silence: suicide prevention through storytelling among indigenous Sami. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 75, 56-56
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Breaking the silence: suicide prevention through storytelling among indigenous Sami
Vise andre…
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 75, s. 56-56Artikkel i tidsskrift, Meeting abstract (Fagfellevurdert) Published
sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2016
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134313 (URN)10.3402/ijch.v75.33200 (DOI)000396153800158 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2017-04-28 Laget: 2017-04-28 Sist oppdatert: 2018-06-09bibliografisk kontrollert
Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Porter, R., Yoshida Ahlin, C. & Sköld, P. (2016). Decline, Adaptation or Transformation: New Perspectives on Demographic Change in Resource Peripheries in Australia and Sweden. Comparative Population Studies, 41(3-4), 1-29
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Decline, Adaptation or Transformation: New Perspectives on Demographic Change in Resource Peripheries in Australia and Sweden
Vise andre…
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: Comparative Population Studies, ISSN 1869-8980, E-ISSN 1869-8999, Vol. 41, nr 3-4, s. 1-29Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Many sparsely populated resource peripheries in developed countries are perceived to suffer from periods of demographic decline due to loss of employment opportunities and services, youth out-migration and population ageing. While these trends tend to apply at broad regional scales and for particular time periods, diverse patterns of demographic change may be apparent if different spatial, temporal and social scales of analysis are taken into consideration. Comparing the experiences of two case study regions in northern Sweden and inland South Australia, this paper proposes an alternative conceptual framework to the ‘discourse of decline’, which could be used to examine the nuances of demographic change within resource peripheries. The framework includes spatial scale considerations that contrast broader regional demographic patterns with the experiences of sub-regions and individual settlements. It also includes temporal scale aspects, examining demographic change over different time periods to understand the pace, duration and frequency of population growth and decline. The framework finally includes social unit considerations, emphasising that demographic change affects different social groups in different ways. The results of the case studies suggest that considering demographic change as adaptation or transformation rather than decline may be more useful for identifying new – and qualitatively different – demographic pathways that emerge over time. 

Emneord
demographic decline; resource peripheries; population ageing; youth out-migration; female flight
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131123 (URN)10.12765/CPoS-2016-11en (DOI)000394693600003 ()2-s2.0-85018342663 (Scopus ID)881251 (Lokal ID)881251 (Arkivnummer)881251 (OAI)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-260
Tilgjengelig fra: 2017-02-06 Laget: 2017-02-06 Sist oppdatert: 2023-05-02bibliografisk kontrollert
Anderson, I., Robson, B., Connolly, M., Al-Yaman, F., Bjertness, E., King, A., . . . Yap, L. (2016). Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study. The Lancet, 388(10040), 131-157
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study
Vise andre…
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, nr 10040, s. 131-157Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark populations, but have been restricted in their coverage of countries or the range of health indicators. Our objective is to describe the health and social status of Indigenous and tribal peoples relative to benchmark populations from a sample of countries.

Methods: Collaborators with expertise in Indigenous health data systems were identified for each country. Data were obtained for population, life expectancy at birth, infant mortality, low and high birthweight, maternal mortality, nutritional status, educational attainment, and economic status. Data sources consisted of governmental data, data from non-governmental organisations such as UNICEF, and other research. Absolute and relative differences were calculated.

Findings: Our data (23 countries, 28 populations) provide evidence of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous peoples than for non-Indigenous populations. However, this is not uniformly the case, and the size of the rate difference varies. We document poorer outcomes for Indigenous populations for: life expectancy at birth for 16 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1 year in 15 populations; infant mortality rate for 18 of 19 populations with a rate difference greater than one per 1000 livebirths in 16 populations; maternal mortality in ten populations; low birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in three populations; high birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in one population; child malnutrition for ten of 16 populations with a difference greater than 10% in five populations; child obesity for eight of 12 populations with a difference greater than 5% in four populations; adult obesity for seven of 13 populations with a difference greater than 10% in four populations; educational attainment for 26 of 27 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 24 populations; and economic status for 15 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 14 populations.

Interpretation: We systematically collated data across a broader sample of countries and indicators than done in previous studies. Taking into account the UN Sustainable Development Goals, we recommend that national governments develop targeted policy responses to Indigenous health, improving access to health services, and Indigenous data within national surveillance systems.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2016
Emneord
Indigenous health, Population health
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
epidemiologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124249 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(16)00345-7 (DOI)000379269200030 ()27108232 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84982859363 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Wallenberg Academy FellowsSwedish Research Council, 2012-5490
Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-08-02 Laget: 2016-07-29 Sist oppdatert: 2023-03-23bibliografisk kontrollert
Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Nordin, G. & Sköld, P. (2016). Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden. Energy Research & Social Science, 16, 13-24
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 16, s. 13-24Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent research has identified a series of human geography impacts of natural resource developments in sparsely populated areas like the Arctic. These impacts can be mapped to the 'resource cycle', and arise from periods of population growth and decline, changing patterns of human migration and mobility, changing patterns of settlement, and changes in the demographic 'balance' between males and females, young and old, Indigenous and non-Indigenous. This paper examines the applicability of the resource cycle model in the case of hydro energy development in the Jokkmokk municipality of Sweden. Using quantitative demographic data, media reports, and contemporary accounts of hydro development, the paper describes the human geography of Jokkmokk since the late 19th century. The paper concludes that changes in human geography in Jokkmokk mirror what has been observed in regions dependent on non-renewable resources, although it is difficult to distinguish many impacts from those that might have occurred under alternative development scenarios. The paper identifies a 'settlement cycle' with phases of integrated and separated habitation for populations specifically associated with the development. Settlement dynamics, and the impacts of hydro on Sami geography are areas for further research.

Emneord
hydropower, resource cycle, staples thesis, human geography, Arctic
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118369 (URN)10.1016/j.erss.2016.03.003 (DOI)000379436100003 ()2-s2.0-84961114029 (Scopus ID)881251 (Lokal ID)881251 (Arkivnummer)881251 (OAI)
Prosjekter
Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development (www.mistraarctic.se)
Merknad

Ett corrigendum har publicerats för den här artikeln: / A corrigendum for this article has been published:

Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Nordin, G., & Skold, P. (2017). Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden (vol 16, pg 13, 2016). Energy Research & Social Science, 28, 109-109. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2017.05.021

Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-03-17 Laget: 2016-03-17 Sist oppdatert: 2023-05-02bibliografisk kontrollert
Axelsson, P., Sköld, P. & Tano, S. (2016). Sweden: the Sami. In: Kate Silburn, Hannah Reich & Ian Anderson (Ed.), A global snapshot of indigenous and tribal peoples' health: the Lancet–Lowitja Institute collaboration (pp. 46-47). Carlton South, Victoria, Australia: The Lowitja Institute
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Sweden: the Sami
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: A global snapshot of indigenous and tribal peoples' health: the Lancet–Lowitja Institute collaboration / [ed] Kate Silburn, Hannah Reich & Ian Anderson, Carlton South, Victoria, Australia: The Lowitja Institute , 2016, , s. 2s. 46-47Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Carlton South, Victoria, Australia: The Lowitja Institute, 2016. s. 2
Emneord
Indigenous health, Sami Health, Lowitja, Sweden
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
epidemiologi; folkhälsa
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130354 (URN)978-1-921889-50-9 (ISBN)
Forskningsfinansiär
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Tilgjengelig fra: 2017-01-18 Laget: 2017-01-18 Sist oppdatert: 2018-09-11bibliografisk kontrollert
Carson, D. B., Sköld, P., Carson, D. A. & Nilsson, L. M. (2016). The local demography of resource economies: long term implications of natural resource industries for demographic development in sparsely populated areas. In: Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Gertrude Saxinger (Ed.), Settlements at the edge: remote human settlements in developed nations (pp. 357-378). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The local demography of resource economies: long term implications of natural resource industries for demographic development in sparsely populated areas
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: Settlements at the edge: remote human settlements in developed nations / [ed] Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Gertrude Saxinger, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, s. 357-378Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Settlements at the Edge examines the evolution, characteristics, functions and shifting economic basis of settlements in sparsely populated areas of developed nations. With a focus on demographic change, the book features theoretical and applied cases which explore the interface between demography, economy, well-being and the environment. This book offers a comprehensive and insightful knowledge base for understanding the role of population in shaping the development and histories of northern sparsely populated areas of developed nations including Alaska (USA), Australia, Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Finland and other nations with territories within the Arctic Circle.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016
Serie
New Horizons in Regional Science series
Emneord
natural resources, industries, mines, demography, settlement
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
grekiska
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126012 (URN)2-s2.0-85016353374 (Scopus ID)881251 (Lokal ID)9781784711955 (ISBN)9781784711962 (ISBN)881251 (Arkivnummer)881251 (OAI)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-09-26 Laget: 2016-09-26 Sist oppdatert: 2024-02-21bibliografisk kontrollert
Prosjekter
Barentsregionen - en transnationell historia om det subarktiska norra Europa [2015-1715_Formas]; Umeå universitet; Publikasjoner
Gubolev, A., Kiselev, A., Rönnqvist, C., Salo, M. & Tjelmeland, H. (2015). 5. The impact of World War II. In: Lars Elenius (Ed.), The Barents region: a transnational history of subarctic Northern Europe (pp. 304-334). Oslo: Pax
Organisasjoner
Identifikatorer
ORCID-id: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5762-949x