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Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Fernandez, V., Giordano, Y. & Hällgren, M. (2024). Actualizing novel trajectories: chronological and kairotic improvisations. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 32(1), Article ID e12514.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Actualizing novel trajectories: chronological and kairotic improvisations
2024 (English)In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973, Vol. 32, no 1, article id e12514Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of first responders during extreme crisis events consists of improvising under time pressure to retain control of the unfolding situation and mitigate harmful effects to help organizations restore their 'normal' functioning. This pervasive view of crises as cosmologic events obscures their transformational dimension and their long-term positive outcomes. In this article, we explore how actors respond to time pressure and vital stakes while identifying and actualizing a novel trajectory. They improvise to overcome limitations, create, and enact a desirable future to seize an opportunity that arises due to unexpected surprises. We argue that the actualization of novel trajectories relies on a combination of the enactment of a duplicate temporality that combines the chronological time-pressure of the unfolding event and kairotic time, in which critical decisions and actions actualize the desired future. Our contributions to the crisis management literature are twofold. First, we conceptualize chronological and kairotic improvisation practices to acknowledge that crisis response is not only about acting quickly but also about doing the right thing at the right time. Second, we shed light on crises as 'cosmologic' events, showing that they can be a point of origin for long-term positive outcomes. Finally, we advocate for a deeper and fine-grained consideration of time and temporality to advance crisis management studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
cosmogonic event, crisis management, improvisation, temporality, transformation processof crisis
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215776 (URN)10.1111/1468-5973.12514 (DOI)001090942200001 ()2-s2.0-85174596898 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-25 Created: 2023-10-25 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Fernandez, V. (2023). Compétence collective et tensions de rôle, un portrait en clair-obscur: [Collective competence and role strain: a nuanced portrait]. @GRH, 45(4), 13-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compétence collective et tensions de rôle, un portrait en clair-obscur: [Collective competence and role strain: a nuanced portrait]
2023 (French)In: @GRH, ISSN 2034-9130, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 13-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [fr]

La construction de la compétence collective à la faveur des leviers traditionnels de GRH et plus largement des leviers institués est aujourd’hui admise dans la littérature. Dans ce papier, nous concentrons notre attention sur la manière dont la hiérarchie mobilise ces leviers. Dans la lignée des travaux les plus récents qui s’intéressent aux facteurs qui transforment, dissolvent ou limitent la compétence collective, nous étudions le levier de composition d’équipe et les tensions de rôle qu’elles génèrent. Nous examinons le cas du PGHM de Chamonix, organisation militaire de secours en montagne, pour comprendre quels effets, positifs et négatifs, les tensions de rôle induites par la hiérarchie produisent sur le développement de la compétence collective. Nos résultats en clair-obscur, tendent à nuancer l’effet néfaste des tensions de rôle, permettent d’identifier de nouveaux facteurs d’émergence de la compétence collective et proposent une articulation entre ambiguïté et conflit de rôle.

Abstract [en]

The construction of collective competence using traditional HRM levers and more broadly instituted levers is now accepted in the literature. In this paper, we focus our attention on how the hierarchy mobilizes these levers. In line with the most recent works that focus on the factors that transform, dissolve, or limit collective competence, we study the lever of team composition and the role strain it generates. We examine the case of the PGHM in Chamonix, a military mountain rescue organization, to understand what effects, positive and negative, role strain caused by hierarchy has on the development and maintenance of collective competence. Our nuanced results aim to elaborate on the harmful effect of role strain, identify new factors for the emergence of collective competence, and suggest a connection between ambiguity and role conflict.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bruxelles: de boeck duculot, 2023
Keywords
Collective competence, Role strain, Hierarchy, Team composition, Compétence collective, Tensions de rôle, Hiérarchie, Compostion d'Équipe
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-207682 (URN)10.3917/grh.045.0013 (DOI)
Note

Article available in Frensh and in English. 

Available from: 2023-04-27 Created: 2023-04-27 Last updated: 2023-10-26Bibliographically approved
Fernandez, V., Jané, S. & Hällgren, M. (2022). Shared body puzzles: examining collective embodied sensemaking on the climbing wall. In: : . Paper presented at EGOS 2022, "Organizing: the beauty of imperfection", Vienna, Austra, July 7-9, 2022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shared body puzzles: examining collective embodied sensemaking on the climbing wall
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214729 (URN)
Conference
EGOS 2022, "Organizing: the beauty of imperfection", Vienna, Austra, July 7-9, 2022
Available from: 2023-09-27 Created: 2023-09-27 Last updated: 2023-10-26Bibliographically approved
Jané, S., Fernandez, V. & Hällgren, M. (2022). Shit happens. How do we make sense of that?. Qualitative research in organization and management, 17(4), 425-441
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shit happens. How do we make sense of that?
2022 (English)In: Qualitative research in organization and management, ISSN 1746-5648, E-ISSN 1746-5656, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 425-441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon how encountering trauma unexpectedly in the field informs the doing of fieldwork.

Design/methodology/approach: A reflexive essay approach was adopted to explore traumatic incidents in extreme contexts. Written vignettes, interviews, field notes and information conversations served as the bases for reflections.

Findings: Four themes arose from the reflections (Bracketing, Institutional Pressure, Impact on Research and Unresolvedness). It was suggested that researchers engaged in extreme context research, and management and organization studies scholars engaged in dangerous fieldwork more broadly, are under institutional pressure to continue work that may put themselves in harm's way. Traumatic experiences also shape and reflect the researcher's identity, which informs choices about current and future research projects.

Research limitations/implications: It was suggested that scholars will benefit from reading the accounts of others to reduce the burden of isolation that can accompany traumatic field experiences.

Originality/value: Exploring single traumatic events enabled in engaging with trauma encountered unexpectedly and directly in the field. The reflections reveal the effects of psychological and physical trauma on researchers, and highlight how trauma impacts the research process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2022
Keywords
Extreme contexts, Identity, Reflexive essay, Researcher trauma, Sense-making
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200863 (URN)10.1108/QROM-12-2021-2261 (DOI)000871323700001 ()2-s2.0-85140721118 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-11-14 Created: 2022-11-14 Last updated: 2023-10-26Bibliographically approved
Fernandez, V. (2020). L’émergence de la compétence collective en contextes extrêmes: le cas des équipes de secours en montagne. (Doctoral dissertation). Nice: Université Côte d'Azur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>L’émergence de la compétence collective en contextes extrêmes: le cas des équipes de secours en montagne
2020 (French)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Alternative title[en]
The emergence of collective competence in extreme contexts : the case of mountain rescue teams
Abstract [en]

Risky, emergency or disruptive contexts are all qualifiers used for so-called "extreme" contexts that are usually characterized by uncertainty, time pressure and the presence of risks and / or dangers. Many authors and practitioners believe that they have now become the new normal for many organizations. The first studies that inspired this research consider that accidents are inevitable while others, such as those involving high reliability organizations (military aircraft carriers, professional firefighters) show that some organizations sustain their operation without major accidents, despite working in these contexts. They heavily rely on teamwork: the so-called "extreme action" teams. They are made up of a small number of people with heterogeneous expertise and being immersed in risky environments to achieve the objectives assigned to them. One of the major challenges for such teams is to be able to achieve their goals while preserving their integrity, which raises the question of their ability to work together. To answer it, we drew on the field of human resources, focusing on collective competence. In fact, this theme has undergone constant development, mainly since the mid-2000s. French and English research in this area are quite complementary without necessarily engaging in dialogue with each other. The first are rather focused on the components and conditions for the emergence of collective competence, while the second identifies the performance levers of teamwork. These two fields of research highlight the role played by coordination, implicit and explicit, between actors, communication practices as well as certain traditional levers of human resources management (training, recruitment, remuneration and evaluation) in the construction of this ability to act collectively. They allow the combination of individual expertise necessary for the achievement of the mission to be carried out. They also support progress toward the goal by enabling necessary adaptations related to changes in the mission or in the natural environment. Drawing on these literatures and relying on a single case, our thesis examines the collective competence necessary for the success and reliability of extreme action teams. This research was carried out through the study of an elite mountain rescue unit, the Peloton de Gendarmerie de Haute Montagne (PGHM) in Chamonix. These teams are extreme action teams whose mission is to rescue hikers and mountaineers in the hostile mountain environment. The interviews and observations that we conducted with the PGHM as well as with the Forces Aériennes de Gendarmerie allowed us to understand how the collective competence of these action teams is built and maintained, ensuring both the safety of the members of the the team and the success of mountain rescue operations.

Abstract [fr]

Contextes risqués, d’urgence ou disruptifs sont autant de qualificatifs employés pour les contextes dits « extrêmes » que l’on caractérise habituellement par l’incertitude, la pression temporelle et la présence de risques et/ou de dangers. Nombre d’auteurs et de praticiens estiment qu’ils sont désormais devenus les nouvelles conditions de normalité pour nombre d’organisations. Les premiers travaux ayant inspiré ces recherches considèrent que les accidents sont inéluctables alors que d’autres, comme ceux portant sur les organisations hautement fiables (porte-avions militaires, pompiers professionnels) montrent que certaines organisations travaillant dans de tels contextes opèrent durablement sans accident majeur. Ces dernières mettent notamment en avant le travail d’équipe : celui des équipes dites « d’action extrême ». Elles ont la particularité d’être constituées d’un petit nombre de personnes détentrices d’expertises hétérogènes et d’être immergées dans des environnements risqués pour atteindre les objectifs qui leur sont assignés. L’un des enjeux majeurs pour de telles équipes est de pouvoir atteindre leurs objectifs tout en préservant leur intégrité, ce qui soulève la question de leur capacité à travailler de concert. Pour y répondre, nous avons puisé dans le champ des ressources humaines, en nous intéressant à la compétence collective. En effet, cette thématique connaît un développement constant, essentiellement depuis le milieu des années 2000. Les travaux francophones et anglophones en la matière sont assez complémentaires sans pour autant dialoguer les uns avec les autres. Les premiers sont plutôt centrés sur les composants et les conditions d’émergence de la compétence collective, alors que les seconds identifient les leviers de performance du travail d’équipe. Ces deux champs de recherche mettent en relief le rôle que jouent la coordination, implicite et explicite, entre les acteurs, les pratiques de communication ainsi que certains leviers traditionnels de gestion des ressources humaines (formation, recrutement, rémunération et évaluation) dans la construction de cette capacité à agir collectivement. Ils permettent la combinaison des expertises individuelles nécessaires à la réalisation de la mission à réaliser. Ils soutiennent également la progression vers l’objectif en habilitant les adaptations nécessaires liées aux évolutions de la mission de l’environnement naturel. À partir de ces littératures et d’un cas unique, notre thèse examine la compétence collective nécessaire à la réussite et à la fiabilité des équipes d’action extrême. Cette recherche a été menée au travers de l’étude d’une unité d’élite de secours en montagne, le Peloton de Gendarmerie de Haute Montagne (PGHM) de Chamonix. Ces équipes sont des équipes d’action extrême dont la mission est de porter secours à des randonneurs et des alpinistes, dans le milieu hostile qu’est la montagne. Les entretiens et observations que nous avons menés auprès du PGHM ainsi qu’auprès des Forces Aériennes de Gendarmerie nous ont permis de comprendre comment se construit et se maintient la compétence collective de ces équipes d’action, garantissant à la fois la sécurité des membres de l’équipe et la réussite des opérations de secours en montagne.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nice: Université Côte d'Azur, 2020. p. 401
Keywords
Collective competence, extreme contexts, qualitative study, Contextes extrêmes, Compétence collective
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-207683 (URN)
Public defence
2020-12-10, Nice, 14:00 (French)
Supervisors
Available from: 2023-05-26 Created: 2023-04-27 Last updated: 2023-10-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7969-3441

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