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Kaelin, V. C., Saluja, S., Bosak, D. L., Anaby, D., Werler, M. & Khetani, M. A. (2024). Caregiver strategies supporting community participation among children and youth with or at risk for disabilities: a mixed-methods study. Frontiers in Pediatrics , 12, Article ID 1345755.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caregiver strategies supporting community participation among children and youth with or at risk for disabilities: a mixed-methods study
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2024 (English)In: Frontiers in Pediatrics , E-ISSN 2296-2360, Vol. 12, article id 1345755Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The purpose of this mixed-methods study is to examine the role of caregiver strategies to support community participation among children and youth with disabilities and those at risk, from the caregiver perspective. For the quantitative phase, we tested the hypothesized positive effect of participation-focused caregiver strategies on the relationship(s) between participation-related constructs and community participation attendance and involvement. For the qualitative phase, we solicited caregiver perspectives to explain the quantitative findings.

Methods: An explanatory sequential mixed-methods design (QUAN > qual) was used. For the quantitative phase, we conducted secondary analyses of data collected during a second follow-up phase of a longitudinal cohort study, including 260 families of children and youth (mean age: 13.5 years) with disabilities and those at risk [i.e., 120 families of children and youth with craniofacial microsomia (CFM); 140 families of children and youth with other types of childhood-onset disabilities]. Data were collected through the Participation and Environment Measure—Children and Youth, the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, and the Child Behavior Checklist and analyzed using structural equation modeling. For the qualitative phase, we conducted semi-structured interviews with eight caregivers of children and youth with disabilities and those at risk (i.e., three caregivers of children and youth with CFM; five caregivers of children and youth with other childhood-onset disabilities). Interviews were transcribed verbatim and inductively content-analyzed.

Results: Our model reached acceptable to close model fit [CFI = 0.952; RMSEA = 0.068 (90% CI = 0.054–0.082); SRMR = 0.055; TLI = 0.936], revealing no significant effect of the number of participation-focused caregiver strategies on the relationships between participation-related constructs (e.g., activity competence, environment/context) and community participation in terms of attendance and involvement. The qualitative findings revealed three main categories for how caregivers explained these quantitative results: (1) caregiver workload and supports needed for implementing strategies; (2) caregivers careful strategy quality appraisal; and (3) community setting characteristics hindering successful strategy implementation.

Discussion: The findings suggest that the insignificant effect of the number of caregiver strategies may be explained by the intensified need for caregiver effort and support to develop and implement quality strategies that are responsive to community setting characteristics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2024
Keywords
attendance, childhood-onset disability, craniofacial microsomia, involvement, pediatric rehabilitation
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221836 (URN)10.3389/fped.2024.1345755 (DOI)2-s2.0-85186245190 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-03-12 Created: 2024-03-12 Last updated: 2024-03-12Bibliographically approved
Kaelin, V. C. & Peyer, D. (2024). Participation of young people with Down syndrome: moving beyond educating families [Letter to the editor]. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation of young people with Down syndrome: moving beyond educating families
2024 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
National Category
Occupational Therapy Pediatrics
Research subject
Occupational therapy; Rehabilitation Medicine; Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223915 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.15913 (DOI)001202724000001 ()38622781 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85190370048 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-01 Created: 2024-05-01 Last updated: 2024-05-02
Kaelin, V. C., Bosak, D. L., Saluja, S., Newman-Griffis, D., Boyd, A. D. & Khetani, M. A. (2024). Representation of child and youth participation within the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). Disability and Rehabilitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Representation of child and youth participation within the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS)
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2024 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To examine (1) how much participation is represented in the benchmark Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) resource, and (2) to what extent that representation reflects the definition of child and youth participation and/or its related constructs per the family of Participation-Related Constructs framework.

Materials and methods: We searched and analysed UMLS concepts related to the term “participation.” Identified UMLS concepts were rated according to their representation of participation (i.e., attendance, involvement, both) as well as participation-related constructs using deductive content analysis.

Results: 363 UMLS concepts were identified. Of those, 68 had at least one English definition, resulting in 81 definitions that were further analysed. Results revealed 2 definitions (2/81; 3%; 2/68 UMLS concepts) representing participation “attendance” and 18 definitions (18/81; 22%; 14/68 UMLS concepts) representing participation “involvement.” No UMLS concept definition represented both attendance and involvement (i.e., participation). Most of the definitions (11/20; 55%; 9/16 UMLS concepts) representing attendance or involvement also represent a participation-related construct.

Conclusion(s): The representation of participation within the UMLS is limited and poorly aligned with the contemporary definition of child and youth participation. Expanding ontological resources to represent child and youth participation is needed to enable better data analytics that reflect contemporary paediatric rehabilitation practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
rehabilitation, attendance, involvement, health informatics, artificial intelligence, knowledge representation
National Category
Occupational Therapy Information Systems
Research subject
Occupational therapy; Rehabilitation Medicine; health services research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223914 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2024.2338191 (DOI)001200037900001 ()38596871 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85190412833 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-01 Created: 2024-05-01 Last updated: 2024-05-02
Rizk, S., Kaelin, V. C., Sim, J. G., Murphy, N. J., McManus, B. M., Leland, N. E., . . . Khetani, M. A. (2023). Implementing an Electronic Patient-Reported Outcome and Decision Support Tool in Early Intervention. Applied Clinical Informatics, 14(1), 91-107
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementing an Electronic Patient-Reported Outcome and Decision Support Tool in Early Intervention
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2023 (English)In: Applied Clinical Informatics, ISSN 1869-0327, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 91-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the study is to identify and prioritize early intervention (EI) stakeholders' perspectives of supports and barriers to implementing the Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM), an electronic patient-reported outcome (e-PRO) tool, for scaling its implementation across multiple local and state EI programs.

Methods: An explanatory sequential (quan > QUAL) mixed-methods study was conducted with EI families (n = 6), service coordinators (n = 9), and program leadership (n = 7). Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to share select quantitative pragmatic trial results (e.g., percentages for perceived helpfulness of implementation strategies) and elicit stakeholder perspectives to contextualize these results. Three study staff deductively coded transcripts to constructs in the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Data within CFIR constructs were inductively analyzed to generate themes that were rated by national early childhood advisors for their relevance to longer term implementation.

Results: All three stakeholder groups (i.e., families, service coordinators, program leadership) identified thematic supports and barriers across multiple constructs within each of four CFIR domains: (1) Six themes for intervention characteristics, (2) Six themes for process, (3) three themes for inner setting, and (4) four themes for outer setting. For example, all stakeholder groups described the value of the YC-PEM e-PRO in forging connections and eliciting meaningful information about family priorities for efficient service plan development (intervention characteristics). Stakeholders prioritized reaching families with diverse linguistic preferences and user navigation needs, further tailoring its interface with automated data capture and exchange processes (process); and fostering a positive implementation climate (inner setting). Service coordinators and program leadership further articulated the value of YC-PEM e-PRO results for improving EI access (outer setting).

Conclusion: Results demonstrate the YC-PEM e-PRO is an evidence-based intervention that is viable for implementation. Optimizations to its interface are needed before undertaking hybrid type-2 and 3 multisite trials to test these implementation strategies across state and local EI programs with electronic data capture capabilities and diverse levels of organizational readiness and resources for implementation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Georg Thieme Verlag KG, 2023
Keywords
assessment, children, early intervention, facilitators and barriers, family engagement, goal setting, implementation strategies, patient-reported outcomes, Child, Child, Preschool, Electronics, Focus Groups, Humans, Patient Reported Outcome Measures, Qualitative Research, human, information processing, patient-reported outcome, preschool child
National Category
Pediatrics Occupational Therapy Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212678 (URN)10.1055/s-0042-1760631 (DOI)000924719800002 ()36724883 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147235006 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-08 Created: 2023-08-08 Last updated: 2023-08-10Bibliographically approved
Kaelin, V. C., Boyd, A. D., Werler, M. M., Parde, N. & Khetani, M. A. (2023). Natural language processing to classify caregiver strategies supporting participation among children and youth with craniofacial microsomia and other childhood-onset disabilities. Journal of Healthcare Informatics Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Natural language processing to classify caregiver strategies supporting participation among children and youth with craniofacial microsomia and other childhood-onset disabilities
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Healthcare Informatics Research, ISSN 2509-4971, E-ISSN 2509-498XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Customizing participation-focused pediatric rehabilitation interventions is an important but also complex and potentially resource intensive process, which may benefit from automated and simplified steps. This research aimed at applying natural language processing to develop and identify a best performing predictive model that classifies caregiver strategies into participation-related constructs, while filtering out non-strategies. We created a dataset including 1,576 caregiver strategies obtained from 236 families of children and youth (11–17 years) with craniofacial microsomia or other childhood-onset disabilities. These strategies were annotated to four participation-related constructs and a non-strategy class. We experimented with manually created features (i.e., speech and dependency tags, predefined likely sets of words, dense lexicon features (i.e., Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts)) and three classical methods (i.e., logistic regression, naïve Bayes, support vector machines (SVM)). We tested a series of binary and multinomial classification tasks applying 10-fold cross-validation on the training set (80%) to test the best performing model on the held-out test set (20%). SVM using term frequency-inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) was the best performing model for all four classification tasks, with accuracy ranging from 78.10 to 94.92% and a macro-averaged F1-score ranging from 0.58 to 0.83. Manually created features only increased model performance when filtering out non-strategies. Results suggest pipelined classification tasks (i.e., filtering out non-strategies; classification into intrinsic and extrinsic strategies; classification into participation-related constructs) for implementation into participation-focused pediatric rehabilitation interventions like Participation and Environment Measure Plus (PEM+) among caregivers who complete the Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth (PEM-CY). 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
Keywords
pediatric rehabilitation, artificial intelligence, activities, preferences, sense of self, environment
National Category
Occupational Therapy Other Health Sciences Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214632 (URN)10.1007/s41666-023-00149-y (DOI)
Available from: 2023-09-21 Created: 2023-09-21 Last updated: 2023-09-21
Kaelin, V. C., Anaby, D., Werler, M. M. & Khetani, M. A. (2023). School participation among young people with craniofacial microsomia and other childhood-onset disabilities. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School participation among young people with craniofacial microsomia and other childhood-onset disabilities
2023 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim: To examine how school environment, physical functioning problems, and behavioral problems explain levels of school participation (i.e. attendance and involvement) among young people with craniofacial microsomia (CFM) and other childhood-onset disabilities, and whether participation-focused caregiver strategies play a role in these relationships.

Method: We conducted secondary analyses of a subset of data (n = 260 families: 120 with CFM and 140 with other childhood-onset disabilities) from the second follow-up phase of a longitudinal cohort study. We applied structural equation modeling with data collected from the Participation and Environment Measure – Children and Youth version, the Child Behavior Checklist, and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory physical functioning scale.

Results: Model fit was acceptable to close (comparative fit index = 0.973; root mean square error of approximation = 0.055; standardized root mean squared residual = 0.043; Tucker–Lewis index = 0.958). School environmental support had a positive effect on young people's participation attendance and involvement, and physical functioning problems had a negative effect on participation involvement. The number of disclosed caregiver strategies had a significant positive effect on the relationship between school environmental support and school participation attendance.

Interpretation: Findings confirm the effect of school environmental support and physical functioning problems on school participation and highlight the role of participation-focused caregiver strategies to intensify the positive effect of school environmental support on school participation attendance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
Pediatric rehabilitation, adolescence, education, attendance, involvement
National Category
Occupational Therapy Other Health Sciences Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212668 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.15628 (DOI)000980777000001 ()37138446 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85158123804 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-07 Created: 2023-08-07 Last updated: 2023-08-07
Kaelin, V. C., Valizadeh, M., Salgado, Z., Sim, J. G., Anaby, D., Boyd, A. D., . . . Khetani, M. A. (2022). Capturing and operationalizing participation in pediatric re/habilitation research using artificial intelligence: A scoping review. Frontiers in Rehabilitation Sciences, 3, Article ID 855240.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capturing and operationalizing participation in pediatric re/habilitation research using artificial intelligence: A scoping review
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Rehabilitation Sciences, ISSN 2673-6861, Vol. 3, article id 855240Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is increased interest in using artificial intelligence (AI) to provide participation-focused pediatric re/habilitation. Existing reviews on the use of AI in participation-focused pediatric re/habilitation focus on interventions and do not screen articles based on their definition of participation. AI-based assessments may help reduce provider burden and can support operationalization of the construct under investigation. To extend knowledge of the landscape on AI use in participation-focused pediatric re/habilitation, a scoping review on AI-based participation-focused assessments is needed.

Objective: To understand how the construct of participation is captured and operationalized in pediatric re/habilitation using AI.

Methods: We conducted a scoping review of literature published in Pubmed, PsycInfo, ERIC, CINAHL, IEEE Xplore, ACM Digital Library, ProQuest Dissertation and Theses, ACL Anthology, AAAI Digital Library, and Google Scholar. Documents were screened by 2–3 independent researchers following a systematic procedure and using the following inclusion criteria: (1) focuses on capturing participation using AI; (2) includes data on children and/or youth with a congenital or acquired disability; and (3) published in English. Data from included studies were extracted [e.g., demographics, type(s) of AI used], summarized, and sorted into categories of participation-related constructs.

Results: Twenty one out of 3,406 documents were included. Included assessment approaches mainly captured participation through annotated observations (n = 20; 95%), were administered in person (n = 17; 81%), and applied machine learning (n = 20; 95%) and computer vision (n = 13; 62%). None integrated the child or youth perspective and only one included the caregiver perspective. All assessment approaches captured behavioral involvement, and none captured emotional or cognitive involvement or attendance. Additionally, 24% (n = 5) of the assessment approaches captured participation-related constructs like activity competencies and 57% (n = 12) captured aspects not included in contemporary frameworks of participation.

Conclusions: Main gaps for future research include lack of: (1) research reporting on common demographic factors and including samples representing the population of children and youth with a congenital or acquired disability; (2) AI-based participation assessment approaches integrating the child or youth perspective; (3) remotely administered AI-based assessment approaches capturing both child or youth attendance and involvement; and (4) AI-based assessment approaches aligning with contemporary definitions of participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
involvement. engagement, assessment, measurement, natural language processing, machine learning, computer vision, technology
National Category
Occupational Therapy Physiotherapy Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212592 (URN)10.3389/fresc.2022.855240 (DOI)001013531600001 ()35919375 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-08-07 Created: 2023-08-07 Last updated: 2023-08-07Bibliographically approved
Kaelin, V. C., Wallace, E. R., Werler, M. M., Collett, B. R. & Khetani, M. A. (2022). Community participation in youth with craniofacial microsomia. Disability and Rehabilitation, 44(2), 253-260
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community participation in youth with craniofacial microsomia
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2022 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 253-260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To examine differences in community participation and environmental support for youth with and without craniofacial microsomia.

Methods: This study involved secondary analyses of a subset of data (n = 396) from a longitudinal cohort study. Multiple linear and Poisson regression analyses and Wilcoxon Mann–Whitney tests were used to estimate differences in community participation and environmental support between youth with craniofacial microsomia and youth without craniofacial microsomia, stratified based on their history of education and health-related service use. Chi-square analyses were used to explore item-level group differences in change desired across community activities.

Results: Statistically significant differences were found in community participation frequency (ES = −0.52; p < 0.001), level of involvement (r = −0.16; p = 0.010), and desire for change in participation when comparing youth with craniofacial microsomia and non-affected peers not receiving services (p < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences between youth with craniofacial microsomia and non-affected peers receiving services.

Conclusions: Results suggest lower community participation in youth with craniofacial microsomia as compared to non-affected peers not receiving services. This may suggest opportunities for designing and testing interventions to promote community participation among youth with craniofacial microsomia, so as to support their transition to adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Leisure activities, caregivers, patient reported outcome measures
National Category
Pediatrics Occupational Therapy Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212589 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2020.1765031 (DOI)000542011000001 ()32478589 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087071024 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-07 Created: 2023-08-07 Last updated: 2023-08-07Bibliographically approved
Kaelin, V. C., Villegas, V., Chen, Y.-F., Murphy, N., Papautsky, E., Litfin, J., . . . Khetani, M. (2022). Effectiveness and scalability of an electronic patient-reported outcome measure and decision support tool for family-centred and participation-focused early intervention: PROSPECT hybrid type 1 trial protocol. BMJ Open, 12(1), Article ID e051582.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness and scalability of an electronic patient-reported outcome measure and decision support tool for family-centred and participation-focused early intervention: PROSPECT hybrid type 1 trial protocol
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2022 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e051582Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Early intervention (EI) endorses family-centred and participation-focused services, but there remain insufficient options for systematically enacting this service approach. The Young Children’s Participation and Environment Measure electronic patient-reported outcome (YC-PEM e-PRO) is an evidence-based measure for caregivers that enables family-centred services in EI. The Parent-Reported Outcomes for Strengthening Partnership within the Early Intervention Care Team (PROSPECT) is a community-based pragmatic trial examining the effectiveness of implementing the YC-PEM e-PRO measure and decision support tool as an option for use within routine EI care, on service quality and child outcomes (aim 1). Following trial completion, we will characterise stakeholder perspectives of facilitators and barriers to its implementation across multiple EI programmes (aim 2).

Methods and analysis: This study employs a hybrid type 1 effectiveness-implementation study design. For aim 1, we aim to enrol 223 caregivers of children with or at risk for developmental disabilities or delays aged 0–3 years old that have accessed EI services for three or more months from one EI programme in the Denver Metro catchment of Colorado. Participants will be invited to enrol for 12 months, beginning at the time of their child’s annual evaluation of progress. Participants will be randomised using a cluster-randomised design at the EI service coordinator level. Both groups will complete baseline testing and follow-up assessment at 1, 6 and 12 months. A generalised linear mixed model will be fitted for each outcome of interest, with group, time and their interactions as primary fixed effects, and adjusting for child age and condition severity as secondary fixed effects. For aim 2, we will conduct focus groups with EI stakeholders (families in the intervention group, service coordinators and other service providers in the EI programme, and programme leadership) which will be analysed thematically to explain aim 1 results and identify supports and remaining barriers to its broader implementation in multiple EI programmes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2022
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212593 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2021-051582 (DOI)000739490700007 ()34983760 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122755036 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-07 Created: 2023-08-07 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Kaelin, V. C., Valizadeh, M., Salgado, Z., Parde, N. & Khetani, M. A. (2021). Artificial intelligence in rehabilitation targeting the participation of children and youth with disabilities: Scoping review. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 23(11), Article ID e25745.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Artificial intelligence in rehabilitation targeting the participation of children and youth with disabilities: Scoping review
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 23, no 11, article id e25745Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in research on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to improve child and youth participation in daily life activities, which is a key rehabilitation outcome. However, existing reviews place variable focus on participation, are narrow in scope, and are restricted to select diagnoses, hindering interpretability regarding the existing scope of AI applications that target the participation of children and youth in a pediatric rehabilitation setting.

Objective: The aim of this scoping review is to examine how AI is integrated into pediatric rehabilitation interventions targeting the participation of children and youth with disabilities or other diagnosed health conditions in valued activities.

Methods: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using established Applied Health Sciences and Computer Science databases. Two independent researchers screened and selected the studies based on a systematic procedure. Inclusion criteria were as follows: participation was an explicit study aim or outcome or the targeted focus of the AI application; AI was applied as part of the provided and tested intervention; children or youth with a disability or other diagnosed health conditions were the focus of either the study or AI application or both; and the study was published in English. Data were mapped according to the types of AI, the mode of delivery, the type of personalization, and whether the intervention addressed individual goal-setting.

Results: The literature search identified 3029 documents, of which 94 met the inclusion criteria. Most of the included studies used multiple applications of AI with the highest prevalence of robotics (72/94, 77%) and human-machine interaction (51/94, 54%). Regarding mode of delivery, most of the included studies described an intervention delivered in-person (84/94, 89%), and only 11% (10/94) were delivered remotely. Most interventions were tailored to groups of individuals (93/94, 99%). Only 1% (1/94) of interventions was tailored to patients’ individually reported participation needs, and only one intervention (1/94, 1%) described individual goal-setting as part of their therapy process or intervention planning.

Conclusions: There is an increasing amount of research on interventions using AI to target the participation of children and youth with disabilities or other diagnosed health conditions, supporting the potential of using AI in pediatric rehabilitation. On the basis of our results, 3 major gaps for further research and development were identified: a lack of remotely delivered participation-focused interventions using AI; a lack of individual goal-setting integrated in interventions; and a lack of interventions tailored to individually reported participation needs of children, youth, or families.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2021
Keywords
health care, pediatric rehabilitation, technology, young persons, robotics, human-machine interaction, personalization, customization, goal-setting, natural language processing, machine learning
National Category
Occupational Therapy Computer Sciences Physiotherapy Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212585 (URN)10.2196/25745 (DOI)000726107800004 ()34734833 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85118992377 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-07 Created: 2023-08-07 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1290-9441

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