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Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Granvik, C., Andersson, S., Andersson, L., Brorsson, C., Forsell, M. N. E., Ahlm, C., . . . Edin, A. (2024). Olfactory dysfunction as an early predictor for post-COVID condition at 1-year follow-up. Brain and Behavior, 14(6), Article ID e3574.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Olfactory dysfunction as an early predictor for post-COVID condition at 1-year follow-up
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2024 (English)In: Brain and Behavior, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 14, no 6, article id e3574Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Olfactory dysfunction together with neurological and cognitive symptoms are common after COVID-19. We aimed to study whether performance on olfactory and neuropsychological tests following infection predict post-COVID condition (PCC), persisting symptoms, and reduced health-related quality of life.

Methods: Both hospitalized (N = 10) and non-hospitalized individuals (N = 56) were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Participants were evaluated 1–3 months after infection with an olfactory threshold test and neuropsychological tests, which was used as predictors of PCC. A questionnaire outlining persisting symptoms and the validated instrument EuroQol five-dimension five-level for health-related quality of life assessment were used as outcome data 1 year after infection (N = 59). Principal component analysis was used to identify relevant predictors for PCC at 1 year.

Results: Objectively assessed olfactory dysfunction at 1–3 months post infection, but not subjective olfactory symptoms, predicted post-COVID condition with reduced health-related quality of life (PCC+) at 1 year. The PCC+ group scored more often below the cut off for mild cognitive impairment on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (61.5% vs. 21.7%) and higher on the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory-20, compared to the group without PCC+.

Conclusion: Our results indicate that objectively assessed, olfactory dysfunction is a predictor for PCC+. These findings underscore the importance of objective olfactory testing. We propose that olfactory screening in the early post-acute phase of COVID-19 infection might identify individuals that are at higher risk of developing long-term health sequalae.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
COVID-19, health-related quality of life, long covid, olfactory dysfunction, post-COVID condition (PCC)
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-226169 (URN)10.1002/brb3.3574 (DOI)38841730 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85195270158 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-06235Swedish Research Council, 2016-06514Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20210078Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20200325Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, VC-2020-0015Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, FS2.1.6-849-20Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, VLL 1925-2017Region Västerbotten, RV-939393Region Västerbotten, RV-938855
Available from: 2024-06-18 Created: 2024-06-18 Last updated: 2024-06-18Bibliographically approved
Berginström, N. & Andersson, L. (2024). Remote neuropsychological assessment of patients with neurological disorders and injuries: a study protocol for a cross-sectional case-control validation study. BMJ Open, 14(4), Article ID e080628.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remote neuropsychological assessment of patients with neurological disorders and injuries: a study protocol for a cross-sectional case-control validation study
2024 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e080628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: There are great potential benefits of being able to conduct neuropsychological assessments remotely, especially for hard-to-reach or less mobile patient groups. Such tools need to be equivalent to standard tests done in the clinic and also easy to use in a variety of clinical populations.

Methods and analysis: This study protocol describes a cross-sectional study aimed at validating the newly developed digitalized neuropsychological test battery Mindmore Remote in patients with neurological disorders and injuries. Diagnoses comprise traumatic brain injury, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, brain tumour and epilepsy. 50 patients in each patient group will be included. In addition, 50 healthy controls will be recruited. All participants will undergo both testing with Mindmore Remote at home and traditional neuropsychological assessment face-to-face in a randomised order. The primary outcome is the association between tests from the Mindmore Remote battery and their equivalent traditional neuropsychological tests. Further, bias between methods and differences between groups will also be investigated.

Ethics and dissemination: The study protocol has been approved by the Swedish Ethical Review Authority (2022-06230-01) and adheres to the declaration of Helsinki. All participants will be given oral and written information about the study and sign informed consent forms before entering the study. All participants are informed that they can terminate their participation in the study at any given time, without giving any explanation, and participating in the study or not will not affect their care at the clinic. Neither authors nor personnel involved in the research project are affiliated with Mindmore AB. The results from the study will be published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and presented at national and international conferences on the topic.

Trial registration number: NCT05819008.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2024
National Category
Neurology Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-224290 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2023-080628 (DOI)38653513 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85191382126 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-13 Created: 2024-05-13 Last updated: 2024-05-13Bibliographically approved
Lillqvist, M., Claeson, A.-S., Zakrzewska, M. & Andersson, L. (2023). Comparable responses to a wide range of olfactory stimulation in women and men. Scientific Reports, 13(1), Article ID 9059.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparable responses to a wide range of olfactory stimulation in women and men
2023 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 9059Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The evidence for differences between women and men in terms of olfactory abilities is contradictory. We analyzed women and men's performance and reactions to a wider range of odour exposure outcomes than usually studied, to assess possible differences and similarities between sexes. Measures of sensitivity and sensory decision rule were established in 37 women and 39 men. Perceptual, cognitive, symptom-related and autonomic nervous system (skin conductance level and heart-rate variability) reactions were also assessed during extended ambient odour exposure, as well as participants' self-rated chemical intolerance. Bayesian analyses consistently revealed greater support for sex-related similarities than differences, suggesting that women and men perform and react comparably not only in terms of basic olfactory measures, but also to environmental odour exposure mimicking everyday situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-209549 (URN)10.1038/s41598-023-35936-5 (DOI)001000705300044 ()37270617 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160899912 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M14-0375:1
Available from: 2023-06-13 Created: 2023-06-13 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
M. Gavelin, H., Stigsdotter Neely, A., Aronsson, I., Josefsson, M. & Andersson, L. (2023). Mental fatigue, cognitive performance and autonomic response following sustained mental activity in clinical burnout. Biological Psychology, 183, Article ID 108661.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental fatigue, cognitive performance and autonomic response following sustained mental activity in clinical burnout
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2023 (English)In: Biological Psychology, ISSN 0301-0511, E-ISSN 1873-6246, Vol. 183, article id 108661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate the effects of sustained mental activity on perceptions of mental fatigue, cognitive performance, and autonomic response in patients with clinical burnout as compared to a healthy control group.

Methods: Patients with clinical burnout (n = 30) and healthy control participants (n = 30) completed a 3-hour test session, in which they were administered a set of cognitive tests before and after an effortful cognitive task with concurrent sound exposure. Perceptions of mental fatigue and task demands (mental effort and concentration difficulties) were assessed repeatedly over the course of the test session. Heart rate variability was recorded to index autonomic response.

Results: In comparison with controls, perceived mental fatigue increased earlier in the session for the clinical burnout group and did not recover following a short rest period. Throughout the session, patients rated the tasks as more demanding and showed less improvement on measures of attention and processing speed, inhibition and working memory. While autonomic responses were initially comparable, there was a unique decrease in high-frequency heart rate variability in the clinical burnout group after extended testing and exposure.

Conclusion: Patients with clinical burnout are affected differently than healthy controls by sustained mental activity, as reflected by ratings of perceived mental fatigue, aspects of cognitive performance and autonomic response. Further investigation into the role of autonomic regulation in relation to cognitive symptoms in clinical burnout is warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Burnout, Cognition, Exhaustion disorder, Heart rate variability, Mental fatigue
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214032 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsycho.2023.108661 (DOI)001067177400001 ()37598882 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85168840567 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01111
Available from: 2023-09-07 Created: 2023-09-07 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved
Dantoft, T. M., Nordin, S., Andersson, L., Petersen, M. W., Skovbjerg, S. & Jørgensen, T. (2021). Multiple chemical sensitivity described in the Danish general population: Cohort characteristics and the importance of screening for functional somatic syndrome comorbidity-The DanFunD study. PLOS ONE, 16(2), Article ID e0246461.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiple chemical sensitivity described in the Danish general population: Cohort characteristics and the importance of screening for functional somatic syndrome comorbidity-The DanFunD study
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2021 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 2, article id e0246461Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is characterized by widespread symptoms attributed to exposure to airborne chemicals. MCS is categorized as a functional somatic syndrome (FSS), and MCS cases often meet the criteria for other types of FSS, e.g. fibromyalgia. The primary aim was to characterize MCS regarding symptom triggers, symptoms, lifestyle and describe demographics, socioeconomics and lifestyle factors associated with MCS. A secondary aim was to examine the implication of FSS comorbidity.

Methods: Data were derived from a random sample of the Danish adult population enrolled in the Danish Study of Functional Disorders (DanFunD; n = 9,656). Questionnaire data comprised information used to delimit MCS and four additional types of FSS, as well as data on demographics, socioeconomics and lifestyle. MCS cases (n = 188) was stratified into subgroups; MCS only (n = 109) and MCS with comorbid FSS (n = 73). Information regarding FSS comorbidities were missing for six MCS cases. MCS subgroups and controls without FSS comorbidities (n = 7,791) were compared by means of logistic regression analyses, adjusted for age and sex.

Results: MCS was associated with female sex, not being in occupation and low social status, but not with age or education. MCS cases reported normal dietary intake and smoking habits and lower alcohol consumption. Additional associations were found between MCS and low rate of cohabitation, sedentarism, daily physically limitations, and poor quality of sleep. However, subgroup analysis revealed that these findings were primarily associated with MCS with comorbid FSS.

Conclusions: MCS was associated with lower socioeconomic status, physically inactivity and poor quality of sleep. Subgroup analysis revealed that several associations was explained by FSS comorbidity, i.e. MCS cases with no comorbid FSS showed normal rate of cohabitation and did not report physical limitations or difficulties sleeping. Overall, our findings emphasise the importance of screening MCS cases for FSS comorbidity both in epidemiological and clinical settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2021
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181657 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0246461 (DOI)000623658100019 ()33626058 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85102097976 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-06-11 Created: 2021-06-11 Last updated: 2021-06-14Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Sandberg, P., Åström, E., Lillqvist, M. & Claeson, A.-S. (2020). Chemical Intolerance Is Associated With Altered Response Bias, not Greater Sensory Sensitivity. i-Perception, 11(6), Article ID 2041669520978424.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical Intolerance Is Associated With Altered Response Bias, not Greater Sensory Sensitivity
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2020 (English)In: i-Perception, E-ISSN 2041-6695, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 2041669520978424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chemical intolerance is a surprisingly prevalent condition or affliction characterized by adverse reactions to low levels of chemical, often odorous stimulation. Sufferers often assume that their plight is due to an uncommon sensory acuteness, yet studies repeatedly fail to reveal altered detection thresholds. Here, we investigated whether self-reported chemical intolerance is associated with altered sensory sensitivity or response bias. The sensory acuity (sensitivity; A) and sensory decision rule (criterion; B) to n-butanol was assessed using the method of constant stimuli in 82 participants with different degrees of chemical intolerance (low to high). Higher self-reported chemical intolerance was associated with a lower criterion, but not with sensitivity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
chemical intolerance, chemosensory, idiopathic environmental intolerance, multiple chemical sensitivity, signal detection theory, smell
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-178526 (URN)10.1177/2041669520978424 (DOI)000601264400001 ()33425314 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85097893220 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M14-0375:1
Available from: 2021-01-15 Created: 2021-01-15 Last updated: 2023-11-15Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Eriksson, J., Stillesjö, S., Juslin, P., Nyberg, L. & Karlsson Wirebring, L. (2020). Neurocognitive processes underlying heuristic and normative probability judgments. Cognition, 196, 1-7, Article ID 104153.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurocognitive processes underlying heuristic and normative probability judgments
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2020 (English)In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 196, p. 1-7, article id 104153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Judging two events in combination (A&B) as more probable than one of the events (A) is known as a conjunction fallacy. According to dual-process explanations of human judgment and decision making, the fallacy is due to the application of a heuristic, associative cognitive process. Avoiding the fallacy has been suggested to require the recruitment of a separate process that can apply normative rules. We investigated these assumptions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during conjunction tasks. Judgments, whether correct or not, engaged a network of brain regions identical to that engaged during similarity judgments. Avoidance of the conjunction fallacy additionally, and uniquely, involved a fronto-parietal network previously linked to supervisory, analytic control processes. The results lend credibility to the idea that incorrect probability judgments are the result of a representativeness heuristic that requires additional neurocognitive resources to avoid.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER, 2020
Keywords
Decision making, Dual-system, Dual-process, fMRI, Representativeness
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169341 (URN)10.1016/j.cognition.2019.104153 (DOI)000518704700021 ()31838247 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076262700 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ujl
Available from: 2020-04-15 Created: 2020-04-15 Last updated: 2023-12-14Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, K. & Andersson, L. (2018). Den undflyende lukten. Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, 27(1-2), 14-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Den undflyende lukten
2018 (Swedish)In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. 14-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Fleeting Sense of Smell (Den undflyende lukten)

This is an overview of the elusive sense of smell, both from a historical/cultural and psychological perspective. We follow two themes. In the first, we describe the repeated efforts to understand and categorize human olfaction, from antiquity to present day. We disseminate how smell has been positioned in sensory hierarchies, describe odor classifications systems and discuss differing views on the relationship between odor and health. The second theme regards how odors and the sense

itself has been used as a means for understanding, separating and classifying other phenomena. Odors have throughout history been used to de- marcate class boundaries; the (non-)reliance of the sense of smell has been seen as an indication of civilization. Olfactory acuity is used to separate humans from animals, women from men, and young from old. These smell-based taxonomies persist, despite having no clear backing from em- pirical evidence. Finally, we suggest that the inter- est in smell may be on the rise, both from a societal and scientific perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2018
Keywords
smell, olfaction, history, culture, psychology, categorization.
National Category
Ethnology
Research subject
Psychology; History Of Sciences and Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154684 (URN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M14-0375:1
Available from: 2018-12-24 Created: 2018-12-24 Last updated: 2021-01-19Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Sandberg, P., Olofsson, J. K. & Nordin, S. (2018). Effects of Task Demands on Olfactory, Auditory, and Visual Event-Related Potentials Suggest Similar Top-Down Modulation Across Senses. Chemical Senses, 43(2), 129-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Task Demands on Olfactory, Auditory, and Visual Event-Related Potentials Suggest Similar Top-Down Modulation Across Senses
2018 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A widely held view is that top-down modulation of sensory information relies on an amodal control network that acts through the thalamus to regulate incoming signals. Olfaction lacks a direct thalamic projection, which suggests that it may differ from other modalities in this regard. We investigated the late positive complex (LPC) amplitudes of event-related potentials (ERP) from 28 participants, elicited by intensity-matched olfactory, auditory and visual stimuli, during a condition of focused attention, a neutral condition, and a condition in which stimuli were to be actively ignored. Amplitudes were largest during the attend condition, lowest during the ignore condition, with the neutral condition in between. A Bayesian analysis resulted in strong evidence for similar effects of task across sensory modalities. We conclude that olfaction, despite its unique neural projections, does not differ from audition and vision in terms of task-dependent neural modulation of the LPC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
attention, audition, electrophysiology, late positive complex, olfaction, vision
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145156 (URN)10.1093/chemse/bjx082 (DOI)000424225200007 ()29325013 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041497392 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Aazh, H., Knipper, M., Danesh, A. A., Cavanna, A. E., Andersson, L., Paulin, J., . . . Moore, B. C. J. (2018). Insights from the Third International Conference on Hyperacusis: Causes, Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Noise & Health, 20(95), 162-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insights from the Third International Conference on Hyperacusis: Causes, Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment
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2018 (English)In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 20, no 95, p. 162-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hyperacusis is intolerance of certain everyday sounds that causes significant distress and impairment in social, occupational, recreational, and other day-to-day activities. 

Objective: The aim of this report is to summarize the key findings and conclusions from the Third International Conference on Hyperacusis.

Topics covered: The main topics discussed comprise (1) diagnosis of hyperacusis and audiological evaluations, (2) neurobiological aspect of hyperacusis, (3) misophonia, (4) hyperacusis in autism spectrum disorder, (5) noise sensitivity, (6) hyperacusis-related distress and comorbid psychiatric illness, and (7) audiologist-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for hyperacusis.

Conclusions: Implications for research and clinical practice are summarised.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2018
Keywords
Audiology, auditory system, hyperacusis, misophonia, noise sensitivity
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151568 (URN)10.4103/nah.NAH_2_18 (DOI)000442780700005 ()30136676 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052619993 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4088-0025

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