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Lindkvist, Marie
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Publications (10 of 108) Show all publications
Swai, E. A., Moshi, H. I., Msuya, S. E., Lindkvist, M., Sörlin, A. & Sahlen, K.-G. (2024). Adaptive adjustment to the needs of families caring for children and adolescents with physical disabilities in north-eastern Tanzania: a grounded-theory study. Global Health Action, 17(1), Article ID 2354009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptive adjustment to the needs of families caring for children and adolescents with physical disabilities in north-eastern Tanzania: a grounded-theory study
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2024 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 2354009Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Family interactions, which are always multi-faceted, are complicated further by family members with disabilities. In resource-poor settings, policies and programmes that address the needs of and challenges faced by families are often inaccessible or unavailable. Approximately 13% of the families in Tanzania have at least one member with a disability, yet family-centred research on caring for disabled children and adolescents is scarce in this context.

OBJECTIVE: The aim is to explore the needs and challenges faced by families that care for children and adolescents with physical disabilities in the Kilimanjaro Region of north-eastern Tanzania.

METHODS: This qualitative study had a constructivist grounded-theory design. In-depth interviews, using a semi-structured interview guide based on the social-capital framework, were conducted with 12 female participants aged between 24 and 80. A conceptual model of family needs, inspired by Maslow's hierarchy of needs, informed the analysis.

RESULTS: Challenging needs were grouped into five categories, which were linked to Maslow's hierarchy of needs and related to the central concept of 'adaptive adjustment': (1) 'barely surviving'; (2) 'safety needs in jeopardy'; (3) 'sociocultural protection'; (4) 'self-esteem far beyond reach', and (5) 'dreaming of self-actualisation'.

CONCLUSION: Families caring for children and adolescents with physical disabilities in north-eastern Tanzania have needs that extend beyond the available and accessible resources. Families can adjust and adapt by avoiding certain situations, accepting the reality of their circumstances and exploring alternative ways of coping. A sustainable support system, including social networks, is essential for meeting basic needs and ensuring safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
adaptive adjustment, challenging needs, Paediatrics, physical disabilities, public health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-225943 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2024.2354009 (DOI)001238292100001 ()38832537 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85195017237 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Familjen Erling-Perssons Stiftelse
Available from: 2024-06-12 Created: 2024-06-12 Last updated: 2024-06-12Bibliographically approved
Mzilangwe, E. S., Chande Mallya, R., Lindkvist, M., Kaaya, S. & Nkulu Kalengayi, F. K. (2024). Sexual violence victimisation and response among university students in sub-Saharan Africa: a scoping review protocol. BMJ Open, 14(1), Article ID e076015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sexual violence victimisation and response among university students in sub-Saharan Africa: a scoping review protocol
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2024 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 14, no 1, article id e076015Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Sexual violence (SV) is highly prevalent among university campuses across the globe, despite of several initiatives implemented to address it. Several studies have been published focusing on various aspects of SV on campuses. However, no review has been retrieved from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Database, Cochrane Library or Ovid examining evidence synthesis on prevalence, risk factors, victims and perpetrators, policies, laws and universities responses to SV in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This review aims to map the existing literature on SV victimisation among university students in SSA, related response strategies, and identify gaps in the evidence.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This review will follow JBI guidelines and will be conducted from 1 July 2023 to 31 December 2023. A team of five reviewers will screen eligible documents and articles for relevance from various data sources including electronic databases such as MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Google Scholar, PubMed and websites for government and agencies. Standard information for each study will be collected and a common analytical framework for all the primary documents will be conducted.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This review will involve analysis of published data only and therefore does not require ethics approval. The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal.

REGISTRATION: This review has been registered with the Open Science Framework.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Health Equity, Health Services Accessibility, Health policy, Organisation of health services, PUBLIC HEALTH, Risk Factors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-220286 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2023-076015 (DOI)001154790300040 ()38233058 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182799422 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Familjen Erling-Perssons Stiftelse
Available from: 2024-01-31 Created: 2024-01-31 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
Vogt, T., Lindkvist, M., Ivarsson, A., Silfverdal, S.-A. & Vaezghasemi, M. (2024). Temporal trends and educational inequalities in obesity, overweight and underweight in pre-pregnant women and their male partners: a decade (2010–2019) with no progress in Sweden. European Journal of Public Health, Article ID ckae052.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temporal trends and educational inequalities in obesity, overweight and underweight in pre-pregnant women and their male partners: a decade (2010–2019) with no progress in Sweden
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2024 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, article id ckae052Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Trends in overweight and obesity among expectant parents can provide useful information about the family environment in which children will grow up and about possible social inequalities that may be passed on to them. Therefore, we aimed to assess whether the prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity changed over time in pre-pregnant women and their male partners in northern Sweden, and if there were any educational inequalities.

Methods: This study is based on cross-sectional data from a repeated survey of the population in Västerbotten, Sweden. The study population included 18,568 pregnant women and 18,110 male partners during the period 2010–2019. Multinomial logistic regression models were fitted separately for pregnant women and male partners to assess whether the prevalence of age-adjusted underweight, normal weight, overweight and obesity had evolved between 2010 and 2019, and whether trends differed by educational level.

Results: Among women, obesity prevalence increased from 9.4% in 2010 to 11.7% in 2019. Among men, it went from 8.9 to 12.8%. Educational inequalities were sustained across the study period. In 2019, the prevalence of obesity was 7.8 percentage points (pp) (CI = 4.4–11.3) higher among women with low compared to high education. The corresponding figure for men was 6.4 pp (CI = 3.3–9.6).

Conclusions: It is not obvious that the prevalence of obesity among parents-to-be will decrease under current dispositions. Public health policies and practice should therefore be strengthened.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2024
Keywords
obesity, pregnancy, body mass index procedure, educational status, parent, knowledge acquisitionunder, weight, overweight
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223140 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckae052 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2022-00493
Available from: 2024-04-10 Created: 2024-04-10 Last updated: 2024-04-10
Lwin, M. W., Timby, E., Ivarsson, A., Eurenius, E., Vaezghasemi, M., Silfverdal, S.-A. & Lindkvist, M. (2023). Abnormal birth weights for gestational age in relation to maternal characteristics in Sweden: a five year cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 976.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abnormal birth weights for gestational age in relation to maternal characteristics in Sweden: a five year cross-sectional study
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2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 976Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Abnormal birth weight - small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) - are important indicators for newborn health. Due to changes in lifestyle in recent decades, it is essential to keep up-to-date with the latest information on maternal factors linked to abnormal birth weight. The aim of this study is to investigate SGA and LGA in relation to maternal individual, lifestyle and socioeconomic characteristics.

Methods: This is a register-based cross-sectional study. Self-reported data from Sweden's Salut Programme maternal questionnaires (2010-2014) were linked with records in the Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR). The analytical sample comprised 5089 singleton live births. A Swedish standard method using ultrasound-based sex-specific reference curves defines the abnormality of birth weight in MBR. Univariable and multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine crude and adjusted associations between abnormal birth weights and maternal individual, lifestyle and socioeconomic characteristics. A sensitivity analysis, using alternative definitions of SGA and LGA under the percentile method, was undertaken.

Results: In multivariable logistic regression, maternal age and parity were associated with LGA (aOR = 1.05, CI = 1.00, 1.09) and (aOR = 1.31, CI = 1.09, 1.58). Maternal overweight and obesity were strongly associated with LGA (aOR = 2.28, CI = 1.47, 3.54) and (aOR = 4.55, CI = 2.85, 7.26), respectively. As parity increased, the odds of delivering SGA babies decreased (aOR = 0.59, CI = 0.42, 0.81) and preterm deliveries were associated with SGA (aOR = 9.46, CI = 5.67, 15.79). The well-known maternal determinants of abnormal birthweight, such as unhealthy lifestyles and poor socioeconomic factors, were not statistically significant in this Swedish setting.

Conclusions: The main findings suggest that multiparity, maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity are strong determinants for LGA babies. Public health interventions should address modifiable risk factors, especially maternal overweight and obesity. These findings suggest that overweight and obesity is an emerging public health threat for newborn health. This might also result in the intergenerational transfer of overweight and obesity. These are important messages for public health policy and decision making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Birth weight, Body mass index, Cross-sectional, Large for gestational age, Lifestyle, Maternal obesity, Small for gestational age
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-209152 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-15829-y (DOI)000995510200006 ()37237290 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160376071 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Västerbotten
Available from: 2023-06-26 Created: 2023-06-26 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Swai, E. A., Msuya, S. E., Moshi, H., Lindkvist, M., Sörlin, A. & Sahlen, K.-G. (2023). Children and adolescents with physical disabilities: describing characteristics and disability-related needs in the Kilimanjaro region, north-eastern Tanzania – a cross-sectional survey. BMJ Open, 13(1), Article ID e064849.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children and adolescents with physical disabilities: describing characteristics and disability-related needs in the Kilimanjaro region, north-eastern Tanzania – a cross-sectional survey
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2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 1, article id e064849Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To describe the characteristics and disability-related needs of children and adolescents with physical disabilities in the Kilimanjaro region, North-Eastern Tanzania.

Design: A cross-sectional community survey was conducted from November 2020 to June 2021. Trained research assistants interviewed primary children’s carers using a questionnaire based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Framework. Data were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics V.27. The Pearson χ2 test was used to examine differences between age, gender and self-reported needs. The independent t-test assessed difference in needs according to age and gender.

Setting: Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania.

Participants: Children and adolescents, aged 2–18 years, with physical disabilities (n=212).

Results: Almost 40% had severe speech (n=84) and joint mobility (n=79) impairments, and more than half (n=124) had severe or complete difficulties walking. In aspects of self-care (caring for body parts, toileting, dressing, eating and drinking), most had severe and complete difficulties. Almost 70% (n=135) of households were located near health facilities without rehabilitation services. About one-quarter (n=51) had never received rehabilitation services. More than 90% (n=196) needed assistive devices, and therapeutic exercises (n=193). Over three-quarters needed nutritional supplements (n=162).

Conclusion: Children and adolescents with physical disabilities in North-Eastern Tanzania have impaired speech and joint mobility, and difficulties in communication, self-care and walking. Rehabilitation services essential for addressing these impairments and activity limitations are either scarce or inaccessible. Action is needed to facilitate urban and rural access to rehabilitation services in order to improve the well-being of children and adolescents with physical disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203833 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-064849 (DOI)000924512900004 ()36592996 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145491645 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Familjen Erling-Perssons StiftelseUmeå University
Available from: 2023-01-20 Created: 2023-01-20 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Backman, A. C., Lindkvist, M., Lövheim, H., Sjögren, K. & Edvardsson, D. (2023). Exploring the impact of nursing home managers' leadership on staff job satisfaction, health and intention to leave in nursing homes. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 32(19-20), 7227-7237
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the impact of nursing home managers' leadership on staff job satisfaction, health and intention to leave in nursing homes
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 32, no 19-20, p. 7227-7237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and Objectives: To explore the impact of nursing home leadership and staffing characteristics on staff job satisfaction, health and intention to leave.

Background: The number of older people has outpaced growth in the nursing home workforce worldwide. Identifying predictors with the potential to positively impact staff job satisfaction, health and intentions to leave are important. Leadership of the nursing home manager can be one such predictor.

Design: Cross-sectional design.

Methods: A sample of 2985 direct care staff in 190 nursing homes in 43 randomly selected municipalities in Sweden completed surveys on leadership, job satisfaction, self-rated health and intention to leave (response rate 52%). Descriptive statistics and Generalised Estimating Equations were conducted. The STROBE reporting checklist was applied.

Results: Nursing home managers' leadership was positively related to job satisfaction, self-rated health and low intention to leave. Lower staff educational levels were related to poorer health and lower job satisfaction.

Conclusions: Nursing home leadership plays a significant role in the job satisfaction, self-reported health and intention to leave of direct care staff. Low education levels among staff seem to negatively influence staff health and job satisfaction, suggesting that educational initiatives for less-educated staff could be beneficial for improving staff health and job satisfaction.

Relevance to clinical practice: Managers seeking to improve staff job satisfaction can consider how they support, coach and provide feedback. Recognising staff achievement at work can contribute to high job satisfaction. One important implication for managers is to offer continuing education to staff with lower or no education, given the large amount of uneducated direct care workers in aged care and the impact this may have on staff job satisfaction and health.

No patient or public contribution: No patient or public contribution was required to outcome measures in this study. Direct care staff and managers contributed with data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
health, intention to leave, job satisfaction, leadership, management
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-210214 (URN)10.1111/jocn.16781 (DOI)001002196400001 ()2-s2.0-85161607763 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-4016Swedish Research Council, 521-2014-2715
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-12-21Bibliographically approved
Backman, A. C., Lindkvist, M., Lövheim, H., Sjögren, K. & Edvardsson, D. (2023). Longitudinal changes in nursing home leadership, direct care staff job strain and social support in Swedish nursing homes: findings from the U-AGE SWENIS study. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 18(1), Article ID e12515.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal changes in nursing home leadership, direct care staff job strain and social support in Swedish nursing homes: findings from the U-AGE SWENIS study
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 18, no 1, article id e12515Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Promoting healthy work environment as a manager in nursing homes is important to safeguard staff health and well-being as well as care quality when facing increasing demands. The impact of leadership on staff work environment needs further exploration.

Objectives: To describe longitudinal changes in nursing home leadership, direct care staff characteristics, job strain and social support.

Methods: This study has a repeated cross-sectional design, a five-year follow-up study. Nursing home staff in 181 corresponding units (n = 1253 in 2014 and n = 1176 in 2019) completed surveys about leadership, staff job strain and social support in a five-year follow-up study. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted.

Results: A higher degree of leadership defined by coaching and providing direct feedback to care staff, handling conflicts in a constructive way and having control of the clinical work, was significantly associated with a lower degree of job strain and a higher degree of social support among staff, with stronger associations at follow-up. The proportion of enrolled nurses increased significantly at follow-up.

Conclusions: Leadership is increasingly important for staff work environment, especially in times of increased workload and decreasing collegiality and deteriorating work atmosphere at work. Implications for Practice: Stakeholder and policy makers in nursing home care may reflect on how managers' leadership is prioritised in these environments because such leadership is associated with staff job strain and social support. Managers striving to improve the work situation of staff may consider their own role and allow flexibility in how and when the work can be performed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
job strain, leadership, management, social support, stress
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201344 (URN)10.1111/opn.12515 (DOI)000882955600001 ()36373748 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85142127790 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vårdal FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-4016Swedish Research Council, 521-2014-2715
Available from: 2022-12-14 Created: 2022-12-14 Last updated: 2023-07-13Bibliographically approved
Vaezghasemi, M., Vogt, T., Lindkvist, M., Pulkki-Brännström, A.-M., Richter Sundberg, L., Lundahl, L., . . . Ivarsson, A. (2023). Multifaceted determinants of social-emotional problems in preschool children in Sweden: An ecological systems theory approach. SSM - Population Health, 21, Article ID 101345.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multifaceted determinants of social-emotional problems in preschool children in Sweden: An ecological systems theory approach
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2023 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 21, article id 101345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social-emotional problems occurring early in life can place children at future risk of adverse health, social and economic outcomes. Determinants of social-emotional problems are multi-layered and originate from different contexts surrounding children, though few studies consider them simultaneously. We adopted a holistic approach by using Bronfenbrenner's process-person-context-time model as a structuring device. We aimed to assess what characteristics of families and children from pregnancy, over birth, and up to 3 years of age are associated with social-emotional problems in boys and girls. This study used regional data from the Salut Programme, a universal health promotion programme implemented in Antenatal and Child Health Care, and data from national Swedish registers. The study population included 6033 3-year-olds and their parents during the period 2010–2018. Distinct logistic regression models for boys and girls were used to assess associations between the family social context, parents' lifestyle, parent's mental health, children's birth characteristics, and indicators of proximal processes (the independent variables); and children's social-emotional problems as measured by the parent-completed Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social-Emotional between 33 and 41 months of age (the outcome). Overall, a less favourable family social context, detrimental lifestyle of the parents during pregnancy, and parents' mental illness from pregnancy onwards were associated with higher odds of social-emotional problems in 3-year-olds. Higher screentime and infrequent shared book-reading were associated with higher odds of social-emotional problems. The multifaceted determinants of children's social-emotional problems imply that many diverse targets for intervention exist. Additionally, this study suggests that Bronfenbrenner's process-person-context-time theoretical framework could be relevant for public health research and policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Social-emotional health, Mental health, Preschool children, Ecological systems theory:sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-204344 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2023.101345 (DOI)2-s2.0-85147123061 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2021-00155
Available from: 2023-02-02 Created: 2023-02-02 Last updated: 2023-02-17Bibliographically approved
Vaezghasemi, M., Pulkki-Brännström, A.-M., Lindkvist, M., Silfverdal, S.-A., Lohr, W. & Ivarsson, A. (2023). Social inequalities in social-emotional problems among preschool children: a population-based study in Sweden. Global Health Action, 16(1), Article ID 2147294.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social inequalities in social-emotional problems among preschool children: a population-based study in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 2147294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Social-emotional ability is important for overall health and wellbeing in early childhood. Recognizing preschool children in need of extra support, especially those living in unfavourable conditions, can have immediate positive effects on their health and benefit their wellbeing in the long-term.

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to investigate whether there are social inequalities in preschool children's social-emotional problems, and whether inequalities differ between boys and girls.

METHOD: This study utilized repeated measures from cross-sectional population-based surveys of three-year old children (2014-2018). The final study population comprised of 9,099 children which was 61% of all the eligible children in Västerbotten County during the study period. The Ages and Stages Questionnaires: Social-Emotional (ASQ:SE) 36-month interval was used to measure children's social-emotional ability. Social inequalities were studied with respect to parents' income, education, and place of birth, for which data was obtained from Statistics Sweden. Multiple logistic and ordered regressions were used.

RESULTS: Among 3-year-olds, social-emotional problems were more common in the most vulnerable social groups, i.e. parents in the lowest income quintile (OR: 1.45, p < 0.001), parents with education not more than high school (OR: 1.51, p < 0.001), and both parents born outside Sweden (OR: 2.54, p < 0.001). Notably, there was a larger difference in social-emotional problems between the lowest and highest social categories for girls compared to boys. Higher odds of social-emotional problems were associated with boys not living with both parents and girls living in the areas of Skellefteå and Umeå, i.e. more populated geographical areas.

CONCLUSION: Already at 3-years of age social-emotional problems were more common in children with parents in the most vulnerable social groups. This does not fulfil the ambition of an equitable start in life for every child and might contribute to reproduction of social inequalities across generations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Ages and Stages Questionnaires: Social-Emotional (ASQ:SE), Population-based, mental health, preschool children, social inequality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-204345 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2022.2147294 (DOI)000923029200001 ()36722260 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147186828 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Public Health Agency of Sweden Region Västerbotten
Available from: 2023-02-02 Created: 2023-02-02 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Kindstedt, J., Glader, E.-L., Lövheim, H., Lindkvist, M. & Gustafsson, M. (2023). The impact of nursing home residency on psychotropic drug use in major neurocognitive disorder: a nationwide comparison. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 38(11), Article ID e6018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of nursing home residency on psychotropic drug use in major neurocognitive disorder: a nationwide comparison
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 38, no 11, article id e6018Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Psychotropic drugs are utilized against neuropsychiatric symptoms among people with major neurocognitive disorder (NCD) despite well-documented risks, and older people in nursing homes are expected to be more frequently exposed to those medicines. This study compared psychotropic drug use and associated factors between older people with major NCD and matched references.

Methods: This cross-sectional study included individuals from three national registries in Sweden. References were randomly matched 1:1 by age and sex from the Swedish Total Population Register. Drug use was defined as at least one prescription fill from 1 July to 31 December 2019 and presented as proportion of drug users. In addition, ORs regarding psychotropic drug use and associated factors use were analysed using generalized estimating equations.

Results: There were 102,419 complete matching pairs alive on 31 December 2019. The proportions of psychotropic drug users were 59% in the population of people with major NCD and 28% in the reference group. Moreover, there was a substantial number of individuals in nursing homes who had been treated with antipsychotics but who, for unknown reasons, had not been diagnosed with major NCD. Psychotropic drug use was positively associated with both major NCD and nursing home residency. The difference in drug use in relation to major NCD was more pronounced among people living in ordinary homes.

Conclusion: Despite well-documented risks in people with cognitive impairment, psychotropic drug use was overall high and positively associated with both major NCD and nursing home residency. Taken together, interventions to better target neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people are warranted. Hypnotic drug use among older people in general as well as antipsychotic drug exposure among older people in nursing homes appear to be two important focus areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
major neurocognitive disorder, nursing home, older people, psychotropic drugs
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216677 (URN)10.1002/gps.6018 (DOI)37909144 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175678118 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-22 Created: 2023-11-22 Last updated: 2023-11-22Bibliographically approved
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