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Publications (10 of 47) Show all publications
Hobson, B., Oláh, L. S. & Sandström, G. (2023). Changes in family diversity in Sweden: opportunities, constraints and challenges (1ed.). In: Marina A. Adler; Karl Lenz (Ed.), The changing faces of families: diverse family forms in various policy contexts (pp. 142-163). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in family diversity in Sweden: opportunities, constraints and challenges
2023 (English)In: The changing faces of families: diverse family forms in various policy contexts / [ed] Marina A. Adler; Karl Lenz, London: Routledge, 2023, 1, p. 142-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter traces the changes in family diversity within the social, cultural and legal context of the Swedish welfare state. We focus on three distinctive features, deeply rooted in Swedish law and policy that have shaped family law, discourses and practices of doing a family: (1) the framing of gender equality; (2) the construction and privileging of biological fatherhood; and (3) the mother/father binary in the heteronormative family. The gender equality framework has allowed for agency and choice in the doing of family. The latter two have impeded LGBTQA+ couples and single women from forming families through access to MAR and ultimately from achieving the full legal recognition of their parenthood. Throughout the chapter, we reveal the complexities, contradictions and ambivalent positions in Swedish policy and law by tracing the barriers that had to be overcome and the challenges that remain for the recognition of diverse family forms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2023 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Studies in Family Sociology
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206916 (URN)10.4324/9781003193500-8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85190031384 (Scopus ID)9781003193500 (ISBN)9781032045030 (ISBN)9781032045023 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-04-21 Created: 2023-04-21 Last updated: 2024-04-23Bibliographically approved
Sandström, G., Padyab, M., Noguchi, H. & Fu, R. (2023). Convergence and persistent contrasts in the determinants of working-age women in Sweden and Japan living alone since the 1990s. Genus - Journal of Population Sciences, 79(11)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Convergence and persistent contrasts in the determinants of working-age women in Sweden and Japan living alone since the 1990s
2023 (English)In: Genus - Journal of Population Sciences, E-ISSN 2035-5556, Vol. 79, no 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The increase in one-person households (OPHs) in the developed world is often seen as the result of a trend in which individualistic values and behaviors are replacing family solidarity. Nordic countries have been identified as frontrunners in this development. In Asia, equally developed countries like Japan retain elements of a strong-family system and an asymmetrical gender regime, simultaneously as they are experiencing rapid increases in OPHs. This article aims to uncover how the demographic and socioeconomic composition of OPHs have developed since the 1990s among working-age women in Sweden and Japan. Our results show that, in particular, civil status and income play different roles for OPH-living in Sweden and Japan. In contrast to Japan, the level of OPHs remained stable over time in Sweden, and even declined among women with high incomes. This suggests that the negative association between family formation and women’s economic activity is temporary and only prevails as long as society has not adapted to the convergence of men’s and women’s socioeconomic roles. The findings are discussed in light of the "second demographic transition" and "dual equilibrium theory".

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
One-person households, Single living, Gender, Family systems, Sweden, Japan
National Category
History Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Population studies; Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-208295 (URN)10.1186/s41118-023-00192-y (DOI)000989156300001 ()2-s2.0-85159594948 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation (Grant No. 2019.0029)
Available from: 2023-05-17 Created: 2023-05-17 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Oláh, L. S., Karlsson, L. & Sandström, G. (2023). Living-apart-together (lat) in contemporary Sweden: (how) does it relate to vulnerability?. Journal of Family Issues, 44(1), 3-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living-apart-together (lat) in contemporary Sweden: (how) does it relate to vulnerability?
2023 (English)In: Journal of Family Issues, ISSN 0192-513X, E-ISSN 1552-5481, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 3-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden is among the countries with the highest share of single households in Europe, but not all are truly partnerless. We examine the potential vulnerability of individuals in living-apart-together relationships at age 30 and above, analyzing data from the Swedish GGS. We apply multinomial logistic regression. The results show that individuals engaging in LAT occupy an intermediate position in terms of socioeconomic resources (homeownership and economic situation), being less advantaged than co-residents but better-off than singles, especially men. We find no association between ill-health and living in a LAT arrangement. Having previous family experiences (unions with or without children) is positively associated with LAT, but childhood family composition does not matter. The majority of LAT individuals claim to be constrained to living-apart-together rather than LAT being their preferred alternative. Women and the elderly (aged 70+) are, however, more likely to engage in LAT by choice and appreciate their non-residential partnerships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
living-apart-together, vulnerability, GGS, Sweden
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187906 (URN)10.1177/0192513X211041988 (DOI)000797912800001 ()2-s2.0-85115670818 (Scopus ID)
Projects
The power of one? The long-term increase in one-person households in Sweden, 1900-2017, from Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation (MAW 2019.0029)Ageing well—individuals, families and households under changing demographic regimes in Sweden, from the Swedish Research Council for Health,Working life and Welfare (FORTE), grant number 2016-07115
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07115Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, MAW 2019.0029
Available from: 2021-09-24 Created: 2021-09-24 Last updated: 2022-12-20Bibliographically approved
Sundvall, S., Lundh, C., Dribe, M. & Sandström, G. (2023). Models of leaving home: patterns and trends in Sweden, 1830–1959. The History of the Family, 28(3), 601-629
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Models of leaving home: patterns and trends in Sweden, 1830–1959
2023 (English)In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 601-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we examine the development of age at leaving the parental household in Sweden between the years 1830-1959. We utilize individual-level longitudinal data from two geographically and socioeconomically different regions: the county of Scania in the very south of Sweden, and Västerbotten to the north. We use descriptive and multivariate analyses to investigate how determinants, such as age at marriage and socioeconomic status, affected the age at leaving the parental household over time and between different subgroups, such as sex and rural-urban setting. We show that the age at leaving the parental household was initially low but increased strongly during industrialization but fell again during the interwar period and onwards. Regional and subgroup differences in age at leaving the parental household were small throughout the investigated period, indicating that the development was general in nature. Therefore, we argue that our results indicate that different models governed the structures and norms of home leaving during our investigated period. More specifically, a pre-industrial model gradually shifted into an industrial model, with the latter one becoming dominant in the 1920s. In the pre-industrial model, leaving home was shaped by the life-cycle service system. In the industrial model, age at marriage instead became a main determinant of home leaving.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Young adult, Parental home, Industrialization, Sweden
National Category
History
Research subject
Population studies; Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-210407 (URN)10.1080/1081602x.2023.2222111 (DOI)001013759400001 ()2-s2.0-85162661127 (Scopus ID)
Projects
the Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, grant number MAW 2019.0029Jan Wallander’s and Tom Hedelius’ Foundation and Tore Browaldh Foundation (P18-0130)the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences (RJ) for the program “The Rise and Fall of the Industrial City: Landskrona Population Study”, grant number M15-0173:1
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M15-0173:1Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, MAW 2019.0029
Available from: 2023-06-21 Created: 2023-06-21 Last updated: 2024-05-06Bibliographically approved
Sandström, G. & Stanfors, M. (2023). Socio-economic status and the rise of divorce in Sweden: the case of the 1880–1954 marriage cohorts in Västerbotten. Population Studies, 77(3), 417-435
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socio-economic status and the rise of divorce in Sweden: the case of the 1880–1954 marriage cohorts in Västerbotten
2023 (English)In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 417-435Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An established negative association between socio-economic status (SES) and divorce has applied to most Western nations since 1960. We expected a positive association between SES and divorce for low-divorce contexts historically because only individuals in higher social strata had the resources to overcome barriers to divorce. According to Goode’s socio-economic growth theory, this relationship was reversed as industrialization and modernization began removing the economic and normative barriers. Making use of longitudinal data from parish registers, we investigated SES and other micro-level determinants of divorce among men and women in northern Sweden who married between 1880 and 1954. Results indicated a positive association between SES and divorce among those who married 1880–1919, with the middle class, not the elite, featuring the highest divorce risks. This association changed for couples who married in the 1920s, for whom divorce became more common and the working class faced similar divorce risks to the higher social strata.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
divorce, Sweden, socio-economic status (SES), economic independence, event history analysis
National Category
History Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
demography; Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-202450 (URN)10.1080/00324728.2022.2149844 (DOI)000907956900001 ()36603598 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145583633 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, MAW 2019.0029
Available from: 2023-01-10 Created: 2023-01-10 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Meyer, A. C., Ebeling, M., Drefahl, S., Hedström, M., Ek, S., Sandström, G. & Modig, K. (2023). The impact of hip fracture on geriatric care and mortality among older swedes: Mapping care trajectories and their determinants. American Journal of Epidemiology, 192(1), 41-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of hip fracture on geriatric care and mortality among older swedes: Mapping care trajectories and their determinants
Show others...
2023 (English)In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 192, no 1, p. 41-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines the impact of hip fractures on trajectories of home care, care home residence, and mortality among individuals aged 65 and older and explores the impact of living arrangement, cohabitation, frailty, and socioeconomic position on these trajectories. Based on a linkage of nationwide Swedish population registers, our study included 20,573 individuals with first hip fracture in 2014-2015. Care trajectories during two years following the fracture were visualized and compared to two hip fracture-free control groups drawn from the general population; age-and-sex-matched controls and health-matched controls identified through propensity score matching. Multistate modeling was employed to identify sociodemographic and health-related factors associated with care trajectories among hip fracture patients. Already before their fracture, hip fracture patients had worse health than the general population. However, when controlling for pre-fracture health, hip fractures still had a considerable impact on care use and mortality. Comparisons to the health-matched controls suggest that hip fractures have an immediate, yet short-term, impact on care trajectories. Long-term care needs are largely attributable to poorer health profiles independent of the fracture itself. This emphasizes the importance of adequate comparison groups when examining the consequences of diseases which are often accompanied by other underlying health problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
home care, care homes, osteoporosis, hip fracture, ageing, registers, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology; Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-198726 (URN)10.1093/aje/kwac149 (DOI)000865704600001 ()35968686 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 2019135Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07115
Available from: 2022-08-20 Created: 2022-08-20 Last updated: 2023-01-11Bibliographically approved
Brändström, A., Meyer, A. C., Modig, K. & Sandström, G. (2022). Determinants of home care utilization among the Swedish old: nationwide register-based study. European Journal of Ageing, 19, 651-662
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determinants of home care utilization among the Swedish old: nationwide register-based study
2022 (English)In: European Journal of Ageing, ISSN 1613-9372, E-ISSN 1613-9380, Vol. 19, p. 651-662Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the 1990s, Sweden has implemented aging-in-place policies increasing the share of older adults dependent on home care instead of residing in care homes. At the same time previous research has highlighted that individuals receive home care at a higher age than before. Consequently, services are provided for a shorter time before death, increasing reliance on family and kin as caregivers. Previous studies addressing how homecare is distributed rely primarily on small surveys and are often limited to specific regions. This study aims to ascertain how home care services are distributed regarding individual-level factors such as health status, living arrangements, availability of family, education, and socioeconomic position. To provide estimates that can be generalized to Sweden as a whole, we use register data for the entire Swedish population aged 65 + in 2016. The study's main findings are that home care recipients and the amount of care received are among the oldest old with severe co morbidities. Receiving home care is slightly more common among women, but only in the highest age groups. Childlessness and socioeconomic factors play a small role in who receives home care or not. Instead, the primary home care recipients are those older adults living alone who lack direct support from family members residing in the same household.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Home care, Living arrangements, Health, Municipal care, Sweden
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190557 (URN)10.1007/s10433-021-00669-9 (DOI)000731200700001 ()2-s2.0-85121362495 (Scopus ID)
Projects
FORTE-program (DNR: 2016–07115): Ageing well—individuals, families and households under changing demographic regimes in SwedenMarcus and Amalia Wallenberg Grant (DNR: MAW 2019.0029) The power of one? -The long-term increase in one-person households in Sweden, 1900–2017.
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07115Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, MAW 2019.0029
Available from: 2021-12-18 Created: 2021-12-18 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Meyer, A. C., Sandström, G. & Modig, K. (2022). Nationwide data on home care and care home residence: presentation of the Swedish Social Service Register, its content and coverage. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 50(7), 946-958
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nationwide data on home care and care home residence: presentation of the Swedish Social Service Register, its content and coverage
2022 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 946-958Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: All Swedish municipalities are legally obliged to provide publicly funded eldercare to individuals in need. The Swedish Social Service Register collects data on such care. It is the only nationwide source of information on care home residency and use of home care but has rarely been used for research. This study aims to present the content and coverage of the Social Service Register and to provide guidance for researchers planning to use these data.

Methods: For each month between 2013and 2020, we examined which of Sweden’s 290 municipalities reported data to the Social Service Register. We calculated proportions of the population (restricted to ages 80–89 years to enable comparison) that were reported to the Social ServiceRegister in each municipality and presented the types and amount of care recorded in the register.

Results: The proportion of municipalities reporting to the Social Service Register increased from 82% to 98% during the study period but several municipalities reported fragmentarily and inconsistently, particularly during earlier years. Among municipalities reporting to the Social Service Register, 9% of the population aged 80–89 years resided in care homes and 19% received home care, but the registered amount and types of care varied substantially between municipalities and over time.

Conclusions: The Swedish Social Service Register provides valuable data for research on aging and eldercare utilization, but data should be selected and vetted carefully, especially for earlier years. The amount and types of care may not always be comparable between geographical regions and different time periods. In recent years, however, the coverage of the Social Service Register is good.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Health registers, register data, coverage, population, ageing, home care, elder care, Sweden, administrative registers
National Category
Social Work Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics
Research subject
Population studies; Epidemiology; Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190986 (URN)10.1177/14034948211061016 (DOI)000738766900001 ()34965796 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122127722 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07115
Available from: 2022-01-04 Created: 2022-01-04 Last updated: 2022-11-30Bibliographically approved
Liselotte, E., Junkka, J., Sandström, G. & Vikström, L. (2022). Supply or demand? Institutionalization of the mentally ill in the emerging Swedish welfare state, 1900–59. History of Psychiatry, 33(2), 180-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supply or demand? Institutionalization of the mentally ill in the emerging Swedish welfare state, 1900–59
2022 (English)In: History of Psychiatry, ISSN 0957-154X, E-ISSN 1740-2360, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 180-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historical studies on the institutionalization of the mentally ill have primarily relied on data for institutionalized patients rather than the population at risk. Consequently, the underlying factors of institutionalization are unclear. Using Swedish longitudinal microdata from 1900–59 reporting mental disorders, we examine whether supply factors, such as distance to institutions and number of asylum beds, influenced the risk of institutionalization, in addition to demand factors such as access to family. Institutionalization risks were associated with the supply of beds and proximity to an asylum, but also dependent on families’ unmet demand for care of relatives. As the supply of mental care met this family-driven demand in the 1930s, the relative risk of institutionalization increased among those lacking family networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Asylum, confinement, institutionalization, mental illness, Sweden, 20th century
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Historical Demography; History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-195005 (URN)10.1177/0957154x221084976 (DOI)000798273900004 ()2-s2.0-85130323789 (Scopus ID)
Projects
MAW 2019.0003 / Risks and Loads from Disabilities and Later Life Outcomes
Available from: 2022-05-19 Created: 2022-05-19 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sandström, G., Padyab, M., Noguchi, H. & FU, R. (2021). Changes in demographic and socioeconomic determinants of living alone among women in Sweden and Japan since the 1990s. Stockholm: Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in demographic and socioeconomic determinants of living alone among women in Sweden and Japan since the 1990s
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The increase in one-person household (OPHs) in the developed world is often seen as theresult of a trend where family solidarity is replaced by individualistic values and behaviourswhere the Nordic countries have been identified as forerunners in this development. In Asia,countries such as Japan have reached equal levels of economic development but retainelements of a strong family system and exhibit a much more asymmetric gender regime.This study compares the changes in the demographic and socioeconomic composition ofOPH women in Sweden and Japan between 1990 and 2016. The probability to be an OPHhousehold is analysed by means of logistic regression models using microdata covering the entire population in Sweden and the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions in Japan. In Sweden, the growth of the female OPH population has halted and shifted to a decline compared to Japan where it has increased rapidly since the 1990s. The analysis finds increasing similarities between the countries in the age patterns and urban-rural differences while persistent contrast in the impact of women’s socioeconomic status and family history remains salient. The findings provide evidence that the transformation of women’s economic role does not result in an ever-increasing shift towards “less” family. Rather, living arrangements depend on the extent to which gender regime adapts to increased economic self-sufficiency among women. These findings highlight the need for preparedness for continued increases of the OPH population among policymakers in economically developed strong family societies such as Japan 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2021. p. 38
Series
Stockholm Research Reports in Demography, ISSN 2002-617X ; 2021:9
Keywords
one person households, single living, gender, family systems, Sweden, Japan
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182287 (URN)10.17045/sthlmuni.14402519.v1 (DOI)
Projects
FORTE 2016-07115 Ageing well - individuals, families and households under changing demographic regimes in Sweden
Available from: 2021-04-17 Created: 2021-04-17 Last updated: 2021-04-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7559-2571

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