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Publications (10 of 81) Show all publications
Demiroglu, O. C., Müller, D. K., Back, A. & Lundmark, L. (2023). Impacts of climate change on Swedish second home tourism. In: Bailey Ashton Adie and Michael Hall (Ed.), Second Homes and Climate Change: (pp. 39-55). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impacts of climate change on Swedish second home tourism
2023 (English)In: Second Homes and Climate Change / [ed] Bailey Ashton Adie and Michael Hall, London and New York: Routledge, 2023, p. 39-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Second home tourism has been labelled the hidden giant of tourism. Still, little attention has been given to the impact of climate change and second homes. On the contrary, planning has neglected second homes and their users, who therefore often remain invisible in public statistics. After an overview of potential climate change induced risks for second home tourism, this chapter assesses the Swedish second home stock’s risk exposure. It is shown that second homes indeed concentrate on exposed localities such as mountain, riverine, and shoreline environments. Climate models also project dramatic change for northern environments, and thus, the presence of second homes needs to be recognised in planning to adapt to the risks of property damage as well as risks for its users.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2023
Series
Contemporary Geographies of Leisure, Tourism and Mobility
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212428 (URN)2-s2.0-85145678239 (Scopus ID)9781000905533 (ISBN)9780367549466 (ISBN)9781003091295 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-07-27 Created: 2023-07-27 Last updated: 2023-08-16Bibliographically approved
Bohn, D., Carson, D. A., Demiroglu, O. C. & Lundmark, L. (2023). Public funding and destination evolution in sparsely populated Arctic regions. Tourism Geographies, 25(8), 1833-1855
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public funding and destination evolution in sparsely populated Arctic regions
2023 (English)In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 1833-1855Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the role of public funding in transforming tourism pathways in sparsely populated Arctic destinations, comparing Northern Sweden and Finnish Lapland. Our theoretical framework considers destination path plasticity and moments of change through the lens of geographical political economy to understand patterns of uneven development. This perspective helps explain how regional development funding driven by multi-scalar political priorities and global markets set structural conditions for tourism. We present a spatial analysis of public funding between 2007 and 2021 for private firms and public projects, complemented by document analysis and expert interviews. We find that public funding in Finnish Lapland has largely reinforced ‘Arctification’ and export-driven tourism in a few locations. In Northern Sweden, it has focused more on redistributing resources to micro-businesses and broader socio-economic development in lagging regions, yet with limited impacts on changing dominant tourism pathways. Public projects improved knowledge creation and networking among public and private actors but were largely unable to consolidate emerging pathways in the long run. Overall, regional development funding supported incremental change around existing pathways and had limited transformative effects in response to shocks or disruptive moments due to the rigid nature of funding programmes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Arctic tourism, geographical political economy, Path plasticity, regional development funding, trigger events, uneven development
National Category
Human Geography Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206754 (URN)10.1080/14616688.2023.2193947 (DOI)000968064100001 ()2-s2.0-85152028194 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-02228Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00352
Available from: 2023-05-02 Created: 2023-05-02 Last updated: 2024-03-19Bibliographically approved
Eimermann, M., Carson, D. A. & Lundmark, L. (2023). Transforming a dogsledding community: the 'Gafsele Open' and lifestyle migrants in sparsely populated northern Sweden. In: Heather Mair (Ed.), Handbook on tourism and rural community development: (pp. 386-402). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transforming a dogsledding community: the 'Gafsele Open' and lifestyle migrants in sparsely populated northern Sweden
2023 (English)In: Handbook on tourism and rural community development / [ed] Heather Mair, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023, p. 386-402Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter increases our understanding of how intra-European lifestyle migrants may transform communities in sparsely populated areas (SPAs) through their engagements in civil society, using the example of a dogsledding community in Arctic Sweden. In-depth narrative analysis of interviews with international migrant dogsledders and longer-term residents shows the heterogeneity of communities in sparsely populated settings and their diverse perspectives on community transformation and renewal in response to challenges of demographic shrinkage (Eimermann et al., 2022). The case study village of Gafsele in Åsele municipality provides an interesting study context as it is home to a relatively large group of international migrants, many of whom were attracted by exceptional opportunities for dogsledding and an internationally renowned trail network. The local dogsledding club organizes an annual dogsledding event (the Gafsele Open) attracting Swedish and international participants. Balancing their incomes and lifestyles around dogsledding activities, migrants are engaging in the club and co-organizing the event as individuals and through their businesses (D.A. Carson et al., 2018; Eimermann & Singleton, 2021). This area is thus exploring its potential for local rural development through community- and nature-based tourism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023
Series
Research handbooks in tourism
Keywords
community, dogsledding, lifestyle, northern Sweden, sparsely populated areas, tourism
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-208280 (URN)10.4337/9781800370067.00038 (DOI)2-s2.0-85163048035 (Scopus ID)9781800370050 (ISBN)9781800370067 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00344
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-07-12Bibliographically approved
Jóhannesson, G. T., Welling, J., Müller, D. K., Lundmark, L., Nilsson, R. O., de la Barre, S., . . . Maher, P. (2022). Arctic tourism in times of change: uncertain futures – from overtourism to re-starting tourism. Copenhagen: Nordisk ministerråd
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arctic tourism in times of change: uncertain futures – from overtourism to re-starting tourism
Show others...
2022 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The report presents findings from a workshop where researchers, students, tourism industry representatives, policy makers and entrepreneurs from the Arctic discussed the challenges of overtourism, the impact of COVID-19 and visions for restarting tourism. A key for sustainable management of tourism is that actors are aware that they are part of a wide ranging tourism system that affects how they can tackle ensuing crisis or challenges such as overtourism and undertourism. The COVID-19 hit tourism hard across the Arctic although there are also regional differences. The pandemic revealed the vulnerability of the tourism product and opened a space for reconsidering tourism growth and the negative impacts of tourism on climate, biodiversity and communities. The report argues for the need to build tourism based on tourism-community collaboration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: Nordisk ministerråd, 2022. p. 40
Series
TemaNord, ISSN 0908-6692 ; 2022:516
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-192992 (URN)10.6027/temanord2022-516 (DOI)978-92-893-7277-0 (ISBN)978-92-893-7278-7 (ISBN)
Funder
Nordic Council of Ministers
Available from: 2022-03-09 Created: 2022-03-09 Last updated: 2022-03-09Bibliographically approved
Eimermann, M., Adjei, E., Bjarnason, T. & Lundmark, L. (2022). Exploring population redistribution at sub-municipal levels: Microurbanisation and messy migration in Sweden’s high North. Journal of Rural Studies, 90, 93-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring population redistribution at sub-municipal levels: Microurbanisation and messy migration in Sweden’s high North
2022 (English)In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 90, p. 93-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To contribute to more balanced perspectives on sub-municipal population change in sparsely populated areas(SPAs), this paper closely examines a local pocket of growth in a shrinking Northern Swedish municipality.Integrating Swedish register data with in-depth qualitative insights, the geographic study examines patterns andprocesses of uneven local population dynamics linked to life course migration. This is done through a sociospatialcluster analysis containing, first, 15 aggregate socioeconomic variables for sub-municipal areas, andthen individual characteristics like birth countries, age groups, sex ratios, educational attainment, andemployment status. A Foresight approach and interviews with locals, municipal officials, and incoming lifestylemigrants complement this. Studying these individuals’ practical compromises regarding housing, income, andleisure at sub-municipal levels helps in overcoming fallacies in population change research at broader regionallevels, and illustrates the limits of relying solely on quantitative demographic change indicators. The paper showsthat urban traits in the municipal centre and rural natural amenities around a dogsledding trail combine toattract and retain different population groups. This adds to population change studies and shows that municipaladministrative centres in SPAs are not necessarily growing while other villages are declining, and that populationredistribution at the municipal level does not automatically imply the movement of people to municipal centresfrom a municipality’s minor villages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Cluster analysis, Foresight approach, Local context, Microurbanisation, Northern SPAs, Population redistribution
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-195240 (URN)10.1016/j.jrurstud.2022.01.010 (DOI)000806720800009 ()2-s2.0-85124233833 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00344
Available from: 2022-05-25 Created: 2022-05-25 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Lundmark, L. & Hurtig, A.-K. (2022). Resource deserts, village hierarchies and de-growth in sparsely populated areas: The case of Southern Lapland, Sweden. Fennia, 200(2), 210-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resource deserts, village hierarchies and de-growth in sparsely populated areas: The case of Southern Lapland, Sweden
2022 (English)In: Fennia, E-ISSN 1798-5617, Vol. 200, no 2, p. 210-227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Small villages in northern Sweden have seen a continuing removal of key services, such as schools, shops and public transport, since the 1970s. Disinvestment in public services has not been strategically planned but has happened in response to population loss and increased costs on a case-by-case basis. More recently, there has been a shift in policy thinking to what might be termed a ‘de-growth’ approach where digitalisation and increased personal mobility are used to provide new ways of delivering services. The purpose of this paper is to examine the existence of ‘resource deserts’ in Southern Lapland and the emergence (or consolidation) of village hierarchies in allocating public services. We map out the distribution of neighbourhood services (grocery stores, pre-/schools and petrol pumps) among villages, and explore the lived experiences in accessing these resources in different villages. Our results show that resource deserts clearly exist in the south and east of the region, while villages in the more sparsely populated western mountain areas were generally in a better position to retain resources. We identify a lack of consistent and transparent service planning at the village level as a key shortcoming in municipal and regional service strategies. There appear to be unofficial settlement hierarchies in the differential treatment of villages that are otherwise similar in population size, population change and distance to central places. We find that political decisions on service allocations are likely influenced by several factors. These include legacy effects relating to historic settlement status, the location of villages in relation to key transport or mobility corridors, as well as ideological factors favouring villages with more ‘exotic’ features and development potential in line with the municipalities’ economic, social and political priorities. We finally argue that a shift to de-growth needs to be more strategically planned if it is to eliminate resource deserts and promote equity of service access across all villages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Geographical Society of Finland, 2022
Keywords
resource desert, service decline, village hierarchies, rural planning, sparsely populated areas, northern Sweden
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-204609 (URN)10.11143/fennia.120788 (DOI)2-s2.0-85149036762 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016–00352The Kamprad Family Foundation, 2022–0029Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017–00183Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016–344
Available from: 2023-02-08 Created: 2023-02-08 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Lundmark, L., Carson, D. A. & Eimermann, M. (2022). Spillover, sponge or something else?: Dismantling expectations for rural development resulting from giga-investments in northern Sweden. Fennia, 200(2), 157-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spillover, sponge or something else?: Dismantling expectations for rural development resulting from giga-investments in northern Sweden
2022 (English)In: Fennia, E-ISSN 1798-5617, Vol. 200, no 2, p. 157-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paradoxical situation of planning for growth while managing decline has long been a reality for politicians and planners in Nordic peripheries. In recent years, however, attempts to plan for demographic adaptation, smart shrinkage, and ‘right-sizing’ public services have become commonplace. While it has taken decades for this to become an accepted part of municipal planning, new opportunities are now arising in the Swedish North due to several unforeseen giga-investments. These are expected to trigger rapid socio-economic growth along the urbanized coast and in a few select inland locations. Yet the likely effects on shrinking rural and sparsely populated municipalities geographically adjacent to these investment hotspots are much less understood. Previous research suggests that such investment projects might cause pressure for rural labour and housing markets but may also offer a range of positive spillover effects and development opportunities for rural areas. We draw on structural level narratives and interviews with key informants, including local and regional political stakeholders, to identify how the prospects of the giga-investments are viewed in places that are not directly affected, and what opportunities and threats are discussed. An overarching theme identified in the empirical material concerns the a-spatiality of discourses of growth, which we divide into two concrete dilemmas: infrastructure and mobility. Our findings show that, while the investments are seen as ringing in a new ‘golden age’ for the northern region, such a-spatial understandings of regional characteristics might stand in the way of acting fast and being able to make the most of the potential spillover effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Geographical Society of Finland, 2022
Keywords
Arctic Sweden, green (re)industrialization, planning, sparsely populated municipalities, spillover/sponge, sustainable development
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-204610 (URN)10.11143/fennia.120530 (DOI)2-s2.0-85149042039 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2023-02-08 Created: 2023-02-08 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Hall, C. M., Lundmark, L. & Zhang, J. J. (2021). Conclusions - degrowing tourism: can tourism be moved beyond the BAU (Bruntland-as-usual)?. In: C. Michael Hall, Linda Lundmark, Jundan Jasmine Zhang (Ed.), Degrowth and tourism: new perspectives on tourism entrepreneurship, destinations and policy (pp. 239-248). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conclusions - degrowing tourism: can tourism be moved beyond the BAU (Bruntland-as-usual)?
2021 (English)In: Degrowth and tourism: new perspectives on tourism entrepreneurship, destinations and policy / [ed] C. Michael Hall, Linda Lundmark, Jundan Jasmine Zhang, Abingdon: Routledge, 2021, p. 239-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2021
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188675 (URN)9780367335656 (ISBN)9780429320590 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-10-18 Created: 2021-10-18 Last updated: 2021-10-21Bibliographically approved
Hall, C. M., Lundmark, L. & Zhang, J. J. (Eds.). (2021). Degrowth and tourism: new perspectives on tourism entrepreneurship, destinations and policy. Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Degrowth and tourism: new perspectives on tourism entrepreneurship, destinations and policy
2021 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The sustainability of tourism is increasingly under question given the challenges of overtourism, COVID-19 and the contribution of tourism to climate and environmental change. Degrowth and Tourism provides an original response to the central problem of growth in tourism, an imperative that has been intrinsic within tourism practice, and directs the reader to rethink the impacts of tourism and possible alternatives beyond the sustainable growth discourse.

Using a multi-scaled approach to investigate degrowth's macro effects and micro indications in tourism, this book frames degrowth in tourism in terms of business, destination and policy initiatives. It uses a combination of empirical research, case studies and theory to offer new perspectives and approaches to analyse issues related to overtourism, COVID-19, small-scale tourism operations and entrepreneurship, mobility and climate change in tourism. Interdisciplinary chapters provide studies on animal-based tourism, nature-based tourism, domestic tourism, developing community-centric tourism and many other areas, within the paradigm of degrowth.

This book offers significant insight on both the implications of degrowth paradigm in tourism studies and practices, as well as tourism's potential contributions to the degrowth paradigm, and will be essential reading for all those interested in sustainable tourism and transformations through tourism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021. p. 254
Series
Contemporary geographies of leisure, tourism and mobility
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-180347 (URN)10.4324/9780429320590 (DOI)9780367335656 (ISBN)9780429320590 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-02-17 Created: 2021-02-17 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Lundmark, L., Overvåg, K. & Berg, N. G. (2021). Doctoral Thesis Review – Anmeldelse av doktoravhandling: Engeset, Agnes Brudvik. 2021. Store tankar i småbygder? Overlevingsevna blant familiebedrifter inorsk distriktsreiseliv. [Review]. Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, 75(4), 237-238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doctoral Thesis Review – Anmeldelse av doktoravhandling: Engeset, Agnes Brudvik. 2021. Store tankar i småbygder? Overlevingsevna blant familiebedrifter inorsk distriktsreiseliv.
2021 (English)In: Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-1951, E-ISSN 1502-5292, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 237-238Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186441 (URN)10.1080/00291951.2021.1949747 (DOI)2-s2.0-85110928666 (Scopus ID)
Note

Review of: Engeset, Agnes Brudvik. 2021. Store tankar i småbygder? Overlevingsevna blant familiebedrifter inorsk distriktsreiseliv. Doctoral Theses at NTNU,2021:218. Department of Geography, Faculty of SocialSciences, Norwegian University of Science andTechnology, Trondheim. 114 pp. + Articles. ISBN 978-82-326-4784-2 (print version), ISBN 978-82-326-4785-9 (electronic version).

Available from: 2021-08-02 Created: 2021-08-02 Last updated: 2023-09-13Bibliographically approved
Projects
MOBILISING THE RURAL: POST-PRODUCTIVISM AND THE NEW ECONOMY [2011-72_Formas]; Umeå University; Publications
Olofsson, I. (2024). Invisible yet essential: the role of seasonal labour migration in Sweden’s green industries. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå UniversityDemiroglu, O. C. & Turhan, E. (2021). Degrowing tourism: can grassroots form the norm?. In: C. Michael Hall, Linda Lundmark,Jundan Jasmine Zhang (Ed.), Degrowth and tourism: new perspectives on tourism entrepreneurship, destinations and policy (pp. 202-219). RoutledgeAbegg, B., Morin, S., Demiroglu, O. C., François, H., Rothleitner, M. & Strasser, U. (2021). Overloaded!: Critical revision and a new conceptual approach for snow indicators in ski tourism. International journal of biometeorology, 65(5), 691-701Demiroglu, O. C., Lundmark, L. & Strömgren, M. (2019). Development of downhill skiing tourism in Sweden: past, present, and future. In: Ulrike Pröbstl-Haider, Harold Richins and Stefan Türk (Ed.), Winter tourism: trends and challenges (pp. 305-323). CABI PublishingLundmark, L. & Åberg, K. G. (2019). How modest tourism development becomes successful: the complementarity of tourism in Malå municipality. In: Rhonda L. Koster and Doris A. Carson (Ed.), Perspectives on rural tourism geographies: case studies from developed nations on the exotic, the fringe and the boring bits in between (pp. 221-241). SpringerOlofsson, I. & Lundmark, L.The supply of labour to the green industries in Sweden: inequality and dependence among workers and employers.
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3026-1477

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