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Publications (10 of 137) Show all publications
Latz, M. A. C., Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Hedblom, M., Jurdzinski, K. T., Karlson, B., . . . Andersson, A. F. (2024). A comprehensive dataset on spatiotemporal variation of microbial plankton communities in the Baltic Sea. Scientific Data, 11(1), Article ID 18.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comprehensive dataset on spatiotemporal variation of microbial plankton communities in the Baltic Sea
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2024 (English)In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Baltic Sea is one of the largest brackish water environments on earth and is characterised by pronounced physicochemical gradients and seasonal dynamics. Although the Baltic Sea has a long history of microscopy-based plankton monitoring, DNA-based metabarcoding has so far mainly been limited to individual transect cruises or time-series of single stations. Here we report a dataset covering spatiotemporal variation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities and physicochemical parameters. Within 13-months between January 2019 and February 2020, 341 water samples were collected at 22 stations during monthly cruises along the salinity gradient. Both salinity and seasonality are strongly reflected in the data. Since the dataset was generated with both metabarcoding and microscopy-based methods, it provides unique opportunities for both technical and ecological analyses, and is a valuable biodiversity reference for future studies, in the prospect of climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-219321 (URN)10.1038/s41597-023-02825-5 (DOI)38168085 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85181259194 (Scopus ID)
Note

The raw sequencing data generated in this study are available at the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) under the study accession number https://identifiers.org/ena.embl:PRJEB55296 (2023).

Processed sequencing data (ASV sequences with taxonomic annotations and counts in samples) are available at our figshare repository (https://doi.org/10.17044/scilifelab.20751373), along with the contextual, physicochemical, and microscopy data, and sequences of synthetic spike-ins. 

Available from: 2024-01-12 Created: 2024-01-12 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Lønborg, C., Carreira, C., Abril, G., Agustí, S., Amaral, V., Andersson, A., . . . Álvarez-Salgado, X. A. (2024). A global database of dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration measurements in coastal waters (CoastDOM v1). Earth System Science Data, 16(2), 1107-1119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A global database of dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration measurements in coastal waters (CoastDOM v1)
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2024 (English)In: Earth System Science Data, ISSN 1866-3508, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 1107-1119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrogen (DON), and phosphorus (DOP) concentrations are used to characterize the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool and are important components ofbiogeochemical cycling in the coastal ocean. Here, we present the first edition of a global database (CoastDOMv1; available at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.964012, Lønborg et al., 2023) compiling previously published and unpublished measurements of DOC, DON, and DOP in coastal waters. These data are complementedby hydrographic data such as temperature and salinity and, to the extent possible, other biogeochemical variables(e.g. chlorophyll a, inorganic nutrients) and the inorganic carbon system (e.g. dissolved inorganic carbon andtotal alkalinity). Overall, CoastDOM v1 includes observations of concentrations from all continents. However,most data were collected in the Northern Hemisphere, with a clear gap in DOM measurements from the SouthernHemisphere. The data included were collected from 1978 to 2022 and consist of 62 338 data points for DOC,20 356 for DON, and 13 533 for DOP. The number of measurements decreases progressively in the sequenceDOC > DON > DOP, reflecting both differences in the maturity of the analytical methods and the greater focuson carbon cycling by the aquatic science community. The global database shows that the average DOC concentration in coastal waters (average ± standard deviation (SD): 182±314 µmolC L−1; median: 103 µmolC L−1) is13-fold higher than the average coastal DON concentration (13.6 ± 30.4 µmol N L−1; median: 8.0 µmol N L−1),which is itself 39-fold higher than the average coastal DOP concentration (0.34 ± 1.11 µmol P L−1; median:0.18 µmol P L−1). This dataset will be useful for identifying global spatial and temporal patterns in DOM and willhelp facilitate the reuse of DOC, DON, and DOP data in studies aimed at better characterizing local biogeochemical processes; closing nutrient budgets; estimating carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous pools; and establishing abaseline for modelling future changes in coastal waters. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copernicus Publications, 2024
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221514 (URN)10.5194/essd-16-1107-2024 (DOI)001193292600001 ()2-s2.0-85188212493 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2024-02-27 Created: 2024-02-27 Last updated: 2024-04-19Bibliographically approved
Vass, M., Ramasamy, K. P. & Andersson, A. (2024). Microbial hitchhikers on microplastics: the exchange of aquatic microbes across distinct aquatic habitats. Environmental Microbiology, 26(4), Article ID e16618.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial hitchhikers on microplastics: the exchange of aquatic microbes across distinct aquatic habitats
2024 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 26, no 4, article id e16618Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microplastics (MPs) have the potential to modify aquatic microbial communities and distribute microorganisms, including pathogens. This poses a potential risk to aquatic life and human health. Despite this, the fate of ‘hitchhiking’ microbes on MPs that traverse different aquatic habitats remains largely unknown. To address this, we conducted a 50-day microcosm experiment, manipulating estuarine conditions to study the exchange of bacteria and microeukaryotes between river, sea and plastisphere using a long-read metabarcoding approach. Our findings revealed a significant increase in bacteria on the plastisphere, including Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Hyphomonas, Brevundimonas, Aquabacterium and Thalassolituus, all of which are known for their pollutant degradation capabilities, specifically polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We also observed a strong association of plastic-degrading fungi (i.e., Cladosporium and Plectosphaerella) and early-diverging fungi (Cryptomycota, also known as Rozellomycota) with the plastisphere. Sea MPs were primarily colonised by fungi (70%), with a small proportion of river-transported microbes (1%–4%). The mere presence of MPs in seawater increased the relative abundance of planktonic fungi from 2% to 25%, suggesting significant exchanges between planktonic and plastisphere communities. Using microbial source tracking, we discovered that MPs only dispersed 3.5% and 5.5% of river bacterial and microeukaryotic communities into the sea, respectively. Hence, although MPs select and facilitate the dispersal of ecologically significant microorganisms, drastic compositional changes across distinct aquatic habitats are unlikely.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
National Category
Microbiology Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-222904 (URN)10.1111/1462-2920.16618 (DOI)001194570100001 ()38561820 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85189209355 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2024-04-02 Created: 2024-04-02 Last updated: 2024-04-22Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, K. I., Ahlinder, J., Ramasamy, K. P., Andersson, A., Sundell, D., Karlsson, L., . . . Thelaus, J. (2023). Association between Legionella species and humic substances during early summer in the northern Baltic Sea. Frontiers in Marine Science, 9, Article ID 1070341.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between Legionella species and humic substances during early summer in the northern Baltic Sea
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 9, article id 1070341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change is projected to cause alterations in northern coastal systems, including humification and intensified nutrient loads, which can lead to ecosystem imbalances and establishment of new bacterial species. Several potential pathogens, such as different species of Legionella, hide in the environment between infections, some by living inside protozoan host cells. Knowledge about the occurrence of Legionella in natural waters is missing, which disable risk assessments of exposure. We performed a study of the species diversity of Legionella in the northern Baltic Sea (Gulf of Bothnia) during early summer to map their occurrence and to identify possible environmental drivers. We detected Legionella and potential protozoan hosts along gradients of the Gulf of Bothnia. We also for the first time present third generation full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing (Nanopore) to resolve environmental species classification of Legionella, with a method suitable to study all bacteria. Our data show that full length 16S rRNA sequences is sufficient to resolve Legionella while the standard short Illumina sequences did not capture the entire diversity. For accurate species classification of Legionella, harmonization between the Nanopore classification methods is still needed and the bias toward the well-studied Legionella pneumophila need to be resolved. Different Legionella species occurred both in the Bothnian Sea and in the Bothnian Bay and their abundance were linked to humic substances and low salinity. The relative abundance of Legionella was higher in the humic-rich northern waters of the Bothnian Bay. The link between Legionella species and humic substances may be indirect via promotion of the heterotrophic microbial food web, allowing Legionella species and similar bacteria to establish. Humic substances are rich in iron, which has been shown crucial for growth of Legionella species and other pathogens. Considering climate change projections in this regional area, with increased humification and freshwater inflow, this bacterial niche containing potential pathogens might become more widespread in the future Baltic Sea. This study demonstrates the significance of DNA sequencing to monitor public health relevant bacteria like Legionella species in the environment. Including sequencing of bacteria and protozoa in the environmental monitoring programs could be used to identify ecosystem imbalances, which enable appropriate responses to emerging diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
Legionella, protozoa, predation resistance, aquatic microbiology, climate change, ecology change, marginal seas, humification
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203899 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2022.1070341 (DOI)000924634400001 ()2-s2.0-85147432283 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGESwedish Research Council FormasSwedish Armed Forces
Available from: 2023-01-23 Created: 2023-01-23 Last updated: 2023-11-13Bibliographically approved
Zhao, L., Brugel, S., Ramasamy, K. P. & Andersson, A. (2023). Bacterial community responses to planktonic and terrestrial substrates in coastal northern Baltic Sea. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article ID 1130855.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacterial community responses to planktonic and terrestrial substrates in coastal northern Baltic Sea
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 10, article id 1130855Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bacteria are major consumers of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aquatic systems. In coastal zones, bacteria are exposed to a variety of DOM types originating from land and open sea. Climate change is expected to cause increased inflows of freshwater to the northern coastal zones, which may lead either to eutrophication or to increased inputs of refractory terrestrial compounds. The compositional and functional response of bacterial communities to such changes is not well understood. We performed a 2-day microcosm experiment in two bays in the coastal northern Baltic Sea, where we added plankton extract to simulate eutrophication and soil extract to simulate increased inputs of refractory terrestrial compounds. Our results showed that the bacterial communities responded differently to the two types of food substrates but responded in a similar compositional and functional way in both bays. Plankton extract addition induced a change of bacterial community composition, while no significant changes occurred in soil extract treatments. Gammaproteobacteria were promoted by plankton extract, while Alphaproteobacteria dominated in soil extract addition and in the non-amended controls. Carbohydrate metabolism genes, such as aminoglycan and chitin degradation, were enriched by plankton extract, but not soil extract. In conclusion, the coastal bacterial communities rapidly responded to highly bioavailable substrates, while terrestrial matter had minor influence and degraded slowly. Thus, in the northern Baltic Sea, if climate change leads to eutrophication, large changes of the bacterial community composition and function can be expected, while if climate change leads to increased inflow of refractory terrestrial organic matter the bacterial communities will not show fast compositional and functional changes. Degradation of terrestrial organic matter may instead occur over longer periods of time, e.g. years. These findings help to better understand the ability of bacterial communities to utilize different carbon sources and their role in the ecosystem.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206867 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2023.1130855 (DOI)000979525200001 ()2-s2.0-85159867504 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019/0007Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2023-04-19 Created: 2023-04-19 Last updated: 2023-06-07Bibliographically approved
Berglund, Å. M. M., Gallampois, C., Ripszam, M., Larsson, H., Figueroa, D., Griniene, E., . . . Tysklind, M. (2023). Effects on the food-web structure and bioaccumulation patterns of organic contaminants in a climate-altered Bothnian Sea mesocosms. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article ID 1244434.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects on the food-web structure and bioaccumulation patterns of organic contaminants in a climate-altered Bothnian Sea mesocosms
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 10, article id 1244434Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change is expected to alter global temperature and precipitation patterns resulting in complex environmental impacts. The proposed higher precipitation in northern Scandinavia would increase runoff from land, hence increase the inflow of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (tDOM) in coastal regions. This could promote heterotrophic bacterial production and shift the food web structure, by favoring the microbial food web. The altered climate is also expected to affect transport and availability of organic micropollutants (MPs), with downstream effects on exposure and accumulation in biota. This study aimed to assess climate-induced changes in a Bothnian Sea food web structure as well as bioaccumulation patterns of MPs. We performed a mesocosms-study, focusing on aquatic food webs with fish as top predator. Alongside increased temperature, mesocosm treatments included tDOM and MP addition. The tDOM addition affected nutrient availability and boosted both phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria in our fairly shallow mesocosms. The increased tDOM further benefitted flagellates, ciliates and mesozooplankton, while the temperature increase and MP addition had minor effect on those organism groups. Temperature, on the other hand, had a negative impact on fish growth and survival, whereas tDOM and MP addition only had minor impact on fish. Moreover, there were indications that bioaccumulation of MPs in fish either increased with tDOM addition or decreased at higher temperatures. If there was an impact on bioaccumulation, moderately lipophilic MPs (log Kow 3.6 - 4.6) were generally affected by tDOM addition and more lipophilic MPs (log Kow 3.8 to 6.4) were generally affected by increased temperature. This study suggest that both increased temperatures and addition of tDOM likely will affect bioaccumulation patterns of MPs in shallow coastal regions, albeit with counteracting effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
organic contaminants, climate impact, food web, bioaccumulation, ecology, Bothnian Sea
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-217906 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2023.1244434 (DOI)001092680700001 ()
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE, 2009-149The Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2023-12-20 Created: 2023-12-20 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved
Bidleman, T., Andersson, A., Brorström-Lundén, E., Brugel, S., Ericson, L., Hansson, K. & Tysklind, M. (2023). Halomethoxybenzenes in air of the Nordic region. Environmental Science and Ecotechnology, 13, Article ID 100209.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Halomethoxybenzenes in air of the Nordic region
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2023 (English)In: Environmental Science and Ecotechnology, ISSN 2666-4984, Vol. 13, article id 100209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Halomethoxybenzenes (HMBs) are a group of compounds with natural and anthropogenic origins. Here we extend a 2002–2015 survey of bromoanisoles (BAs) in the air and precipitation at Råö on the Swedish west coast and Pallas in Subarctic Finland. New BAs data are reported for 2018 and 2019 and chlorinated HMBs are included for these and some previous years: drosophilin A methyl ether (DAME: 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro-3,6-dimethoxybenzene), tetrachloroveratrole (TeCV: 1,2,3,4-tetrachloro-5,6-dimethoxybenzene), and pentachloroanisole (PeCA). The order of abundance of HMBs at Råö was ΣBAs > DAME > TeCV > PeCA, whereas at Pallas the order of abundance was DAME > ΣBAs > TeCA > PeCA. The lower abundance of BAs at Pallas reflects its inland location, away from direct marine influence. Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) plots of log partial pressure (Pair)/Pa versus 1/T suggested distant transport at both sites for PeCA and local exchange for DAME and TeCV. BAs were dominated by distant transport at Pallas and by both local and distant sources at Råö. Relationships between air and precipitation concentrations were examined by scavenging ratios, SR = (ng m−3)precip/(ng m−3)air. SRs were higher at Pallas than Råö due to greater Henry's law partitioning of gaseous compounds into precipitation at colder temperatures. DAME is produced by terrestrial fungi. We screened 19 fungal species from Swedish forests and found seven of them contained 0.01–3.8 mg DAME per kg fresh weight. We suggest that the volatilization of DAME from fungi and forest litter containing fungal mycelia may contribute to atmospheric levels at both sites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
halomethoxybenzenes (HMBs), bromoanisoles (BAs), drosophilin A methyl ether (DAME), tetrachloroveratrole (TeCV), atmospheric transport, sources
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201161 (URN)10.1016/j.ese.2022.100209 (DOI)000974152400001 ()2-s2.0-85142417471 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2022-11-22 Created: 2022-11-22 Last updated: 2024-01-23Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Zhao, L., Brugel, S., Figueroa, D. & Huseby, S. (2023). Metabarcoding vs Microscopy - comparison of methods to monitor phytoplankton communities. ACS - ES & T Water, 3(8), 2671-2680
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metabarcoding vs Microscopy - comparison of methods to monitor phytoplankton communities
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2023 (English)In: ACS - ES & T Water, E-ISSN 2690-0637, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 2671-2680Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytoplankton are used worldwide to monitor environmental status in aquatic systems. Long-time series of microscopy-analyzed phytoplankton are available from many monitoring stations. The microscopy-method is however time consuming and has short-comings. DNA metabarcoding has been suggested as an alternative method, but the consistency between different methods need further investigation. We performed a comparative study of microscopy and metabarcoding analyzing micro- and nanophytoplankton. For metabarcoding, 25-1000 ml seawater were filtered, DNA extracted and the 18S and 16S rRNA gene amplicons sequenced. For microscopy, based on the Utermöhl method we evaluated the use of three metrics: abundance, biovolume and carbon biomass. At the genus, species, and unidentified taxa level, metabarcoding generally showed higher taxonomic diversity than microscopy, and diversity was already captured at the lowest filtration volume tested, 25 ml. Metabarcoding and microscopy displayed relatively similar distribution pattern at the group level. The results showed that the relative abundances of the 18S rRNA amplicon at the group level best fitted the microscopy carbon biomass metric. The results are promising for implementing DNA metabarcoding as a complement to microscopy in phytoplankton monitoring, especially if databases would be improved and group level indexes could be applied to classify the environmental state of water bodies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2023
Keywords
Sampling volume, diversity, carbon biomass, gene abundance, group/class-level consistency
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-207745 (URN)10.1021/acsestwater.3c00176 (DOI)001033834200001 ()2-s2.0-85166755712 (Scopus ID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form. 

Available from: 2023-05-02 Created: 2023-05-02 Last updated: 2023-12-11Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Grinienė, E., Berglund, Å. M. M., Brugel, S., Gorokhova, E., Figueroa, D., . . . Tysklind, M. (2023). Microbial food web changes induced by terrestrial organic matter and elevated temperature in the coastal northern Baltic Sea. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article ID 1170054.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial food web changes induced by terrestrial organic matter and elevated temperature in the coastal northern Baltic Sea
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 10, article id 1170054Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change has been projected to cause increased temperature and amplified inflows of terrestrial organic matter to coastal areas in northern Europe. Consequently, changes at the base of the food web favoring heterotrophic bacteria over phytoplankton are expected, affecting the food web structure. We tested this hypothesis using an outdoor shallow mesocosm system in the northern Baltic Sea in early summer, where the effects of increased temperature (+ 3°C) and terrestrial matter inputs were studied following the system dynamics and conducting grazing experiments. Juvenile perch constituted the highest trophic level in the system, which exerted strong predation on the zooplankton community. Perch subsequently released the microbial food web from heavy grazing by mesozooplankton. Addition of terrestrial matter had a stronger effect on the microbial food web than the temperature increase, because terrestrial organic matter and accompanying nutrients promoted both heterotrophic bacterial production and phytoplankton primary production. Moreover, due to the shallow water column in the experiment, terrestrial matter addition did not reduce the light below the photosynthesis saturation level, and in these conditions, the net-autotrophy was strengthened by terrestrial matter enrichment. In combination with elevated temperature, the terrestrial matter addition effects were intensified, further shifting the size distribution of the microbial food web base from picoplankton to microphytoplankton. These changes up the food web led to increase in the biomass and proportion of large-sized ciliates (>60 µm) and rotifers. Despite the shifts in the microbial food web size structure, grazing experiments suggested that the pathway from picoplankton to nano- and microzooplankton constituted the major energy flow in all treatments. The study implies that the microbial food web compartments in shallow coastal waters will adjust to climate induced increased inputs of terrestrial matter and elevated temperature, and that the major energy path will flow from picoplankton to large-sized ciliates during the summer period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
mesocosm experiment, climate change, microbial food web, Baltic Sea, terrestrial matter effects, temperature effect
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212872 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2023.1170054 (DOI)2-s2.0-85167351094 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Institute, 00140/2014Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019/0007Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2023-08-18Bibliographically approved
Ramasamy, K. P., Brugel, S., Eriksson, K. I. & Andersson, A. (2023). Pseudomonas ability to utilize different carbon substrates and adaptation influenced by protozoan grazing. Environmental Research, 232, Article ID 116419.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pseudomonas ability to utilize different carbon substrates and adaptation influenced by protozoan grazing
2023 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 232, article id 116419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bacteria are major utilizers of dissolved organic matter in aquatic systems. In coastal areas bacteria are supplied with a mixture of food sources, spanning from refractory terrestrial dissolved organic matter to labile marine autochthonous organic matter. Climate scenarios indicate that in northern coastal areas, the inflow of terrestrial organic matter will increase, and autochthonous production will decrease, thus bacteria will experience a change in the food source composition. How bacteria will cope with such changes is not known. Here, we tested the ability of an isolated bacterium from the northern Baltic Sea coast, Pseudomonas sp., to adapt to varying substrates.

We performed a 7-months chemostat experiment, where three different substrates were provided: glucose, representing labile autochthonous organic carbon, sodium benzoate representing refractory organic matter, and acetate – a labile but low energy food source. Growth rate has been pointed out as a key factor for fast adaptation, and since protozoan grazers speed-up the growth rate we added a ciliate to half of the incubations. The results show that the isolated Pseudomonas is adapted to utilize both labile and ring-structured refractive substrates. The growth rate was the highest on the benzoate substrate, and the production increased over time indicating that adaptation did occur. Further, our findings indicate that predation can cause Pseudomonas to change their phenotype to resist and promote survival in various carbon substrates. Genome sequencing reveals different mutations in the genome of adapted populations compared to the native populations, suggesting the adaptation of Pseudomonas sp. to changing environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Grazing resistance, Carbon substrates, Protozoan grazing, Adaptation, Baltic Sea
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-210067 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2023.116419 (DOI)001025058800001 ()37321339 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85161992549 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation Swedish Research Council Formas, FR-2019/0007Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2023-06-19 Created: 2023-06-19 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7819-9038

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