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Stigsdotter Neely, Anna
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Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Turunen, K. M., Tirkkonen, A., Savikangas, T., Hänninen, T., Alen, M., Fielding, R. A., . . . Sipilä, S. (2022). Effects of Physical and Cognitive Training on Falls and Concern About Falling in Older Adults: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 77(7), 1430-1437
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Physical and Cognitive Training on Falls and Concern About Falling in Older Adults: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial
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2022 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 77, no 7, p. 1430-1437Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this study is to investigate whether combined cognitive and physical training provides additional benefits to fall prevention when compared with physical training (PT) alone in older adults.

Methods: This is a prespecified secondary analysis of a single-blind, randomized controlled trial involving community-dwelling men and women aged 70–85 years who did not meet the physical activity guidelines. The participants were randomized into combined physical and cognitive training (PTCT, n = 155) and PT (n = 159) groups. PT included supervised and home-based physical exercises following the physical activity recommendations. PTCT included PT and computer-based cognitive training. The outcome was the rate of falls over the 12-month intervention (PTCT, n = 151 and PT, n = 155) and 12-month postintervention follow-up (PTCT, n = 143 and PT, n = 148). Falls were ascertained from monthly diaries. Exploratory outcomes included the rate of injurious falls, faller/recurrent faller/fall-related fracture status, and concern about falling.

Results: Estimated incidence rates of falls per person-year were 0.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.7–1.1) in the PTCT and 1.1 (95% CI 0.9–1.3) in the PT during the intervention and 0.8 (95% CI 0.7–1.0) versus 1.0 (95% CI 0.8–1.1), respectively, during the postintervention follow-up. There was no significant difference in the rate of falls during the intervention (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.78; 95% CI 0.56–1.10, p = .152) or in the follow-up (IRR = 0.83; 95% CI 0.59–1.15, p = .263). No significant between-group differences were observed in any exploratory outcomes.

Conclusion: A yearlong PTCT intervention did not result in a significantly lower rate of falls or concern about falling than PT alone in older community-dwelling adults.

Clinical Trial Registration: ISRCTN52388040

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
Keywords
Executive functions, Exercise, Fall prevention, Follow-up, Intervention
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-198254 (URN)10.1093/gerona/glab375 (DOI)000764218700001 ()34910809 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134083500 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-05 Created: 2022-08-05 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Savikangas, T., Törmäkangas, T., Tirkkonen, A., Alen, M., Fielding, R. A., Kivipelto, M., . . . Sipilä, S. (2021). The effects of a physical and cognitive training intervention vs. physical training alone on older adults’ physical activity: A randomized controlled trial with extended follow-up during COVID-19. PLOS ONE, 16(10), Article ID e0258559.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of a physical and cognitive training intervention vs. physical training alone on older adults’ physical activity: A randomized controlled trial with extended follow-up during COVID-19
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2021 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 10, article id e0258559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Executive functions underlie self-regulation and are thus important for physical activity and adaptation to new situations. The aim was to investigate, if yearlong physical and cognitive training (PTCT) had greater effects on physical activity among older adults than physical training (PT) alone, and if executive functions predicted physical activity at baseline, after six (6m) and twelve months (12m) of the interventions, one-year post-intervention follow-up and an extended follow-up during COVID-19 lockdown.

Methods: Data from a single-blinded, parallel-group randomized controlled trial (PASSWORD-study, ISRCTN52388040) were utilized. Participants were 70–85 years old community-dwelling men and women from Jyväskylä, Finland. PT (n = 159) included supervised resistance, walking and balance training, home-exercises and self-administered moderate activity. PTCT (n = 155) included PT and cognitive training targeting executive functions on a computer program. Physical activity was assessed with a one-item, seven-scale question. Executive functions were assessed with color-word Stroop, Trail Making Test (TMT) B-A and Letter Fluency. Changes in physical activity were modeled with multinomial logistic models and the impact of executive functions on physical activity with latent change score models.

Results: No significant group-by-time interaction was observed for physical activity (p>0.1). The subjects were likely to select an activity category higher than baseline throughout the study (pooled data: B = 0.720–1.614, p<0.001–0.046). Higher baseline Stroop predicted higher physical activity through all subsequent time-points (pooled data: B = 0.011–0.013, p = 0.015–0.030). Higher baseline TMT B–A predicted higher physical activity at 6m (pooled data: B = 0.007, p = 0.006) and during COVID-19 (B = 0.005, p = 0.030). In the PT group, higher baseline Letter Fluency predicted higher physical activity at 12m (B = -0.028, p = 0.030) and follow-up (B = -0.042, p = 0.002).

Conclusions: Cognitive training did not have additive effects over physical training alone on physical activity, but multicomponent training and higher executive function at baseline may support adaptation to and maintenance of a physically active lifestyle among older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2021
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Applied Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188868 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0258559 (DOI)000732519500065 ()34644357 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85117217126 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 675003
Available from: 2021-11-02 Created: 2021-11-02 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Stigsdotter Neely, A. & Nyberg, L. (2021). Working memory training in late adulthood: A behavioral and brain perspective (1ed.). In: Jan Rummel (Ed.), Current Issues in Memory: Memory Research in the Public Interest (pp. 319-336). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working memory training in late adulthood: A behavioral and brain perspective
2021 (English)In: Current Issues in Memory: Memory Research in the Public Interest / [ed] Jan Rummel, Routledge, 2021, 1, p. 319-336Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter provides an overview of the efforts that have been undertaken to ameliorate decline in cognitive functions in healthy older adults through practice and training with a particular focus on working memory and its processes. A wealth of evidence has shown that aging is associated with decline in various cognitive abilities. For decades, cognitive aging research has focused on explaining age-related cognitive decline with less emphasis on how to support the aging mind and brain. It has not been until quite recently that more focused attempts to train working memory have become the very topic of cognitive training for both young and old adults. The dual-task training protocol used in this research has varied slightly between studies but generally consists of two tasks performed concurrently such as a tracing task combined with an alphabet-arithmetic task or letter discrimination combined with tone discrimination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021 Edition: 1
Series
Current Issues in Memory
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-191390 (URN)10.4324/9781003106715-20 (DOI)2-s2.0-85109651021 (Scopus ID)9781003106715 (ISBN)9780367618254 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-01-14 Created: 2022-01-14 Last updated: 2022-05-13Bibliographically approved
Eskilsson, T., Fjellman-Wiklund, A., Ek Malmer, E., Stigsdotter Neely, A., Malmberg Gavelin, H., Slunga-Järvholm, L., . . . Nordin, M. (2020). Hopeful struggling for health: Experiences of participating in computerized cognitive training and aerobic training for persons with stress-related exhaustion disorder. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 61(3), 361-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hopeful struggling for health: Experiences of participating in computerized cognitive training and aerobic training for persons with stress-related exhaustion disorder
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2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is important to understand how people with exhaustion disorder (ED) perceive interventions aiming to facilitate cognitive functioning. Therefore, the overall aim of this study was to explore experiences from persons with ED after participating in a 12-week intervention of either computerized cognitive training or aerobic training. Both interventions were performed in addition to a multimodal rehabilitation programme. Thirteen participants, 11 women and 2 men, were interviewed about pros and cons with participating in the training. The interviews were analysed with Qualitative Content Analysis. The analyses resulted in the theme hopeful struggling for health and the categories support, motivation and sensations. It was hard work recovering from ED. Support from others who are in the same situation, family members, and technology and routines for the training were strongly emphasized as beneficial for recovery. Timing, i.e., matching activities to the rehabilitation programme, getting feedback and perceiving joy in the training were important for motivation. Participants in both interventions experienced positive sensations with improved memory performance, everyday life functioning and increased faith in the prospect of recovery. However, it is important to consider various aspects of support and motivation in both computerized cognitive training and aerobic training to enable participants to pursue their participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
Exhaustion disorder, burnout, exercise, qualitative research, rehabilitation
National Category
Physiotherapy Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167762 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12623 (DOI)000509854500001 ()31995652 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078781363 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Turunen, M., Hokkanen, L., Backman, L., Stigsdotter Neely, A., Hanninen, T., Paajanen, T., . . . Ngandu, T. (2019). Computer-based cognitive training for older adults: Determinants of adherence. PLOS ONE, 14(7), Article ID e0219541.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer-based cognitive training for older adults: Determinants of adherence
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2019 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 7, article id e0219541Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The possibilities of computer-based cognitive training (CCT) in postponing the onset of dementia are currently unclear, but promising. Our aim is to investigate older adults ' adherence to a long-term CCT program, and which participant characteristics are associated with adherence to the CCT. This study was part of the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER). Participants were 60-77-year-old individuals with increased dementia risk, recruited from previous population-based studies. The participants included in this study (n = 631) had been randomized to receive a multi-domain lifestyle intervention, including CCT. The measure of adherence was the number of completed CCT sessions (max = 144) as continuous measure. Due to a substantial proportion of participants with 0 sessions, the zero inflated negative binomial regression analyses were used to enable assessment of both predictors of starting the training and predictors of completing a higher number of training sessions. Several cognitive, demographic, lifestyle, and health-related variables were examined as potential predictors of adherence to CCT. Altogether, 63% of the participants participated in the CCT at least once, 20% completed at least half of the training, and 12% completed all sessions. Previous experience with computers, being married or cohabiting, better memory performance, and positive expectations toward the study predicted greater odds for starting CCT. Previous computer use was the only factor associated with a greater number of training sessions completed. Our study shows that there is a large variation in adherence to a long-lasting CCT among older adults with an increased risk of dementia. The results indicate that encouraging computer use, and taking into account the level of cognitive functioning, may help boost adherence to CCT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco: Public Library of Science, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164431 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0219541 (DOI)000484947800109 ()31291337 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069555555 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-22 Created: 2019-10-22 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Vaskivuo, L., Hokkanen, L., Hanninen, T., Antikainen, R., Backman, L., Laatikainen, T., . . . Ngandu, T. (2019). Self and Informant Memory Reports in FINGER: Associations with Two-Year Cognitive Change. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 71(3), 785-795
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self and Informant Memory Reports in FINGER: Associations with Two-Year Cognitive Change
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 785-795Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) may be the first sign of cognitive decline in aging. Objective: To examine whether SMCs reported by oneself and informant predict cognitive change over 2 years among at-risk elderly people, and to determine the relationship of different types of SMCs (prospective and retrospective memory complaints) and change in cognitive function. Methods: This investigation is part of the FINGER project, which is a multicenter randomized controlled trial aiming at preventing cognitive decline in cognitively healthy older adults with increased risk of dementia. A subsample of 303 controlgroup participants (aged 60-80 years) and their informants (n = 261) rated the frequency of SMCs, using the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ). Cognitive performance was measured at baseline and at 1- and 2-year follow-up visits using a neuropsychological test battery. Results: Participants who reported more SMCs improved less in global cognition, executive function, and memory during the subsequent 2 years in the fully-adjusted analyses. Self-reported retrospective memory problems predicted less improvement in all cognitive domains, whereas prospective memory problems did not. Informant-reported memory problems were not linked to subsequent change in cognition. Conclusion: Our results indicate that self-reported SMCs, measured with PRMQ, predict future cognitive change in several cognitive domains. By contrast, reports by informants were not linked to changes in cognition. Among cognitively healthy at-risk elderly individuals, the persons themselves observe more easily problems relevant for their future cognitive trajectories than their informants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS PRESS, 2019
Keywords
Aging, cognition, dementia, memory
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164492 (URN)10.3233/JAD-190133 (DOI)000488819100007 ()31424391 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85073089105 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-22 Created: 2019-10-22 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Vaskivuo, L., Hokkanen, L., Hänninen, T., Antikainen, R., Backman, L., Laatikainen, T., . . . Ngandu, T. (2018). Associations between prospective and retrospective subjective memory complaints and neuropsychological performance in older adults: the finger study. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 24(10), 1099-1109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between prospective and retrospective subjective memory complaints and neuropsychological performance in older adults: the finger study
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2018 (English)In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, ISSN 1355-6177, E-ISSN 1469-7661, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1099-1109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are among the key concerns in the elderly, but their role in detecting objective cognitive problems is unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the association between SMCs (both prospective and retrospective memory complaints) and neuropsychological test performance in older adults at risk of cognitive decline. Methods: This investigation is part of the FINGER project, a multicenter randomized controlled trial aiming at preventing cognitive decline in high-risk individuals. The cognitive assessment of participants was conducted at baseline using a modified neuropsychological test battery (NTB). SMCs were evaluated with the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ) in a sub-sample of 560 participants (mean age, 69.9 years). Results: Having more prospective SMCs was associated with slower processing speed, but not with other NTB domains. Retrospective SMCs were linked to poorer function on NTB total score, processing speed, and memory. Executive function domain was not associated with any PRMQ ratings. Depressive symptoms and poor quality of life diluted the observed associations for NTB total score and memory. However, the association between PRMQ and processing speed remained even after full adjustments. Conclusions: Our results indicate that self-reported memory problems, measured with PRMQ, are associated with objectively measured cognitive performance. Such complaints in healthy elderly people also seem to reflect reduced mental tempo, rather than memory deficits. Slowing of processing speed may thus be negatively related to memory self-efficacy. It is also important to consider affective factors among those who report memory problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
Subjective memory complaints, Prospective memory, Retrospective memory, Cognitive performance, Memory, Processing speed
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154072 (URN)10.1017/S135561771800053X (DOI)000450425500009 ()30178733 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052846858 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Solomon, A., Turunen, H., Ngandu, T., Peltonen, M., Levälahti, E., Helisalmi, S., . . . Kivipelto, M. (2018). Effect of the Apolipoprotein E Genotype on Cognitive Change During a Multidomain Lifestyle Intervention A Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Neurology, 75(4), 462-470
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of the Apolipoprotein E Genotype on Cognitive Change During a Multidomain Lifestyle Intervention A Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial
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2018 (English)In: JAMA Neurology, ISSN 2168-6149, E-ISSN 2168-6157, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 462-470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

IMPORTANCE: The role of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon 4 allele as an effect modifier in lifestyle interventions to prevent cognitive impairment is still unclear. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the APOE epsilon 4 allele modifies the previously reported significant cognitive benefits of a multidomain lifestyle intervention (prespecified subgroup analysis). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) was a randomized clinical trial in 6 centers across Finland (screening and randomization performed from September 7, 2009, through November 24, 2011; intervention duration, 2 years). Data analysis was performed from August 1, 2015, to March 31, 2016. The study population was at-risk older individuals from the general population. Inclusion criteria were age of 60 to 77 years; Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging, and Dementia risk score of at least 6 points; and cognition at a mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. Individuals with dementia or substantial cognitive impairment and conditions that prevented cooperation or safe engagement in the intervention were excluded. APOE genotype data were available for 1175 of the 1260 participants. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomly assigned in a 1: 1 ratio to a multidomain intervention group (diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk management) or a control group (general health advice). Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants, and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcome was change in cognition measured through a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. Analysis was based on modified intention to treat (participants with at least 1 postbaseline assessment). RESULTS: A total of 1109 participants (mean [SD] age, 69.3 [4.7] years; 514 [46.3%] female) were included in the analysis: 362 APOE epsilon 4 allele carriers (173 intervention and 189 control) and 747 noncarriers (380 intervention and 367 control). The APOE epsilon 4 carriers and noncarriers were not significantly different at baseline (except for serum cholesterol level). The difference between the intervention and control groups in annual neuropsychological test battery total score change was 0.037 (95% CI, 0.001 to 0.073) among carriers and 0.014 (95% CI, -0.011 to 0.039) among noncarriers. Intervention effect was not significantly different between carriers and noncarriers (0.023; 95% CI, -0.021 to 0.067). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Healthy lifestyle changesmay be beneficial for cognition in older at-risk individuals even in the presence of APOE-related genetic susceptibility to dementia. Whether such benefits are more pronounced in APOE epsilon 4 carriers compared with noncarriers should be further investigated. The findings also emphasize the importance of early prevention strategies that target multiple modifiable risk factors simultaneously.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association, 2018
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147329 (URN)10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.4365 (DOI)000429439000012 ()29356827 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042674095 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Rosenberg, A., Ngandu, T., Rusanen, M., Antikainen, R., Bäckman, L., Havulinna, S., . . . Kivipelto, M. (2018). Multidomain lifestyle intervention benefits a large elderly population at risk for cognitive decline and dementia regardless of baseline characteristics: The FINGER trial. Alzheimer's & Dementia: Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, 14(3), 263-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multidomain lifestyle intervention benefits a large elderly population at risk for cognitive decline and dementia regardless of baseline characteristics: The FINGER trial
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2018 (English)In: Alzheimer's & Dementia: Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, ISSN 1552-5260, E-ISSN 1552-5279, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The 2-year Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) multidomain lifestyle intervention trial (NCT01041989) demonstrated beneficial effects on cognition. We investigated whether sociodemographics, socioeconomic status, baseline cognition, or cardiovascular factors influenced intervention effects on cognition.

Methods: The FINGER recruited 1260 people from the general Finnish population (60-77 years, at risk for dementia). Participants were randomized 1: 1 to multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognition, and vascular risk management) and regular health advice. Primary outcome was change in cognition (Neuropsychological Test Battery z-score). Prespecified analyses to investigate whether participants' characteristics modified response to intervention were carried out using mixed-model repeated-measures analyses.

Results: Sociodemographics (sex, age, and education), socioeconomic status (income), cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination), cardiovascular factors (body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol, fasting glucose, and overall cardiovascular risk), and cardiovascular comorbidity did not modify response to intervention (P-values for interaction > .05). Conclusions: The FINGER intervention was beneficial regardless of participants' characteristics and can thus be implemented in a large elderly population at increased risk for dementia. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Prevention, Cognitive impairment, Dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Multidomain, Lifestyle, tervention, Randomized controlled trial
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146577 (URN)10.1016/j.jalz.2017.09.006 (DOI)000427993000001 ()29055814 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85037036134 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Sipilä, S., Tirkkonen, A., Hänninen, T., Laukkanen, P., Alen, M., Fielding, R. A., . . . Törmäkangas, T. (2018). Promoting safe walking among older people: the effects of a physical and cognitive training intervention vs. physical training alone on mobility and falls among older community-dwelling men and women (the PASSWORD study): design and methods of a randomized controlled trial. BMC Geriatrics, 18, Article ID 215.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promoting safe walking among older people: the effects of a physical and cognitive training intervention vs. physical training alone on mobility and falls among older community-dwelling men and women (the PASSWORD study): design and methods of a randomized controlled trial
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2018 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, article id 215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Safe and stable walking is a complex process involving the interaction of neuromuscular, sensory and cognitive functions. As physical and cognitive functions deteriorate with ageing, training of both functions may have more beneficial effects on walking and falls prevention than either alone. This article describes the study design, recruitment strategies and interventions of the PASSWORD study investigating whether a combination of physical and cognitive training (PTCT) has greater effects on walking speed, dual-task cost in walking speed, fall incidence and executive functions compared to physical training (PT) alone among 70-85-year-old community-dwelling sedentary or at most moderately physically active men and women.

Methods: Community-dwelling sedentary or at most moderately physically active, men and women living in the city of Jyvaskyla will be recruited and randomized into physical training (PT) and physical and cognitive training (PTCT). The 12-month interventions include supervised training sessions and home exercises. Both groups attend physical training intervention, which follows the current physical activity guidelines. The PTCT group performes also a web-based computer program targeting executive functions. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months thereafter. Falls data are collected during the interventions and the subsequent one-year follow-up. The primary outcome is 10-m walking speed. Secondary outcomes include 6-min walking distance, dual-task cost in walking speed, fall incidence and executive function assessed with color Stroop and Trail Making A and B tests. Explanatory outcomes include e.g. body composition and bone characteristics, physical performance, physical activity, life-space mobility, fall-related self-efficacy, emotional well-being and personality characteristics.

Discussion: The study is designed to capture the additive and possible synergistic effects of physical and cognitive training. When completed, the study will provide new knowledge on the effects of physical and cognitive training on the prevention of walking limitations and rate of falls in older people. The expected results will be of value in informing strategies designed to promote safe walking among older people and may have a significant health and socio-economic impact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Aging, Executive function, Physical activity, Prevention, Sedentary
National Category
Geriatrics Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152403 (URN)10.1186/s12877-018-0906-0 (DOI)000444654400003 ()30219032 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053431043 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
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