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Zickerman, C., Brorsson, C., Hultin, M., Johansson, G., Winsö, O. & Haney, M. (2023). Preoperative anxiety level is not associated with postoperative negative behavioral changes in premedicated children. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 67(6), 706-713
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preoperative anxiety level is not associated with postoperative negative behavioral changes in premedicated children
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2023 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 706-713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Anesthesia preinduction anxiety in children can according to some studies lead to long-term anxiety and negative behavioral changes (NBC), while other studies have not found this effect. This secondary analysis from a recent premedication trial comparing clonidine and midazolam aimed to test the relation between preoperative anxiety assessed with modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS) and postoperative NBCs assessed with Post Hospital Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ), regardless of premedication type.

Methods: This is a planned secondary analysis from a published premedication comparison trial in an outpatient surgery cohort, children aged 2–7 years. Participant and preoperative factors, particularly preoperative anxiety as mYPAS scores, were assessed for association with development of postoperative NBCs.

Results: Fifty-four of the 115 participants had high preinduction anxiety (mYPAS >30), and 19 of 115 developed >3 postoperative NBCs 1 week after surgery. There was no association between preinduction anxiety level as mYPAS scores and the development of postoperative NBCs at 1 week after surgery (10 of 19 had both, p =.62) nor after 4- or 26-weeks post-surgery. Only lower age was associated with development of NBCs postoperatively.

Conclusions: Based on the findings from this cohort, high preinduction anxiety does not appear to be associated with NBCs postoperatively in children premedicated with clonidine or midazolam.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
children, postoperative negative behavioral changes, postoperative recovery, preoperative anxiety
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206762 (URN)10.1111/aas.14240 (DOI)000962252500001 ()36928794 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151972127 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Umeå UniversityRegion Västerbotten
Available from: 2023-05-02 Created: 2023-05-02 Last updated: 2023-12-05Bibliographically approved
Åkesson, O., Abrahamsson, P., Johansson, G., Haney, M., Falkenback, D., Hermansson, M., . . . Johansson, J. (2023). Surface microdialysis measures local tissue metabolism after Ivor Lewis esophagectomy; an attempt to predict anastomotic defect. Diseases of the esophagus, 36(8), Article ID doac111.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface microdialysis measures local tissue metabolism after Ivor Lewis esophagectomy; an attempt to predict anastomotic defect
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2023 (English)In: Diseases of the esophagus, ISSN 1120-8694, E-ISSN 1442-2050, Vol. 36, no 8, article id doac111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anastomotic defect (AD) after esophagectomy can lead to severe complications with need for surgical or endoscopic intervention. Early detection enables early treatment and can limit the consequences of the AD. As of today, there are limited methods to predict AD. In this study, we have used microdialysis (MD) to measure local metabolism at the intrathoracic anastomosis. Feasibility and possible diagnostic use were investigated. Sixty patients planned for Ivor Lewis esophagectomy were enrolled. After construction of the anastomosis, surface MD (S-MD) probes were attached to the outer surface of the esophageal remnant and the gastric conduit in close vicinity of the anastomosis and left in place for 7 postoperative days (PODs). Continuous sampling of local tissue concentrations of metabolic substances (glucose, lactate, and pyruvate) was performed postoperatively. Outcome, defined as AD or not according to Esophagectomy Complications Consensus Group definitions, was recorded at discharge or at first postoperative follow up. Difference in concentrations of metabolic substances was analyzed retrospectively between the two groups by means of artificial neural network technique. S-MD probes can be attached and removed from the gastric tube reconstruction without any adverse events. Deviating metabolite concentrations on POD 1 were associated with later development of AD. In subjects who developed AD, no difference in metabolic concentrations between the esophageal and the gastric probe was recorded. The technical failure rate of the MD probes/procedure was high. S-MD can be used in a clinical setting after Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. Deviation in local tissue metabolism on POD 1 seems to be associated with development of AD. Further development of MD probes and procedure is required to reduce technical failure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
anastomotic leakage, esophagectomy, glucose, lactate, microdialysis
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Research subject
Anaesthesiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-202678 (URN)10.1093/dote/doac111 (DOI)000903762100001 ()36572400 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85166362437 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-12 Created: 2023-01-12 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Zickerman, C., Hult, A.-C., Hedlund, L., Winsö, O., Johansson, G. & Haney, M. (2022). Clonidine Versus Midazolam Premedication and Postoperative Negative Behavioral Changes in Younger Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 135(2), 307-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clonidine Versus Midazolam Premedication and Postoperative Negative Behavioral Changes in Younger Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2022 (English)In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, E-ISSN 1526-7598, Vol. 135, no 2, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Postoperative negative behavioral changes (NBCs) are common among children, but risk for this is thought to be reduced with premedication. Midazolam has for many years been a standard premedication for children. More recently, the alpha-2 adrenergic agonist clonidine has also become popular as a preanesthetic sedative. We hypothesized that clonidine was superior to midazolam for limiting new NBCs in children as assessed using the Post Hospital Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ).

METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, blinded study, including 115 participants aged 24 to 95 months and their parents. The participants underwent ear, nose, or throat outpatient surgery and were randomly allocated to premedication with oral midazolam 0.5 mg/kg or oral clonidine 4 µg/kg. Participants were anesthetized by protocol. At home, later, parents were asked to complete the PHBQ assessment instrument for postoperative NBCs for the participants 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months after the surgery. A secondary outcome, preinduction anxiety, was assessed using modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS).

RESULTS: The primary outcome, more than 3 NBCs in an individual case at 1 week, showed no difference in proportions between treatment in the clonidine group compared to the midazolam group, (12/59 or 20% vs 7/56 or 13%, respectively, odds ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-2.58; P =.32). A secondary result showed a higher preinduction anxiety level in the clonidine compared to the midazolam group (mYPAS >30, 43/59 or 71% vs 12/56 or 21%, respectively; P <.001).

CONCLUSIONS: These results did not show a clinical or statistically significant difference, with respect to the primary outcome of behavior changes at 1 week, between the cohorts that received midazolam versus clonidine as a premedication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2022
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Research subject
Anaesthesiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-198329 (URN)10.1213/ANE.0000000000005915 (DOI)000825790300022 ()35203087 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134632034 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-03 Created: 2022-08-03 Last updated: 2023-06-26Bibliographically approved
Fredriksson Sundbom, M., Sangfelt, A., Lindgren, E., Nyström, H., Johansson, G., Brändstrom, H. & Haney, M. (2022). Respiratory and circulatory insufficiency during emergent long-distance critical care interhospital transports to tertiary care in a sparsely populated region: a retrospective analysis of late mortality risk. BMJ Open, 12(2), Article ID e051217.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Respiratory and circulatory insufficiency during emergent long-distance critical care interhospital transports to tertiary care in a sparsely populated region: a retrospective analysis of late mortality risk
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2022 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e051217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To test if impaired oxygenation or major haemodynamic instability at the time of emergency intensive care transport, from a smaller admitting hospital to a tertiary care centre, are predictors of long-term mortality.

Design: Retrospective observational study. Impaired oxygenation was defined as oxyhaemoglobin %–inspired oxygen fraction ratio (S/F ratio)<100. Major haemodynamic instability was defined as a need for treatment with norepinephrine infusion to sustain mean arterial pressure (MAP) at or above 60 mm Hg or having a mean MAP <60. Logistic regression was used to assess mortality risk with impaired oxygenation or major haemodynamic instability.

Setting: Sparsely populated Northern Sweden. A fixed-wing interhospital air ambulance system for critical care serving 900 000 inhabitants.

Participants: Intensive care cases transported in fixed-wing air ambulance from outlying hospitals to a regional tertiary care centre during 2000–2016 for adults (16 years old or older). 2142 cases were included.

Primary and secondary outcome measures: All-cause mortality at 3 months after transport was the primary outcome, and secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality at 1 and 7 days, 1, 6 and 12 months.

Results: S/F ratio <100 was associated with increased mortality risk compared with S/F>300 at all time-points, with adjusted OR 6.3 (2.5 to 15.5, p<0.001) at 3 months. Major haemodynamic instability during intensive care unit (ICU) transport was associated with increased adjusted OR of all-cause mortality at 3 months with OR 2.5 (1.8 to 3.5, p<0.001).

Conclusion: Major impairment of oxygenation and/or major haemodynamic instability at the time of ICU transport to get to urgent tertiary intervention is strongly associated with increased mortality risk at 3 months in this cohort. These findings support the conclusion that these conditions are markers for many fold increase in risk for death notable already at 3 months after transport for patients with these conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2022
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-192545 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2021-051217 (DOI)000780118100029 ()35168967 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124679769 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Västerbotten
Available from: 2022-02-16 Created: 2022-02-16 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Thurm, M., Hultin, M., Johansson, G., Kröger Dahlin, B.-I., Winsö, O. & Ljungberg, B. (2022). Spinal anaesthesia with clonidine: pain relief and earlier mobilisation after open nephrectomy – a randomised clinical trial. Journal of international medical research, 50(9), 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spinal anaesthesia with clonidine: pain relief and earlier mobilisation after open nephrectomy – a randomised clinical trial
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2022 (English)In: Journal of international medical research, ISSN 0300-0605, E-ISSN 1473-2300, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Early mobilisation and effective pain management after open nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma often include epidural analgesia (EDA), requiring an infusion pump and a urinary catheter, thus impeding mobilisation. Spinal anaesthesia (SpA) may be an alternative. This randomised clinical trial evaluated whether SpA improves analgesia and facilitates mobilisation over EDA and which factors influence mobilisation and length of stay (LOS).

Methods: Between 2012 and 2015, 135 patients were randomised and stratified by surgical method to either SpA with clonidine or EDA. Mobility index score (MobIs), pain scale, patient satisfaction questionnaire, and LOS were the main outcome measures.

Results: SpA patients exhibited an increase in MobIs significantly earlier than EDA patients. Among SpA patients >50% reached MobIs ≥13 by postoperative day 3, while 29% of EDA patients never reached MobIs ≥13 before discharge. SpA patients had higher maximum pain scores on postoperative days 1 and 2, but both groups had similar patient satisfaction. One day before discharge, 36/64 SpA versus 22/67 EDA patients (56% and 33%, respectively) were opioid-free. SpA patients were discharged significantly earlier than EDA patients.

Conclusions: SpA facilitates postoperative pain management and is associated with faster mobilisation and shorter LOS.

The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.org (ID-NCT02030717).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
National Category
Geriatrics Occupational Health and Environmental Health Surgery
Research subject
Anaesthesiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-199864 (URN)10.1177/03000605221126883 (DOI)000864163600001 ()36177827 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85138955478 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Västerbotten
Available from: 2022-09-30 Created: 2022-09-30 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Spyckerelle, I., Jonsson Fagerlund, M., Holmgren, E., Johansson, G., Sahlin-Ingridsson, C., Thunberg, J. & Franklin, K. A. (2021). Positive Expiratory Pressure Therapy on Oxygen Saturation and Ventilation After Abdominal Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Annals of surgery open, 2(4), Article ID e101.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Positive Expiratory Pressure Therapy on Oxygen Saturation and Ventilation After Abdominal Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2021 (English)In: Annals of surgery open, ISSN 2691-3593, Vol. 2, no 4, article id e101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate the immediate effects of positive expiratory pressure therapy on oxygen saturation and ventilation after abdominal surgery.

Background: Positive expiratory pressure therapy to treat postoperative hypoxia is widespread, despite a lack of evidence of effect.

Methods: This randomized, sham-controlled, crossover trial investigated adults 1–2 days after abdominal surgery at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden. The intervention was positive expiratory pressure of 10–15 cm H2O. The control was a sham device. The investigations were ended with deep-breathing maneuvers. Outcomes were the gradient of changes in peripheral oxygen saturation and transcutaneous carbon-dioxide partial pressure (PtcCO2).

Results: Eighty patients were included and randomized and 76 patients were analyzed. Oxygen saturation increased from a baseline mean of 92% to 95%, P < 0.001, during positive expiratory pressure breathing, while PtcCO2 decreased from a mean of 36 to 33 mm Hg, P < 0.001. This was followed by apnea, oxygen desaturations to a mean of 89%, P < 0.001, and increased PtcCO2 before returning to baseline values. The changes in oxygen saturation and PtcCO2 did not differ from sham breathing or deep-breathing maneuvers.

Conclusions: Positive expiratory pressure breathing after abdominal surgery improves oxygen saturation during the maneuver because of hyperventilation, but it is followed by apnea, hypoventilation, and oxygen desaturation. The effect is not different from the expiration to a sham device or hyperventilation. It is time to stop positive expiratory pressure therapy after abdominal surgery, as there is no evidence of effect in previous trials, apart from the adverse effects reported here.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2021
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193283 (URN)10.1097/AS9.0000000000000101 (DOI)
Available from: 2022-03-24 Created: 2022-03-24 Last updated: 2024-04-18Bibliographically approved
Fredriksson Sundbom, M., Sandberg, J., Johansson, G., Brändstrom, H., Nyström, H. & Haney, M. (2021). Total Mission Time and Mortality in a Regional Interhospital Critical Care Transport System: A Retrospective Observational Study. Air Medical Journal, 40(6), 404-409
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Total Mission Time and Mortality in a Regional Interhospital Critical Care Transport System: A Retrospective Observational Study
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2021 (English)In: Air Medical Journal, ISSN 1067-991X, E-ISSN 1532-6497, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 404-409Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: We assessed the mortality risk related to the time for intensive care unit transport in a geographically large regional health care system.

Methods: Patient-level data from critical care ambulance missions were analyzed for 2,067 cases, mission time, and relevant patient factors. Mission time was used as a surrogate for the “distance” to tertiary care, and mortality at 7 days and other intervals was assessed.

Results: No increased mortality risk was found at 7 days in an unadjusted regression analysis (odds ratio = 1.00; range, 0.999-1.002; P = .66). In a secondary analysis, an increased mortality risk was observed in longer mission time subgroups and at later mortality assessment intervals (> 375 mission minutes and 90-day mortality; adjusted hazard ratio = 1.56; range, 1.07-2.28; P = .02). Negative changes in oxygenation and hemodynamic status and transport-related adverse events were associated with the longest flight times. Measurable but small changes during flight were noted for mean arterial pressure and oxygenation.

Conclusion: The main finding was that there was no overall difference in mortality risk based on mission time. We conclude that transport distances or accessibility to critical care in the tertiary care center in a geographically large but sparsely populated region is not clearly associated with mortality risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Emergency, Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care, Critical Care, Fixed-wing
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189651 (URN)10.1016/j.amj.2021.08.005 (DOI)2-s2.0-85115193240 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Västerbotten
Available from: 2021-11-17 Created: 2021-11-17 Last updated: 2022-04-14Bibliographically approved
Jacobson, S., Larsson, P., Åberg, A.-M., Johansson, G., Winsö, O. & Söderberg, S. (2020). Levels of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) associates with sepsis-related in-hospital mortality in women. Journal of Inflammation, 17, Article ID 28.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) associates with sepsis-related in-hospital mortality in women
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Inflammation, E-ISSN 1476-9255, Vol. 17, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) mediates the innate immune response either through direct opsonisation of microorganisms or through activation of the complement system. There are conflicting data whether MBL deficiency leads to increased susceptibility to infections or not. The aim of this study was to determine if low levels of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) predict sepsis development, sepsis severity and outcome from severe sepsis or septic shock.

Method: Patients aged 18 years or more with documented sepsis within 24 h after admission to the intensive care unit were included if they had participated in a health survey and donated blood samples prior to the sepsis event. A subset of these patients had stored plasma also from the acute phase. Two matched referents free of known sepsis were selected for each case. Plasma levels MBL were determined in stored samples from health surveys (baseline) and from ICU admission (acute phase). The association between MBL and sepsis, sepsis severity and in-hospital mortality were determined with 1300 ng/mL as cut-off for low levels.

Results: We identified 148 patients (61.5% women) with a first-time sepsis event 6.5 years (median with IQR 7.7) after participation in a health survey, of which 122 also had samples from the acute septic phase. Both high MBL levels in the acute phase (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) (2.84 [1.20-6.26]), and an increase in MBL levels from baseline to the acute phase (3.76 [1.21-11.72]) were associated with increased risk for in-hospital death in women, but not in men (0.47 [0.11-2.06]). Baseline MBL levels did not predict future sepsis, sepsis severity or in-hospital mortality.

Conclusions: An increase from baseline to the acute phase as well as high levels in the acute phase associated with an unfavourable outcome in women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2020
Keywords
Case-referent study, Mannose-binding lectin, Sepsis, Sex
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174636 (URN)10.1186/s12950-020-00257-1 (DOI)000563905400002 ()32817747 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85091654389 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-28 Created: 2020-08-28 Last updated: 2023-10-04Bibliographically approved
Åkesson, O., Falkenback, D., Johansson, G. & Abrahamsson, P. (2020). Surface Microdialysis Detects Ischemia After Esophageal Resection: An Experimental Animal Study. Journal of Surgical Research, 245, 537-543
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface Microdialysis Detects Ischemia After Esophageal Resection: An Experimental Animal Study
2020 (English)In: Journal of Surgical Research, ISSN 0022-4804, E-ISSN 1095-8673, Vol. 245, p. 537-543Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: After an esophageal resection, continuity is commonly restored by a gastric tube reconstruction and an intrathoracic anastomosis to the remaining proximal esophagus. Ischemia of the anastomotic region is considered to play a pivotal role in anastomotic leakage. Microdialysis (μD) is an excellent method to measure local biochemical substances and parameters in a specific organ or compartment aiming at early detection of ischemia. This animal study evaluates ischemia of the gastric tube reconstruction using a novel method-μD on organ surfaces. This promising method may have the potential to detect an anastomotic leakage before clinical symptoms develop.

METHODS: Anesthetized normoventilated pigs were used. Surface microdialysis (S-μD) catheters and an intraparenchymal oxygen tension catheter were placed on the stomach. A gastric tube was made and the gastroepiploic artery was divided halfway along the greater curvature to produce severe ischemia at the top of the gastric tube. μD data from four locations (gastric tube, ileum and peritoneal cavity) were recorded every 20 min during the experiment. Tissue samples from all catheter sites underwent histopathological analysis. Intraparenchymal oxygen partial pressure, systemic blood tests, and hemodynamic parameters were recorded.

RESULTS: S-μD data showed values indicating severe ischemia at the top of the gastric tube and intermediate ischemia at the level of transection of the gastroepiploic artery. Ischemia was verified by histopathological analysis of tissue samples and intraparenchymal oxygen tension data.

CONCLUSIONS: S-μD can detect and grade severity of local ischemia in real time, in an animal model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Ischemia, Metabolism, Microdialysis
National Category
Surgery Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162922 (URN)10.1016/j.jss.2019.07.060 (DOI)000500939000071 ()31470334 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071308771 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Talsi, O., Berggren, R. K., Johansson, G. & Winsö, O. (2019). A national survey on routines regarding sedation in Swedish intensive care units. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 37(23), 3088-3096
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A national survey on routines regarding sedation in Swedish intensive care units
2019 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 37, no 23, p. 3088-3096Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies concerning sedation in Swedish intensive care units (ICU) have shown variability in drug choices and strategies. Currently, there are no national guidelines on this topic. As an update to a Nordic survey from 2004, and as a follow-up to a recently introduced quality indicator from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry, we performed a national survey.

Methods: A digital survey was sent to the ICUs in Sweden, asking for sedation routines regarding hypnosedatives, analgosedatives, protocols, sedation scales, etc.

Results: Fifty out of 80 ICUs responded to the survey. All units used sedation scales, and 88% used the RASS scale; 80% used written guidelines for sedation. Propofol and dexmedetomidine were the preferred short-term hypnosedatives. Propofol, dexmedetomidine, and midazolam were preferred for long-term hypnosedation. Remifentanil, morphine, and fentanyl were the most frequently used agents for analgosedation.

Conclusions: All ICUs used a sedation scale, an increase compared with previous studies. Concerning the choice of hypno- and analgosedatives, the use of dexmedetomidine, clonidine, and remifentanil has increased, and the use of benzodiazepines has decreased since the Nordic survey in 2004.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Analgesics, intensive care, mechanical ventilation, sedation scale, sedatives
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160299 (URN)10.1080/03009734.2019.1616339 (DOI)000469543300001 ()31119971 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066816712 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-17 Created: 2019-06-17 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5325-2688

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