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Bäckström, A., Rudolfsson, T., Johansson, A.-M., Rönnqvist, L., Rosander, K., Von Hofsten, C. & Domellöf, E. (2023). Atypical motor planning in an interpersonal context in 9-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In: Katja Groleger Sršen; Christopher Newman (Ed.), 35th EACD Annual meeting European Academy of Childhood Disability: Book of abstracts. Paper presented at EACD 2023, 35th EACD Annual Meeting European Academy of Childhood Disability, Ljubljana, Slovenia, May 24-27, 2023. (pp. 254-254). European Academy of Childhood Disability
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atypical motor planning in an interpersonal context in 9-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
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2023 (English)In: 35th EACD Annual meeting European Academy of Childhood Disability: Book of abstracts / [ed] Katja Groleger Sršen; Christopher Newman, European Academy of Childhood Disability , 2023, p. 254-254Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Motor planning deviances may negatively affect interpersonal motor interactions in ASD, although detailed studies are sparse. This study examined motor planning kinematics in an interpersonal and non-interpersonal context in 9-year-old children with ASD and neurotypical peers.

Patients and methods: Twelve children with ASD and 17 controls performed two different sequential manual tasks (preferred hand): grasping and placing a peg on a wooden disc (non-interpersonal) or in the hand of an examiner (interpersonal). Three-dimensional kinematic recordings of arm/hand movements were performed. Group and task differences were explored for total movement duration (MD), and for peak velocity (PV) and placement of peak velocity (PPV) during reach-to-grasp and transport-to-place movements, respectively.

Results: Task differences were found in terms of longer MD and higher transport-to-place-PV in the disc- compared to hand-task. An interaction effect was evident for reach-to-grasp-PPV, where the control-group, but not ASD, had earlier reach-to-grasp-PPV and longer relative deceleration in the hand-task compared to the disc-task.

Conclusion: Results show that the interpersonal context influenced initial reach-to-grasp motor planning in the control-group, but not the ASD-group. Later in the sequential movement (transport-to-place), the interpersonal context seemed to influence motor planning independent of group. Taken together, this indicates support towards a more careful peg-placing in the interpersonal hand-task in the control-group but much less clearly so in the ASD-group.

Relevance for users and families: Atypical motor planning may influence motor interaction with peers. Investigations of motor planning and movement organization in ASD could thus inform interventions also targeting interpersonal exchange.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Academy of Childhood Disability, 2023
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215263 (URN)
Conference
EACD 2023, 35th EACD Annual Meeting European Academy of Childhood Disability, Ljubljana, Slovenia, May 24-27, 2023.
Available from: 2023-10-13 Created: 2023-10-13 Last updated: 2023-10-13Bibliographically approved
Rönnqvist, L., Domellöf, E., Johansson, A.-M., Riklund, K. & Lenfeldt, N. (2022). Corpus callosum white matter microstructures links to cognitive performance and functional laterality in preterm and term born children. Paper presented at 34th Annual Meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), Barcelona, Spain, May 18–21, 2022. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 64(S3), 46-46, Article ID OC-096.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corpus callosum white matter microstructures links to cognitive performance and functional laterality in preterm and term born children
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2022 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 64, no S3, p. 46-46, article id OC-096Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Knowledge is lacking concerning long-term influences of preterm birth on action-cognition integrations related to corpus callosum (CC) maturation/myelination. Here, we investigate long-term-effects of preterm-birth on CC microstructures/organization in relation to cognition and functional-laterality.

Patients and methods: The sample included 82 children, 41 term-born (M-age=8.1y), and 41 preterm-born (M-age=8.2y); subdivided into V-PT, (GA=25–32w, N=23), and M-PT, (GA=33–35w, N=18), without major brain-deficits. DTI performed in 3T-MRI-scanners, generated maps of CC Genu, Truncus, Splenium (FA, MD, AD, RD-values). Results from WISC-IV (verbal-comprehension-VCI, perceptual-reasoning-PRI, working-memory-WM, processing-speed-PS, FSIQ), and Laterality-index (hand-, foot-, eye-preference) were analyzed related to DTI-outcomes.

Results: Significant group difference found regarding CC-FA-values (F(2,79)=5,3527, p=.006), post-hoc-test showed that VPT differed from term (p=.015) and MPT-born (p=.016), by lower FA-Genu, Truncus, Splenium. This pattern also found for MD, RD, and AD-values. Positive-correlations (p<.01) found between GA and all CC-FA-values, and negatively for all MD, RD and AD-Splenium. VPT-born showed lower (p=.005) FSIQ (M=93) than term (M=103). Correlations (p<.05) found between WM and CC-FA-values in Genu for VPT-born, and between CC-FA-values in Genu, Truncus and PRI-index (p<.01) for term-born. VPT-born showed lower Hand- and overall-laterality-index than term and MPT, and no significant correlations between laterality-index and CC-values. Term and MPT-children showed positive correlations (p<.01) between decreasing overall-laterality-index and FA-values, and negative for MD-Splenum, RD-Splenium and RD-Truncus. 

Conclusion: DTI revealed evidence for long-term impact of very-premature birth on CC related to atypical hemispheric maturation and behavioral integrations compared to term-born controls. The findings highlight importance of including functional-laterality to models investigating brain white-matter-microstructures.

Keywords
preterm, children, dMRI, corpus callosum, cognitive performance, laterality
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Psychology; Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-195282 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.15214 (DOI)
Conference
34th Annual Meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), Barcelona, Spain, May 18–21, 2022
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015 – 01353Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, SAB20-0039
Available from: 2022-05-26 Created: 2022-05-26 Last updated: 2023-05-04Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A.-M., Rudolfsson, T., Bäckström, A., Rönnqvist, L., von Hofsten, C., Rosander, K. & Domellöf, E. (2022). Development of motor imagery in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder: a longitudinal study. Brain Sciences, 12(10), Article ID 1307.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of motor imagery in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder: a longitudinal study
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2022 (English)In: Brain Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 12, no 10, article id 1307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a diagnosis based on social communication deficits and prevalence of repetitive stereotyped behaviors, but sensorimotor disturbances are commonly exhibited. This longitudinal study aimed at exploring the development of the ability to form mental motor representations (motor imagery; MI) in 14 children with ASD and 17 typically developing (TD) children at 7, 8 and 9 years of age. MI was investigated using a hand laterality paradigm from which response times (RT) and error rates were extracted and compared with performance on a visually based mental rotation task (VI). A criterion task was used to ensure that the children could perform the task. The results showed wide performance variability in the ASD group with more failures than TD in the MI criterion task, especially at 7 years. For all age levels and both the MI and VI tasks, the error rates were significantly higher and RTs longer for the ASD group compared with TD. Signs of MI strategies were however noted in the ASD group as biomechanically constrained orientations had longer RTs than less constrained orientations, a RT pattern that differed from the VI task. The presence of MI in the ASD group was most evident at 9 years, but the error rates remained high at all ages, both in the MI and VI task. In comparison, the TD group showed stable MI strategies at all ages. These findings indicate that MI ability is delayed and/or impaired in children with ASD which may be related to difficulties performing required mental rotations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
autism spectrum disorder, development, longitudinal, motor imagery, visual imagery
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200825 (URN)10.3390/brainsci12101307 (DOI)000872423700001 ()36291242 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85140593620 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2015.0192Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2020.0200
Available from: 2022-11-14 Created: 2022-11-14 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, A., Rudolfsson, T., Johansson, A.-M., Rönnqvist, L., Rosander, K., Von Hofsten, C. & Domellöf, E. (2022). Visuomotor integration in action planning in 7-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder. In: Specia issue: Abstracts of the 34th annual meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD) Barcelona, Spain 18-21 May 2022: . Paper presented at EACD 2022, 34th Annual Meeting European Academy of Childhood Disability, Barcelona, Spain, May 18-21, 2022. (pp. 65-65). Mac Keith Press, Article ID P-060.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visuomotor integration in action planning in 7-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder
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2022 (English)In: Specia issue: Abstracts of the 34th annual meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD) Barcelona, Spain 18-21 May 2022, Mac Keith Press, 2022, p. 65-65, article id P-060Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Difficulties with action planning and visuomotor integration may contribute to atypical motorfunctioning in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), although detailed studies of sensorimotorintegration in action planning are sparse. This ongoing study investigates visuomotor integration in actionplanning in 7-year-old children with and without ASD.

Patients and methods: A sub-sample of 6 children with ASD and 6 typically developing (TD) controls wereincluded. Recordings of gaze synchronized with 3D kinematic registration were made during performance of amanual sequential peg rotation task with variations in goal insertion complexity. Group differences and relations between movement duration and number of gaze shifts over the sequential movement phases(latency, reach-to-grasp, grasp, and transport-to-fit) were explored.

Results: No significant group differences were found for either movement duration or number of gaze shifts.When controlling for the between-participants variance, total number of gaze shifts and number of gaze shiftsin reach-to-grasp were related to movement duration in the initial phases of the movement in the TD-group but not in the ASD-group.

Conclusion: The results indicate that, whilst performance measures were similar between groups, the overallpattern of visuomotor integration was related to feed-forward movement processes in the sequentialmovement in the TD-group but not in the ASD-group. This finding adds support to previous suggestions thatvisuomotor integration underpinning action planning may operate differently in ASD. Synchronizedexamination of gaze and detailed movement registration appears as a promising methodology for detailed investigation of visuomotor integration in action planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mac Keith Press, 2022
Series
Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology (DMCN), ISSN 1469-8749 ; 2022:64(S3)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-197173 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.15215 (DOI)
Conference
EACD 2022, 34th Annual Meeting European Academy of Childhood Disability, Barcelona, Spain, May 18-21, 2022.
Available from: 2022-06-23 Created: 2022-06-23 Last updated: 2022-07-04Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A., Bäckström, A., Rudolfsson, T., Rönnqvist, L. & Domellöf, E. (2021). Action preparation, performance and motor imagery in children with autism spectrum disorder. Paper presented at 33rd EACD Annual Meeting, "Childhood Disability in a Changing World", Europe (Virtual), May-June, 2021. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 63(S2), 39, Article ID 36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Action preparation, performance and motor imagery in children with autism spectrum disorder
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2021 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 63, no S2, p. 39-, article id 36Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Motor anomalies are frequent in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Effective and efficient motor acts rely on the formation of motor plans that serve as predictive models or blue-prints of upcoming actions. We studied movement initiation latencies (MILs) and movement durations in a peg-rotation (PR) task and response times (RT) in a motor imagery (MI) task in children with ASD.

Patients and Methods: Thirteen 7–8 year-old children with ASD (4 girls) and 17 typically developing (TD) children (9 girls) participated. MILs and PR task duration, extracted from 3D kinematic recordings, and RTs on a MI task (hand laterality judgement task) was compared between children with ASD and TD. The PR-task varied in constraints and the possibility to pre-plan actions was experimentally controlled.

Results: Nine of the ASD children passed the MI task showing biomechanical constraints effect but the error rate was however higher than in TD. The MILs on the PR-task were shorter when pre-planning was possible, indicating a time cost for movement planning. This cost was highest for the children who failed the MI task, specifically for the PR-task with the highest constraint where task durations also were the highest. Overall, TD children had shorter PR-task durations than ASD.

Conclusion: MI ability was highly varied for the ASD children. Interestingly, the children with ASD failing the MI task showed the greatest increase in MILs in relation to task difficulty indicative of pre-planning. They also had increased task durations, specifically for the most difficult condition, suggestive of poorer on-line control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
movement planning, autism spectrum disorder, motor imagery
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-183276 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.14882 (DOI)
Conference
33rd EACD Annual Meeting, "Childhood Disability in a Changing World", Europe (Virtual), May-June, 2021
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2015.0192Swedish Research Council, 2015 – 01353
Note

Special Issue: Abstracts of the 33rd Annual Meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), Europe (Virtual), May–June 2021

Poster presentation 36

Available from: 2021-05-20 Created: 2021-05-20 Last updated: 2023-03-14Bibliographically approved
Grip, H., Johansson, A.-M., Rönnqvist, L., Boraxbekk, C.-J. & Häger, C. (2021). Individual finger movement control and association to brain activity in healthy participants. In: : . Paper presented at XXVIII Congress of the International Society Biomechanics (ISB), Digital, July 25-29, 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual finger movement control and association to brain activity in healthy participants
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2021 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Physiotherapy; Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223310 (URN)
Conference
XXVIII Congress of the International Society Biomechanics (ISB), Digital, July 25-29, 2021
Available from: 2024-04-12 Created: 2024-04-12 Last updated: 2024-04-15Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A.-M., Grip, H., Rönnqvist, L., Selling, J., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Strong, A. & Häger, C. (2021). Influence of visual feedback, hand dominance and sex on individuated finger movements. Experimental Brain Research, 239(6), 1911-1928
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of visual feedback, hand dominance and sex on individuated finger movements
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2021 (English)In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 239, no 6, p. 1911-1928Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to perform individual finger movements, highly important in daily activities, involves visual monitoring and proprioception. We investigated the influence of vision on the spatial and temporal control of independent finger movements, for the dominant and non-dominant hand and in relation to sex. Twenty-six healthy middle-aged to old adults (M age = 61 years; range 46–79 years; females n = 13) participated. Participants performed cyclic flexion–extension movements at the metacarpophalangeal joint of one finger at a time while keeping the other fingers as still as possible. Movements were recorded using 3D optoelectronic motion technique (120 Hz). The movement trajectory distance; speed peaks (movement smoothness); Individuation Index (II; the degree a finger can move in isolation from the other fingers) and Stationarity Index (SI; how still a finger remains while the other fingers move) were extracted. The main findings were: (1) vision only improved the II and SI marginally; (2) longer trajectories were evident in the no-vision condition for the fingers of the dominant hand in the female group; (3) longer trajectories were specifically evident for the middle and ring fingers within the female group; (4) females had marginally higher II and SI compared with males; and (5) females had fewer speed peaks than males, particularly for the ring finger. Our results suggest that visual monitoring of finger movements marginally improves performance of our non-manipulative finger movement task. A consistent finding was that females showed greater independent finger control compared with males.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Finger movements, Kinematics, Motor control, Sex differences, Spatiotemporal, Vision
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182943 (URN)10.1007/s00221-021-06100-0 (DOI)000641194800003 ()2-s2.0-85104833016 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region VästerbottenKonung Gustaf V:s och Drottning Victorias FrimurarestiftelseSwedish Research Council, 2015 – 01353
Available from: 2021-05-11 Created: 2021-05-11 Last updated: 2022-05-12Bibliographically approved
Rönnqvist, L., Domellöf, E., Johansson, A.-M., Riklund, K. & Lenfeldt, N. (2021). Long-term effects of a preterm birth on cerebellar volumes and myelination: links to children's cognitive and motor performance at 8-years of age. In: : . Paper presented at Fetal and Neonatal Neurology - From basic science to clinical application, Online, March 3-5, 2021. MCA scientific events, Article ID EA62.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term effects of a preterm birth on cerebellar volumes and myelination: links to children's cognitive and motor performance at 8-years of age
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2021 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND: Recent studies have found that a reduced growth of the cerebellum is associated with poorer scores on both general intelligence tests and motor balance tests (Matthews et al., 2018) in children born preterm (PT), and that lower test scores may be persistent in adolescents born very PT (Allin et al., 2001). Notably, even low-risk children born PT at 9-years of age have been reported displaying regional brain volume reduction in the cerebellum (Arhan et al., 2017). So far, however, few studies have been conducted on cerebellar volumes and the role of its myelinated content, and if/how cerebellar myelination is associated with cognitive and kinematic outcome performance in children born PT.

To this end, the present study aim was to investigate whether cerebellar volumes were associated with gestational age (GA) and/or birth weight (BW) in a sample of children born PT (without known focal lesions) compared to controls (term born). We also wished to explore whether the cerebellum volumetric analyses, targeting the amount of myelinated content, would be linked to the children’s cognitive and motor performance. 

PATIENTS AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 59 children investigated at early school-age (M = 8.17 years), 27 born PT (divided into moderately PT, MPT, and very PT, VPT) and 32 born full-term (FT). Brain scans were conducted by a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner and Synthetic MRI (SyMRI) was used to investigate brain and cerebellar volumes and additionally, the amount of myelin content. Cognitive performance was assessed by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 4th Edition (WISC-IV), and goal-directed upper-limb movement kinematics were recorded by a 6-camera, optoelectronic 3D registrations system (240Hz). 

RESULTS: The results displayed reduced volumes of the cerebellum for children born VPT (see Table 1), and  smaller volumes were significantly associated with lower GA and BW. Children born VPT showed significantly lower full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) scores than children born MPT and FT. Overall, reduced myelinated content in the cerebellum was also significantly associated with lower FSIQ scores (see Fig.1). The children born VPT further displayed significantly poorer upper-limb kinematics than the other groups. However, no evident overall (independent of GA at birth) correlation was found between reduced volumes of the cerebellum and the kinematic performance. 

CONCLUSIONS: A very preterm birth (< 32 weeks’ of gestation) increases the risk for long-term effects on cerebellar volumes, including less myelin content, and poorer cognitive and motor performance. The findings emphasize the importance of myelinated content in cerebellum and its role for cognitive function and upper-limb movement performance in children born very preterm. These findings merit for further longitudinal studies including bigger samples of both preterm and term born infants and children.

Keywords: preterm, children, cerebellum, brain volumes, myelin, cognitive functioning, motor functioning

References:

Matthews et al., Longitudinal preterm cerebellar volume: perinatal and neurodevelopmental outcome associations. The Cerebellum, 2018, 17(5), 610-627.

Allin et al., Cognitive and motor function and the size of the cerebellum in adolescents born very pre-term. Brain, 2001, 124(1), 60-66.

Arhan et al., Regional brain volume reduction and cognitive outcomes in preterm children at low risk at 9 years of age. Child's Nervous System, 2017, 33, 8, 1317–1326.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MCA scientific events, 2021
National Category
Pediatrics Neurosciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182195 (URN)
Conference
Fetal and Neonatal Neurology - From basic science to clinical application, Online, March 3-5, 2021
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015 – 01353Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2021-04-12 Created: 2021-04-12 Last updated: 2023-03-07Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, A., Johansson, A.-M., Rudolfsson, T., Rönnqvist, L., von Hofsten, C., Rosander, K. & Domellöf, E. (2021). Motor planning and movement execution during goal-directed sequential manual movements in 6-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder: A kinematic analysis. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 115, Article ID 104014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motor planning and movement execution during goal-directed sequential manual movements in 6-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder: A kinematic analysis
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2021 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 115, article id 104014Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Atypical motor functioning is prevalent in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Knowledge of the underlying kinematic properties of these problems is sparse.

Aims: To investigate characteristics of manual motor planning and performance difficulties/diversity in children with ASD by detailed kinematic measurements. Further, associations between movement parameters and cognitive functions were explored.

Methods and procedures: Six-year-old children with ASD (N = 12) and typically developing (TD) peers (N = 12) performed a sequential manual task comprising grasping and fitting a semi-circular peg into a goal-slot. The goal-slot orientation was manipulated to impose different motor planning constraints. Movements were recorded by an optoelectronic system.

Outcomes and results: The ASD-group displayed less efficient motor planning than the TD-group, evident in the reach-to-grasp and transport kinematics and less proactive adjustments of the peg to the goal-slot orientations. The intra-individual variation of movement kinematics was higher in the ASD-group compared to the TD-group. Further, in the ASD-group, movement performance associated negatively with cognitive functions.

Conclusions and implications: Planning and execution of sequential manual movements proved challenging for children with ASD, likely contributing to problems in everyday actions. Detailed kinematic investigations contribute to the generation of specific knowledge about the nature of atypical motor performance/diversity in ASD. This is of potential clinical relevance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Autism spectrum disorder, Children, Developmental disabilities, Intelligence, Kinematic analysis, Motor planning, Working memory
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-185544 (URN)10.1016/j.ridd.2021.104014 (DOI)000671568800007 ()2-s2.0-85108424202 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2015.0192Swedish Research Council, 2015 - 01353
Available from: 2021-06-30 Created: 2021-06-30 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Walton, L., Eriksson Domellöf, M., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Domellöf, E., Rönnqvist, L., Bäckström, D., . . . Stigsdotter Neely, A. (2021). The Effects of Working Memory Updating Training in Parkinson's Disease: A Feasibility and Single-Subject Study on Cognition, Movement and Functional Brain Response. Frontiers in Psychology, 11, Article ID 587925.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effects of Working Memory Updating Training in Parkinson's Disease: A Feasibility and Single-Subject Study on Cognition, Movement and Functional Brain Response
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2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 11, article id 587925Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Parkinson's disease (PD), the fronto-striatal network is involved in motor and cognitive symptoms. Working memory (WM) updating training engages this network in healthy populations, as observed by improved cognitive performance and increased striatal BOLD signal. This two-part study aimed to assess the feasibility of WM updating training in PD and measure change in cognition, movement and functional brain response in one individual with PD after WM updating training. A feasibility and single-subject (FL) study were performed in which patients with PD completed computerized WM updating training. The outcome measures were the pre-post changes in criterion and transfer cognitive tests; cognitive complaints; psychological health; movement kinematics; and task-related BOLD signal. Participants in the feasibility study showed improvements on the criterion tests at post-test. FL displayed the largest improvements on the criterion tests and smaller improvements on transfer tests. Furthermore, FL reported improved cognitive performance in everyday life. A shorter onset latency and smoother upper-limb goal-directed movements were measured at post-test, as well as increased activation within the striatum and decreased activation throughout the fronto-parietal WM network. This two-part study demonstrated that WM updating training is feasible to complete for PD patients and that change occurred in FL at post-test in the domains of cognition, movement and functional brain response.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2021
Keywords
Parkinson's disease, cognitive training, cognition, working memory, movement kinematics, functional magnetic resonance imaging
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology
Research subject
Neurology; Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-180163 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2020.587925 (DOI)000612001800001 ()33519604 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85100012546 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-22 Created: 2021-02-22 Last updated: 2023-05-03Bibliographically approved
Projects
The relation between sensory-motor and behavior functioning and brain development and organization in preterm born children: A quasi-longitudinal design [2011-01790_VR]; Umeå UniversityLong-term impact of an extremely preterm birth: associations between brain structure/function, movement organization and cognitive performance at 12-years of age [2015-01353_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3710-8368

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