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Wilson, Timothy
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Publications (10 of 116) Show all publications
Wilson, T. & Jacobsson, M. (2022). Social constructs and two factor successes: the Sydney opera house. In: : . Paper presented at Pennsylvania Economic Association (PEA) Conference, Gannon University, Pennsylvania, USA, June 2-4, 2022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social constructs and two factor successes: the Sydney opera house
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Megaprojects are big and bold, but they almost always overshoot in costs and time. Their patterns tend to follow the ‘iron law’ of megaprojects, “over budget, over time, over and over again”. In this regard, the poster child of megaproject failures is the Sydney Opera House. That is, among alleged failures, it is one of the worst. Built in 1959-1973, it had a 1,400 % overrun in cost and ran six years behind schedule. That approach to evaluation is harsh.  Both of us has been to Sydney and have visited the Opera House. Since it opened in 1973 the Opera House has repaid its A$100 million many times over as a tourist attraction and as a cultural center, the expert evaluation report to the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, 2007 asserted, “It stands by itself as one of the indisputable masterpieces of human creativity, not only in the 20th century but in the history of humankind”. Consequently, we are motivated to look at success in megaprojects. In that regard, the purpose of this paper is to continue the extended processes used for megaproject evaluations. In particular, it introduces the concepts of social construct reality and a two-factor approach to assessing success. The paper should be of interest to economists because it relates to commissioning of ultra-large projects and their eventual paybacks. 

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-197488 (URN)
Conference
Pennsylvania Economic Association (PEA) Conference, Gannon University, Pennsylvania, USA, June 2-4, 2022
Available from: 2022-06-29 Created: 2022-06-29 Last updated: 2023-06-01Bibliographically approved
Burström, T., Wilson, T. & Wincent, J. (2020). Dynamics of after-sales managers' strategizing work: What, why and how. Journal of Business Research, 110, 119-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamics of after-sales managers' strategizing work: What, why and how
2020 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 110, p. 119-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The strategizing work of After-sales managers is understudied. This paper therefore investigate how after-sales strategies actually come about in early phases of product development. The study builds on three month observations and 68 interviews. This paper studies a radical vehicle platform project where the participating organizations organized product development through cross-functional project teams. First, this paper penetrates the "black box" of activities that after-sales managers must avail themselves, and the strategy work that after-sales managers perform in practice. Second, we develop a framework explaining and defining the dynamics of after-sales strategizing work. Third, we develop a process model capturing the activities of after-sales strategizing process. Four, after-sales has been given a marginal role in strategy and strategizing. This paper therefore contributes to the strategy-as-practice research stream where we show and elaborate upon the mechanisms in the dynamics of strategy work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
After-sales, Platform, Projects, Strategy, Radical, Development
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170520 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.12.049 (DOI)000527382500009 ()2-s2.0-85077984866 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-05-07 Created: 2020-05-07 Last updated: 2021-01-14Bibliographically approved
Wilson, T. & Lindbergh, L. (2019). Reflections on a green new deal: Swedish sustainability. In: Sigmond, N., Belloit, J. and Myers, C. (Ed.), : . Paper presented at National Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference, Penn State, PA, November 7-8, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflections on a green new deal: Swedish sustainability
2019 (English)In: / [ed] Sigmond, N., Belloit, J. and Myers, C., 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Presently, there has been a discussion of a “Green Bill of Rights” in the U.S.  Two of the elements in this discussion include affordable housing and ecological sustainability, areas in which Sweden is an acknowledged leader.  That is, Sweden is perceived as sustaining a high level of competitiveness while producing a pleasant environment in which to live.  In effect, the Swedish State is involved in municipal public housing and sustainability is the responsibility of Government Offices as a whole, which produces proactive programs in these sectors.  The task of implementing Sweden’s strategy for sustainable development has illustrated a holistic approach and the State has played a major role in its development. Insofar as Sweden might be a model for other countries interested in extending their efforts in sustainable development (perhaps the U.S.), observations here provide some insights into possible approaches and results.  Put another way, the paper involves some consideration of “how did we get here and where are we going?”  The framework for this paper associates sustainability with Zhang and London’s modified Porter model and treats elements of municipal public housing, domestic airline travel and forest products in construction. 

Keywords
Sweden Sustainability
National Category
Economics and Business Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165226 (URN)
Conference
National Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference, Penn State, PA, November 7-8, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2020-02-07Bibliographically approved
Wilson, T. L. & Lindbergh, L. (2019). The continued progression of Sweden's sustainable (green) economy. In: Yang, X. (ed.) (Ed.), Pennsylvania Economic Association 2019 Conference Proceedings (In press): . Paper presented at 2019 Pennsylvania Economic Association Conference, Kutztown, USA, May 30-June 1, 2019 (pp. 410-419). Pennsylvania Economic Association
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The continued progression of Sweden's sustainable (green) economy
2019 (English)In: Pennsylvania Economic Association 2019 Conference Proceedings (In press) / [ed] Yang, X. (ed.), Pennsylvania Economic Association , 2019, p. 410-419Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The task of implementing Sweden's strategy for sustainable development has had a holistic approach and the State has played a major role in its development. The framework for this paper comes from a recent publication that associates sustain ability with Zhang and London’s modified Porter model and discusses current Swedish developments in municipal public housing, domestic air transportation and wood products. Insofar as Sweden might be a model for extending efforts in sustainable development, observations here provide some insight into possible approaches and results, particularly so in the U.S. current interest in a "Green Bill of Rights". 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pennsylvania Economic Association, 2019
Keywords
Sustainability, Sweden
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164298 (URN)
Conference
2019 Pennsylvania Economic Association Conference, Kutztown, USA, May 30-June 1, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2020-01-22Bibliographically approved
Lindbergh, L. & Wilson, T. (2018). Developments in Swedish Rental housing: unanticipated consequences of Public Municipal Housing Companies Act 2011. Competition Forum, 16(1), 19-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developments in Swedish Rental housing: unanticipated consequences of Public Municipal Housing Companies Act 2011
2018 (English)In: Competition Forum, ISSN 1545-2581, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reflects some specific accommodations that have occurred in the Swedish rental sector as a consequence of Municipal Housing Companies (MHCs) complying with the Public Municipal Housing Companies Act of 2011, which required them to perform in a more business-like manner.  It was not explicitly noted, but undoubtedly assumed, that the municipal sector of housing would function much as before.  Unexpected consequences, however, have changed the competitive landscape.  Not only have MHCs been affected, but independent rental companies as well.  Further, tenants have not been particularly pleased with some of the developments.  Three cases triangulate the observations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Competitiveness, 2018
Keywords
Municipal Public Housing, Sweden, Companies Act of 2011, Business-Like, Unanticipated Changes
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153163 (URN)
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2023-04-25Bibliographically approved
Wilson, T. & Lindbergh, L. (2018). Onward and Upward: A Swedish Corporate Finance Course. In: Sigmond, N., Belloit, J. and Myers, C. (eds.) (Ed.), Northeastern Association of Business, Economicsand Technology Conference Proceedings: . Paper presented at Northeastern Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference, Pennsylvania, November 1-2, 2018 (pp. 329-341).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Onward and Upward: A Swedish Corporate Finance Course
2018 (English)In: Northeastern Association of Business, Economicsand Technology Conference Proceedings / [ed] Sigmond, N., Belloit, J. and Myers, C. (eds.), 2018, p. 329-341Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Business education in Sweden has been characterized as the meeting of Mercury, the god of merchants, with Minerva, the patron of science.  The understanding of corporate financing typifies that association, i.e., commerce is depicted in accepted, systematic formulations.  The course that is described herein is a master’s level finance course at Umeå University in Sweden – Advanced Corporate Finance.   The primary purpose of this course is to provide an integrated overview of the most important concepts in Corporate Finance in theory, practice and in some instances method.  The course is designed to develop students’ ability to

  • assess the impact of information asymmetry on corporate financial policy decisions,
  • explain the theoretical basis and applicable strategies applied in corporate control,
  • compare and contrast leverage strategies in ideal versus real capital markets and ably explain the impact of alternative taxation systems on the use of debt,
  • argue for optimal levels of corporate debt and be able to value an offering under different financing strategies, and
  • formulate and logically defend a position in regard to current issues, which confront corporations today.

Highlighted and discussed are measures such as how business valuation can affect various stakeholders, and potential implications are related to ethics and sustainability.  A group exercise and case study analysis, used in the course, are covered in the paper.  The paper should be of interest to educators and administrators because of Michael Porter’s reflection that one of the competitive advantages of Sweden is the universally high educational level of its population. 

Keywords
Business education, Sweden, Advanced Corporate Finance
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
education; Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153164 (URN)
Conference
Northeastern Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference, Pennsylvania, November 1-2, 2018
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Lindbergh, L., Olofsson, T., Vesterberg, J., Andersson, S. & Wilson, T. (2018). Reflections on sustainable Ålidhem: a case study in Swedish municipal public housing refurbishment. Property Management, 36(2), 203-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflections on sustainable Ålidhem: a case study in Swedish municipal public housing refurbishment
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Property Management, ISSN 0263-7472, E-ISSN 1758-731X, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 203-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This work is initiated under the premise that reliable evaluation methods are necessary to ensure investments in energy conservation, and the purpose of this paper is to contribute to that literature. It describes some pilot changes and their impact in an actual field study oriented toward upgrading municipal public housing (MPH) units.

Design/methodology/approach: The research for this paper was connected to an MPH refurbishment project situated in northern Sweden. The overall energy efficiency goal within the project was a 40-50 percent reduction in the supplied energy for central electricity, domestic hot water and space heating. In order to evaluate if these goals were feasible, a measurement system was installed in a pilot building and in a neighboring building used as a reference. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the post-retrofit performance of the pilot building with the performance of the reference building when it was kept in its initial state (a comparison possible because both buildings had initial similarities).

Findings: Impacts could be quantified insofar as a reference (control) building in the same environment was sustained for comparison purposes. A 43 percent improvement was observed in energy utilization in the pilot building compared to its reference companion (99.8 vs 174.5 kWh/m2 per year). When the approach described herein was applied to new construction, the present goal of 65 kWh/m2 was approached as measured by Swedish standards.

Practical implications: Results should be of interest to academics in the housing field, professionals involved in refurbishment and residents themselves, renting MPH flats.

Originality/value: This study is unique in the following ways: first, it really was a field experiment with a control, thus it did not have any exogenous interference in interpreting results. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind. The second interesting characteristic was that results were subsequently used in the refurbishment of other buildings in the complex and in the construction of others. The major value of the paper may be associated with its timing. It comes at a time when the Kyoto agreement has raised concerns about sustainability, but also at a time when many buildings are facing a need for refurbishment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
Refurbishment, Energy Savings, Systematic Approach, Municipal Public Housing, Sweden
National Category
Business Administration Civil Engineering
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138657 (URN)10.1108/PM-04-2016-0017 (DOI)000428653800006 ()2-s2.0-85044533160 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Wilson, T. (2018). Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: have we forgotten something?. Business Horizons, 61(1), 47-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: have we forgotten something?
2018 (English)In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 47-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What's past is prologue. Or is it? The construction of the Empire State Building (ESB) was not only the fastest erection of a skyscraper ever, but the construction company that took on the job allegedly began with no equipment or supplies that would be adequate for the job. The project was completed ahead of schedule and under budget; instead of 1 year and 6 months as anticipated, it only took 1 year and 45 days. The costs totaled $24.7 million instead of the estimated $43 million. So, we ask, how was this possible and is there something we could learn? Based on a review of existing literature describing the history and construction of the ESB, we outline strategic, operational, and contextual explanations for what appears to be a truly successful megaproject. We illustrate how, for example, inspiration from Henry Ford's assembly line technique, the uniqueness of the logistics during the construction period, the economic decline of the Depression, and early ideas of concurrent engineering and fast-track construction enabled the success. Our conclusion is that there are lessons to be learned in going back to basics when tackling a megaproject.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Empire State Building, Megaprojects, Project management, Empire State Realty Trust
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142420 (URN)10.1016/j.bushor.2017.09.004 (DOI)000423637100006 ()2-s2.0-85030849386 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Burström, T. & Wilson, T. (2018). The texture of tension: complexity, uncertainty and equivocality. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 11(2), 458-485
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The texture of tension: complexity, uncertainty and equivocality
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 458-485Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The premise of this paper is that tension exists among participants and parties engaged in projects. The uniqueness of development virtually assures this. The purpose of this paper is to propose that tension is a product of the precursors of complexity, uncertainty and equivocality, and an attempt is made to characterize tension as it arises in projects - its genesis and its nature. 

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth case study was conducted in a manner in which the contextually sensitive empirical researches for which Nordic studies are known. Within discussions on the strategy, decision making, intra-and inter-project interdependencies and managing across development sites associated with a flagship project, 77 statements concerning tension were identified for analysis. Through a literature review, 12 tension-driving factors were identified. These factors were used as base for analysis. 

Findings

These statements were analyzed for content to produce a model associating tension with its precursors and the literature on tension. It is found that due to innovation turbulence, tension-driving factors are cascaded in and around organization(s). Tension is manifested in various ways for different stakeholders and tension management is performed through cognitive and emotional responses. The texture of tension is characterized by fluidity, multiplicity and parallelism. 

Research limitations/implications

Case studies can of course not be generalized; they are valuable, however, in indicating important observations for further studies. 

Practical implications

A contribution is made to management theory where knowledge about project context is seen as essential in order to understand best practices for project execution and effectiveness. 

Originality/value

Although common, even virtually assured in projects, tension tends to be neglected in successful management. This study associates the genesis of tension through the underlying contributions of complexity, uncertainty and equivocality. It is believed to be the first study of its type.

Keywords
Tension, complexity, uncertainty, equivocality, projects
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142419 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-01-2017-0005 (DOI)000441077500011 ()2-s2.0-85045186445 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Wilson, T. (2018). Tinkerbell and the Empire State Building: Recalling what seems to be forgotten. PM World Journal, VII(VII), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tinkerbell and the Empire State Building: Recalling what seems to be forgotten
2018 (English)In: PM World Journal, ISSN 2330-4480, Vol. VII, no VII, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

“I do believe in fairies! I do! I do!!” (Peter Pan)

In the 1905 play “Peter Pan; or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up”, Sir James Matthew Barrie described how Peter Pan, through his strong beliefs, brought the fairy Tinkerbell back to life. In this short essay, we aim to initiate discussions on the role of strong beliefs and the so-called “Tinkerbell effect” in upholding taken-for-granted assumptions within the construction industry.

As the basis for the discussion, the essay reports on a recently published journal article in Business Horizons entitled “Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: Have we forgotten something?” (Jacobsson and Wilson, 2018). Presently the article is also sold as a case study and teaching case by Harvard Business Review. (The case study can be accessed at https://tinyurl.com/HBRcasestudy and the teaching case at https://tinyurl.com/HBPEcase)

Keywords
Projects, Empire State Building, Construction, Project Management, Mega projects
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150124 (URN)
Available from: 2018-07-09 Created: 2018-07-09 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
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