Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Modig, Lars
Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Mir Fakhraei, R., Lindberg, E., Benediktsdóttir, B., Svanes, C., Johannessen, A., Holm, M., . . . Emilsson, Ö. I. (2024). Gastroesophageal reflux and snoring are related to asthma and respiratory symptoms: Results from a Nordic longitudinal population survey. Respiratory Medicine, 221, Article ID 107495.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gastroesophageal reflux and snoring are related to asthma and respiratory symptoms: Results from a Nordic longitudinal population survey
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 221, article id 107495Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To study if individuals with nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) and habitual snoring are more likely to develop asthma and respiratory symptoms (i.e. wheeze, cough, chest tightness, breathlessness) than those without these conditions, and if these associations are additive.

Methods: We used data from the population-based prospective questionnaire study Respiratory Health in Northern Europe (RHINE) (11,024 participants), with data from 1999 and 2011. Participants with heartburn or belching after going to bed, at least 1 night/week, were considered to have nGER. Participants reporting loud snoring at least 3 nights/week were considered to have habitual snoring. Participants were grouped into four groups by their nGER and snoring status: “never”; “former”; “incident”; “persistent”. Incident respiratory symptoms were analyzed among participants without respective symptom at baseline.

Results: Snoring and nGER were independently associated with incident asthma and respiratory symptoms. The risk of incident wheeze was increased in subjects with incident or persistent snoring (adjusted odds ratio (95 % CI): 1.44 (1.21–1.72)), nGER (2.18 (1.60–2.98)) and in those with both snoring and nGER (2.59 (1.83–3.65)). The risk of developing asthma was increased in subjects with incident or persistent snoring (1.44 (1.15–1.82)), nGER (1.99 (1.35–2.93)) and in those with both snoring and nGER (1.72 (1.06–2.77)). No significant interaction was found between snoring and nGER. A similar pattern was found for the incidence of all other respiratory symptoms studied, with the highest risk among those with both incident or persistent nGER and snoring.

Conclusion: The risk of developing asthma and respiratory symptoms is increased among subjects with nGER and habitual snoring. These associations are independent of each other and confounding factors. Snoring and nGER together are additive on respiratory symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Asthma, Epidemiology, Habitual snoring, Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux, Respiratory symptom
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218872 (URN)10.1016/j.rmed.2023.107495 (DOI)38101459 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180325337 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareBror Hjerpstedts stiftelse
Available from: 2024-01-05 Created: 2024-01-05 Last updated: 2024-01-05Bibliographically approved
Jiang, Z., Schenk, L., Assarsson, E., Albin, M., Bertilsson, H., Dock, E., . . . Engfeldt, M. (2024). Hexavalent chromium still a concern in Sweden: evidence from a cross-sectional study within the safechrom project. International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), 256, Article ID 114298.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hexavalent chromium still a concern in Sweden: evidence from a cross-sectional study within the safechrom project
Show others...
2024 (English)In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 256, article id 114298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is classified as a human carcinogen. Occupational Cr(VI) exposure can occur during different work processes, but the current exposure to Cr(VI) at Swedish workplaces is unknown.

Methods: This cross-sectional study (SafeChrom) recruited non-smoking men and women from 14 companies with potential Cr(VI) exposure (n = 113) and controls from 6 companies without Cr(VI) exposure (n = 72). Inhalable Cr(VI) was measured by personal air sampling (outside of respiratory protection) in exposed workers. Total Cr was measured in urine (pre- and post-shift, density-adjusted) and red blood cells (RBC) (reflecting Cr(VI)) in exposed workers and controls. The Bayesian tool Expostats was used to assess risk and evaluate occupational exposure limit (OEL) compliance.

Results: The exposed workers performed processing of metal products, steel production, welding, plating, and various chemical processes. The geometric mean concentration of inhalable Cr(VI) in exposed workers was 0.15 μg/m3 (95% confidence interval: 0.11–0.21). Eight of the 113 exposed workers (7%) exceeded the Swedish OEL of 5 μg/m3, and the Bayesian analysis estimated the share of OEL exceedances up to 19.6% for stainless steel welders. Median post-shift urinary (0.60 μg/L, 5th-95th percentile 0.10–3.20) and RBC concentrations (0.73 μg/L, 0.51–2.33) of Cr were significantly higher in the exposed group compared with the controls (urinary 0.10 μg/L, 0.06–0.56 and RBC 0.53 μg/L, 0.42–0.72). Inhalable Cr(VI) correlated with urinary Cr (rS = 0.64) and RBC-Cr (rS = 0.53). Workers within steel production showed the highest concentrations of inhalable, urinary and RBC Cr. Workers with inferred non-acceptable local exhaustion ventilation showed significantly higher inhalable Cr(VI), urinary and RBC Cr concentrations compared with those with inferred acceptable ventilation. Furthermore, workers with inferred correct use of respiratory protection were exposed to significantly higher concentrations of Cr(VI) in air and had higher levels of Cr in urine and RBC than those assessed with incorrect or no use. Based on the Swedish job-exposure-matrix, approximately 17 900 workers were estimated to be occupationally exposed to Cr(VI) today.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that some workers in Sweden are exposed to high levels of the non-threshold carcinogen Cr(VI). Employers and workers seem aware of Cr(VI) exposure, but more efficient exposure control strategies are required. National strategies aligned with the European strategies are needed in order to eliminate this cause of occupational cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Biomonitoring, Hexavalent chromium, Inhalable, Occupational cancer, Occupational exposure limits
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218305 (URN)10.1016/j.ijheh.2023.114298 (DOI)2-s2.0-85179081515 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00208AFA Insurance, 200279
Available from: 2023-12-21 Created: 2023-12-21 Last updated: 2023-12-21Bibliographically approved
Kisiel, M. A., Arnfelt, O., Lindberg, E., Jogi, O., Malinovschi, A., Johannessen, A., . . . Janson, C. (2023). Association between abdominal and general obesity and respiratory symptoms, asthma and COPD: Results from the RHINE study. Respiratory Medicine, 211, Article ID 107213.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between abdominal and general obesity and respiratory symptoms, asthma and COPD: Results from the RHINE study
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 211, article id 107213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Previous studies on the association between abdominal and general obesity and respiratory disease have provided conflicting results. Aims and objectives: We aimed to explore the associations of abdominal obesity with respiratory symptoms, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease independently from general obesity in women and men.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was based on the Respiratory Health in Northern Europe (RHINE) III questionnaire (n = 12 290) conducted in 2010–2012. Abdominal obesity was self-measured waist circumference using a sex-specific standard cut-off point: ≥102 cm in males and ≥88 cm in females. General obesity was defined as self-reported BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2.

Results: There were 4261 subjects (63% women) with abdominal obesity and 1837 subjects (50% women) with general obesity. Both abdominal and general obesity was independent of each other and associated with respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR) from 1.25 to 2.00)). Asthma was significantly associated with abdominal and general obesity in women, OR (95% CI) 1.56 (1.30–1.87) and 1.95 (1.56–2.43), respectively, but not in men, OR 1.22 (0.97–3.17) and 1.28 (0.97–1.68) respectively. A similar sex difference was found for self-reported chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Conclusions: General and abdominal obesity were independent factors associated with respiratory symptoms in adults. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently linked to abdominal and general obesity in women but not men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206011 (URN)10.1016/j.rmed.2023.107213 (DOI)000972687200001 ()2-s2.0-85150384769 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-28 Created: 2023-03-28 Last updated: 2024-02-08Bibliographically approved
Zhao, T., Markevych, I., Fuertes, E., de Hoogh, K., Accordini, S., Boudier, A., . . . Heinrich, J. (2023). Impact of long-term exposure to ambient ozone on lung function over a course of 20 years (The ECRHS study): a prospective cohort study in adults. The Lancet Regional Health: Europe, 34, Article ID 100729.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of long-term exposure to ambient ozone on lung function over a course of 20 years (The ECRHS study): a prospective cohort study in adults
Show others...
2023 (English)In: The Lancet Regional Health: Europe, E-ISSN 2666-7762, Vol. 34, article id 100729Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: While the adverse effects of short-term ambient ozone exposure on lung function are well-documented, the impact of long-term exposure remains poorly understood, especially in adults.

Methods: We aimed to investigate the association between long-term ozone exposure and lung function decline. The 3014 participants were drawn from 17 centers across eight countries, all of which were from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). Spirometry was conducted to measure pre-bronchodilation forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) at approximately 35, 44, and 55 years of age. We assigned annual mean values of daily maximum running 8-h average ozone concentrations to individual residential addresses. Adjustments were made for PM2.5, NO2, and greenness. To capture the ozone-related change in spirometric parameters, our linear mixed effects regression models included an interaction term between long-term ozone exposure and age.

Findings: Mean ambient ozone concentrations were approximately 65 μg/m³. A one interquartile range increase of 7 μg/m³ in ozone was associated with a faster decline in FEV1 of −2.08 mL/year (95% confidence interval: −2.79, −1.36) and in FVC of −2.86 mL/year (−3.73, −1.99) mL/year over the study period. Associations were robust after adjusting for PM2.5, NO2, and greenness. The associations were more pronounced in residents of northern Europe and individuals who were older at baseline. No consistent associations were detected with the FEV1/FVC ratio.

Interpretation: Long-term exposure to elevated ambient ozone concentrations was associated with a faster decline of spirometric lung function among middle-aged European adults over a 20-year period. Funding: German Research Foundation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Air pollution, Forced expiratory volume, Middle aged, NDVI, Spirometry, Vital capacity
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214280 (URN)10.1016/j.lanepe.2023.100729 (DOI)2-s2.0-85169614645 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2023-09-11Bibliographically approved
Amin, H., Šantl-Temkiv, T., Cramer, C., Finster, K., Real, F. G., Gislason, T., . . . Bertelsen, R. J. (2023). Indoor airborne microbiome and endotoxin: meteorological events and occupant characteristics are important determinants. Environmental Science and Technology, 57(32), 11750-11766
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indoor airborne microbiome and endotoxin: meteorological events and occupant characteristics are important determinants
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 57, no 32, p. 11750-11766Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Airborne bacteria and endotoxin may affect asthma and allergies. However, there is limited understanding of the environmental determinants that influence them. This study investigated the airborne microbiomes in the homes of 1038 participants from five cities in Northern Europe: Aarhus, Bergen, Reykjavik, Tartu, and Uppsala. Airborne dust particles were sampled with electrostatic dust fall collectors (EDCs) from the participants' bedrooms. The dust washed from the EDCs' clothes was used to extract DNA and endotoxin. The DNA extracts were used for quantitative polymerase chain (qPCR) measurement and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, while endotoxin was measured using the kinetic chromogenic limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. The results showed that households in Tartu and Aarhus had a higher bacterial load and diversity than those in Bergen and Reykjavik, possibly due to elevated concentrations of outdoor bacterial taxa associated with low precipitation and high wind speeds. Bergen-Tartu had the highest difference (ANOSIM R = 0.203) in β diversity. Multivariate regression models showed that α diversity indices and bacterial and endotoxin loads were positively associated with the occupants' age, number of occupants, cleaning frequency, presence of dogs, and age of the house. Further studies are needed to understand how meteorological factors influence the indoor bacterial community in light of climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2023
Keywords
16S rRNA and occupants' age, airborne microbiome, meteorological data, Northern Europe
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-213404 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.3c01616 (DOI)001040469100001 ()37523308 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85167815288 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 804199Novo Nordisk Foundation, NNF19OC0056963
Available from: 2023-09-08 Created: 2023-09-08 Last updated: 2023-09-08Bibliographically approved
Kisiel, M. A., Sedvall, M., Malinovschi, A., Franklin, K. A., Gislason, T., Shlunssen, V., . . . Janson, C. (2023). Inflammatory bowel disease and asthma: results from the RHINE study. Respiratory Medicine, 216, Article ID 107307.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory bowel disease and asthma: results from the RHINE study
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 216, article id 107307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Asthma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are common inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of IBD with asthma and respiratory symptoms.

Methods: This study is based on 13,499 participants from seven northern European countries that filled in a postal questionnaire on asthma, respiratory symptoms, IBD including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and various lifestyle variables.

Results: There were 195 participants with IBD. The prevalence of asthma (14.5 vs 8.1%, p = 0.001), different respiratory symptoms (range 11.9–36.8% vs range 6.0–18.6%, p < 0.005), non-infectious rhinitis (52.1 vs. 41.6%, p = 0.004) and chronic rhinosinusitis (11.6 vs 6.0%, p = 0.001) were higher in subjects with IBD than in those without IBD. In multivariable regression analysis, the association between IBD and asthma was statistically significant (OR 1.95 (95% CI 1.28–2.96)) after adjusting for confounders such as sex, BMI, smoking history, educational level and physical activity. There was a significant association between asthma and ulcerative colitis (adjusted OR 2.02 (95% CI 1.27–2.19)), and asthma but not Crohn's disease (adjusted OR 1.66 (95% CI 0.69–3.95)). A significant gender interaction was found with a significant association between IBD and asthma in women but not in men ((OR 2.72 (95% CI 1.67–4.46) vs OR 0.87 (95% CI 0.35–2.19), p = 0.038).

Conclusions: Patients with IBD, particularly those with ulcerative colitis and female, have a higher prevalence of asthma and respiratory symptoms. Our findings indicate that it is important to consider respiratory symptoms and disorders when examining patients with manifest or suspected IBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Asthma, Inflammatory bowel disease, Respiratory symptoms, Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212015 (URN)10.1016/j.rmed.2023.107307 (DOI)37271300 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85161725846 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-07-13 Created: 2023-07-13 Last updated: 2024-02-08Bibliographically approved
Xu, S., Marcon, A., Bertelsen, R. J., Benediktsdottir, B., Brandt, J., Engemann, K., . . . Johannessen, A. (2023). Long-term exposure to low-level air pollution and greenness and mortality in Northern Europe: the Life-GAP project. Environment International, 181, Article ID 108257.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term exposure to low-level air pollution and greenness and mortality in Northern Europe: the Life-GAP project
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 181, article id 108257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Air pollution has been linked to mortality, but there are few studies examining the association with different exposure time windows spanning across several decades. The evidence for the effects of green space and mortality is contradictory.

Objective: We investigated all-cause mortality in relation to exposure to particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10), black carbon (BC), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3) and greenness (normalized difference vegetation index - NDVI) across different exposure time windows.

Methods: The exposure assessment was based on a combination of the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model and the Urban Background Model for the years 1990, 2000 and 2010. The analysis included a complete case dataset with 9,135 participants from the third Respiratory Health in Northern Europe study (RHINE III), aged 40–65 years in 2010, with mortality follow-up to 2021. We performed Cox proportional hazard models, adjusting for potential confounders.

Results: Altogether, 327 (3.6 %) persons died in the period 2010–2021. Increased exposures in 1990 of PM2.5, PM10, BC and NO2 were associated with increased all-cause mortality hazard ratios of 1.40 (95 % CI1.04–1.87 per 5 μg/m3), 1.33 (95 % CI: 1.02–1.74 per 10 μg/m3), 1.16 (95 % CI: 0.98–1.38 per 0.4 μg/m3) and 1.17 (95 % CI: 0.92–1.50 per 10 μg/m3), respectively. No statistically significant associations were observed between air pollution and mortality in other time windows. O3 showed an inverse association with mortality, while no association was observed between greenness and mortality. Adjusting for NDVI increased the hazard ratios for PM2.5, PM10, BC and NO2 exposures in 1990. We did not find significant interactions between greenness and air pollution metrics. Conclusion: Long term exposure to even low levels of air pollution is associated with mortality. Opening up for a long latency period, our findings indicate that air pollution exposures over time may be even more harmful than anticipated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Green space, Long-term effect, Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone, Particulate matter, Premature mortality
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216179 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2023.108257 (DOI)37857189 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175181088 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Research Council of Norway, 300765
Available from: 2023-11-10 Created: 2023-11-10 Last updated: 2023-11-10Bibliographically approved
Gyawali, S., López-Cervantes, J. P., Johannessen, A., Gislason, T., Holm, M., Janson, C., . . . Svanes, C. (2023). Maternal and paternal tuberculosis is associated with increased asthma and respiratory symptoms in their offspring: a study from Northern Europe. Frontiers in Allergy, 4, Article ID 1193141.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal and paternal tuberculosis is associated with increased asthma and respiratory symptoms in their offspring: a study from Northern Europe
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Allergy, E-ISSN 2673-6101, Vol. 4, article id 1193141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Given the profound impact of tuberculosis (TB) on immunity and given murine studies suggesting that infections may influence immunity across generations, we hypothesize that parental TB might impact health and disease in future offspring.

Objective: This study investigated the impact of maternal and paternal TB on offspring asthma and respiratory symptoms.

Methods: We included data from the third follow-up of the Respiratory Health in Northern Europe study (RHINE). Information on own asthma status, asthma-like symptoms and other respiratory symptoms, as well as information about parental TB and asthma, were collected using standardized questionnaires. The associations between parental TB and RHINE participants' asthma and respiratory symptoms were analyzed using multiple logistic regression, with adjustment for parental education, smoking habits and asthma.

Results: Of 8,323 study participants, 227 (2.7%) reported only paternal TB, 282 (3.4%) only maternal TB, and 33 (0.4%) reported that both parents had TB. We found a higher risk of asthma (aOR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.05–1.57) in offspring with a history of parental TB as compared to offspring without parental TB., Parental TB was significantly associated with allergic asthma in offspring (aOR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.29–2.05), while no significant association between parental TB and asthma without allergy (aOR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.76–1.32) in offspring was observed.

Conclusion: Results from this study indicate that parental TB might be a risk factor for offspring's asthma and respiratory symptoms. We raise the hypothesis that the immunological impact of infections might be transmitted to influence offspring phenotype in humans.

Keywords
asthma, epigenetic, generational study, offspring asthma, tuberculosis
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212115 (URN)10.3389/falgy.2023.1193141 (DOI)001012461400001 ()37361110 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85163587897 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Research Council of NorwaySwedish Heart Lung FoundationVårdal FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy Association
Available from: 2023-07-17 Created: 2023-07-17 Last updated: 2023-07-17Bibliographically approved
Gyawali, S., López-Cervantes, J. P., Jõgi, N. O., Mustafa, T., Janson, C., Holm, M., . . . Svanes, C. (2023). Previous tuberculosis infection associated with increased frequency of asthma and respiratory symptoms in a nordic–baltic multicentre population study. ERJ Open Research, 9(3), Article ID 00011-2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Previous tuberculosis infection associated with increased frequency of asthma and respiratory symptoms in a nordic–baltic multicentre population study
Show others...
2023 (English)In: ERJ Open Research, E-ISSN 2312-0541, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 00011-2023Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) infection induces profound local and systemic, immunological and inflammatory changes that could influence the development of other respiratory diseases; however, the association between TB and asthma is only partly understood. Our objective was to study the association of TB with asthma and respiratory symptoms in a Nordic–Baltic population-based study.

Methods: We included data from the Respiratory Health in Northern Europe (RHINE) study, in which information on general characteristics, TB infection, asthma and asthma-like symptoms were collected using standardised postal questionnaires. Asthma was defined based on asthma medication usage and/or asthma attacks 12 months prior to the study, and/or by a report of ≥three out of five respiratory symptoms in the last 12 months. Allergic/nonallergic asthma were defined as asthma with/without nasal allergy. The associations of TB with asthma outcomes were analysed using logistic regressions with adjustments for age, sex, smoking, body mass index and parental education.

Results: We included 8379 study participants aged 50–75 years, 61 of whom reported having had TB. In adjusted analyses, participants with a history of TB had higher odds of asthma (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.13– 3.47). The associations were consistent for nonallergic asthma (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.16–4.07), but not for allergic asthma (OR 1.20, 95% CI 0.53–2.71).

Conclusion: We found that in a large Northern European population-based cohort, persons with a history of TB infection more frequently had asthma and asthma symptoms. We speculate that this may reflect longterm effects of TB, including direct damage to the airways and lungs, as well as inflammatory responses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Respiratory Society (ERS), 2023
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-209566 (URN)10.1183/23120541.00011-2023 (DOI)000989622600002 ()2-s2.0-85160605318 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-12 Created: 2023-06-12 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Veber, T., Pyko, A., Carlsen, H. K., Holm, M., Gislason, T., Janson, C., . . . Orru, H. (2023). Traffic noise in the bedroom in association with markers of obesity: a cross-sectional study and mediation analysis of the respiratory health in Northern Europe cohort. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 1246.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traffic noise in the bedroom in association with markers of obesity: a cross-sectional study and mediation analysis of the respiratory health in Northern Europe cohort
Show others...
2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous research suggests an association between road traffic noise and obesity, but current evidence is inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess the association between nocturnal noise exposure and markers of obesity and to assess whether sleep disturbance might be a mediator in this association.

Methods: We applied data from the Respiratory Health in Northern Europe (RHINE) cohort. We used self-measured waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) as outcome values. Noise exposure was assessed as perceived traffic noise in the bedroom and/or the bedroom window’s location towards the street. We applied adjusted linear, and logistic regression models, evaluated effect modifications and conducted mediation analysis.

Results: Based on fully adjusted models we found that women, who reported very high traffic noise levels in bedroom, had 1.30 (95% CI 0.24–2.37) kg/m2 higher BMI and 3.30 (95% CI 0.39–6.20) cm higher WC compared to women, who reported no traffic noise in the bedroom. Women who reported higher exposure to road traffic noise had statistically significant higher odds of being overweight and have abdominal obesity with OR varying from 1.15 to 1.26 compared to women, who reported no traffic noise in the bedroom. For men, the associations were rather opposite, although mostly statistically insignificant. Furthermore, men, who reported much or very much traffic noise in the bedroom, had a statistically significantly lower risk of abdominal obesity. Sleep disturbance fully or partially mediated the association between noise in bedroom and obesity markers among women.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that self-reported traffic noise in the bedroom may be associated to being overweight or obese trough sleep disturbance among women, but associations were inconclusive among men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Adiposity, Indoor, Nocturnal, Noise, Obesity, Overweight, Road Traffic, Self-reported
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212047 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-16128-2 (DOI)2-s2.0-85163708638 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-07-18 Created: 2023-07-18 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications