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Conradsson, Mia
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Öhlin, J., Toots, A., Dahlin Almevall, A., Littbrand, H., Conradsson, M., Hörnsten, C., . . . Söderberg, S. (2022). Concurrent validity of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire adapted for adults aged ≥ 80 years (IPAQ-E 80 +) - tested with accelerometer data from the SilverMONICA study. Gait & Posture, 92, 135-143
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concurrent validity of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire adapted for adults aged ≥ 80 years (IPAQ-E 80 +) - tested with accelerometer data from the SilverMONICA study
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2022 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 92, p. 135-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Physical activity and sedentary behavior vary across the life span, and in very old people activity behavior can vary considerably over 24 h. A physical activity questionnaire adapted for this age group is lacking. This study was conducted to validate such a newly developed questionnaire suitable for use in very old people.

Research question: Is the International Physical Activity Questionnaire adapted for adults aged ≥ 80 years (IPAQ-E 80 +) a valid measure of physical activity in very old people?

Methods: Seventy-six participants (55.3% women) with a mean age of 84.4 ± 3.8 years wore accelerometers for ≥ 5 consecutive days, and completed the IPAQ-E 80 +. Spearman's rho and Bland-Altman plots were used to analyze the validity of IPAQ-E 80 + against accelerometer measures. Analyses were conducted for the separate items sitting, laying down at daytime and nighttime, walking, moderate to vigorous (MV) walking, and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and the summary measures: total inactive time, sedentary time (i.e. lying down at daytime + sitting), total active time, and total MVPA + MV walking.

Results: The IPAQ-E 80 + correlated with the accelerometer measures of total inactive- (r = 0.55, p < 0.001), sedentary- (r = 0.28, p = 0.015), walking- (r = 0.54 p < 0.001) and total active- (r = 0.60, p < 0.001) times, but not with measures of intensity of walking or physical activity; MV walking (r = 0.06, p = 0.58), MVPA (r = 0.17, p = 0.13).

Significance: In this study the IPAQ-E 80 + showed fair to substantial correlations with accelerometers, and it therefore seems able to rank very old people according to levels of PA (total inactive-, sedentary-, and total active time, and walking time). The IPAQ-E 80 + seems promising for use in studies investigating associations between activity behavior and health in this population. Further investigation is needed to determine whether the IPAQ-E 80 + can accurately measure PA intensity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Validity, Physical activity questionnaire, Sedentary behavior, Very old people, Accelerometry
National Category
Physiotherapy Geriatrics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187217 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2021.11.019 (DOI)000788079500011 ()34847411 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85120962874 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-01074Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01-6
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2021-09-06 Created: 2021-09-06 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Lampinen, J., Conradsson, M., Nyqvist, F., Olofsson, B., Gustafson, Y., Nilsson, I. & Littbrand, H. (2022). Loneliness among very old people with and without dementia: prevalence and associated factors in a representative sample. European Journal of Ageing, 19, 1441-1453
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Loneliness among very old people with and without dementia: prevalence and associated factors in a representative sample
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2022 (English)In: European Journal of Ageing, ISSN 1613-9372, E-ISSN 1613-9380, Vol. 19, p. 1441-1453Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Loneliness and dementia are common among very old (aged ≥ 80 years) people, but whether the prevalence of loneliness differs between very old people with and without dementia is unknown and few studies have investigated associated factors. The aims of the present study were to compare the prevalence of loneliness between people with and without dementia in a representative sample of very old people, and to investigate factors associated with loneliness in the two groups separately. This population-based study was conducted with data on 1176 people aged 85, 90, and ≥ 95 years (mean age 89.0 ± 4.47 years) from the Umeå 85 + /Gerontological Regional Database study conducted in northern Sweden, during year 2000–2017. Structured interviews and assessments were conducted during home visits. Loneliness was assessed using the question “Do you ever feel lonely?.” Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with loneliness in participants with and without dementia. The prevalence of loneliness did not differ between people with and without dementia (50.9% and 46.0%, respectively; p = 0.13). Seven and 24 of 35 variables were univariately associated with the experience of loneliness in participants with and without dementia, respectively. In the final models, living alone and having depressive symptoms were associated with the experience of loneliness in both study groups. In participants without dementia, living in a nursing home was associated with the experience of less loneliness. These findings contribute with important knowledge when developing strategies to reduce loneliness in this growing age group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Aged 80 and over, Cross-sectional study, Dementia, Social participation
National Category
Nursing Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-199917 (URN)10.1007/s10433-022-00729-8 (DOI)000854398500001 ()36157280 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85138167224 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01- 6Vårdal FoundationKonung Gustaf V:s och Drottning Victorias FrimurarestiftelseThe Kempe FoundationsRegion VästerbottenThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedEuropean CommissionInterreg
Available from: 2022-10-05 Created: 2022-10-05 Last updated: 2022-12-30Bibliographically approved
Sondell, A., Lampinen, J., Conradsson, M., Littbrand, H., Englund, U., Nilsson, I. & Lindelöf, N. (2021). Experiences of community-dwelling older people with dementia participating in a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program. BMC Geriatrics, 21(1), Article ID 341.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of community-dwelling older people with dementia participating in a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program
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2021 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is great need for development of feasible rehabilitation for older people with dementia. Increased understanding of this population’s experiences of rehabilitation participation is therefore important. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of community-dwelling older people with dementia participating in a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program.

Methods: Sixteen older people with dementia were interviewed about their experiences of participation in a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program. The program comprised assessments by a comprehensive team of rehabilitation professionals followed by a rehabilitation period of 16 weeks, including interventions based on individualized rehabilitation goals conducted with the support of the rehabilitation team. The rehabilitation was performed in the participants’ homes, in the community and at an outpatient clinic, including exercise with social interaction in small groups offered twice a week to all participants. The interviews were conducted at the end of the rehabilitation period and analysed with qualitative content analysis.

Results: The analysis resulted in one overarching theme: Empowered through participation and togetherness and four sub-themes: Being strengthened through challenges; Gaining insights, motives, and raising concerns about the future; Being seen makes participation worthwhile; and Feelings of togetherness in prosperity and adversity. The participants increased their self-esteem by daring and coping in the rehabilitation. The insights about themselves and their condition motivated them to continue with their prioritized activities, but also raised concerns about how the future would play out. Collaboration in the group and being seen and acknowledged by staff strengthened their own motivation and self-efficacy.

Conclusion: According to community-dwelling older people with dementia, a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program was experienced as viable and beneficial. The participants seemed empowered through the rehabilitation and expressed mostly positive experiences and perceived improvements. Providers of interdisciplinary rehabilitation programs for this group should consider aspects raised by the participants e.g. the positive experience of being challenged in both exercise and daily activities; the importance of being seen and feeling secure; the benefits and challenges of collaboration with others in the same situation; and the generation of new perspectives of current and future situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2021
Keywords
Aged, Dementia, Experiences, Interdisciplinary, Qualitative research, Rehabilitation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-184444 (URN)10.1186/s12877-021-02282-y (DOI)000660608300004 ()2-s2.0-85107216049 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-06-14 Created: 2021-06-14 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Näsman, M., Niklasson, J., Saarela, J., Nygård, M., Olofsson, B., Conradsson, M., . . . Nyqvist, F. (2019). Five-year change in morale is associated with negative life events in very old age. Aging & Mental Health, 84-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Five-year change in morale is associated with negative life events in very old age
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2019 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to study changes in morale in individuals 85 years and older, and to assess the effect of negative life events on morale over a five-year follow-up period.

METHOD: The present study is based on longitudinal data from the Umeå85+/GERDA-study, including individuals 85 years and older at baseline (n = 204). Morale was measured with the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS). Negative life events were assessed using an index including 13 negative life events occurring during the follow-up period. Linear regression was used for the multivariate analyses.

RESULTS: The majority of the sample (69.1%) had no significant changes in morale during the five-year follow-up. However, the accumulation of negative life events was significantly associated with a greater decrease in PGCMS. A higher baseline PGCMS score did not attenuate the adverse effect negative life events had on morale.

CONCLUSION: Morale seemed to be mainly stable in a five-year follow-up of very old people. It seems, nonetheless, that individuals are affected by negative life events, regardless of level of morale. Preventing negative life events and supporting individuals who experience multiple negative life events could have important implications for the care of very old people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Longitudinal studies, life events, mental health, morale
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142034 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2017.1393795 (DOI)000461682000012 ()29077486 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032466807 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Västerbotten County CouncilNorrbotten County CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-1512Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-11-17 Created: 2017-11-17 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Niklasson, J., Näsman, M., Nyqvist, F., Conradsson, M., Olofsson, B., Lövheim, H. & Gustafson, Y. (2017). Higher morale is associated with lower risk of depressive disorders five years later among very old people. Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), 69, 61-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Higher morale is associated with lower risk of depressive disorders five years later among very old people
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2017 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 69, p. 61-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether higher morale, i.e. future-oriented optimism, at baseline was associated with lower risk of depressive disorders five years later among very old people.Methods The Umeå85+/GErontological Regional Database, a population-based study with a longitudinal design, recruited participants in Sweden and Finland aged 85, 90 and ≥95 years. The sample in the present study included 647 individuals (89.1±4.4 years (Mean±SD), range 85-103). After five years, 216 were alive and agreed to a follow-up (92.6±3.4 years, range 90-104). The Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS) was used to assess morale. The depressive disorder diagnosis was determined according to DSM-IV based on medical records and interview data including assessment scales for depressive disorders. A number of sociodemographic, functional and health-related variables were analysed as possible confounders.Results For those with no depressive disorders at baseline, the only baseline variable significantly associated with depressive disorders five years later was the PGCMS score. A logistic regression model showed lower risk of depressive disorders five years later with higher baseline PGCMS scores (odds ratio 0.779 for one point increase in PGCMS, p<0.001). The association remained after adjusting for social isolation (p<0.1 association with depressive disorders five years later).Conclusion Our results indicate that the higher the morale, the lower the risk of depressive disorders five years later among very old people. The PGCMS seems to identify those very old individuals at increased risk of depressive disorders five years later. Preventive measures could befocused on this group.

Keywords
Morale, Depressive disorders, Geriatric psychiatry, Aged, 80 and over, Salutogenic factor, Future-oriented optimism
National Category
Geriatrics Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129655 (URN)10.1016/j.archger.2016.11.008 (DOI)000390449000009 ()27889589 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84997080371 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-08 Created: 2017-01-08 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Nyqvist, F., Cattan, M., Conradsson, M., Nasman, M. & Gustafson, Y. (2017). Prevalence of loneliness over ten years among the oldest old. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45(4), 411-418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of loneliness over ten years among the oldest old
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 411-418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study examined the prevalence of loneliness among the oldest old within a 10-year period and studied the influence of various sociodemographic, social and health characteristics on loneliness.

Methods: The study used population-based data from the Umea85+/GErontological Regional DAtabase-study (GERDA) for the years 2000-2002, 2005-2007 and 2010-2012 including 85-year-old, 90-year-old and 95-year-old participants. A final sample of 304 participants in 2000-2002, 329 participants in 2005-2007 and 401 participants in 2010-2012 was included in the analyses.

Results: Although the level of loneliness was already high in 2000-2002 (49.3% reported frequent loneliness), the results showed limited changes in loneliness during the 10-year study period. Loneliness was closely related to living alone, depressive symptoms and living in institutional settings.

Conclusions: Although societal changes such as solitary living and growing urbanization suggest a changing trend in loneliness, we found that the prevalence of loneliness was relatively stable in this study. Nevertheless, loneliness is common among the oldest old and a focus on social issues related to living arrangements and on depressive symptoms is important in understanding loneliness.

Keywords
Oldest old, loneliness, trends, Sweden
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136313 (URN)10.1177/1403494817697511 (DOI)000402148400011 ()28381194 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019696612 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-21 Created: 2017-06-21 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Boström, G., Hörnsten, C., Brännström, J., Conradsson, M., Nordström, P., Allard, P., . . . Littbrand, H. (2016). Antidepressant use and mortality in very old people. International psychogeriatrics, 28(7), 1201-1210
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antidepressant use and mortality in very old people
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2016 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 1201-1210Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Antidepressant treatment may increase the risk of death. The association between antidepressants and mortality has been evaluated in community-dwelling older people, but not in representative samples of very old people, among whom dementia, multimorbidity, and disability are common.

METHODS: Umeå 85+/GERDA study participants (n = 992) aged 85, 90, and ≥95 years were followed for up to five years. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze mortality risk associated with baseline antidepressant treatment, adjusted for potential confounders.

RESULTS: Mean age was 89 years; 27% of participants had dementia, 20% had stroke histories, 29% had heart failure, and 16% used antidepressants. In age- and sex-adjusted analyses, antidepressant use was associated with a 76% increased mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-2.19). Adding adjustment for Geriatric Depression Scale score, HR was 1.62 (95% CI, 1.29-2.03). The association was not significant when adjusting for additional confounding factors (HR = 1.08; 95% CI, 0.85-1.38). Interaction analyses in the fully adjusted model revealed a significant interaction between sex and antidepressant use (HR: 1.76; 95% CI, 1.05-2.94). Among male and female antidepressant users, the HRs for death were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.47-1.24) and 1.28 (95% CI, 0.97-1.70), respectively.

CONCLUSION: Among very old people, baseline antidepressant treatment does not seem to be independently associated with increased mortality risk. However, the risk may be different in men and women. This difference and the potential risk of initial treatment require further investigation in future cohort studies of very old people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2016
Keywords
depression, antidepressants, age 80 and over, dementia, residential facilities, frail elderly, epidemiology, mortality
National Category
Geriatrics
Research subject
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119010 (URN)10.1017/S104161021600048X (DOI)000382387500016 ()26987958 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84961217608 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-07 Created: 2016-04-07 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Boström, G., Conradsson, M., Hörnsten, C., Rosendahl, E., Lindelöf, N., Holmberg, H., . . . Littbrand, H. (2016). Effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on depressive symptoms among people with dementia in residential care: a randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 31(8), 868-878
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on depressive symptoms among people with dementia in residential care: a randomized controlled trial
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 868-878Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a high-intensity functional exercise program on depressive symptoms among older care facility residents with dementia.

METHODS: Residents (n = 186) with a diagnosis of dementia, age ≥ 65 years, Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥ 10, and dependence in activities of daily living were included. Participants were randomized to a high-intensity functional exercise program or a non-exercise control activity conducted 45 min every other weekday for 4 months. The 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) were administered by blinded assessors at baseline, 4, and 7 months.

RESULTS: No difference between the exercise and control activity was found in GDS or MADRS score at 4 or 7 months. Among participants with GDS scores ≥ 5, reductions in GDS score were observed in the exercise and control groups at 4 months (-1.58, P = 0.001 and -1.54, P = 0.004) and 7 months (-1.25, P = 0.01 and -1.45, P = 0.007). Among participants with MADRS scores ≥ 7, a reduction in MADRS score was observed at 4 months in the control group (-2.80, P = 0.009) and at 7 months in the exercise and control groups (-3.17, P = 0.003 and -3.34, P = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS: A 4-month high-intensity functional exercise program has no superior effect on depressive symptoms relative to a control activity among older people with dementia living in residential care facilities. Exercise and non-exercise group activities may reduce high levels of depressive symptoms.

Keywords
dementia, residential facilities, depression, exercise, randomized controlled trial, frail elderly
National Category
Other Health Sciences Physiotherapy Geriatrics
Research subject
Geriatrics; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113681 (URN)10.1002/gps.4401 (DOI)000382959400004 ()26644304 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84977676446 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Niklasson, J., Hörnsten, C., Conradsson, M., Nyqvist, F., Olofsson, B., Lövheim, H. & Gustavsson, Y. (2016). High morale and survival. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 85, 75-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High morale and survival
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 85, p. 75-75Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123987 (URN)10.1016/j.jpsychores.2016.03.185 (DOI)000377627200068 ()
Note

Meeting Abstract: 59

Available from: 2016-08-19 Created: 2016-07-07 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved
Wiklund, R., Toots, A., Conradsson, M., Olofsson, B., Holmberg, H., Rosendahl, E., . . . Littbrand, H. (2016). Risk factors for hip fracture in very old people: a population-based study. Osteoporosis International, 27(3), 923-931
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk factors for hip fracture in very old people: a population-based study
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2016 (English)In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 923-931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knowledge of risk factors for hip fracture among very old people is limited. Walking indoors with help from ≤1 person, Parkinson's disease, currently smoking, delirium in the previous month, underweight, and age were associated with increased risk of hip fracture and could be important for preventive strategy development.

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study is to investigate risk factors for hip fracture among a representative sample of very old people.

METHODS: In total, 953 participants from the Umeå 85+/Gerontological Regional Database population-based cohort study were interviewed and assessed during home visits. Associations of baseline characteristics with hip fracture during the maximum 5-year follow-up period were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression.

RESULTS: Participants had a mean age of 89.3 ± 4.7 years; 65.8 % were women, 36.8 % lived in residential care facilities, 33.6 % had dementia, and 20.4 % had histories of hip fracture. During a mean follow-up period of 2.7 years, 96 (10.1 %) individuals sustained hip fracture. Walking indoors with help from no more than one person (hazard ratio [HR] = 8.57; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.90-38.71), Parkinson's disease (HR = 5.12; 95 % CI, 1.82-14.44), currently smoking (HR = 4.38; 95 % CI 2.06-9.33), delirium in the previous month (HR = 2.01; 95 % CI, 1.15-3.49), underweight (body mass index <22; HR = 1.74, 95 % CI, 1.09-2.77), and age (HR = 1.09; 95 % CI, 1.04-1.14) were associated independently with an increased risk of hip fracture. Hip prosthesis at baseline decreased the risk of hip fracture (HR = 0.37; 95 % CI, 0.15-0.91), but only for those with bilateral hip prostheses.

CONCLUSIONS: Seven factors were associated independently with incident hip fracture during follow-up in this sample of very old people. These factors could have important clinical implications in identifying persons at high risk of hip fracture, as well as in the development of effective preventive strategies.

Keywords
Dementia, Hip fracture, Independent living, Residential facility, Risk factor, Very old
National Category
Other Health Sciences Physiotherapy Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113677 (URN)10.1007/s00198-015-3390-9 (DOI)000371311400010 ()26537711 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84959200364 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
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