Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 117) Show all publications
Vestin, E., Boström, G., Olsson, J., Elgh, F., Lind, L., Kilander, L., . . . Weidung, B. (2024). Herpes simplex viral infection doubles the risk of dementia in a contemporary cohort of older adults: a prospective study. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 97(4), 1841-1850
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Herpes simplex viral infection doubles the risk of dementia in a contemporary cohort of older adults: a prospective study
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 1841-1850Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Evidence indicates that herpes simplex virus (HSV) participates in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Objective: We investigated AD and dementia risks according to the presence of herpesvirus antibodies in relation to anti-herpesvirus treatment and potential APOE ε4 carriership interaction.

Methods: This study was conducted with 1002 dementia-free 70-year-olds living in Sweden in 2001–2005 who were followed for 15 years. Serum samples were analyzed to detect anti-HSV and anti-HSV-1 immunoglobulin (Ig) G, anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG, anti-HSV IgM, and anti-HSV and anti-CMV IgG levels. Diagnoses and drug prescriptions were collected from medical records. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were applied.

Results: Cumulative AD and all-cause dementia incidences were 4% and 7%, respectively. Eighty-two percent of participants were anti-HSV IgG carriers, of whom 6% received anti-herpesvirus treatment. Anti-HSV IgG was associated with a more than doubled dementia risk (fully adjusted hazard ratio = 2.26, p = 0.031). No significant association was found with AD, but the hazard ratio was of the same magnitude as for dementia. Anti-HSV IgM and anti-CMV IgG prevalence, anti-herpesvirus treatment, and anti-HSV and -CMV IgG levels were not associated with AD or dementia, nor were interactions between anti-HSV IgG and APOE ε4 or anti-CMV IgG. Similar results were obtained for HSV-1.

Conclusions: HSV (but not CMV) infection may be indicative of doubled dementia risk. The low AD incidence in this cohort may have impaired the statistical power to detect associations with AD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2024
Keywords
Aged 80 and over, Alzheimer disease, apolipoprotein E, cognitive disorder, cohort study, cytomegalovirus, dementia, Herpes simplex, human herpesvirus 1, neurocognitive disorder
National Category
Neurology Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221788 (URN)10.3233/JAD-230718 (DOI)38306033 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85185225398 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Gun och Bertil Stohnes StiftelseThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedSwedish Society of MedicineMärta Lundqvists FoundationRegion UppsalaStiftelsen Gamla TjänarinnorThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2024-03-19 Created: 2024-03-19 Last updated: 2024-03-19Bibliographically approved
Backman, A. C., Sjögren, K., Lövheim, H. & Edvardsson, D. (2024). Moving between doing and being - Meanings of person-centredness as narrated by nursing home managers: A phenomenological hermeneutical study. Nursing Open, 11(1), Article ID e2073.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moving between doing and being - Meanings of person-centredness as narrated by nursing home managers: A phenomenological hermeneutical study
2024 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 11, no 1, article id e2073Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study aimed to illuminate meanings of person-centredness as narrated by nursing home managers in nursing homes rated as highly person-centred.

Design: A phenomenological hermeneutical approach was used.

Methods: Twelve nursing home managers in 11 highly person-centred nursing homes in 7 municipalities in Sweden were included in this interview study. The findings were interpreted, reflected and discussed through the lens of Ricoeur.

Results: Meanings of person-centredness could be understand as moving between doing and being through knowing, sensing, sharing and giving for person-centredness. These aspects contributed via knowledge, understanding, interaction and action that involved doing for and being with older persons through these caring dimensions. By moving between doing for, being with and being part of the overall nursing home narrative, knowing, sensing, sharing and giving could support the persons' identity in different ways. This may also contribute to sense-making, preserving dignity and promoting self-esteem when aiming to provide a good life for older persons in nursing homes, within an ever-present ethical frame.

No Patient or Public Contribution: This study illuminated meanings of person-centredness as narrated by nursing home managers. No patient of public contribution was investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
managers, person-centred care, phenomenological hermeneutic, Ricoeur
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218865 (URN)10.1002/nop2.2073 (DOI)001127959400001 ()2-s2.0-85180505094 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-4016Swedish Research Council, 521-2014-2715
Available from: 2024-01-05 Created: 2024-01-05 Last updated: 2024-01-05Bibliographically approved
Backman, A. C., Ahnlund, P., Lövheim, H. & Edvardsson, D. (2024). Nursing home managers' descriptions of multi-level barriers to leading person-centred care: a content analysis. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 19(1), Article ID e12581.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing home managers' descriptions of multi-level barriers to leading person-centred care: a content analysis
2024 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 19, no 1, article id e12581Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Research suggests that person-centred care can be beneficially implemented and sustained, even though barriers remain that prevent uptake in clinical practice. Understanding barriers to person-centred care seems important, as this has an impact on care practices and resident outcomes. Moreover, there is limited knowledge about nursing home managers' descriptions of barriers when leading person-centred care.

Objectives: To explore barriers to leading person-centred care as narrated by nursing home managers.

Methods: A descriptive qualitative design was used to collect data using individual interviews with 12 nursing home managers in highly person-centred nursing homes. Data were analysed using content analysis.

Results: Multi-level barriers to leading person-centred care were identified on the (1) person level, (2) team level and (3) organisational level. Placing professional and family considerations ahead of resident considerations was described as a barrier on the personal level (1). Also, staff's divergent care values, processes, and priorities together with turnover and low foundational knowledge were identified as barriers on the team level (2). On an organisational level (3), constrained finances, functional building design and group level rostering were identified as barriers.

Conclusion: Multi-level barriers influence nursing home managers' ability to lead and promote person-centred care. Promoting the development of person-centred practices requires efforts to eliminate barriers on person, team and organisational level.

Implications for Practice: Identifying and overcoming barriers at various levels in nursing home care has the potential to promote person-centred practices. This study can inform stakeholders and policymakers of challenges and complexities in person-centred practices. Multi-level strategies are needed to target challenges at person-, team- and organisational level when striving to develop person-centred care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
aged care, barriers, care of older people, content analysis, leadership, long-term care, nursing home care, person-centred care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215941 (URN)10.1111/opn.12581 (DOI)001085942900001 ()37859588 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174549236 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2023-11-01 Created: 2023-11-01 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Olsson, J., Nourmohammadi, S., Honkala, E., Johansson, A., Hallmans, G., Weidung, B., . . . Elgh, F. (2024). Time trends in herpesvirus seroepidemiology among Swedish adults. BMC Infectious Diseases, 24(1), Article ID 273.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time trends in herpesvirus seroepidemiology among Swedish adults
Show others...
2024 (English)In: BMC Infectious Diseases, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Human herpesviruses are widespread among the human population. The infections often occurunnoticed, but severe disease as well as long-term sequelae are part of the symptom spectrum. The prevalence variesamong subpopulations and with time. The aim of this study was to describe the seroprevalence of ImmunoglobulinG against Herpes simplex 1, Herpes simplex 2, Epstein-Barr virus and Cytomegalovirus in the adult Swedish populationover a time period of several decades.

Methods: Serum samples (n = 892) from biobanks, originating from 30-year-old women, 50-year-old menand 50-year-old women sampled between 1975 and 2018, were analyzed for presence of anti-herpesvirus antibod-ies. Linear regression analysis was used to test for a correlation between birth year and seroprevalence. Multiple linearregression analysis was used to differentiate between other factors such as age and gender.

Results: Birth year correlated negatively with the prevalence of immunoglobulin G against Herpes simplex 1and Epstein-Barr virus (p = 0.004 and 0.033), and positively with Immunoglobulin G against Cytomegalovirus(p = 0.039). When participant categories were analyzed separately, birth year correlated negatively with the preva-lence of Immunoglobulin G against Herpes simplex 1 and Herpes simplex 2 (p = 0.032 and 0.028) in 30-year-old women,and with the prevalence of Immunoglobulin G against Cytomegalovirus in 50-year-old men (p = 0.011).

Conclusions: The prevalence of Immunoglobulin G against Herpes simplex 1, Herpes simplex 2 and Epstein-Barr virusdecreases in later birth cohorts. This indicates a trend of declining risk of getting infected with these viruses as a childand adolescen (9) (PDF) Time trends in herpesvirus seroepidemiology among Swedish adults. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
Keywords
Herpes, Herpes simplex, Epstein-Barr virus, Cytomegalovirus, Seroprevalence, Epidemiology, Time trends, Immunoglobulin G
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics Infectious Medicine
Research subject
Infectious Diseases; Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221713 (URN)10.1186/s12879-024-09155-w (DOI)38431567 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85186556771 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region VästerbottenUmeå UniversityThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedAlzheimerfonden
Available from: 2024-03-03 Created: 2024-03-03 Last updated: 2024-03-13Bibliographically approved
Snellman, S., Hörnsten, C., Olofsson, B., Gustafson, Y., Lövheim, H. & Niklasson, J. (2024). Validity and test–retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Geriatric Depression Scale among very old adults. BMC Geriatrics, 24(1), Article ID 261.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validity and test–retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Geriatric Depression Scale among very old adults
Show others...
2024 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) has shown good validity and reliability, but few studies have examined the GDS among very old adults or the Swedish translation.

Objectives: Evaluate the validity and reliability of the Swedish version of GDS-15 among very old adults.

Methods: In the Umeå85 + /GErontological Regional DAtabase (GERDA) study, 387 participants were assessed with both the GDS-15 and the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The mean age was 91 years. Concurrent validity between the scales was calculated using Spearman's correlation. We used the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) V symptom criteria for depression based on MADRS item scores to define depression. We calculated the Area Under the Curve (AUC) and found an optimal cut-off. A convenience sample with 60 individuals was used to calculate test–retest reliability with Cohen’s kappa and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC).

Results: Spearman's correlation coefficients between total scores for GDS-15 and MADRS were 0.60. Cronbach's alpha for the whole scale was 0.73. The AUC was 0.90 for distinguishing major depression, and the recommended cut-off of ≥ 5 showed a sensitivity of 95.2% and specificity of 65.8%. The test–retest showed that Cohen’s kappa was substantial (0.71) and the ICC was excellent (0.95).

Conclusions: The Swedish version of the GDS-15 showed good validity and reliability among very old adults. The generally recommended cut-off of ≥ 5 seems reasonable to use with the Swedish version and among very old adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2024
Keywords
Aged 80 and over, Depression, Psychiatric status rating scales, Psychometrics, ROC curve
National Category
Geriatrics Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-222888 (URN)10.1186/s12877-024-04869-7 (DOI)001187389700003 ()38500031 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85188072998 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2014– 99X-22610–01–6Region VästerbottenNorrbotten County CouncilThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the Demented
Available from: 2024-04-08 Created: 2024-04-08 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Kindstedt, J., Andersson, P., Westberg, A., Glader, E.-L., Lövheim, H. & Gustafsson, M. (2023). Exploring medication-related hospital admissions and their association with cognitive impairment among acutely admitted older people. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 19(7), 1048-1053
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring medication-related hospital admissions and their association with cognitive impairment among acutely admitted older people
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN 1551-7411, E-ISSN 1934-8150, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 1048-1053Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Medication-related hospital admissions (MRAs) are common among older people. Persons with cognitive impairment are especially vulnerable to adverse drug effects. At the same time, increased home health care and social support could theoretically prevent medication-related problems. This study aims to estimate the proportion of MRAs and explore their relationship with cognitive impairment in a population of acutely admitted older people.

Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 300 individuals aged 75 years or older admitted to an acute medical ward. Two assessors identified possibly MRAs using the Assessment Tool for Hospital Admissions Related to Medications 10 (AT-HARM10). Screening for cognitive impairment was performed during ward stay using a 4-item test related to time orientation. Prevalence odds ratios between cognitive test scores and MRAs were analysed through logistic regression.

Results: Using AT-HARM10, 108 out of 300 admissions (36%) were classified as possibly MRAs by both assessors. Moreover, MRAs were least common among patients with the lowest cognitive test scores. There was an association regarding MRAs when the lowest test score was treated as a cut-off and compared against a reference category comprising all other scores (OR, 0.31 [95% CI 0.10–0.93]; p = 0.037) in a logistic regression model adjusted for cohabitation and home health care.

Conclusion: Approximately one-third of the hospital admissions among acutely admitted older people were considered at least possibly medication-related. Hence, there is still a great need to manage medication-related problems and reduce MRAs in this vulnerable population. Using a 4-item instrument to screen for cognitive impairment, there was a negative association between MRA and lowest cognitive test score. Further exploration of the relationship between MRAs and cognitive impairment may indicate appropriate components and target populations for interventions that aims to reduce the risk of MRA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Cognitive impairment, Hospital admissions, Medication-related problems, Older people
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-207881 (URN)10.1016/j.sapharm.2023.04.117 (DOI)001001988900001 ()37105774 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85153801441 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-01078Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-01438Region Västerbotten
Available from: 2023-05-09 Created: 2023-05-09 Last updated: 2023-09-24Bibliographically approved
Backman, A. C., Lindkvist, M., Lövheim, H., Sjögren, K. & Edvardsson, D. (2023). Exploring the impact of nursing home managers' leadership on staff job satisfaction, health and intention to leave in nursing homes. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 32(19-20), 7227-7237
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the impact of nursing home managers' leadership on staff job satisfaction, health and intention to leave in nursing homes
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 32, no 19-20, p. 7227-7237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and Objectives: To explore the impact of nursing home leadership and staffing characteristics on staff job satisfaction, health and intention to leave.

Background: The number of older people has outpaced growth in the nursing home workforce worldwide. Identifying predictors with the potential to positively impact staff job satisfaction, health and intentions to leave are important. Leadership of the nursing home manager can be one such predictor.

Design: Cross-sectional design.

Methods: A sample of 2985 direct care staff in 190 nursing homes in 43 randomly selected municipalities in Sweden completed surveys on leadership, job satisfaction, self-rated health and intention to leave (response rate 52%). Descriptive statistics and Generalised Estimating Equations were conducted. The STROBE reporting checklist was applied.

Results: Nursing home managers' leadership was positively related to job satisfaction, self-rated health and low intention to leave. Lower staff educational levels were related to poorer health and lower job satisfaction.

Conclusions: Nursing home leadership plays a significant role in the job satisfaction, self-reported health and intention to leave of direct care staff. Low education levels among staff seem to negatively influence staff health and job satisfaction, suggesting that educational initiatives for less-educated staff could be beneficial for improving staff health and job satisfaction.

Relevance to clinical practice: Managers seeking to improve staff job satisfaction can consider how they support, coach and provide feedback. Recognising staff achievement at work can contribute to high job satisfaction. One important implication for managers is to offer continuing education to staff with lower or no education, given the large amount of uneducated direct care workers in aged care and the impact this may have on staff job satisfaction and health.

No patient or public contribution: No patient or public contribution was required to outcome measures in this study. Direct care staff and managers contributed with data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
health, intention to leave, job satisfaction, leadership, management
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-210214 (URN)10.1111/jocn.16781 (DOI)001002196400001 ()2-s2.0-85161607763 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-4016Swedish Research Council, 521-2014-2715
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-12-21Bibliographically approved
Backman, A. C., Lindkvist, M., Lövheim, H., Sjögren, K. & Edvardsson, D. (2023). Longitudinal changes in nursing home leadership, direct care staff job strain and social support in Swedish nursing homes: findings from the U-AGE SWENIS study. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 18(1), Article ID e12515.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal changes in nursing home leadership, direct care staff job strain and social support in Swedish nursing homes: findings from the U-AGE SWENIS study
Show others...
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 18, no 1, article id e12515Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Promoting healthy work environment as a manager in nursing homes is important to safeguard staff health and well-being as well as care quality when facing increasing demands. The impact of leadership on staff work environment needs further exploration.

Objectives: To describe longitudinal changes in nursing home leadership, direct care staff characteristics, job strain and social support.

Methods: This study has a repeated cross-sectional design, a five-year follow-up study. Nursing home staff in 181 corresponding units (n = 1253 in 2014 and n = 1176 in 2019) completed surveys about leadership, staff job strain and social support in a five-year follow-up study. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted.

Results: A higher degree of leadership defined by coaching and providing direct feedback to care staff, handling conflicts in a constructive way and having control of the clinical work, was significantly associated with a lower degree of job strain and a higher degree of social support among staff, with stronger associations at follow-up. The proportion of enrolled nurses increased significantly at follow-up.

Conclusions: Leadership is increasingly important for staff work environment, especially in times of increased workload and decreasing collegiality and deteriorating work atmosphere at work. Implications for Practice: Stakeholder and policy makers in nursing home care may reflect on how managers' leadership is prioritised in these environments because such leadership is associated with staff job strain and social support. Managers striving to improve the work situation of staff may consider their own role and allow flexibility in how and when the work can be performed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
job strain, leadership, management, social support, stress
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201344 (URN)10.1111/opn.12515 (DOI)000882955600001 ()36373748 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85142127790 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vårdal FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-4016Swedish Research Council, 521-2014-2715
Available from: 2022-12-14 Created: 2022-12-14 Last updated: 2023-07-13Bibliographically approved
Weidung, B., Josefsson, M., Lyttkens, P., Olsson, J., Elgh, F., Lind, L., . . . Lövheim, H. (2023). Longitudinal Effects of Herpesviruses on Multiple Cognitive Outcomes in Healthy Elderly Adults. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 94(2), 751-762
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal Effects of Herpesviruses on Multiple Cognitive Outcomes in Healthy Elderly Adults
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 751-762Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Herpesviruses have been proposed to be involved in Alzheimer's disease development as potentially modifiable pathology triggers.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations of serum antibodies for herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and cytomegalovirus (CMV) and anti-herpesvirus treatment with cognitive outcomes in relation to interactions with APOE ɛ4.

METHODS: The study included 849 participants in the population-based Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors study. Cognitive performance at the ages of 75 and 80 years was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), trail-making test (TMT) A and B, and 7-minute screening test (7MS).

RESULTS: Anti- HSV-1 IgG positivity was associated cross-sectionally with worse performance on the MMSE, TMT-A, TMT-B, 7MS, enhanced free recall, and verbal fluency tests (p = 0.016, p = 0.016, p < 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.033, and p < 0.001, respectively), but not orientation or clock drawing. Cognitive scores did not decline over time and longitudinal changes did not differ according to HSV-1 positivity. Anti- CMV IgG positivity was not associated cross-sectionally with cognition, but TMT-B scores declined more in anti- CMV IgG carriers. Anti- HSV-1 IgG interacted with APOE ɛ4 in association with worse TMT-A and better enhanced cued recall. Anti- HSV IgM interacted with APOE ɛ4 and anti-herpesvirus treatment in association with worse TMT-A and clock drawing, respectively.

CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that HSV-1 is linked to poorer cognition in cognitively healthy elderly adults, including impairments in executive function, memory, and expressive language. Cognitive performance did not decline over time, nor was longitudinal decline associated with HSV-1.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2023
Keywords
Aged 80 and over, Alzheimer’s disease, Apolipoproteins E, cognition disorders, cohort studies, cytomegalovirus, dementia, Herpes simplex, herpesvirus 1 human, neurocognitive disorders
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212502 (URN)10.3233/JAD-221116 (DOI)37334589 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165546399 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-01 Created: 2023-08-01 Last updated: 2023-08-01Bibliographically approved
Corneliusson, L., Lövheim, H., Sköldunger, A., Sjögren, K. & Edvardsson, D. (2023). Relocation patterns and predictors of relocation and mortality in Swedish sheltered housing and aging in place. Journal of Aging and Environment, 37(4), 386-402
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relocation patterns and predictors of relocation and mortality in Swedish sheltered housing and aging in place
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Environment, ISSN 2689-2618, E-ISSN 2689-2626, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 386-402Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A reported objective of Swedish sheltered housing is to postpone care needs and relocation. The aim of this study was to describe migration patterns and explore predictors of relocation to nursing homes and mortality, in a sample of residents in sheltered housing and aging in place. To explore longitudinal differences between groups, study data were combined with registry data. The results showed that a higher percentage of residents in sheltered housing had relocated to a nursing home and deceased over a three-year time period, compared to aging in place, implying further interventions may be required to promote health in sheltered housing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Cohort study, housing for the elderly, longitudinal study, social participation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186894 (URN)10.1080/26892618.2022.2103868 (DOI)001095413400002 ()2-s2.0-85134750392 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-02715Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-04016
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form. 

Available from: 2021-08-25 Created: 2021-08-25 Last updated: 2024-04-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5271-4780

Search in DiVA

Show all publications