Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Andersson, Magnus, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9835-3263
Publications (10 of 105) Show all publications
Öberg, R., Sil, T. B., Ohlin, C. A., Andersson, M. & Malyshev, D. (2024). Assessing CaDPA levels, metabolic activity, and spore detection through deuterium labeling. The Analyst, 149(6), 1861-1871
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing CaDPA levels, metabolic activity, and spore detection through deuterium labeling
Show others...
2024 (English)In: The Analyst, ISSN 0003-2654, E-ISSN 1364-5528, Vol. 149, no 6, p. 1861-1871Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many strains among spore-forming bacteria species are associated with food spoilage, foodborne disease, and hospital-acquired infections. Understanding the impact of environmental conditions and decontamination techniques on the metabolic activity, viability, and biomarkers of these spores is crucial for combatting them. To distinguish and track spores and to understand metabolic mechanisms, spores must be labeled. Staining or genetic modification are current methods for this, however, these methods can be time-consuming, and affect the viability and function of spore samples. In this work, we investigate the use of heavy water for permanent isotope labeling of spores and Raman spectroscopy for tracking sporulation/germination mechanisms. We also discuss the potential of this method in observing decontamination. We find that steady-state deuterium levels in the spore are achieved after only ∼48 h of incubation with 30% D2O-infused broth and sporulation, generating Raman peaks at cell silent region of 2200 and 2300 cm−1. These deuterium levels then decrease rapidly upon spore germination in non-deuterated media. We further find that unlike live spores, spores inactivated using various methods do not lose these Raman peaks upon incubation in growth media, suggesting these peaks may be used to indicate the viability of a spore sample. We further observe several Raman peaks exclusive to deuterated DPA, a spore-specific chemical biomarker, at e.g. 988 and 2300 cm−1, which can be used to track underlying changes in spores involving DPA. In conclusion, permanent spore labeling using deuterium offers a robust and non-invasive way of labeling bacterial spores for marking, viability determination, and characterising spore activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2024
National Category
Other Physics Topics Analytical Chemistry Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221377 (URN)10.1039/d3an02162a (DOI)001160646800001 ()38348676 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85185190708 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04016The Kempe Foundations, JCK-1916.2Swedish Armed Forces, 470-A400823
Available from: 2024-02-21 Created: 2024-02-21 Last updated: 2024-03-21Bibliographically approved
Öberg, R., Landström, L., Gracia-Espino, E., Larsson, A., Andersson, M. & Andersson, P. O. (2024). Characterization of carfentanil and thiofentanil using surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy and density functional theory. Journal of Raman Spectroscopy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of carfentanil and thiofentanil using surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy and density functional theory
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, ISSN 0377-0486, E-ISSN 1097-4555Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Fentanyls are synthetic opioids up to 10,000 times more potent than morphine. Although initially developed for medical applications, fentanyl and its analogues have recently grown synonymous with the ongoing opioid epidemic. To combat the continued spread of these substances, there is a need for rapid and sensitive techniques for chemical detection. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has the potential for trace detection of harmful chemical substances. However, vibrational spectra obtained by SERS often differ between SERS substrates, as well as compared with spectra from normal Raman (NR) spectroscopy. Herein, SERS and NR responses from two fentanyl analogues, carfentanil (CF) and thiofentanil (TF), were measured and analysed with support from density functional theory (DFT) modelling. Using commercially available silver nanopillar SERS substrates, the SERS signatures of samples diluted in acetonitrile between 0.01 and 1000 µg/mL were studied. Relative SERS peak intensities measured in the range of 220–1800 cm−1 vary with concentration, while SERS and NR spectra largely agree for CF at higher concentrations ((Formula presented.) 100 µg/mL). For TF, three distinct NR peaks at 262, 366 and 667 cm−1 are absent or strongly suppressed in the SERS spectrum, attributed to the lone-pair electrons of the thiophene's sulphur atom binding to the Ag surface. The concentration dependence of the Raman peak at (Formula presented.) 1000 cm−1, assigned to trigonal bending of the phenyl ring, approximately follows a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. This work elucidates similarities and differences between SERS and NR in fentanyl detection and discusses the chemical rationale behind these differences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
carfentanil, opioids, Raman, SERS, thiofentanil
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-219515 (URN)10.1002/jrs.6643 (DOI)001139395600001 ()2-s2.0-85181933303 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04016Swedish Research Council, 2018-03937The Kempe Foundations, JCK-2132
Available from: 2024-01-22 Created: 2024-01-22 Last updated: 2024-01-22
Öberg, R., Sil, T. B., Johansson, A. C., Malyshev, D., Landström, L., Johansson, S., . . . Andersson, P. O. (2024). UV-induced spectral and morphological changes in bacterial spores for inactivation assessment. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 128(7), 1638-1646
Open this publication in new window or tab >>UV-induced spectral and morphological changes in bacterial spores for inactivation assessment
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 128, no 7, p. 1638-1646Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to detect and inactivate spore-forming bacteria is of significance within, for example, industrial, healthcare, and defense sectors. Not only are stringent protocols necessary for the inactivation of spores but robust procedures are also required to detect viable spores after an inactivation assay to evaluate the procedure’s success. UV radiation is a standard procedure to inactivate spores. However, there is limited understanding regarding its impact on spores’ spectral and morphological characteristics. A further insight into these UV-induced changes can significantly improve the design of spore decontamination procedures and verification assays. This work investigates the spectral and morphological changes to Bacillus thuringiensis spores after UV exposure. Using absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, we observe an exponential decay in the spectral intensity of amino acids and protein structures, as well as a logistic increase in dimerized DPA with increased UV exposure on bulk spore suspensions. Additionally, using micro-Raman spectroscopy, we observe DPA release and protein degradation with increased UV exposure. More specifically, the protein backbone’s 1600–1700 cm–1 amide I band decays slower than other amino acid-based structures. Last, using electron microscopy and light scattering measurements, we observe shriveling of the spore bodies with increased UV radiation, alongside the leaking of core content and disruption of proteinaceous coat and exosporium layers. Overall, this work utilized spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to gain new understanding of UV-induced spore inactivation relating to spore degradation and CaDPA release. The study also identified spectroscopic indicators that can be used to determine spore viability after inactivation. These findings have practical applications in the development of new spore decontamination and inactivation validation methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2024
National Category
Microbiology Analytical Chemistry Other Physics Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221378 (URN)10.1021/acs.jpcb.3c07062 (DOI)38326108 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85185157140 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04016The Kempe Foundations, JCK-1916.2Swedish Armed Forces, 470-A400823
Note

Published as part of The Journal of Physical Chemistry B virtual special issue “Advances in Cellular Biophysics”.

Available from: 2024-02-21 Created: 2024-02-21 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
Qamar, S., Öberg, R., Malyshev, D. & Andersson, M. (2023). A hybrid CNN-Random Forest algorithm for bacterial spore segmentation and classification in TEM images. Scientific Reports, 13(1), Article ID 18758.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A hybrid CNN-Random Forest algorithm for bacterial spore segmentation and classification in TEM images
2023 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 18758Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a new approach to segment and classify bacterial spore layers from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images using a hybrid Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) and Random Forest (RF) classifier algorithm. This approach utilizes deep learning, with the CNN extracting features from images, and the RF classifier using those features for classification. The proposed model achieved 73% accuracy, 64% precision, 46% sensitivity, and 47% F1-score with test data. Compared to other classifiers such as AdaBoost, XGBoost, and SVM, our proposed model demonstrates greater robustness and higher generalization ability for non-linear segmentation. Our model is also able to identify spores with a damaged core as verified using TEMs of chemically exposed spores. Therefore, the proposed method will be valuable for identifying and characterizing spore features in TEM images, reducing labor-intensive work as well as human bias.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Other Physics Topics Other Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216165 (URN)10.1038/s41598-023-44212-5 (DOI)37907463 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175591485 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04016The Kempe Foundations, JCK-2129.3
Available from: 2023-11-04 Created: 2023-11-04 Last updated: 2023-12-01Bibliographically approved
Valijam, S., Nilsson, D., Öberg, R., Albertsdóttir Jonsmoen, U. L., Porch, A., Andersson, M. & Malyshev, D. (2023). A lab-on-a-chip utilizing microwaves for bacterial spore disruption and detection. Biosensors & bioelectronics, 231, Article ID 115284.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A lab-on-a-chip utilizing microwaves for bacterial spore disruption and detection
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 231, article id 115284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bacterial spores are problematic in agriculture, the food industry, and healthcare, with the fallout costs from spore-related contamination being very high. Spores are difficult to detect since they are resistant to many of the bacterial disruption techniques used to bring out the biomarkers necessary for detection. Because of this, effective and practical spore disruption methods are desirable. In this study, we demonstrate the efficiency of a compact microfluidic lab-on-chip built around a coplanar waveguide (CPW) operating at 2.45 GHz. We show that the CPW generates an electric field hotspot of ∼10 kV/m, comparable to that of a commercial microwave oven, while using only 1.2 W of input power and thus resulting in negligible sample heating. Spores passing through the microfluidic channel are disrupted by the electric field and release calcium dipicolic acid (CaDPA), a biomarker molecule present alongside DNA in the spore core. We show that it is possible to detect this disruption in a bulk spore suspension using fluorescence spectroscopy. We then use laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to show the loss of CaDPA on an individual spore level and that the loss increases with irradiation power. Only 22% of the spores contain CaDPA after exposure to 1.2 W input power, compared to 71% of the untreated control spores. Additionally, spores exposed to microwaves appear visibly disrupted when imaged using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Overall, this study shows the advantages of using a CPW for disrupting spores for biomarker release and detection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Raman spectroscopy, Fluorescence sep CaDPA, Waveguide, Biomarker, Bacillus
National Category
Other Physics Topics Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Biophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206257 (URN)10.1016/j.bios.2023.115284 (DOI)000980707400001 ()37031508 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151660389 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04016Swedish Foundation for Strategic ResearchThe Kempe Foundations, JCK-1916.2Swedish Armed Forces, 470-A400821
Available from: 2023-04-01 Created: 2023-04-01 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Alakpa, E. V., Bahrd, A., Wiklund, K., Andersson, M., Novikov, L. N., Ljungberg, C. & Kelk, P. (2023). Bioprinted schwann and mesenchymal stem cell co-cultures for enhanced spatial control of neurite outgrowth. Gels, 9(3), Article ID 172.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioprinted schwann and mesenchymal stem cell co-cultures for enhanced spatial control of neurite outgrowth
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Gels, E-ISSN 2310-2861, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 172Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bioprinting nerve conduits supplemented with glial or stem cells is a promising approach to promote axonal regeneration in the injured nervous system. In this study, we examined the effects of different compositions of bioprinted fibrin hydrogels supplemented with Schwann cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on cell viability, production of neurotrophic factors, and neurite outgrowth from adult sensory neurons. To reduce cell damage during bioprinting, we analyzed and optimized the shear stress magnitude and exposure time. The results demonstrated that fibrin hydrogel made from 9 mg/mL of fibrinogen and 50IE/mL of thrombin maintained the gel’s highest stability and cell viability. Gene transcription levels for neurotrophic factors were significantly higher in cultures containing Schwann cells. However, the amount of the secreted neurotrophic factors was similar in all co-cultures with the different ratios of Schwann cells and MSCs. By testing various co-culture combinations, we found that the number of Schwann cells can feasibly be reduced by half and still stimulate guided neurite outgrowth in a 3D-printed fibrin matrix. This study demonstrates that bioprinting can be used to develop nerve conduits with optimized cell compositions to guide axonal regeneration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
3D bioprinting, biosynthetic conduit, dorsal root ganglion, mesenchymal stem cells, nerve regeneration, Schwann cells
National Category
Neurosciences Other Physics Topics Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205908 (URN)10.3390/gels9030172 (DOI)000958086200001 ()36975621 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151501139 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014–2306Umeå UniversityRegion Västerbotten, 7002408Swedish Dental Association
Available from: 2023-03-22 Created: 2023-03-22 Last updated: 2023-04-13Bibliographically approved
Valijam, S., Salehi, A. & Andersson, M. (2023). Design of a low-voltage dielectrophoresis lab-on-the chip to separate tumor and blood cells. Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, 27(3), Article ID 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design of a low-voltage dielectrophoresis lab-on-the chip to separate tumor and blood cells
2023 (English)In: Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, ISSN 1613-4982, E-ISSN 1613-4990, Vol. 27, no 3, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we design and propose a compact label-free microfluidic lab-on-a-chip device to separate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from red blood cells (RBCs) at low voltage to minimize cell damage. With the aim of developing a mm-long device to perform cell separation, we used 3D finite element simulation modeling and investigated separation efficiency for different electrode configurations, electrode shapes, and channel heights. Our results show that configuring the electrodes as two arrays, consisting of only five pairs of top and bottom planar electrodes shifted relative to each other and energized with ± 6 V at 70 kHz, generates sufficient non-uniform electric fields to separate CTCs and RBCs in a 2 mm long channel. The advantage of the proposed design is the simplicity of the electrode arrangement and that the electrodes do not cover the central part of the channel, thus allowing for brightfield imaging of the channel. In addition, the low voltage needed and the 50 µm high channel reduce the Joule heating effect and improve the device's separation and throughput efficiency. We suggest that the proposed design would be effective for separating CTCs and RBCs and, thus, used as a device for the early detection of CTCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2023
Keywords
CTC, Dielectrophoresis, LOC, Microfluidics, RBC
National Category
Other Physics Topics Other Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205909 (URN)10.1007/s10404-023-02632-9 (DOI)000935918900002 ()2-s2.0-85148622172 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04016Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research, RMX18-0152
Available from: 2023-03-22 Created: 2023-03-22 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Jonsmoen, U. L., Malyshev, D., Öberg, R., Dahlberg, T., Aspholm, M. E. & Andersson, M. (2023). Endospore pili - flexible, stiff and sticky nanofibers. Biophysical Journal, 122(13), 2696-2706
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Endospore pili - flexible, stiff and sticky nanofibers
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 122, no 13, p. 2696-2706Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Species belonging to the Bacillus cereus group form endospores (spores) whose surface is decorated with micrometers-long and nanometers-wide endospore appendages (Enas). The Enas have recently been shown to represent a completely novel class of Gram-positive pili. They exhibit remarkable structural properties making them extremely resilient to proteolytic digestion and solubilization. However, little is known about their functional and biophysical properties. In this work, we apply optical tweezers to manipulate and assess how wild type and Ena-depleted mutant spores immobilize on a glass surface. Further, we utilize optical tweezers to extend S-Ena fibers to measure their flexibility and tensile stiffness. Finally, by oscillating single spores, we examine how the exosporium and Enas affect spores’ hydrodynamic properties. Our results show that S-Enas (μm long pili) are not as effective as L-Enas in immobilizing spores to glass surfaces but are involved in forming spore to spore connections, holding the spores together in a gel-like state. The measurements also show that S-Enas are flexible but tensile stiff fibers, which support structural data suggesting that the quaternary structure is composed of subunits arranged in a complex to produce a bendable fiber (helical turns can tilt against each other) with limited axial fiber extensibility. Lastly, the results show that the hydrodynamic drag is 1.5-times higher for wild type spores expressing S- and L-Enas compared to mutant spores expressing only L-Enas or ”bald spores” lacking Ena, and 2-times higher compared to spores of the exosporium deficient strain. This study unveils novel findings on the biophysics of S- and L-Enas, their role in spore aggregation, binding of spores to glass, and their mechanical behavior upon exposure to drag forces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
aggregation, pili, adhesion, optical tweezers, spore
National Category
Biophysics Other Physics Topics Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-208834 (URN)10.1016/j.bpj.2023.05.024 (DOI)2-s2.0-85160684458 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04016
Available from: 2023-06-01 Created: 2023-06-01 Last updated: 2023-11-04
Valijam, S., Nilsson, D. P. G., Malyshev, D., Öberg, R., Salehi, A. & Andersson, M. (2023). Fabricating a dielectrophoretic microfluidic device using 3D-printed moulds and silver conductive paint. Scientific Reports, 13(1), Article ID 9560.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fabricating a dielectrophoretic microfluidic device using 3D-printed moulds and silver conductive paint
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 9560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dielectrophoresis is an electric field-based technique for moving neutral particles through a fluid. When used for particle separation, dielectrophoresis has many advantages compared to other methods, like providing label-free operation with greater control of the separation forces. In this paper, we design, build, and test a low-voltage dielectrophoretic device using a 3D printing approach. This lab-on-a-chip device fits on a microscope glass slide and incorporates microfluidic channels for particle separation. First, we use multiphysics simulations to evaluate the separation efficiency of the prospective device and guide the design process. Second, we fabricate the device in PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) by using 3D-printed moulds that contain patterns of the channels and electrodes. The imprint of the electrodes is then filled with silver conductive paint, making a 9-pole comb electrode. Lastly, we evaluate the separation efficiency of our device by introducing a mixture of 3 μm and 10 μm polystyrene particles and tracking their progression. Our device is able to efficiently separate these particles when the electrodes are energized with ±12 V at 75 kHz. Overall, our method allows the fabrication of cheap and effective dielectrophoretic microfluidic devices using commercial off-the-shelf equipment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Analytical Chemistry Other Physics Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-209721 (URN)10.1038/s41598-023-36502-9 (DOI)37308526 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85161909317 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04016Swedish Foundation for Strategic ResearchThe Kempe Foundations, JCK-1916.2
Available from: 2023-06-13 Created: 2023-06-13 Last updated: 2023-06-26Bibliographically approved
Malyshev, D., Jones, I. A., McKracken, M., Öberg, R., Harper, G. M., Joshi, L. T. & Andersson, M. (2023). Hypervirulent R20291 Clostridioides difficile spores show disinfection resilience to sodium hypochlorite despite structural changes. BMC Microbiology, 23(1), Article ID 59.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hypervirulent R20291 Clostridioides difficile spores show disinfection resilience to sodium hypochlorite despite structural changes
Show others...
2023 (English)In: BMC Microbiology, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clostridioides difficile is a spore forming bacterial species and the major causative agent of nosocomial gastrointestinal infections. C. difficile spores are highly resilient to disinfection methods and to prevent infection, common cleaning protocols use sodium hypochlorite solutions to decontaminate hospital surfaces and equipment. However, there is a balance between minimising the use of harmful chemicals to the environment and patients as well as the need to eliminate spores, which can have varying resistance properties between strains. In this work, we employ TEM imaging and Raman spectroscopy to analyse changes in spore physiology in response to sodium hypochlorite. We characterize different C. difficile clinical isolates and assess the chemical’s impact on spores’ biochemical composition. Changes in the biochemical composition can, in turn, change spores’ vibrational spectroscopic fingerprints, which can impact the possibility of detecting spores in a hospital using Raman based methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Bacterial spores, C. difficile, Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy, LTRS, Raman spectroscopy, Terbium
National Category
Infectious Medicine Other Physics Topics Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205911 (URN)10.1186/s12866-023-02787-z (DOI)000944160700001 ()36879193 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85149934176 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04016Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-03-22 Created: 2023-03-22 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Anmälan om utnyttjande av återvändarbidrag för beviljade postdoktorsstipendier [2010-02495_VR]; Umeå UniversityIdentification of key adhesion mechanisms in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria - Characterization and analysis of bacterial adhesion [2013-05379_VR]; Umeå UniversityBiophysical and Physicochemical Fingerprinting of Single Bacterial Spores [2019-04016_VR]; Umeå University; Publications
Valijam, S., Nilsson, D., Öberg, R., Albertsdóttir Jonsmoen, U. L., Porch, A., Andersson, M. & Malyshev, D. (2023). A lab-on-a-chip utilizing microwaves for bacterial spore disruption and detection. Biosensors & bioelectronics, 231, Article ID 115284. Jonsmoen, U. L., Malyshev, D., Öberg, R., Dahlberg, T., Aspholm, M. E. & Andersson, M. (2023). Endospore pili - flexible, stiff and sticky nanofibers. Biophysical Journal, 122(13), 2696-2706
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9835-3263

Search in DiVA

Show all publications

Profile pages

Research group homepage