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Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Fonseca-Rodriguez, O., Adams, R. E., Sheridan, S. C. & Schumann, B. (2023). Projection of extreme heat- and cold-related mortality in Sweden based on the spatial synoptic classification. Environmental Research, 239, Article ID 117359.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Projection of extreme heat- and cold-related mortality in Sweden based on the spatial synoptic classification
2023 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 239, article id 117359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Climate change is projected to result in increased heat events and decreased cold events. This will substantially impact human health, particularly when compounded with demographic change. This study employed the Spatial Synoptic Classification (SSC) to categorize daily weather into one of seven types. Here we estimated future mortality due to extremely hot and cold weather types under different climate change scenarios for one southern (Stockholm) and one northern (Jämtland) Swedish region.

Methods: Time-series Poisson regression with distributed lags was used to assess the relationship between extremely hot and cold weather events and daily deaths in the population above 65 years, with cumulative effects (6 days in summer, 28 days in winter), 1991 to 2014. A global climate model (MPI-M-MPI-ESM-LR) and two climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and 8.5) were used to project the occurrence of hot and cold days from 2031 to 2070. Place-specific projected mortality was calculated to derive attributable numbers and attributable fractions (AF) of heat- and cold-related deaths.

Results: In Stockholm, for the RCP 4.5 scenario, the mean number of annual deaths attributed to heat increased from 48.7 (CI 32.2–64.2; AF = 0.68%) in 2031–2040 to 90.2 (56.7–120.5; AF = 0.97%) in 2061–2070, respectively. For RCP 8.5, heat-related deaths increased more drastically from 52.1 (33.6–69.7; AF = 0.72%) to 126.4 (68.7–175.8; AF = 1.36%) between the first and the last decade. Cold-related deaths slightly increased over the projected period in both scenarios. In Jämtland, projections showed a small decrease in cold-related deaths but no change in heat-related mortality.

Conclusions: In rural northern region of Sweden, a decrease of cold-related deaths represents the dominant trend. In urban southern locations, on the other hand, an increase of heat-related mortality is to be expected. With an increasing elderly population, heat-related mortality will outweigh cold-related mortality at least under the RCP 8.5 scenario, requiring societal adaptation measures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Climate change, Cold, Heat, Mortality projection, Spatial synoptic classification, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215920 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2023.117359 (DOI)37863163 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174461411 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017/0009
Available from: 2023-11-02 Created: 2023-11-02 Last updated: 2023-11-02Bibliographically approved
Daca, C. S. L., San Sebastian, M., Arnaldo, C., Schumann, B. & Namatovu, F. (2023). Socioeconomic and geographical inequalities in health care coverage in Mozambique: a repeated cross-sectional study of the 2015 and 2018 national surveys. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 1007.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socioeconomic and geographical inequalities in health care coverage in Mozambique: a repeated cross-sectional study of the 2015 and 2018 national surveys
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2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1007Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Over the past years, Mozambique has implemented several initiatives to ensure equitable coverage to health care services. While there have been some achievements in health care coverage at the population level, the effects of these initiatives on social inequalities have not been analysed.

Objective: The present study aimed to assess changes in socioeconomic and geographical inequalities (education, wealth, region, place of residence) in health care coverage between 2015 and 2018 in Mozambique.

Methods: The study was based on repeated cross-sectional surveys from nationally representative samples: the Survey of Indicators on Immunisation, Malaria and HIV/AIDS in Mozambique (IMASIDA) 2015 and the 2018 Malaria Indicator survey. Data from women of reproductive age (15 to 49 years) were analysed to evaluate health care coverage of three indicators: insecticide-treated net use, fever treatment of children, and use of Fansidar malaria prophylaxis for pregnant women. Absolute risk differences and the slope index of inequality (SII) were calculated for the 2015 survey period and the 2018 survey period, respectively. An interaction term between the socioeconomic and geographical variables and the period was included to assess inequality changes between 2015 and 2018.

Results: The non-use of insecticide-treated nets dropped, whereas the proportion of women with children who were not treated for fever and the prevalence of women who did not take the full Fansidar dose during pregnancy decreased between 2015 and 2018. Significant reductions in the inequality related to insecticide-treated net use were observed for all socioeconomic variables. Concerning fever treatment, some reductions in socioeconomic inequalities were observed, though not statistically significant. For malaria prophylaxis, the SII was significant for education, wealth, and residence in both periods, but no significant inequality reductions were observed in any of these variables over time.

Conclusions: We observed significant reductions of socioeconomic inequalities in insecticide-treated net use, but not in fever treatment of children and Fansidar prophylaxis for pregnant women. Decision-makers should target underserved populations, specifically the non-educated, poor, and rural women, to address inequalities in health care coverage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Health care coverage, Health inequality, Mozambique, National surveys, Socioeconomic inequalities
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-209540 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-15988-y (DOI)37254141 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160627630 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2023-06-13 Created: 2023-06-13 Last updated: 2024-05-20Bibliographically approved
Daca, C., Schumann, B., Arnaldo, C. & San Sebastian, M. (2022). Wealth inequalities in reproductive and child health preventive care in Mozambique: a decomposition analysis. Global Health Action, 15(1), Article ID 2040150.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wealth inequalities in reproductive and child health preventive care in Mozambique: a decomposition analysis
2022 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 2040150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Assessing the gap between rich and poor is important to monitor inequalities in health. Identifying the contribution to that gap can help policymakers to develop interventions towards decreasing that difference.

Objective: To quantify the wealth inequalities in health preventive measures (bed net use, vaccination, and contraceptive use) to determine the demographic and socioeconomic contribution factors to that inequality using a decomposition analysis.

Methods: Data from the 2015 Immunisation, Malaria and AIDs Indicators Survey were used. The total sample included 6946 women aged 15–49 years. Outcomes were use of insecticide-treated nets (ITN), child vaccination, and modern contraception use. Wealth Index was the exposure variable and age, marital status, place of residence, region, education, occupation, and household wealth index were the explanatory variables. Wealth inequalities were assessed using concentration indexes (Cindex). Wagstaff-decomposition analysis was conducted to assess the determinants of the wealth inequality.

Results: The Cindex was −0.081 for non-ITN, −0.189 for lack of vaccination coverage and −0.284 for non-contraceptive use, indicating a pro-poor inequality. The results revealed that 88.41% of wealth gap for ITN was explained by socioeconomic factors, with education and wealth playing the largest roles. Lack of full vaccination, socioeconomic factors made the largest contribution, through the wealth variable, whereas geographic factors came next. Finally, the lack of contraceptive use, socioeconomic factors were the main explanatory factors, but to a lesser degree than the other two outcomes, with wealth and education contributing most to explaining the gap.

Conclusion: There was a pro-poor inequality in reproductive and child preventive measures in Mozambique. The greater part of this inequality could be attributed to wealth, education, and residence in rural areas. Resources should be channeled into poor and non-educated rural communities to tackle these persistent inequities in preventive care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2022
Keywords
decomposition analysis, health preventive care, Mozambique, Socioeconomic inequality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193395 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2022.2040150 (DOI)000769311900001 ()35290171 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85126650585 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-04-12 Created: 2022-04-12 Last updated: 2024-05-20Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, L., Junkka, J., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2021). Ambient temperature and stillbirth risks in northern Sweden, 1880–1950. Environmental Epidemiology, 5(6), Article ID e176.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambient temperature and stillbirth risks in northern Sweden, 1880–1950
2021 (English)In: Environmental Epidemiology, ISSN 2474-7882, Vol. 5, no 6, article id e176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Climate vulnerability of the unborn can contribute to adverse birth outcomes, in particular, but it is still not well under-stood. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and stillbirth risk among a historical population in northern Sweden (1880–1950).

Methods: We used digitized parish records and daily temperature data from the study region covering coastal and inland communi-ties some 600 km north of Stockholm, Sweden. The data included 141,880 births, and 3,217 stillbirths, corresponding to a stillbirth rate of 22.7 (1880–1950). The association between lagged temperature (0–7 days before birth) and stillbirths was estimated using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Incidence risk ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence intervals were computed, and stratified by season and sex.

Results: We observed that the stillbirth risk increased both at low and high temperatures during the extended summer season (April to September), at −10°C, and the IRR was 2.3 (CI 1.28, 4.00) compared to the minimum mortality temperature of +15°C. No clear effect of temperature during the extended winter season (October to March) was found. Climate vulnerability was greater among the male fetus compared to the female counterparts.

Conclusion: In this subarctic setting before and during industrialization, both heat and cold during the warmer season increased the stillbirth risk. Urbanization and socio-economic development might have contributed to an uneven decline in climate vulnerability of the unborn.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2021
Keywords
Stillbirth, Ambient temperature, Seasonality, Environment, Climate vulnerability, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Epidemiology; Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189202 (URN)10.1097/EE9.0000000000000176 (DOI)000784743400005 ()34909556 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144816445 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2021-11-08 Created: 2021-11-08 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Junkka, J., Lena, K., Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2021). Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880–1950. Environmental Research, 192, Article ID 110400.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880–1950
2021 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 192, article id 110400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In resource-poor societies, neonatal mortality (death in the first 28 days of life) is usually very high.Young infants are particularly vulnerable to environmental health risks, which are modified by socioeconomicfactors that change over time. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and neonatalmortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition.

Methods: Parish register data and temperature data in coastal Vasterbotten, ¨ Sweden, between 1880 and 1950were used. Total and sex-specific neonatal mortality was modelled as a function of mean temperature, adjustingfor age, seasonality and calendar time, using discrete-time survival analysis. A linear threshold function wasapplied with a cut point at 14.5 ◦C (the minimum mortality temperature). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Further analyses were stratified by study period (1800–1899, 1900–1929,and 1930–1950).

Results: Neonatal mortality was 32.1 deaths/1000 live births, higher in boys than in girls, and decreased between1880 and 1950, with high inter-annual variability. Mean daily temperature was +2.5 ◦C, ranging from − 40.9 ◦Cto +28.8 ◦C. At − 20 ◦C, the OR of neonatal death was 1.56 (CI 1.30–1.87) compared to the reference at +14.5 ◦C.Among girls, the OR of mortality at − 20 ◦C was 1.17 (0.88–1.54), and among boys, it was 1.94 (1.53–2.45). Atemperature increase from +14.5 to +20 ◦C was associated with a 25% increase of neonatal mortality (OR 1.25,CI 1.04–1.50). Heat- and cold-related risks were lowest between 1900 and 1929.

Conclusions: In this remote sub-Arctic region undergoing socio-economic changes, we found an increased mortality risk in neonates related to low but also to high temperature. Climate vulnerability varied across time andwas particularly high among boys. This demonstrates that environmental impacts on human health are complexand highly dependent on the specific local context, with many, often unknown, contributing determinants ofvulnerability. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Climate vulnerability, Ambient temperature, Neonatal mortality, Sweden, Demographic transition
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology; History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-177264 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2020.110400 (DOI)000599687100009 ()3129863 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85094559994 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-12-03 Created: 2020-12-03 Last updated: 2021-05-10Bibliographically approved
Fonseca Rodriguez, O., Sheridan, S. C., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2021). Effect of extreme hot and cold weather on cause-specific hospitalizations in Sweden: A time series analysis. Environmental Research, 193, Article ID 110535.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of extreme hot and cold weather on cause-specific hospitalizations in Sweden: A time series analysis
2021 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 193, article id 110535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Considering that several meteorological variables can contribute to weather vulnerability, the estimation of their synergetic effects on health is particularly useful. The spatial synoptic classification (SSC) has been used in biometeorological applications to estimate the effect of the entire suite of weather conditions on human morbidity and mortality. In this study, we assessed the relationships between extremely hot and dry (dry tropical plus, DT+) and hot and moist (moist tropical plus, MT+) weather types in summer and extremely cold and dry (dry polar plus, DP+) and cold and moist (moist polar, MP+) weather types in winter and cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations by age and sex. Time-series quasi-Poisson regression with distributed lags was used to assess the relationship between oppressive weather types and daily hospitalizations over 14 subsequent days in the extended summer (May to August) and 28 subsequent days during the extended winter (November to March) over 24 years in 4 Swedish locations from 1991 to 2014. In summer, exposure to hot weather types appeared to reduce cardiovascular hospitalizations while increased the risk of hospitalizations for respiratory diseases, mainly related to MT+. In winter, the effect of cold weather on both cause-specific hospitalizations was small; however, MP+ was related to a delayed increase in cardiovascular hospitalizations, whilst MP+ and DP + increased the risk of hospitalizations due to respiratory diseases. This study provides useful information for the staff of hospitals and elderly care centers who can help to implement protective measures for patients and residents. Also, our results could be helpful for vulnerable people who can adopt protective measures to reduce health risks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Cardiovascular hospitalizations, Respiratory hospitalizations, Spatial synoptic classification, Hot weather, Cold weather, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-177327 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2020.110535 (DOI)000613940400002 ()2-s2.0-85097420161 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-12-06 Created: 2020-12-06 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, L., Junkka, J., Schumann, B. & Häggström Lundevaller, E. (2021). Socioeconomic disparities in climate vulnerability: neonatal mortality in northern Sweden, 1880–1950. Population and environment, 43(2), 149-180
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socioeconomic disparities in climate vulnerability: neonatal mortality in northern Sweden, 1880–1950
2021 (English)In: Population and environment, ISSN 0199-0039, E-ISSN 1573-7810, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 149-180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to analyse the association between season of birth, temperature and neonatal mortality according to socioeconomic status in northern Sweden from 1880 to 1950. The source material for this study comprised digitised parish records combined with local weather data. The association between temperature, seasonality, socioeconomic status and neonatal mortality was modelled using survival analysis. We can summarise our findings according to three time periods. During the first period (1880–1899), temperature and seasonality had the greatest association with high neonatal mortality, and the socioeconomic differences in vulnerability were small. The second period (1900–1929) was associated with a decline in seasonal and temperature-related vulnerabilities among all socioeconomic groups. For the last period (1930–1950), a new regime evolved with rapidly declining neonatal mortality rates involving class-specific temperature vulnerabilities, and there was a particular effect of high temperature among workers. We conclude that the effect of season of birth on neonatal mortality was declining for all socioeconomic groups (1880–1950), whereas weather vulnerability was pronounced either when the socioeconomic disparities in neonatal mortality were large (1880–1899) or during transformations from high to low neonatal rates in the course of industrialisation and urbanisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Neonatal mortality, Environment, Temperature, Seasonality, Social class
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Epidemiology; Sociology; Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-184409 (URN)10.1007/s11111-021-00383-9 (DOI)000659776700001 ()2-s2.0-85107747637 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P17-0033:1
Available from: 2021-06-14 Created: 2021-06-14 Last updated: 2022-01-12Bibliographically approved
Lindvall, K., Kinsman, J., Abraha, A., Dalmar, A., Abdullahi, M. F., Godefay, H., . . . Schumann, B. (2020). Health Status and Health Care Needs of Drought-Related Migrants in the Horn of Africa: A Qualitative Investigation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(16), Article ID 5917.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health Status and Health Care Needs of Drought-Related Migrants in the Horn of Africa: A Qualitative Investigation
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 16, article id 5917Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia, situated in the Horn of Africa, are highly vulnerable to climate change, which manifests itself through increasing temperatures, erratic rains and prolonged droughts. Millions of people have to flee from droughts or floods either as cross-border refugees or as internally displaced persons (IDPs). The aim of this study was to identify knowledge status and gaps regarding public health consequences of large-scale displacement in these countries. After a scoping review, we conducted qualitative in-depth interviews during 2018 with 39 stakeholders from different disciplines and agencies in these three countries. A validation workshop was held with a selection of 13 interviewees and four project partners. Malnutrition and a lack of vaccination of displaced people are well-known challenges, while mental health problems and gender-based violence (GBV) are less visible to stakeholders. In particular, the needs of IDPs are not well understood. The treatment of mental health and GBV is insufficient, and IDPs have inadequate access to essential health services in refugee camps. Needs assessment and program evaluations with a patients’ perspective are either lacking or inadequate in most situations. The Horn of Africa is facing chronic food insecurity, poor population health and mass displacement. IDPs are an underserved group, and mental health services are lacking. A development approach is necessary that moves beyond emergency responses to the building of long-term resilience, the provision of livelihood support and protection to reduce displacement by droughts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
climate change, drought, migration, displacement, health, health care, Horn of Africa, Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya, knowledge needs
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174530 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17165917 (DOI)000565061800001 ()32824046 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85089628583 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-26 Created: 2020-08-26 Last updated: 2020-10-15Bibliographically approved
Fonseca Rodriguez, O., Sheridan, S., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2020). Hot and cold weather based on the spatial synoptic classification and cause-specific mortality in Sweden: a time-stratified case-crossover study. International journal of biometeorology, 64(9), 1435-1449
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hot and cold weather based on the spatial synoptic classification and cause-specific mortality in Sweden: a time-stratified case-crossover study
2020 (English)In: International journal of biometeorology, ISSN 0020-7128, E-ISSN 1432-1254, Vol. 64, no 9, p. 1435-1449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The spatial synoptic classification (SSC) is a holistic categorical assessment of the daily weather conditions at specific locations; it is a useful tool for assessing weather effects on health. In this study, we assessed (a) the effect of hot weather types and the duration of heat events on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality in summer and (b) the effect of cold weather types and the duration of cold events on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality in winter. A time-stratified case-crossover design combined with a distributed lag nonlinear model was carried out to investigate the association of weather types with cause-specific mortality in two southern (Skåne and Stockholm) and two northern (Jämtland and Västerbotten) locations in Sweden. During summer, in the southern locations, the Moist Tropical (MT) and Dry Tropical (DT) weather types increased cardiovascular and respiratory mortality at shorter lags; both hot weather types substantially increased respiratory mortality mainly in Skåne. The impact of heat events on mortality by cardiovascular and respiratory diseases was more important in the southern than in the northern locations at lag 0. The cumulative effect of MT, DT and heat events lagged over 14 days was particularly high for respiratory mortality in all locations except in Jämtland, though these did not show a clear effect on cardiovascular mortality. During winter, the dry polar and moist polar weather types and cold events showed a negligible effect on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality. This study provides valuable information about the relationship between hot oppressive weather types with cause-specific mortality; however, the cold weather types may not capture sufficiently effects on cause-specific mortality in this sub-Arctic region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Cardiovascular mortality, Respiratory mortality, Spatial synoptic classification, Sweden, Hot weather, Cold weather
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Environmental Sciences Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Research subject
Epidemiology; environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170076 (URN)10.1007/s00484-020-01921-0 (DOI)000528322900001 ()32328787 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85084159671 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, FR-2017/0009
Available from: 2020-04-24 Created: 2020-04-24 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Lena, K., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2020). Neonatal Mortality and Temperature in Two Northern Swedish Rural Parishes, 1860–1899—The Significance of Ethnicity and Gender. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(4), Article ID 1216.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neonatal Mortality and Temperature in Two Northern Swedish Rural Parishes, 1860–1899—The Significance of Ethnicity and Gender
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 4, article id 1216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to analyze the association between season of birth and daily temperature for neonatal mortality in two Swedish rural parishes between 1860 and 1899. Further, we aimed to study whether the association varied according to ethnicity (indigenous Sami reindeer herders and non-Sami settlers) and gender. The source material for this study comprised digitized parish records from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, combined with local weather data provided by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. Using a time event-history approach, we investigated the association between daily temperature (at birth and up to 28 days after birth) and the risk of neonatal death during the coldest months (November through March). The results showed that Sami neonatal mortality was highest during winter and that the Sami neonatal mortality risk decreased with higher temperatures on the day of birth. Male neonatal risk decreased with higher temperatures during the days following birth, while no effect of temperature was observed among female neonates. We conclude that weather vulnerability differed between genders and between the indigenous and non-indigenous populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2020
Keywords
neonatal mortality, temperature, seasonality, indigenous population, gender, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168105 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17041216 (DOI)000522388500092 ()32070044 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079592825 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P17-0033:1
Available from: 2020-02-17 Created: 2020-02-17 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Projects
Climate, social and demographic change and disease in Sweden during three hundred years [P12-1312:1_RJ]; Umeå UniversityWhat´s the weather got to do with it? - Infant mortality in Northern Sweden during the demographic transition [P17-0033:1_RJ]; Umeå University; Publications
Karlsson, L., Junkka, J., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2021). Ambient temperature and stillbirth risks in northern Sweden, 1880–1950. Environmental Epidemiology, 5(6), Article ID e176. Karlsson, L., Junkka, J., Schumann, B. & Häggström Lundevaller, E. (2021). Socioeconomic disparities in climate vulnerability: neonatal mortality in northern Sweden, 1880–1950. Population and environment, 43(2), 149-180Lena, K., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2019). The association between cold extremes and neonatal mortality in Swedish Sápmi from 1800–1895. Global Health Action, 12(1), Article ID 1623609.
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9722-0370

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