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Publications (10 of 179) Show all publications
Ngin, P., Haglund, P., Proum, S. & Fick, J. (2024). Pesticide screening of surface water and soil along the Mekong River in Cambodia. Science of the Total Environment, 912, Article ID 169312.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pesticide screening of surface water and soil along the Mekong River in Cambodia
2024 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 912, article id 169312Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Widespread use of pesticides globally has led to serious concerns about environmental contamination, particularly with regard to aquatic and soil ecosystems. This work involved investigating concentrations of 64 pesticides in surface-water and soil samples collected in four provinces along the Mekong River in Cambodia during the dry and rainy seasons (276 samples in total), and conducting semi-structured interviews with local farmers about pesticide use. Furthermore, an ecological risk assessment of the detected pesticides was performed. In total, 56 pesticides were detected in surface water and 43 in soil, with individual pesticides reaching maximum concentrations of 1300 ng/L in the surface-water samples (tebufenozide) and 1100 ng/g dry weight in the soil samples (bromophos-ethyl). The semi-structured interviews made it quite evident that the instructions that farmers are provided regarding the use of pesticides are rudimentary, and that overuse is common. The perceived effect of pesticides was seen as an end-point, and there was a limited process of optimally matching pesticides to pests and crops. Several pesticides were used regularly on the same crop, and the period between application and harvest varied. Risk analysis showed that bromophos-ethyl, dichlorvos, and iprobenfos presented a very high risk to aquatic organisms in both the dry and rainy seasons, with risk quotient values of 850 for both seasons, and of 67 in the dry season and 78 in the rainy season for bromophos-ethyl, and 49 in the dry season and 16 in the rainy season for dichlorvos. Overall, this work highlights the occurrence of pesticide residues in surface water and soil along the Mekong River in Cambodia, and emphasizes the urgent need for monitoring and improving pesticide practices and regulations in the region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Ecological risk assessment, LC-MS/MS, Mekong River, Pesticides, QuEChERS, Soil, SPE, Surface water
National Category
Environmental Sciences Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-219332 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.169312 (DOI)38104830 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85181086161 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2024-01-12 Created: 2024-01-12 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Berglund, Å. M. M., Gallampois, C., Ripszam, M., Larsson, H., Figueroa, D., Griniene, E., . . . Tysklind, M. (2023). Effects on the food-web structure and bioaccumulation patterns of organic contaminants in a climate-altered Bothnian Sea mesocosms. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article ID 1244434.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects on the food-web structure and bioaccumulation patterns of organic contaminants in a climate-altered Bothnian Sea mesocosms
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 10, article id 1244434Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change is expected to alter global temperature and precipitation patterns resulting in complex environmental impacts. The proposed higher precipitation in northern Scandinavia would increase runoff from land, hence increase the inflow of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (tDOM) in coastal regions. This could promote heterotrophic bacterial production and shift the food web structure, by favoring the microbial food web. The altered climate is also expected to affect transport and availability of organic micropollutants (MPs), with downstream effects on exposure and accumulation in biota. This study aimed to assess climate-induced changes in a Bothnian Sea food web structure as well as bioaccumulation patterns of MPs. We performed a mesocosms-study, focusing on aquatic food webs with fish as top predator. Alongside increased temperature, mesocosm treatments included tDOM and MP addition. The tDOM addition affected nutrient availability and boosted both phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria in our fairly shallow mesocosms. The increased tDOM further benefitted flagellates, ciliates and mesozooplankton, while the temperature increase and MP addition had minor effect on those organism groups. Temperature, on the other hand, had a negative impact on fish growth and survival, whereas tDOM and MP addition only had minor impact on fish. Moreover, there were indications that bioaccumulation of MPs in fish either increased with tDOM addition or decreased at higher temperatures. If there was an impact on bioaccumulation, moderately lipophilic MPs (log Kow 3.6 - 4.6) were generally affected by tDOM addition and more lipophilic MPs (log Kow 3.8 to 6.4) were generally affected by increased temperature. This study suggest that both increased temperatures and addition of tDOM likely will affect bioaccumulation patterns of MPs in shallow coastal regions, albeit with counteracting effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
organic contaminants, climate impact, food web, bioaccumulation, ecology, Bothnian Sea
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-217906 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2023.1244434 (DOI)001092680700001 ()
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE, 2009-149The Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2023-12-20 Created: 2023-12-20 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved
Hollender, J., Schymanski, E. L., Ahrens, L., Alygizakis, N., Béen, F., Bijlsma, L., . . . Krauss, M. (2023). NORMAN guidance on suspect and non-target screening in environmental monitoring. Environmental Sciences Europe, 35(1), Article ID 75.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>NORMAN guidance on suspect and non-target screening in environmental monitoring
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2023 (English)In: Environmental Sciences Europe, ISSN 2190-4707, E-ISSN 2190-4715, Vol. 35, no 1, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing production and use of chemicals and awareness of their impact on ecosystems and humans has led to large interest for broadening the knowledge on the chemical status of the environment and human health by suspect and non-target screening (NTS). To facilitate effective implementation of NTS in scientific, commercial and governmental laboratories, as well as acceptance by managers, regulators and risk assessors, more harmonisation in NTS is required. To address this, NORMAN Association members involved in NTS activities have prepared this guidance document, based on the current state of knowledge. The document is intended to provide guidance on performing high quality NTS studies and data interpretation while increasing awareness of the promise but also pitfalls and challenges associated with these techniques. Guidance is provided for all steps; from sampling and sample preparation to analysis by chromatography (liquid and gas—LC and GC) coupled via various ionisation techniques to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS), through to data evaluation and reporting in the context of NTS. Although most experience within the NORMAN network still involves water analysis of polar compounds using LC–HRMS/MS, other matrices (sediment, soil, biota, dust, air) and instrumentation (GC, ion mobility) are covered, reflecting the rapid development and extension of the field. Due to the ongoing developments, the different questions addressed with NTS and manifold techniques in use, NORMAN members feel that no standard operation process can be provided at this stage. However, appropriate analytical methods, data processing techniques and databases commonly compiled in NTS workflows are introduced, their limitations are discussed and recommendations for different cases are provided. Proper quality assurance, quantification without reference standards and reporting results with clear confidence of identification assignment complete the guidance together with a glossary of definitions. The NORMAN community greatly supports the sharing of experiences and data via open science and hopes that this guideline supports this effort.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214113 (URN)10.1186/s12302-023-00779-4 (DOI)001057513500001 ()2-s2.0-85169708278 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2023-09-12Bibliographically approved
Rebryk, A., Koschorreck, J. & Haglund, P. (2023). Temporal trends of lipophilic organic contaminants in blue mussel (1994–2017) and eelpout (1994–2017) from the southern Baltic Sea. Science of the Total Environment, 897, Article ID 166282.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temporal trends of lipophilic organic contaminants in blue mussel (1994–2017) and eelpout (1994–2017) from the southern Baltic Sea
2023 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 897, article id 166282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A time-trend study was carried out for two important Baltic Sea species, blue mussel (1994–2017, 11 samples) and eelpout (1994–2017, 11 samples), to track the changes in levels of regulated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and show potential increases in the levels of the contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). It was carried out utilizing gas chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) based non-target screening (NTS). Data were acquired in two modes – electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ion chemical ionization (ECNI) – to widen the contaminant coverage, and treated using a fast semi-automated NTS data processing workflow. The study revealed that >250 tentatively identified compounds show statistically significant temporal trends in Baltic blue mussel and eelpout. A large number of regulated substances, including but not limited to PCBs, DDTs and other organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), chlorobenzenes, and many polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), showed significant declining trends, as was expected. Their rates of decline were in good agreement with previously reported data. In contrast, increasing trends were observed for many CECs, some polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs), and hydrocarbons. The CEC group included, among others, four compounds, namely, one personal care product ingredient, 2-ethylhexyl stearate, one brominated compound 1,2,3,5-tetrabromobenzene and two intermediates 4-isopropoxyaniline and bilobol dimethyl ether, that were reported in marine biota for the first time to the best of our knowledge. Several compounds, including four CECs and two unknown brominated compounds, showed levels considerably higher than the common legacy pollutants (CB-153 and BDE-99), which might be taken into consideration for future monitoring and risk assessment. In addition, this work revealed the presence of a plethora of organoiodinated compounds that exhibited statistically significant temporal trends in the samples under study, which could be of future interest.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Temporal trends, Non-target screening, GC-HRMS, Contaminants of emerging concern, Baltic blue mussel, Baltic eelpout
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214108 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.166282 (DOI)37597558 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85172424751 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2023-10-16Bibliographically approved
Dürig, W., Lindblad, S., Golovko, O., Gkotsis, G., Aalizadeh, R., Nika, M.-C., . . . Ahrens, L. (2023). What is in the fish? Collaborative trial in suspect and non-target screening of organic micropollutants using LC- and GC-HRMS. Environment International, 181, Article ID 108288.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is in the fish? Collaborative trial in suspect and non-target screening of organic micropollutants using LC- and GC-HRMS
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2023 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 181, article id 108288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A collaborative trial involving 16 participants from nine European countries was conducted within the NORMAN network in efforts to harmonise suspect and non-target screening of environmental contaminants in whole fish samples of bream (Abramis brama). Participants were provided with freeze-dried, homogenised fish samples from a contaminated and a reference site, extracts (spiked and non-spiked) and reference sample preparation protocols for liquid chromatography (LC) and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Participants extracted fish samples using their in-house sample preparation method and/or the protocol provided. Participants correctly identified 9–69 % of spiked compounds using LC-HRMS and 20–60 % of spiked compounds using GC-HRMS. From the contaminated site, suspect screening with participants’ own suspect lists led to putative identification of on average ∼145 and ∼20 unique features per participant using LC-HRMS and GC-HRMS, respectively, while non-target screening identified on average ∼42 and ∼56 unique features per participant using LC-HRMS and GC-HRMS, respectively. Within the same sub-group of sample preparation method, only a few features were identified by at least two participants in suspect screening (16 features using LC-HRMS, 0 features using GC-HRMS) and non-target screening (0 features using LC-HRMS, 2 features using GC-HRMS). The compounds identified had log octanol/water partition coefficient (KOW) values from −9.9 to 16 and mass-to-charge ratios (m/z) of 68 to 761 (LC-HRMS and GC-HRMS). A significant linear trend was found between log KOW and m/z for the GC-HRMS data. Overall, these findings indicate that differences in screening results are mainly due to the data analysis workflows used by different participants. Further work is needed to harmonise the results obtained when applying suspect and non-target screening approaches to environmental biota samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Biota, Collaborative trial, Exposome, GC-HRMS, LC-HRMS, Suspect and non-target analysis
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216197 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2023.108288 (DOI)2-s2.0-85175353112 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-08 Created: 2023-11-08 Last updated: 2023-11-08Bibliographically approved
Rebryk, A., Gallampois, C. & Haglund, P. (2022). A time-trend guided non-target screening study of organic contaminants in Baltic Sea harbor porpoise (1988–2019), guillemot (1986–2019), and white-tailed sea eagle (1965–2017) using gas chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry. Science of the Total Environment, 829, Article ID 154620.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A time-trend guided non-target screening study of organic contaminants in Baltic Sea harbor porpoise (1988–2019), guillemot (1986–2019), and white-tailed sea eagle (1965–2017) using gas chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry
2022 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 829, article id 154620Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The rate of decline in regulated persistent organic pollutant (POP) concentrations in Baltic Sea biota has leveled off in recent years, with new contaminants frequently being discovered. There is, therefore, a need for comprehensive approaches to study occurrence and temporal trends of a wide range of environmental contaminants, including legacy POPs, contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), and new contaminants. In the current work, non-target screening (NTS) workflows were developed and used for, to the best of our knowledge, the first time-trend directed NTS of biota using gas chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). To maximize contaminant coverage, both electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ion chemical ionization (ECNI) were used. The EI data were treated using highly automated workflows to find, prioritize, and tentatively identify contaminants with statistically significant temporal trends. The ECNI data were manually processed and reviewed prior to time-trend analysis. Altogether, more than 300 tentatively identified contaminants were found to have significant temporal trends in samples of Baltic guillemot, harbor porpoise, or white-tailed sea eagle. Significant decreases were found for many regulated chemicals, as could be expected, such as PCBs, polychlorinated terphenyls, chlorobenzenes, toxaphenes, DDT, other organochlorine pesticides, and tri- and tetra- bromodiphenyl ethers (BDEs). The rate of decline of legacy POPs agreed well with data reported from targeted analyses. Significant increases were observed for small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heptaBDEs, CECs, and terpenes and related compounds. The CECs included, among others, one plasticizer tributyl acetylcitrate (ATBC), two antioxidants 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)phenol and 2,6-bis(tert-butyl)-4-(4-morpholinyl-methyl)phenol, and two compounds used in polymer production, trimethyl isocyanurate and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, which had not previously been reported in biota. Their increased concentrations in biota indicate increased use and release. The increase in ATBC may be linked to increased use of it as a substitute for di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), which has been phased out over the last decade.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Temporal trends, Non-target screening, GC-HRMS, Contaminants of emerging concern, The Baltic Sea, Top consumer species
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193243 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.154620 (DOI)000793203100012 ()35306077 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85126536226 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Available from: 2022-03-22 Created: 2022-03-22 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Haglund, P. & Rebryk, A. (2022). Biomagnification and Temporal Trends of New and Emerging Dechloranes and Related Transformation Products in Baltic Sea Biota. Environmental Science and Technology Letters, 9(5), 406-412
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomagnification and Temporal Trends of New and Emerging Dechloranes and Related Transformation Products in Baltic Sea Biota
2022 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology Letters, E-ISSN 2328-8930, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 406-412Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To enhance knowledge of the environmental distribution and temporal trends of dechloranes and their transformation products (TPs) we performed suspect screening of Baltic Sea biota (eelpout, herring, harbor porpoise, guillemot and white-tailed sea eagle). Evaluation of new and “digitally frozen” gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry data revealed 31 compounds: five dechloranes (Dechlorane [Mirex], Dechlorane 602, Dechlorane 603, and syn-/anti-Dechlorane Plus [DP]), three isomers, and 23 TPs. Six new Dechlorane 603 TPs and two new DP TPs were detected, including one hydroxy-TP. Some TPs occurred at much higher concentrations than the parent compounds (e.g., Dechlorane 603 TPs were >10-fold more abundant than their parent). Concentrations of contaminants in the most contaminated species (white-tailed sea eagle) changed little over the period 1965–2017. Slow declines were detected for most compounds (median, 2% per year), although concentrations of DP and DP-TPs increased by 1% per year. Ten contaminants biomagnify, and the trophic magnification factors for TPs of Mirex, Dechlorane 602 and Dechlorane 603 (8.2 to 17.8) were similar to the parent compounds (6.6 to 12.4) and higher than that of DP (2.4, nonsignificant). The results are discussed in relation to the current review of DP for potential listing under the Stockholm Convention on POPs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2022
Keywords
Dechloranes, emerging contaminants, transformation products, suspect screening, biomagnification, temporal trends, top predators
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193899 (URN)10.1021/acs.estlett.2c00171 (DOI)000801203800007 ()2-s2.0-85129058654 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Baltic Sea multilevel health impacts on key species of anthropogenic hazardous substances
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental ResearchBONUS - Science for a better future of the Baltic Sea region, Art. 185
Available from: 2022-04-20 Created: 2022-04-20 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Rebryk, A. & Haglund, P. (2022). Comprehensive non-target screening of biomagnifying organic contaminants in the Baltic Sea food web. Science of the Total Environment, 851, Article ID 158280.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comprehensive non-target screening of biomagnifying organic contaminants in the Baltic Sea food web
2022 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 851, article id 158280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) based non-target screening (NTS) is a powerful approach for the simultaneous determination of multiple environmental contaminant classes in complex biota samples. In this study, trophic biomagnification factor (TMF) directed NTS was performed to find and (tentatively) identify known, emerging, and new chemical contaminants that are persistent and biomagnify in Baltic Sea biota. The investigated food web included seven species: one filter feeder (blue mussel, Mytilus edulis), two fish (eelpout, Zoarces viviparous; herring, Clupea harengus), two marine mammals (harbor porpoise, Phocoena phocoena; grey seal, Halichoerus grypus) and two birds (guillemot, Uria aalge; white-tailed sea eagle, Haliaeetus albicilla). The NTS procedure included extraction with organic solvent mixtures, two-step high-resolution gel permeation chromatography clean-up, Florisil® fractionation, gas chromatography (GC) HRMS analysis in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ion chemical ionization (ECNI) modes, and NTS data processing. The latter was performed differently for the EI and ECNI data: the EI data were treated using a flexible and highly automated TMF-directed NTS workflow, whereas the ECNI data were treated with a simpler and less automated workflow that specifically screened for brominated compounds. The two workflows collectively revealed biomagnification (statistically significant TMF values) of >250 tentatively identified compounds, including legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as PCBs and PCB-related compounds, DDT and its metabolites, and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), and halogenated natural products (HNPs). Among the tentatively identified CECs, nine have not previously been reported in environmental biota samples. These included four polymer additives (used as antioxidants, rubber additives or plasticizers) and two cosmetic product additives (ethyl myristate and isopropyl palmitate). The CECs should be prioritized for future structure verification and quantification using reference standards.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Non-target screening, Biomagnification, Trophic magnification factors, GC-HRMS, Contaminants of emerging concern, Baltic Sea
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-198941 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.158280 (DOI)000874763100008 ()36029819 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85136591772 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental ResearchBONUS - Science for a better future of the Baltic Sea region, Art. 185
Available from: 2022-08-29 Created: 2022-08-29 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Mohammed Taha, H., Aalizadeh, R., Alygizakis, N., Antignac, J.-P., Arp, H. P., Bade, R., . . . Schymanski, E. L. (2022). The NORMAN Suspect List Exchange (NORMAN-SLE): facilitating European and worldwide collaboration on suspect screening in high resolution mass spectrometry. Environmental Sciences Europe, 34(1), Article ID 104.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The NORMAN Suspect List Exchange (NORMAN-SLE): facilitating European and worldwide collaboration on suspect screening in high resolution mass spectrometry
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2022 (English)In: Environmental Sciences Europe, ISSN 2190-4707, E-ISSN 2190-4715, Vol. 34, no 1, article id 104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The NORMAN Association (https://www.norman-network.com/) initiated the NORMAN Suspect List Exchange (NORMAN-SLE; https://www.norman-network.com/nds/SLE/) in 2015, following the NORMAN collaborative trial on non-target screening of environmental water samples by mass spectrometry. Since then, this exchange of information on chemicals that are expected to occur in the environment, along with the accompanying expert knowledge and references, has become a valuable knowledge base for “suspect screening” lists. The NORMAN-SLE now serves as a FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable) chemical information resource worldwide.

Results: The NORMAN-SLE contains 99 separate suspect list collections (as of May 2022) from over 70 contributors around the world, totalling over 100,000 unique substances. The substance classes include per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), pharmaceuticals, pesticides, natural toxins, high production volume substances covered under the European REACH regulation (EC: 1272/2008), priority contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and regulatory lists from NORMAN partners. Several lists focus on transformation products (TPs) and complex features detected in the environment with various levels of provenance and structural information. Each list is available for separate download. The merged, curated collection is also available as the NORMAN Substance Database (NORMAN SusDat). Both the NORMAN-SLE and NORMAN SusDat are integrated within the NORMAN Database System (NDS). The individual NORMAN-SLE lists receive digital object identifiers (DOIs) and traceable versioning via a Zenodo community (https://zenodo.org/communities/norman-sle), with a total of > 40,000 unique views, > 50,000 unique downloads and 40 citations (May 2022). NORMAN-SLE content is progressively integrated into large open chemical databases such as PubChem (https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) and the US EPA’s CompTox Chemicals Dashboard (https://comptox.epa.gov/dashboard/), enabling further access to these lists, along with the additional functionality and calculated properties these resources offer. PubChem has also integrated significant annotation content from the NORMAN-SLE, including a classification browser (https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/classification/#hid=101).

Conclusions: The NORMAN-SLE offers a specialized service for hosting suspect screening lists of relevance for the environmental community in an open, FAIR manner that allows integration with other major chemical resources. These efforts foster the exchange of information between scientists and regulators, supporting the paradigm shift to the “one substance, one assessment” approach. New submissions are welcome via the contacts provided on the NORMAN-SLE website (https://www.norman-network.com/nds/SLE/).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Chemicals of emerging concern, Cheminformatics, Data exchange, Environmental contaminants, Exposomics, FAIR (Findable Accessible Interoperable Reusable) data, High resolution mass spectrometry, Non-target screening, Open science, Suspect screening
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200821 (URN)10.1186/s12302-022-00680-6 (DOI)000871050600001 ()36284750 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85140599341 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 101036756NIH (National Institutes of Health)EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 603437EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 733032
Available from: 2022-11-16 Created: 2022-11-16 Last updated: 2023-08-21Bibliographically approved
Rodríguez, J., Gallampois, C., Haglund, P., Timonen, S. & Rowe, O. (2021). Bacterial communities as indicators of environmental pollution by POPs in marine sediments. Environmental Pollution, 268, Article ID 115690.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacterial communities as indicators of environmental pollution by POPs in marine sediments
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2021 (English)In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 268, article id 115690Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Decades of intensive discharge from industrial activities into coastal systems has resulted in the accumulation of a variety of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in marine waters and sediments, having detrimental impacts on aquatic ecosystems and the resident biota. POPs are among the most hazardous chemicals originating from industrial activities due to their biotoxicity and resistance to environmental degradation. Bacterial communities are known to break down many of these aromatic compounds, and different members of naturally occurring bacterial consortia have been described to work in syntrophic association to thrive in heavily contaminated waters and sediments, making them potential candidates as bioindicators of environmental pollution. In this study environmental, sampling was combined with chemical analysis of pollutants and high-resolution sequencing of bacterial communities using Next Generation Sequencing molecular biology tools. The aim of the present study was to describe the bacterial communities from marine sediments containing high loads of POPs and to identify relevant members of the resident microbial communities that may act as bioindicators of contamination. Marine sediments were collected from a coastal bay area of the Baltic Sea historically influenced by intense industrial activity, including metal smelting, oil processing, and pulp and paper production. Different types of POPs were detected at high concentrations. Fiberbank sediments, resulting from historic paper industry activity, were found to harbour a clearly distinct bacterial community including a number of bacterial taxa capable of cellulolytic and dechlorination activities. Our findings indicate that specific members of the bacterial communities thrive under increasing levels of POPs in marine sediments, and that the abundances of certain taxa correlate with specific POPs (or groups), which could potentially be employed in monitoring, status assessment and environmental management purposes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Bacterial communities, Persistent organic pollutants, Environmental indicators, Environmental pollution, Baltic sea
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-177526 (URN)10.1016/j.envpol.2020.115690 (DOI)000600553000014 ()33045590 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85092365016 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2020-12-11 Created: 2020-12-11 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2293-7913

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