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Eliasson, Kent
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Eliasson, K. & Westerlund, O. (2023). Housing markets and geographical labour mobility to high-productivity regions: the case of Stockholm. European Urban and Regional Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Housing markets and geographical labour mobility to high-productivity regions: the case of Stockholm
2023 (English)In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In many countries, there are signs of declining migration to high-productivity urban areas due to restrictions in the housing market and increasing regional differences in housing prices. Using detailed population-wide register data for Sweden, we estimate how regional variation in housing prices and homeownership is associated with the individual’s decision whether to accept a job offer in the Stockholm metropolitan region and the interrelated choice between migration and commuting as the mobility mode. Our findings indicate that high relative housing prices in the Stockholm area and homeownership are associated with decreasing total geographical labour mobility to the region. This is pronounced among the young and among highly skilled workers. The negative effects of high relative housing prices and homeownership on migration are partially but not fully compensated by positive effects on commuting to Stockholm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Commuting, homeownership, housing prices, labour mobility, migration
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-217986 (URN)10.1177/09697764231210791 (DOI)2-s2.0-85178408873 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-14 Created: 2023-12-14 Last updated: 2023-12-14
Eliasson, K. & Westerlund, O. (2023). The urban wage premium and spatial sorting on observed and unobserved ability. Journal of Economic Geography, 23(3), 601-627
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The urban wage premium and spatial sorting on observed and unobserved ability
2023 (English)In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 601-627Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We estimate static and dynamic agglomeration effects on earnings among university graduates using Swedish longitudinal population register data. The prime interest lies with whether and how the dynamic effects of big city work experience vary by observed ability of workers and whether the effects are portable after relocation. Urban wage premium and spatial sorting of university graduates are analysed by using information on school grades, parental education and university rank. We find that the value of accumulated big city work experience increases with observed ability. The dynamic premium of working in bigger cities is not lost when moving to smaller cities, suggesting that it reflects learning effects and human capital accumulation. Our findings indicate systematic spatial sorting on observed indicators of ability as well as on unobserved productive traits. Sorting on unobserved abilities is driven primarily by graduates in the upper part of the observed ability distribution and is apparent also when taking dynamic learning effects into consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
Urban wage premium, university graduates, agglomeration economies, spatial sorting
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200461 (URN)10.1093/jeg/lbac029 (DOI)000870345500001 ()2-s2.0-85160683998 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01706
Available from: 2022-10-21 Created: 2022-10-21 Last updated: 2023-06-12Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, K., Hansson, P. & Lindvert, M. (2021). Patterns of employment, skills, and tasks within MNEs associated with offshoring. The World Economy, 45(4), 944-970
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of employment, skills, and tasks within MNEs associated with offshoring
2021 (English)In: The World Economy, ISSN 0378-5920, E-ISSN 1467-9701, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 944-970Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examine the relationship between relative demands for skills, non-routine, and non-offshorable tasks in Swedish MNE parents (onshore) and their employment shares in affiliates abroad (offshore). Our estimations suggest that increased employment shares in affiliates abroad (offshore) result in higher relative demand for skills and larger shares of non-routine tasks performed by employed that are highly educated in the parents at home (onshore). However, we do not find any evidence for that the share of non-offshorable tasks rises in the parents of Swedish MNEs when employment shares increase in their affiliates overseas. Furthermore, we estimate the relationships between absolute employment onshore (skilled and less-skilled labour) and employment in affiliates offshore (high- and low-income countries). Increased employment in affiliates in low-income countries relates negatively to the employment of less-skilled workers in manufacturing MNE parents (substitute), whereas increased employment in affiliates in high-income countries correlates positively with the employment of skilled workers in service MNE parents (complement).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
multinational enterprises, non-routine and offshorable tasks, offshoring, relative labour demand, skill upgrading
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-191323 (URN)10.1111/twec.13203 (DOI)000705247900001 ()2-s2.0-85116803393 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2022-01-14 Created: 2022-01-14 Last updated: 2022-07-13Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, K., Haapanen, M. & Westerlund, O. (2021). Patterns of inter- and intra-regional differences in human capital and earnings: Evidence from Finland and Sweden 1987–2015. Applied Geography, 135, Article ID 102539.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of inter- and intra-regional differences in human capital and earnings: Evidence from Finland and Sweden 1987–2015
2021 (English)In: Applied Geography, ISSN 0143-6228, E-ISSN 1873-7730, Vol. 135, article id 102539Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we examine the long-term patterns of geographical disparities in human capital and income in Finland and Sweden over the period 1987–2015. Using nationwide longitudinal population register data, we analyze disparities at different spatial scales, between and within functional labor market regions determined by observed travel-to-work patterns. Contrary to the findings from many other developed economies indicating inter-regional divergence in per capita income, we find indications of inter-regional convergence in per capita earnings among the functional labor market regions in both countries after 2000. However, small, and peripheral regions have not recovered from the macroeconomic shocks in the 1990s, in terms of per capita earnings. Our estimates indicate relatively small and statistically insignificant changes in the geographical dispersion of human capital at the inter-regional scale. At the intra-regional scale, the disparities in human capital and earnings between the core and hinterlands are relatively large and persistent, although some evidence of convergence is found for Finland. The largest intra-regional differences in human capital and earnings are found within the metropolitan labor markets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Regional disparities, Human capital, Skill intensity, Income, Intra-regional, Local labor market areas
National Category
Economics Economic Geography
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187851 (URN)10.1016/j.apgeog.2021.102539 (DOI)000703864600003 ()2-s2.0-85114417078 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01706
Available from: 2021-09-22 Created: 2021-09-22 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, K., Haapanen, M. & Westerlund, O. (2020). Regional concentration of university graduates: The role of high school grades and parental background. European Urban and Regional Studies, 27(4), 398-414, Article ID UNSP 0969776420923133.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional concentration of university graduates: The role of high school grades and parental background
2020 (English)In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 398-414, article id UNSP 0969776420923133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we analyse long-term changes in the regional distribution and migration flows of university graduates in Finland and Sweden. This study is based on detailed longitudinal population register data, including information on high school grades and parental background. We find a distinct pattern of skill divergence across regions in both countries over the last 3 decades. The uneven distribution of human capital has been reinforced by the mobility patterns of university graduates, for whom regional sorting by high school grades and parental background is evident. Our findings indicate that traditional measures of human capital concentration most likely underscore actual regional differences in productive skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
Human capital, local labour market areas (LMAs), migration, parental background, school grades, university graduates
National Category
Economics Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173451 (URN)10.1177/0969776420923133 (DOI)000543213700001 ()2-s2.0-85087047570 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-07-10 Created: 2020-07-10 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, K. & Westerlund, O. (2019). Graduate migration, self-selection and urban wage premiums across the regional hierarchy. Umeå: Department of Economics, Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Graduate migration, self-selection and urban wage premiums across the regional hierarchy
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We use Swedish longitudinal population register data on university graduates and estimate the effect of migration on earnings. Migration between regional labour markets is used to identify static and dynamic agglomeration effects on earnings. Heterogeneity in effects is examined by individuals’ position in the ability distribution and by origin-destination size categories of regional labour markets. The results indicate that the effect of upward migration (from smaller to larger labour markets) on earnings is positive throughout. Downward migration (from larger to smaller labour markets) is generally associated with negative or no convincing signs of positive effects on earnings. The estimates indicate positive short-term urban wage premiums (UWP) for all origin-destination flows of upward migration, especially high UWP for in-migration to the Stockholm labour market region. The UWP of upward migration is positive also for movers in the lower end of the ability distribution, but it is substantially higher for high ability migrants. We also find evidence of a positive dynamic UWP of migration to Stockholm from the other regions, particularly for high ability migrants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Department of Economics, Umeå University, 2019. p. 28
Series
Umeå economic studies, ISSN 0348-1018 ; 962
Keywords
Urban wage premium, human capital, migration, agglomeration economies, ability
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165502 (URN)
Available from: 2019-11-25 Created: 2019-11-25 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, K., Haapanen, M. & Westerlund, O. (2019). Regional concentration of university graduates: the role of high school grades and parental background. Umeå: Department of Economics, Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional concentration of university graduates: the role of high school grades and parental background
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we analyse long-term changes in the regional distribution and migration flows of university graduates in Finland and Sweden. The study is based on detailed longitudinal population register data, including information on high school grades and parental background. We find a distinct pattern of skill divergence across regions in both countries over the last three decades. The uneven distribution of human capital has been reinforced by the mobility patterns among university graduates, for whom regional sorting by high school grades and parental background is evident. Our findings indicate that traditional measures of human capital concentration most likely underscore actual regional differences in productive skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Department of Economics, Umeå University, 2019. p. 28
Series
Umeå economic studies, ISSN 0348-1018 ; 966
Keywords
Human capital, university graduates, migration, school grades, parental education, local labour market areas
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165500 (URN)
Projects
Academy of Finland SRC “Beyond MALPE coordination: integrative envisioning” (No. 303552)
Funder
Academy of Finland, 303552
Available from: 2019-11-25 Created: 2019-11-25 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, K. & Westerlund, O. (2018). Regional agglomeration of skills and earnings: from convergence to divergence?. Östersund
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional agglomeration of skills and earnings: from convergence to divergence?
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we analyse the geographical distribution of skills and the human capital content of migration flows between Swedish local labour markets. The study is based on detailed longitudinal population register data. During the last three decades, we find a distinct pattern of skill divergence across regions. The uneven distribution of human capital is reinforced by the mobility of the highly educated population. The pattern of skill divergence coincides with declining or even reversed income convergence across Swedish regions. The skilled regions become both more skilled and richer, while the less skilled regions lag behind. This development has potentially important implications for both regional and national economic policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Östersund: , 2018. p. 49
Series
Tillväxtanalys PM ; 2018:09
Keywords
Agglomeration, Skills, Migration, Regional Divergence
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147920 (URN)
Note

Westerlund acknowledge financial support from Tillväxtanalys (The Swedish Agence for Growth Policy Analysis)

Available from: 2018-05-22 Created: 2018-05-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, K., Hansson, P. & Lindvert, M. (2017). Effects of foreign acquisitions on R&D and high-skill activities. Small Business Economics, 49(1), 163-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of foreign acquisitions on R&D and high-skill activities
2017 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 163-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using Swedish microdata, we find no evidence for the concerns circulating in the public debate that foreign acquisitions lead to reductions in both R&D expenditures and high-skilled activities in targeted domestic firms for either MNEs or non-MNEs. Previous studies have only focused on larger firms. In this paper, we are able to study the impact on smaller firms (fewer than 50 employees), which is important because 90% of the firms acquired by foreign enterprises meet this criterion. For this group of firms, there is no information on R&D, but by using the register of educational attainment, we obtain data on the share of high-skilled labour in all Swedish firms, irrespective of size. Interestingly, we find that among smaller firms, foreign enterprises tend to acquire high-productive, skill-intensive firms (cherry-picking). After the acquisitions, skill upgrading appears in acquired smaller, non-MNE firms, particularly in the service sector.

Keywords
Foreign acquisitions, Skill upgrading, R&D intensity, Propensity score matching
National Category
Economics Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137983 (URN)10.1007/s11187-016-9815-9 (DOI)000405395600009 ()2-s2.0-85007524899 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-01 Created: 2017-08-01 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, K. & Hansson, P. (2016). Are workers more vulnerable in tradable industries?. Review of World Economics, 152(2), 283-320
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are workers more vulnerable in tradable industries?
2016 (English)In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 152, no 2, p. 283-320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reduced trade barriers and lower costs of transportation and information have meant that a growing part of the economy has been exposed to international trade. In particular, this is the case in the service sector. We divide the service sector into a tradable and a non-tradable part using an approach to identify tradable industries utilizing a measure of regional concentration of production. We examine whether the probability of displacement is higher and income losses after displacement greater for workers in tradable services and manufacturing (tradable) than in non-tradable services. We also analyze whether the probability of re-employment is higher for workers displaced from tradable services and manufacturing than from non-tradable services. We find that in the 2000s the probability of displacement is relatively high in tradable services in comparison to non-tradable services and manufacturing. On the other hand, the probability of re-employment is higher for those displaced from tradable services. The largest income losses are found for those who had been displaced from manufacturing. Interestingly, the income losses of those displaced from manufacturing seems mainly to be due to longer spells of non-employment, whereas for those displaced in tradable services lower wages in their new jobs compared to their pre-displacement jobs appears to play a larger role.

Keywords
Displacement costs, Re-employment, Earnings losses, Tradable services
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124200 (URN)10.1007/s10290-016-0249-x (DOI)000378901200003 ()2-s2.0-84960114853 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-03 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
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