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Rosendahl, Erik
Publications (10 of 66) Show all publications
Almevall, A., Dahlin Almevall, A., Öhlin, J., Gustafson, Y., Zingmark, K., Niklasson, J., . . . Olofsson, B. (2024). Self-rated health in old age, related factors and survival: A 20-Year longitudinal study within the Silver-MONICA cohort. Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), 122, Article ID 105392.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated health in old age, related factors and survival: A 20-Year longitudinal study within the Silver-MONICA cohort
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2024 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 122, article id 105392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Self-rated health (SRH) offers insights into the evolving health demographics of an ageing population.

Aim: To assess change in SRH from old age to very old age and their associations with health and well-being factors, and to investigate the association between SRH and survival.

Methods: All participants in the MONICA 1999 re-examination born before 1940 (n = 1595) were included in the Silver-MONICA baseline cohort. The Silver-MONICA follow-up started in 2016 included participants in the Silver-MONICA baseline cohort aged 80 years or older. Data on SRH was available for 1561 participants at baseline with 446 of them also participating in the follow-up. The follow-up examination included a wide variety of measurements and tests.

Findings: Most participants rated their health as "Quite good" (54.5 %) at baseline. Over the study period, 42.6 % had stable SRH, 40.6 % had declined, and 16.8 % had improved. Changes in SRH were at follow-up significantly associated with age, pain, nutrition, cognition, walking aid use, self-paced gait speed, lower extremity strength, independence in activities of daily living, weekly physical exercise, outdoor activity, participation in organized activities, visiting others, morale, and depressive symptoms. SRH at baseline was significantly associated with survival (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: This study demonstrates associations between changes in SRH and a multitude of health- and wellbeing-related factors, as well as a relation between survival and SRH, accentuating their relevance within the ageing population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Aged 80 and over, Aging/psychology, Diagnostic self evaluation, Longitudinal studies, Population characteristics, Self-rated health, Survival analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-222682 (URN)10.1016/j.archger.2024.105392 (DOI)38492492 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85187986768 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-01074Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01-6Visare NorrNorrbotten County CouncilRegion VästerbottenSwedish Dementia CentreFoundation for the Memory of Ragnhild and Einar LundströmSwedish Society of MedicineKonung Gustaf V:s och Drottning Victorias Frimurarestiftelse
Available from: 2024-04-09 Created: 2024-04-09 Last updated: 2024-04-09Bibliographically approved
Frisendahl, N., Ek, S., Rosendahl, E., Franzén, E., Boström, A.-M. & Welmer, A.-K. (2023). Can the 1-leg standing test be replaced by self-reported balance in the first-time injurious fall screening tool?. Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, 46(2), 103-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can the 1-leg standing test be replaced by self-reported balance in the first-time injurious fall screening tool?
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, ISSN 1539-8412, E-ISSN 2152-0895, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 103-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and Purpose: The First-time Injurious Fall (FIF) screening tool was created to identify fall risk in community-living older men and women, who may be targets for primary preventive interventions. The FIF tool consists of 3 self-reported questions and 1 physical test (1-leg standing balance). The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive ability of the FIF tool and a modified FIF tool (in which 1-leg standing is replaced by self-reported balance) for first-time injurious falls.

Methods: A cohort of 1194 community-living people 60 years and older from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K), Sweden, was followed longitudinally for 5 years. Data on injurious falls were collected from registered data and were defined as receipt of care after a fall. The predictive ability of the FIF tool and the m-FIF tool was explored using Harrell's C statistic, stratified by sex.

Results and Discussion: The injurious fall rate per 1000 person-years was 54.9 (95% CI: 47.22-63.78) for women and 36.3 (95% CI: 28.84-45.78) for men. The predictive ability for women and men according to Harrell's C statistic was 0.70 and 0.71 for the FIF tool and the m-FIF tool. The predictive ability was 0.70 and 0.69 for 1-leg standing, and 0.65 and 0.60 for self-reported balance problems.

Conclusions: The m-FIF tool presented similar predictive ability as the FIF tool regarding first-time injurious falls. This finding could extend the usefulness of the tool to other settings, such as to electronic health (eHealth). A quickly and easily administered screening tool can help physical therapists to identify people with a high risk of falling who may need to undergo a more comprehensive fall risk assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2023
Keywords
community living, eHealth, objective measurement, older adults, subjective measurement
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206373 (URN)10.1519/JPT.0000000000000362 (DOI)000956150600004 ()35947043 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150665733 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2014-21-96Karolinska InstituteUmeå University
Available from: 2023-04-04 Created: 2023-04-04 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Simonsson, E., Levik Sandström, S., Hedlund, M., Holmberg, H., Johansson, B., Lindelöf, N., . . . Rosendahl, E. (2023). Effects of controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness and global cognitive function in older adults: the Umeå hit study-a randomized controlled trial. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 78(9), 1581-1590
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness and global cognitive function in older adults: the Umeå hit study-a randomized controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 78, no 9, p. 1581-1590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: This study examined the effects of regulated and controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIT) adapted for older adults, compared to moderate-intensity training (MIT), on cardiorespiratory fitness; cognitive, cardiovascular, and muscular function; and quality of life.

METHODS: Sixty-eight nonexercising older adults (66-79 years, 44% males) were randomized to 3 months of twice-weekly HIT (20-minute session including 10 × 6-second intervals) or MIT (40-minute session including 3 × 8-minute intervals) on stationary bicycles in an ordinary gym setting. Individualized target intensity was watt controlled with a standardized pedaling cadence and individual adjustment of the resistance load. Primary outcomes were cardiorespiratory fitness (V̇o2peak) and global cognitive function (unit-weighted composite).

RESULTS: V̇o2peak increased significantly (mean 1.38 mL/kg/min, 95% CI [0.77, 1.98]), with no between-group difference (mean difference 0.05 [-1.17, 1.25]). Global cognition did not improve (0.02 [-0.05, 0.09]), nor differed between groups (0.11 [-0.03, 0.24]). Significant between-group differences in change were observed for working memory (0.32 [0.01, 0.64]), and maximal isometric knee extensor muscle strength (0.07 N·m/kg [0.003, 0.137]), both in favor of HIT. Irrespective of the group, there was a negative change in episodic memory (-0.15 [-0.28, -0.02]), a positive change in visuospatial ability (0.26 [0.08, 0.44]), and a decrease in systolic (-2.09 mmHg [-3.54, -0.64]) and diastolic (-1.27 mmHg [-2.31, -0.25]) blood pressure.

CONCLUSIONS: In nonexercising older adults, 3 months of watt-controlled supramaximal HIT improved cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular function to a similar extent as MIT, despite half the training time. In favor of HIT, there was an improvement in muscular function and a potential domain-specific effect on working memory.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT03765385.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
Aerobic capacity, HIIT, Moderate-intensity training, SIT, Sprint interval training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214207 (URN)10.1093/gerona/glad070 (DOI)000959356800001 ()36972981 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169177109 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00912Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00159The Kamprad Family FoundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedFoundation for the Memory of Ragnhild and Einar LundströmThe Kempe FoundationsUmeå University
Available from: 2023-09-08 Created: 2023-09-08 Last updated: 2023-09-08Bibliographically approved
Åberg, A. C., Petersson, J. R., Giedraitis, V., McKee, K. J., Rosendahl, E., Halvorsen, K. & Berglund, L. (2023). Prediction of conversion to dementia disorders based on timed up and go dual-task test verbal and motor outcomes: a five-year prospective memory-clinic-based study. BMC Geriatrics, 23(1), Article ID 535.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediction of conversion to dementia disorders based on timed up and go dual-task test verbal and motor outcomes: a five-year prospective memory-clinic-based study
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2023 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: While assessment tools can increase the detection of cognitive impairment, there is currently insufficient evidence regarding clinical outcomes based on screening for cognitive impairment in older adults.

Methods: The study purpose was to investigate whether Timed Up and Go dual-task test (TUGdt) results, based on TUG combined with two different verbal tasks (name different animals, TUGdt-NA, and recite months in reverse order, TUGdt-MB), predicted dementia incidence over a period of five years among patients (N = 186, mean = 70.7 years; 45.7% female) diagnosed with Subjective Cognitive Impairment (SCI) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) following assessment at two memory clinics. Associations between TUG parameters and dementia incidence were examined in Cox regression models.

Results: During follow-up time (median (range) 3.7 (0.1–6.1) years) 98 participants converted to dementia. Novel findings indicated that the TUGdt parameter words/time, after adjustment for age, gender, and education, can be used for the prediction of conversion to dementia in participants with SCI or MCI over a period of five years. Among the TUG-related parameters investigated, words/time showed the best predictive capacity, while time scores of TUG and TUGdt as well as TUGdt cost did not produce significant predictive results. Results further showed that the step parameter step length during TUGdt predicts conversion to dementia before adjustment for age, gender, and education. Optimal TUGdt cutoffs for predicting dementia at 2- and 4-year follow-up based on words/time were calculated. The sensitivity of the TUGdt cutoffs was high at 2-year follow-up: TUGdt-NA words/time, 0.79; TUGdt-MB words/time, 0.71; reducing respectively to 0.64 and 0.65 at 4-year follow-up.

Conclusions: TUGdt words/time parameters have potential as cost-efficient tools for conversion-to-dementia risk assessment, useful for research and clinical purposes. These parameters may be able to bridge the gap of insufficient evidence for such clinical outcomes.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT05893524: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/study/NCT05893524?id=NCT05893524&rank=1 .

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Demenetia disorder, Dual-task, Gait, Mild cognitive impairment, Subjective cognitive impairment
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214274 (URN)10.1186/s12877-023-04262-w (DOI)001058979100001 ()37660032 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169513958 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-1259Swedish Research Council, 2020-0156Promobilia foundation, 20098Promobilia foundation, 22057
Note

Errata: Åberg, A.C., R. Petersson, J., Giedraitis, V. et al. Correction: Prediction of conversion to dementia disorders based on timed up and go dual-task test verbal and motor outcomes: a five-year prospective memory-clinic-based study. BMC Geriatr 2023;23,714. DOI: 10.1186/s12877-023-04427-7

Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2023-11-16Bibliographically approved
Toots, A., Eriksson Domellöf, M., Lundin-Olsson, L., Gustafson, Y. & Rosendahl, E. (2022). Backward relative to forward walking speed and falls in older adults with dementia. Gait & Posture, 96, 60-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Backward relative to forward walking speed and falls in older adults with dementia
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2022 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 96, p. 60-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Adults with dementia have a high risk of falls and fall-related injuries. A greater slowing of backward walking speed (BWS) relative to forward (FWS) has been indicated with older age, and slower BWS has been related to an increased risk of falls. Similarly, slow BWS relative to FWS has been observed in people with dementia.

Research question: Is slower BWS, and slower BWS relative to FWS associated with increased risk of prospective falls in older adults with dementia?

Methods: In total, 52 women and 12 men with dementia living in nursing homes, mean age 86 years, and mean Mini-Mental State Examination score of 14.2 points were included. BWS and FWS was measured over 2.4 m, and the directional difference (DD) calculated (100*((FWS-BWS)/FWS)). Falls were followed for 6 months by review of fall incident reports in electronic medical records at nursing homes and the regional healthcare provider.

Results: Altogether, 95 falls occurred with mean incidence rate 3.1 falls per person-years. Of included participants, 15 (23%) fell once, and 17 (27%) fell twice or more. In negative binomial regression analyses, greater DD was associated with lower prospective incidence fall rate ratio, IRR (IRR= 0.96, p < .001), while BWS was not (IRR= 0.04, p = .126).

Significance: In this study of adults with dementia, slower BWS was not associated with prospective falls. However, slower BWS relative to forward (greater DD) was associated with fewer falls, and possibly a protective response. This is novel research, yet results are promising and indicate that assessing walking speed in multiple directions may inform fall risk in adults with dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Accidental falls, Alzheimer's, Gait
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-195060 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2022.05.013 (DOI)000804643500009 ()2-s2.0-85129987110 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region VästerbottenVårdal FoundationPromobilia foundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedSwedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-01-4Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-04-4Swedish Research Council, K2009-69X-21299-01-1Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X- 22610-01-6Konung Gustaf V:s och Drottning Victorias FrimurarestiftelseForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Society of MedicineAlzheimerfonden
Available from: 2022-05-23 Created: 2022-05-23 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Simonsson, E., Jonasson Stiernman, L., Lundquist, A., Rosendahl, E., Hedlund, M., Lindelöf, N. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2022). Dopamine d2/3-receptor availability and its association with autonomous motivation to exercise in older adults: an exploratory [11c]-raclopride study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 16, Article ID 997131.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dopamine d2/3-receptor availability and its association with autonomous motivation to exercise in older adults: an exploratory [11c]-raclopride study
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 16, article id 997131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Autonomous motivation to exercise occurs when the activity is voluntary and with a perceived inherent satisfaction from the activity itself. It has been suggested that autonomous motivation is related to striatal dopamine D2/3-receptor (D2/3R) availability within the brain. In this study, we hypothesized that D2/3R availability in three striatal regions (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen) would be positively associated with self-reported autonomous motivation to exercise. We also examined this relationship with additional exploratory analyses across a set of a priori extrastriatal regions of interest (ROI).

Methods: Our sample comprised 49 older adults (28 females) between 64 and 78 years of age. The D2/3R availability was quantified from positron emission tomography using the non-displaceable binding potential of [11C]-raclopride ligand. The exercise-related autonomous motivation was assessed with the Swedish version of the Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2.

Results: No significant associations were observed between self-reported autonomous motivation to exercise and D2/3R availability within the striatum (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen) using semi-partial correlations controlling for ROI volume on D2/3R availability. For exploratory analyses, positive associations were observed for the superior (r = 0.289, p = 0.023) and middle frontal gyrus (r = 0.330, p = 0.011), but not for the inferior frontal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, or anterior insular cortex.

Conclusion: This study could not confirm the suggested link between striatal D2/3R availability and subjective autonomous motivation to exercise among older adults. The exploratory findings, however, propose that frontal brain regions may be involved in the intrinsic regulation of exercise-related behaviors, though this has to be confirmed by future studies using a more suitable ligand and objective measures of physical activity levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
aging, autonomous motivation, dopamine, exercise motivation, PET, self-determination theory (SDT)
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201462 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2022.997131 (DOI)000889590000001 ()2-s2.0-85142664855 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-00530Region VästerbottenSwedish National Centre for Research in SportsThe Kamprad Family Foundation
Available from: 2022-12-06 Created: 2022-12-06 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Månsson, L., Pettersson, B., Rosendahl, E., Skelton, D. A., Lundin-Olsson, L. & Sandlund, M. (2022). Feasibility of performance-based and self-reported outcomes in self-managed falls prevention exercise interventions for independent older adults living in the community. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1), Article ID 147.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feasibility of performance-based and self-reported outcomes in self-managed falls prevention exercise interventions for independent older adults living in the community
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2022 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Little is known about associations between performance-based measurements and self-reported scales, nor about ceiling effects or sensitivity to change to evaluate effects in the target population for self-managed exercise interventions. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of using performance-based outcomes for gait speed, functional leg strength and balance, and self-reported outcomes of falls-efficacy and functional ability in two self-managed falls prevention exercise interventions for community dwelling older adults.

METHODS: Independent living, community-dwelling older adults (n = 67) exercised with one of two self-managed falls prevention exercise programmes, a digital programme (DP) or a paper booklet (PB) in a 4-month participant preference trial. Pre- and post-assessments, by blinded assessors, included Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and 30s Chair stand test (30s CST). Participants completed self-reported questionnaires: Activities-specific and Balance Confidence scale (ABC), Iconographical Falls Efficacy Scale (Icon-FES), Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument Function Component (LLFDI-FC). In addition, improvement in balance and leg strength was also self-rated at post-assessment. Participants' mean age was 76 ± 4 years and 72% were women.

RESULTS: Ceiling effects were evident for the balance sub-component of the SPPB, and also indicated for ABC and Icon-FES in this high functioning population. In SPPB, gait speed, 30s CST, and LLFDI-FC, 21-56% of participants did not change their scores beyond the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID). At pre-assessment all performance-based tests correlated significantly with the self-reported scales, however, no such significant correlations were seen with change-scores. Improvement of performance-based functional leg strength with substantial effect sizes and significant correlations with self-reported exercise time was shown. There were no differences in outcomes between the exercise programmes except that DP users reported improved change of leg strength to a higher degree than PB users.

CONCLUSION: The LLFDI-FC and sit-to-stand tests were feasible and sensitive to change in this specific population. The balance sub-component of SPPB and self-reported measures ABC and Icon-FES indicated ceiling effects and might not be suitable as outcome measures for use in a high functioning older population. Development and evaluation of new outcome measures are needed for self-managed fall-preventive interventions with high functioning community-dwelling older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022
Keywords
Aged, Falls prevention, Patient outcome assessment, Self-managed
National Category
Geriatrics Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-192876 (URN)10.1186/s12877-022-02851-9 (DOI)000759555200002 ()35193495 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85125155283 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03481Swedish Research Council, 521-2011-3250Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2022-03-08 Created: 2022-03-08 Last updated: 2022-04-29Bibliographically approved
Bajraktari, S., Zingmark, M., Pettersson, B., Rosendahl, E., Lundin-Olsson, L. & Sandlund, M. (2022). Reaching older people with a digital fall prevention intervention in a Swedish municipality context: an observational study. Frontiers In Public Health, 10, Article ID 857652.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reaching older people with a digital fall prevention intervention in a Swedish municipality context: an observational study
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 10, article id 857652Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is robust evidence that falls in old age can be prevented by exercise programs that include balance training, functional exercises, and strength training. For the interventions to have a population health impact, outreach to the population of focus with suitable interventions is needed. While digital interventions are promising there is limited knowledge on the characteristics of who is reached. The aim of this study was to describe the recruitment process, estimate reach rate at the population level and to describe participants characteristics and representativeness in a digital fall prevention intervention study.

Methods: In a municipality-based observational study, reach of a digital fall prevention intervention was evaluated. The intervention included a digital exercise programme (Safe Step) and optional supportive strategies, complemented with a range of recruitment strategies to optimize reach. Recruitment during a period of 6 months was open to people 70 years or older who had experienced a fall or a decline in balance the past year. Reach was based on data from the baseline questionnaire including health and demographic characteristics of participants. Representativeness was estimated by comparing participants to a sample of older people from the Swedish National Public Health Survey.

Results: The recruitment rate was 4.7% (n = 173) in relation to the estimated population of focus (n = 3,706). Most participants signed up within the first month of the intervention (n = 131). The intervention attracted primarily women, older people with high education, individuals who used the internet or digital applications almost every day and those perceiving their balance as fair or poor. Safe step participants lived more commonly alone and had higher education and better walking ability in comparison to the Swedish National Public Health Survey.

Conclusions: With a range of recruitment strategies most participants were recruited to a digital fall intervention during the first month. The intervention attracted primarily highly educated women who frequently used the internet or smart technologies. In addition to digital fall prevention interventions, a higher diversity of intervention types (digital and non-digital) is more likely to reach a larger group of older people with different needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
accidental falls, aged, balance and strength exercise, digital health, mobile health, RE-AIM framework, reach
National Category
Physiotherapy Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-194291 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2022.857652 (DOI)000795835400001 ()35548075 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85129978211 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00589
Available from: 2022-04-29 Created: 2022-04-29 Last updated: 2023-04-04Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, B., Bajraktari, S., Skelton, D., Zingmark, M., Rosendahl, E., Lundin-Olsson, L. & Sandlund, M. (2022). Recruitment strategies and reach of a digital fall-prevention intervention for community-dwelling older adults. Digital health, 8, Article ID 20552076221126050.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recruitment strategies and reach of a digital fall-prevention intervention for community-dwelling older adults
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2022 (English)In: Digital health, Vol. 8, article id 20552076221126050Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: To have an impact on the population's health, preventive interventions have to reach a large proportion of the intended population. Digital solutions show potential for providing wider access to fall preventive exercise. However, there is a lack of knowledge about how to reach the target group. The aim of this study was to describe the recruitment process used in the Safe Step randomised controlled trial and the characteristics of the participants reached.

Methods: Several recruitment methods, both digital and non-digital, were adopted to reach the intended sample size. Sociodemographic parameters from the baseline questionnaire were used to describe participant characteristics. The characteristics were also compared to a representative sample of older adults in the Swedish population.

Results: In total, 1628 older adults were recruited. Social media proved to be the most successful recruitment strategy, through which 76% of the participants were recruited. The participants reached had a mean age of 75.9 years, lived in both urban and rural locations, were already frequent users of the Internet and applications (smartphone/tablet) (79.9%), had higher education (71.9%), and a large proportion were women (79.4%). In comparison with the general population participants in the Safe Step study were more highly educated (p < 0.001), women in the study more frequently lived alone (p < 0.001) and men more often reported poorer self-rated health (p = 0.04). Within the study, men reported a faster deteriorating balance (p = 0.003) and more prescribed medication (p < 0.001) than women.

Conclusion: Recruitment via social media is a useful strategy for reaching older adults, especially women and frequent users of the Internet, for a fully self-managed and digital fall prevention exercise intervention. This study underlines that a range of interventions must be available to attract and suit older adults with different functional statuses and digital skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
accidental falls, aged, eHealth, exercise, fall prevention, Geriatric medicine, preventive medicine, reach, recruitment, self-management
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-183076 (URN)10.1177/20552076221126050 (DOI)000855672000001 ()36118253 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85138745998 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03481Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00589Umeå UniversityKarolinska Institute
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2021-05-17 Created: 2021-05-17 Last updated: 2022-10-12Bibliographically approved
Toots, A., Lundin-Olsson, L., Nordström, P., Gustafson, Y. & Rosendahl, E. (2021). Exercise effects on backward walking speed in people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial. Gait & Posture, 85, 65-70
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise effects on backward walking speed in people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial
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2021 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 85, p. 65-70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Multidirectional walking, including backward walking, is integral to daily activities, and seems particularly challenging in older age, and in people with pathology affecting postural control such as dementia.

Research Question: Does exercise influence backward walking speed in people with dementia, when tested using habitual walking aids and without, and do effects differ according to walking aid use?

Methods: This study included 141 women and 45 men (mean age 85 years) with dementia from the Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX), a cluster-randomized controlled trial study set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden. Participants were randomized to a High-Intensity Functional Exercise (HIFE) program targeting lower limb strength-, balance and mobility exercise or to a seated attention control activity. Blinded assessors measured 2.4-meter usual backward walking speed, at baseline, 4 - (intervention completion) and 7-month follow-up; tested 1) with habitual walking aids allowed, and 2) without walking aids.

Results: Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect in either backward walking speed test at 4 or 7 months; test 1) 0.005 m/s, P = .788 and –0.006 m/s, P = .754 and test 2) 0.030 m/s, P = .231 and 0.015 m/s, P = .569, respectively. In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between participants who habitually walked unaided compared with those that used a walking aid at 7 months (0.094 m/s, P = .027).

Significance: In this study of older people with dementia living in nursing homes, the effects of exercise had no overall effects on backwards walking speed. Nevertheless, some benefit was indicated in participants who habitually walked unaided, which is promising and merits further investigation in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Backward walking speed, Dementia, Exercise, Mobility limitations, Residential facilities
National Category
Physiotherapy Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-180548 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2020.12.028 (DOI)000644501700009 ()2-s2.0-85100026683 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-22 Created: 2021-02-22 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
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