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Publications (10 of 65) Show all publications
Björnfot, C., Garpebring, A., Qvarlander, S., Malm, J., Eklund, A. & Wahlin, A. (2021). Assessing cerebral arterial pulse wave velocity using 4D flow MRI. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 41(10), 2769-2777
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing cerebral arterial pulse wave velocity using 4D flow MRI
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, ISSN 0271-678X, E-ISSN 1559-7016, Vol. 41, no 10, p. 2769-2777Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intracranial arterial stiffening is a potential early marker of emerging cerebrovascular dysfunction and could be mechanistically involved in disease processes detrimental to brain function via several pathways. A prominent consequence of arterial wall stiffening is the increased velocity at which the systolic pressure pulse wave propagates through the vasculature. Previous non-invasive measurements of the pulse wave propagation have been performed on the aorta or extracranial arteries with results linking increased pulse wave velocity to brain pathology. However, there is a lack of intracranial “target-organ” measurements. Here we present a 4D flow MRI method to estimate pulse wave velocity in the intracranial vascular tree. The method utilizes the full detectable branching structure of the cerebral vascular tree in an optimization framework that exploits small temporal shifts that exists between waveforms sampled at varying depths in the vasculature. The method is shown to be stable in an internal consistency test, and of sufficient sensitivity to robustly detect age-related increases in intracranial pulse wave velocity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
arterial stiffness, arteriosclerosis, Atherosclerosis, magnetic resonance imaging, neurovascular dysfunction
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-183012 (URN)10.1177/0271678X211008744 (DOI)000681011400001 ()33853409 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85104375387 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-17 Created: 2021-05-17 Last updated: 2023-09-14Bibliographically approved
Holmlund, P., Stoverud, K.-H., Wahlin, A., Wiklund, U., Malm, J., Jóhannesson, G. & Eklund, A. (2021). Author Response: Posture-Dependent Collapse of the Optic Nerve Subarachnoid Space: A Combined MRI and Modeling Study [Letter to the editor]. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 62(15), Article ID 15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Author Response: Posture-Dependent Collapse of the Optic Nerve Subarachnoid Space: A Combined MRI and Modeling Study
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2021 (English)In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 62, no 15, article id 15Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-191394 (URN)10.1167/iovs.62.15.15 (DOI)000735528100001 ()34932065 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122376636 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-17 Created: 2022-01-17 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Malm, J., Birnefeld, J., Zarrinkoob, L., Wåhlin, A. & Eklund, A. (2021). Hemodynamic Disturbances in Posterior Circulation Stroke: 4D Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging Added to Computed Tomography Angiography. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 15, Article ID 656769.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hemodynamic Disturbances in Posterior Circulation Stroke: 4D Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging Added to Computed Tomography Angiography
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2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 15, article id 656769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: A clinically feasible, non-invasive method to quantify blood flow, hemodynamics, and collateral flow in the vertebrobasilar arterial tree is missing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying blood flow and blood flow patterns using 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in consecutive patients after an ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation. We also explore if 4D-flow, analyzed in conjunction with computed tomography angiography (CTA), has potential as a diagnostic tool in posterior circulation stroke.

Methods: Twenty-five patients (mean age 62 years; eight women) with acute ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation were investigated. At admission, all patients were examined with CTA followed by MRI (4D flow MRI and diffusion-weighted sequences) at median 4 days after the presenting event. Based on the classification of Caplan, patients were divided into proximal/middle (n = 16) and distal territory infarcts (n = 9). Absolute and relative blood flow rates were calculated for internal carotid arteries (ICA), vertebral arteries (VA), basilar artery (BA), posterior cerebral arteries (P1 and P2), and the posterior communicating arteries (Pcom). In a control group consisting of healthy elderly, the 90th and 10th percentiles of flow were calculated in order to define normal, increased, or decreased blood flow in each artery. “Major hemodynamic disturbance” was defined as low BA flow and either low P2 flow or high Pcom flow. Various minor hemodynamic disturbances were also defined. Blood flow rates were compared between groups. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of each patient’s blood flow profile was performed by assessing relative blood flow rates in each artery in conjunction with findings from CTA.

Results: There was no difference in total cerebral blood flow between patients and controls [604 ± 117 ml/min vs. 587 ± 169 ml/min (mean ± SD), p = 0.39] or in total inflow to the posterior circulation (i.e., the sum of total VA and Pcom flows, 159 ± 63 ml/min vs. 164 ± 52 ml/min, p = 0.98). In individual arteries, there were no significant differences between patients and controls in absolute or relative flow. However, patients had larger interindividual relative flow variance in BA, P1, and P2 (p = 0.01, <0.01, and 0.02, respectively). Out of the 16 patients that had proximal/middle territory infarcts, nine had CTA findings in VA and/or BA generating five with major hemodynamic disturbance identified with 4D flow MRI. For those without CTA findings, seven had no or minor 4D flow MRI hemodynamic disturbance. Among nine patients with distal territory infarcts, one had major hemodynamic disturbances, while the remaining had minor disturbances.

Conclusion: 4D flow MRI contributed to the identification of the patients who had major hemodynamic disturbances from the vascular pathologies revealed on CTA. We thus conclude that 4D flow MRI could add valuable hemodynamic information when used in conjunction with CTA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2021
Keywords
basilar artery, blood flow, brain infarction, hemodynamics, magnetic resonance imaging, posterior cerebral artery, stroke, vertebral artery
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Neurology
Research subject
Radiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188871 (URN)10.3389/fnins.2021.656769 (DOI)000707751700001 ()34658752 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85117091785 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-05616Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20140592Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20180513
Available from: 2021-11-01 Created: 2021-11-01 Last updated: 2022-05-10Bibliographically approved
Olivo, G., Nilsson, J., Garzón, B., Lebedev, A., Wahlin, A., Tarassova, O., . . . Lövdén, M. (2021). Higher VO2max is associated with thicker cortex and lower grey matter blood flow in older adults. Scientific Reports, 11(1), Article ID 16724.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Higher VO2max is associated with thicker cortex and lower grey matter blood flow in older adults
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2021 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 16724Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

VO2max (maximal oxygen consumption), a validated measure of aerobic fitness, has been associated with better cerebral artery compliance and measures of brain morphology, such as higher cortical thickness (CT) in frontal, temporal and cingular cortices, and larger grey matter volume (GMV) of the middle temporal gyrus, hippocampus, orbitofrontal cortex and cingulate cortex. Single sessions of physical exercise can promptly enhance cognitive performance and brain activity during executive tasks. However, the immediate effects of exercise on macro-scale properties of the brain’s grey matter remain unclear. We investigated the impact of one session of moderate-intensity physical exercise, compared with rest, on grey matter volume, cortical thickness, working memory performance, and task-related brain activity in older adults. Cross-sectional associations between brain measures and VO2max were also tested. Exercise did not induce statistically significant changes in brain activity, grey matter volume, or cortical thickness. Cardiovascular fitness, measured by VO2max, was associated with lower grey matter blood flow in the left hippocampus and thicker cortex in the left superior temporal gyrus. Cortical thickness was reduced at post-test independent of exercise/rest. Our findings support that (1) fitter individuals may need lower grey matter blood flow to meet metabolic oxygen demand, and (2) have thicker cortex.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2021
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187002 (URN)10.1038/s41598-021-96138-5 (DOI)000686708000009 ()2-s2.0-85113190348 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 2007-2013EU, European Research Council, 617280
Available from: 2021-08-31 Created: 2021-08-31 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Wahlin, A., Holmlund, P., Fellows, A. M., Malm, J., Buckey, J. C. & Eklund, A. (2021). Re: Wahlin et al.: Optic nerve length before and after spaceflight [REPLY] [Letter to the editor]. Ophthalmology, 128(5), E28-E28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Re: Wahlin et al.: Optic nerve length before and after spaceflight [REPLY]
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2021 (English)In: Ophthalmology, ISSN 0161-6420, E-ISSN 1549-4713, Vol. 128, no 5, p. E28-E28Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Cataract surgeons, nbsp, Cataract surgery, Gender differences, Surgical volume
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187237 (URN)10.1016/j.ophtha.2021.01.004 (DOI)000642151600027 ()33551287 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85101182603 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish National Space Board, 193-17
Available from: 2021-09-08 Created: 2021-09-08 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Pedersen, R., Geerligs, L., Andersson, M., Gorbach, T., Avelar-Pereira, B., Wahlin, A., . . . Salami, A. (2021). When functional blurring becomes deleterious: Reduced system segregation is associated with less white matter integrity and cognitive decline in aging. NeuroImage, 242, Article ID 118449.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When functional blurring becomes deleterious: Reduced system segregation is associated with less white matter integrity and cognitive decline in aging
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2021 (English)In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 242, article id 118449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Healthy aging is accompanied by progressive decline in cognitive performance and concomitant changes in brain structure and functional architecture. Age-accompanied alterations in brain function have been characterized on a network level as weaker functional connections within brain networks along with stronger interactions between networks. This phenomenon has been described as age-related differences in functional network segregation. It has been suggested that functional networks related to associative processes are particularly sensitive to age-related deterioration in segregation, possibly related to cognitive decline in aging. However, there have been only a few longitudinal studies with inconclusive results. Here, we used a large longitudinal sample of 284 participants between 25 to 80 years of age at baseline, with cognitive and neuroimaging data collected at up to three time points over a 10-year period. We investigated age-related changes in functional segregation among two large-scale systems comprising associative and sensorimotor-related resting-state networks. We found that functional segregation of associative systems declines in aging with exacerbated deterioration from the late fifties. Changes in associative segregation were positively associated with changes in global cognitive ability, suggesting that decreased segregation has negative consequences for domain-general cognitive functions. Age-related changes in system segregation were partly accounted for by changes in white matter integrity, but white matter integrity only weakly influenced the association between segregation and cognition. Together, these novel findings suggest a cascade where reduced white-matter integrity leads to less distinctive functional systems which in turn contributes to cognitive decline in aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2021
Keywords
Cognitive aging, Functional segregation, Graph theory, Longitudinal study, Resting-state fMRI, White matter integrity
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186591 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.118449 (DOI)000693220400018 ()34358662 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85111920792 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2021-08-13 Created: 2021-08-13 Last updated: 2023-08-08Bibliographically approved
King, C., Einhorn, L., Brusselaers, N., Carlsson, M., Einhorn, S., Elgh, F., . . . Vahlne, A. (2020). COVID-19: a very visible pandemic [Letter to the editor]. The Lancet, 396(10248), E15-E15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>COVID-19: a very visible pandemic
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2020 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 396, no 10248, p. E15-E15Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174888 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(20)31672-X (DOI)000561619100002 ()32771110 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85088996765 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-15 Created: 2020-09-15 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Derolf, A., Juliusson, G., Benson, L., Floisand, Y., Lazarevic, V., Antunovic, P., . . . Deneberg, S. (2020). Decreasing early mortality in acute myeloid leukaemia in Sweden 1997-2014: improving performance status is a major contributing factor [Letter to the editor]. British Journal of Haematology, 188(1), 187-191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decreasing early mortality in acute myeloid leukaemia in Sweden 1997-2014: improving performance status is a major contributing factor
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2020 (English)In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 188, no 1, p. 187-191Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167355 (URN)10.1111/bjh.16265 (DOI)000505278200021 ()31863470 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076746044 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-22 Created: 2020-01-22 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Schrage, B., Ruebsamen, N., Thorand, B., Koenig, W., Söderberg, S., Wåhlin, A., . . . Karakas, M. (2019). Association of functional iron deficiency with incident cardiovascular diseases and mortality in the general population. Paper presented at Congress of the European-Society-of-Cardiology (ESC) / World Congress of Cardiology, Paris, FRANCE, AUG 31-SEP 04, 2019.. European Heart Journal, 40, 3836-3836
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of functional iron deficiency with incident cardiovascular diseases and mortality in the general population
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2019 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 40, p. 3836-3836Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168206 (URN)000507313003476 ()
Conference
Congress of the European-Society-of-Cardiology (ESC) / World Congress of Cardiology, Paris, FRANCE, AUG 31-SEP 04, 2019.
Note

Supplement: 1. Meeting Abstract: P6226.

Available from: 2020-03-11 Created: 2020-03-11 Last updated: 2021-12-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, C., Hulegårdh, E., Garelius, H., Möllgård, L., Brune, M., Wahlin, A., . . . Lehmann, S. (2019). Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia and the Role of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Population-Based Setting. Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, 25(9), 1770-1778
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia and the Role of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Population-Based Setting
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2019 (English)In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1770-1778Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Secondary AML (s-AML), including AML with an antecedent hematologic disorder (AHD-AML) and therapy-related AML (t-AML), constitutes a large proportion of patients with AML and is considered to confer a dismal prognosis. The role of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with s-AML and the extent to which HCT is performed in these patients has been little studied to date. We used the population-based Swedish AML Registry comprising 3337 intensively treated adult patients over a 17-year period to study the role of HCT within the group of patients with s-AML as well as compared with patients with de novo AML. HCT was performed in 576 patients (22%) with de novo AML, in 74 patients (17%) with AHD-AML, and in 57 patients (20%) with t-AML. At 5 years after diagnosis, there were no survivors among patients with previous myeloproliferative neoplasms who did not undergo HCT, and corresponding survival for patients with antecedent myelodysplastic syndromes and t-AML was and 2% and 4%, respectively. HCT was compared with chemotherapy consolidation in s-AML using 3 models: (1) a 200-day landmark analysis, in which HCT was favorable compared with conventional consolidation (P = .04, log-rank test); (2) a multivariable Cox regression with HCT as a time-dependent variable, in which the hazard ratio for mortality was 0.73 (95% confidence interval, 0.64 to 0.83) for HCT and favored HCT in all subgroups; and (3) a propensity score matching analysis, in which the 5-year overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival in patients with s-AML in first complete remission (CR1) was 48% and 43%, respectively, for patients undergoing HCT versus 20% and 21%, respectively, for those receiving chemotherapy consolidation (P = .01 and .02, respectively, log-rank test). Our observational data suggest that HCT improves survival and offers the only realistic curative treatment option in patients with s-AML. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Secondary AML, Therapy-related AML, Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, Population-based
National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167012 (URN)10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.05.038 (DOI)000488887800008 ()31176789 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067980147 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer SocietyStockholm County CouncilSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6402-0463

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