Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Raza-Ullah, Tatbeeq
Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Xu, R., Wu, J., Gu, J. & Raza-Ullah, T. (2023). How inter-firm cooperation and conflicts in industrial clusters influence new product development performance?: The role of firm innovation capability. Industrial Marketing Management, 111, 229-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How inter-firm cooperation and conflicts in industrial clusters influence new product development performance?: The role of firm innovation capability
2023 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 111, p. 229-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite ongoing cooperation among firms in industrial clusters, inter-firm conflicts are also prevalent, and little research has explored how these factors impact new product development (NPD) performance. In this study, we examine the influence of inter-firm cooperation and conflicts (i.e., constructive and destructive) on NPD performance, and explore the mediating role of innovation capability (i.e., incremental and radical) and the joint interactive effects of cooperation and conflicts on innovation capability. Based on data collected from a multi-sourced sample of 181 industrial cluster firms, our results confirm that innovation capability mediates the relationship between cooperation/constructive conflict and NPD performance. Specifically, we find that cooperation and constructive conflict positively affect both types of innovation capability, while destructive conflict negatively affects incremental innovation capability. Moreover, we identify a negative interaction effect of cooperation and constructive conflict on radical innovation capability, and a positive interactive effect of cooperation and destructive conflict on incremental innovation capability. These findings contribute to the literature on industrial clusters and provide practical implications for firm managers and government officials interested in regional development through industrial clusters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-207739 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2023.04.009 (DOI)000995297000001 ()2-s2.0-85153220564 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-01 Created: 2023-05-01 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Raza-Ullah, T., Stadtler, L. & Fernandez, A.-S. (2023). The individual manager in the spotlight: protecting sensitive knowledge in inter-firm coopetition relationships. Industrial Marketing Management, 110, 85-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The individual manager in the spotlight: protecting sensitive knowledge in inter-firm coopetition relationships
2023 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 110, p. 85-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When firms collaborate with their competitors (i.e., engage in coopetition), individual managers play a pivotal role in protecting their firm's sensitive knowledge from potential misuse by partners. But which managers are more successful in performing this role? To better understand the senior-level human resources who help secure a firm's competitive advantage, we build on the Upper Echelons Theory and explore how managers' cognitions and values, as expressed in their demographic characteristics, influence knowledge protection in coopetitive relationships. To test our hypotheses, we use multi-source, time-lagged data on a sample of 176 small and medium-sized firms involved in coopetition. Our results suggest that managers' tenure and female gender relate positively to knowledge protection, which in turn contributes to subsequent firm performance, whereas managers' age and higher education impact knowledge protection negatively. On this basis, our study helps develop micro-macro linkages between the Upper Echelons Theory and the Resource-Based View, and reveals how different managerial characteristics influence knowledge protection, thereby threatening or securing sustainable firm performance. We discuss the implications for knowledge protection processes and human resource management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Coopetition, Knowledge protection, Inter-firm relationships, Firm performance, Upper echelons theory, Resource-based view
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205633 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2023.02.012 (DOI)000971261000001 ()2-s2.0-85149935563 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation, W18-0024
Available from: 2023-03-11 Created: 2023-03-11 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, M. & Raza-Ullah, T. (2022). Paradoxical tensions at multiple levels and top management team crosslevel bridging in coopetition: a conceptual model. Strategic Management Review
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paradoxical tensions at multiple levels and top management team crosslevel bridging in coopetition: a conceptual model
2022 (English)In: Strategic Management Review, ISSN 2688-2612, E-ISSN 2688-2639Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

In contrast to the conventional strategic management research, emphasizing either cooperation or competition as a beneficial strategy, the emerging literature on coopetition has advanced our knowledge of how the pursuit of both cooperation and competition could potentially lead to greater benefits. However, the literature offers scarce insights into the multi-level dynamics of coopetition and the role of TMT in addressing paradoxical tensions cascaded across levels, that, if not tackled well, can overturn the benefits associated with coopetition. Using key insights from the paradox literature, this paper develops a conceptual model that suggests how the coopetition paradox unfolds at different levels within the organization, activating performing, organizing, and belonging tensions, that, in turn, affect the dynamics of the interplay between cooperation and competition at the inter-firm level. Specifically, the model contributes by foregrounding TMT’s cross-level bridging role (i.e., uniform navigation within and among relationships at the interorganizational level through efficient orchestration of internal processes at organizational levels)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Now Publishers Inc., 2022
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-197008 (URN)
Available from: 2022-06-21 Created: 2022-06-21 Last updated: 2023-07-14
Carmine, S., Andriopoulos, C., Gotsi, M., Härtel, C. E. J., Krzeminska, A., Mafico, N., . . . Keller, J. (2021). A Paradox Approach to Organizational Tensions During the Pandemic Crisis. Journal of Management Inquiry, 30(2), 138-153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Paradox Approach to Organizational Tensions During the Pandemic Crisis
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Journal of Management Inquiry, ISSN 1056-4926, E-ISSN 1552-6542, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 138-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
organization theory, paradox, tensions
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-180797 (URN)10.1177/1056492620986863 (DOI)000618500000001 ()2-s2.0-85100538541 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-25 Created: 2021-02-25 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Raza-Ullah, T. (2021). When does (not) a coopetitive relationship matter to performance? An empirical investigation of the role of multidimensional trust and distrust. Industrial Marketing Management, 96, 86-99
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When does (not) a coopetitive relationship matter to performance? An empirical investigation of the role of multidimensional trust and distrust
2021 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 96, p. 86-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite substantive evidence showing mixed results on the association between a coopetitive relationship and performance, surprisingly little theory explains the contingencies under which a coopetitive relationship does (or does not) matter to performance. By combining insights from the trust-distrust literature and 18 in-depth managerial conversations, this study unpacks the multidimensional nature of trust (i.e., goodwill and competence) and distrust (i.e., malevolence and discredibility) and suggests that the effect of a coopetitive relationship matters to performance, when both trust and distrust are present (at moderate to high levels), but fails to do so when one of them is low and the other is high. The results based on a sample of Swedish firms provide full support for the hypotheses. In terms of theoretical contributions, this study challenges the old wisdom suggesting trust as good and distrust as bad, extends the current understanding of trust and distrust beyond their one-dimensionality, and provides a novel approach to understanding when a coopetitive relationship performs well and when it does not. In terms of practical relevance, it suggests that firms adopt a paradox mindset (with a focus on both trust and distrust) to unlock the positive potential of a coopetitive relationship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Balance, Coopetition, Distrust, Paradox mindset, Trust
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-183507 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2021.03.004 (DOI)000669489500009 ()2-s2.0-85105594380 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius FoundationTore Browaldhs stiftelse, W18-0024
Available from: 2021-05-26 Created: 2021-05-26 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Raza-Ullah, T. & Kostis, A. (2020). Do trust and distrust in coopetition matter to performance?. European Management Journal, 38(3), 367-376
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do trust and distrust in coopetition matter to performance?
2020 (English)In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 367-376Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is widely acknowledged that firms intensely engage in coopetition (i.e., simultaneous cooperation and competition) and obtain unique benefits from such relationships. However, limited knowledge exists about how and when coopetition intensity leads to superior performance. Building on the theoretical work documenting that both trust and distrust are critical for enhancing performance in interfirm relationships, we address the aforementioned gap by looking into the distinct yet beneficial roles of trust and distrust in coopetition. More specifically, we argue that whereas trust likely serves as an intervening mechanism through which coopetition intensity enhances relationship performance, distrust positively influences the association between coopetition intensity and relationship performance. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 225 Swedish firms engaged in coopetition, and provide empirical evidence that trust and distrust play distinct yet important roles in achieving superior performance from coopetition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Coopetition, Trust, Distrust, Performance
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-172493 (URN)10.1016/j.emj.2019.10.004 (DOI)000537454700002 ()2-s2.0-85074531113 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation, W18-0024Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-00741
Available from: 2020-07-03 Created: 2020-07-03 Last updated: 2021-09-20Bibliographically approved
Raza-Ullah, T. & Bengtsson, M. (2020). Does size matter in competitor collaborations? The effect of firm size on creating private and common value from coopetition. In: : . Paper presented at European Group of Organizational Studies, 36th EGOS Colloquium : Organising for a Sustainable Future: Responsibility, Renewal & Resistance, Hamburg, Germany, July 2-4, 2020.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does size matter in competitor collaborations? The effect of firm size on creating private and common value from coopetition
2020 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
coopetition, firm size, value creation
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181631 (URN)
Conference
European Group of Organizational Studies, 36th EGOS Colloquium : Organising for a Sustainable Future: Responsibility, Renewal & Resistance, Hamburg, Germany, July 2-4, 2020
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation, W18-0024
Available from: 2021-03-21 Created: 2021-03-21 Last updated: 2021-03-22Bibliographically approved
Raza-Ullah, T. (2020). Experiencing the paradox of coopetition: A moderated mediation framework explaining the paradoxical tension–performance relationship. Long range planning, 53(1), Article ID 101863.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiencing the paradox of coopetition: A moderated mediation framework explaining the paradoxical tension–performance relationship
2020 (English)In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 53, no 1, article id 101863Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, I investigate how and why experienced paradoxical tension deteriorates coopetitive performance and when such debilitating effects can be managed. More specifically, by drawing on the paradox theory and emotion literature, I suggest that paradoxical tension (i.e., the cognitive difficulty faced by senior managers as they pursue multiple, simultaneous competing demands of coopetition) creates a state of emotional ambivalence, which in turn, contributes negatively to coopetitive performance. I further propose that the negative consequences can be managed through organizational-level mechanisms, namely, emotional capability and balancing capability. The results show a full mediation of emotional ambivalence and a positive influence of balancing capability. Surprisingly, the moderating effect of emotional capability turns out to be negative. However, interestingly, the moderated-mediation result shows that a blend of higher balancing capability and lower emotional capability produces a positive indirect effect of tension on performance. The paper contributes to the research on strategy and organizational paradoxes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
coopetition, paradox, emotion, ambivalence, capability, balancing, tension
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155697 (URN)10.1016/j.lrp.2018.12.003 (DOI)000517856300009 ()2-s2.0-85079101489 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013–00741
Available from: 2019-01-26 Created: 2019-01-26 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, M., Raza-Ullah, T. & Srivastava, M. (2020). Looking different vs thinking differently: Impact of TMT diversity on coopetition capability. Long range planning, 53(1), Article ID 101857.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Looking different vs thinking differently: Impact of TMT diversity on coopetition capability
2020 (English)In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 53, no 1, article id 101857Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we focus on the micro-foundations of coopetition capability and ask: "where does coopetition capability come from?" Drawing upon social psychology and cognitive theories, we seek to offer insights into the micro-foundations of coopetition capability by focusing on the role of top management team (TMT) diversity. We suggest that TMT diversity emerges from two distinct attributes of the team members: surface-level (e.g., age, gender, nationality) and deep-level (e.g., knowledge and experience). We argue that TMT diversity based on surface-level attributes contributes negatively while TMT diversity based on deep-level attributes contributes positively to coopetition capability. We test our hypotheses using a novel dataset that combines primary data and employee level secondary data of a sample of 315 Swedish firms. Results provide broad support for our hypotheses. We discuss the implications of our findings and key limitations of our study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
coopetition, TMT diversity, capability, management, inter-firm, alliance, paradox, tension
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155692 (URN)10.1016/j.lrp.2018.11.001 (DOI)000517856300003 ()2-s2.0-85057135306 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-00741
Available from: 2019-01-26 Created: 2019-01-26 Last updated: 2020-03-19Bibliographically approved
Raza-Ullah, T., Bengtsson, M. & Gnyawali, D. R. (2020). The nature, consequences, and management of emotions in interfirm paradoxical relationships - A conceptual framework. Scandinavian Journal of Management, 36(4), Article ID 101127.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The nature, consequences, and management of emotions in interfirm paradoxical relationships - A conceptual framework
2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 36, no 4, article id 101127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We develop a theory of emotions in interfirm paradoxical relationships with a focus on coopetition and emotional ambivalence. We suggest that appraisals of paradoxical coopetition situations lead to the arousal of multiple, oppositely valenced emotions of various intensities, combinations of which correspond to different states of emotional ambivalence. We explicate how emotional ambivalence, through managers’ appraisal and emotional contagion processes becomes collective and how it impacts coopetition performance. We further theorize how the negative effect of ambivalence on performance could be minimized and the positive effect could be amplified through emotional capability. Our theory provides a nuanced understanding of the complex nature of emotions, and how they arise, manifest, and impact outcomes in interfirm paradoxical relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Coopetition, emotion, ambivalence, paradox, alliance, capability, network
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-177130 (URN)10.1016/j.scaman.2020.101127 (DOI)000601288500002 ()2-s2.0-85096849529 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation, W18-0024
Available from: 2020-11-29 Created: 2020-11-29 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications