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Davis, P. A., Trotter, M., Åström, E. & Rönnlund, M. (2024). Balancing time for health behaviors: associations of time perspective with physical activity and weight management in older adults. American Journal of Health Promotion
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balancing time for health behaviors: associations of time perspective with physical activity and weight management in older adults
2024 (English)In: American Journal of Health Promotion, ISSN 0890-1171, E-ISSN 2168-6602Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To examine associations between time perspective and health promotion behaviors of physical activity and weight management.

Design: Quantitative cross-sectional.

Setting: This study is part of the Betula project on aging, memory, and dementia in Northern Sweden.

Subjects: 417 older adults aged between 55 and 85 years.

Measures: Swedish-Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory; Physical Activity in the past year, past week, and in comparison with others of similar age; Weight Management = Body Mass Index (BMI; kg/m2).

Results: After controlling for age, sex, and years of education, hierarchical linear regression indicated a Balanced Time Perspective was significantly associated with more physical activity in the past year (P =.04), the past week (P <.001), and in comparison with others (P <.01). Past Negative time perspective was associated with less physical activity in the past year (P =.03), and in comparison with others (P =.03). Present Fatalistic was associated with less physical activity during the past week (P =.03), and in comparison with others (P =.01). Present Hedonistic was associated with more physical activity the past week (P =.03), and in comparison with others (P =.03). Past Negative was associated with higher BMI (P =.02), and Future Negative were associated with lower BMI (P =.01). Taken collectively, greater positivity and flexibility across time perspectives was associated with more physical activity, whereas negative oriented time perspectives related with less physical activity and poorer weight management.

Conclusion: Time perspective can be associated with health behaviors in older adults and have implications for health across the lifespan. Health promotion interventions may target older adults’ enjoyment of exercise and weight management in the present, rather than highlight potential negative health outcomes in the future. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2024
Keywords
time perspective, exercise, health behavior, healthy aging, diet, nutrition
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223521 (URN)10.1177/08901171241242546 (DOI)001196225600001 ()38566500 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85189956200 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-18 Created: 2024-04-18 Last updated: 2024-04-18
Pyszkowska, A., Åström, E. & Rönnlund, M. (2024). Deviations from the balanced time perspective, cognitive fusion, and self-compassion in individuals with or without a depression diagnosis: different mean profiles but common links to depressive symptoms. Frontiers in Psychology, 14, Article ID 1290676.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deviations from the balanced time perspective, cognitive fusion, and self-compassion in individuals with or without a depression diagnosis: different mean profiles but common links to depressive symptoms
2024 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1290676Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Prior research indicates that depressive symptoms in unselected or sub-clinical samples are associated with time perspective biases, including a more negative view of the past and a more fatalistic attitude toward the present. In the current study, we compared time perspective profiles for a clinical sample, with a depression diagnosis with that of a control group. Additionally, we considered a measure known as deviations from the balanced time perspective (DBTP) that capture deviations across time frames, not considered in previous studies. A second obejctive was to test a model involving DPTP as a mediator of the links between cognitive fusion and self-compassion with depressive symptoms.

Method: In total, 300 individuals participated in the study, 150 participants with a depression diagnosis and 150 without a depression diagnoses. All participants filled in questions regarding background variables together with Polish adaptations of ZTPI, CFQ, SCS-S, and DASS-21 using a web-survey.

Results: The results showed significantly higher scores on Past Negative and Present Fatalistic in the clinical sample. In line with the hypothesis the clinical group also displayed elevated DBTP scores (d = 0.75), a difference that remained significant when current symptoms were adjusted for. The results of structural equation modeling moreover indicate a major role of cognitive fusion (which, as expected, was strongly associated with DBTP) in predicting symptom burden, regardless of the clinical/non-clinical distinction, but. Still, DBTP accounted for significant (unique) variance in depressive symptoms. By contrast, the inclusion of cognitive fusion and DBTP eliminated the association of self-compassion and depressive symptoms.

Conclusion: Taken together, the results indicate that levels of DBTP/fusion for persons with depression diagnosis is present regardless of current symptom burden. Thus, DBTP could be regarded as a risk factor of developing depression. Prospective research designs are needed to further evaluate the associations of the main constructs in this study and the extent to which they are predictive of future diagnosis and changes in symptom level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2024
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-219300 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1290676 (DOI)001144525500001 ()38250112 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182625858 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-10 Created: 2024-01-10 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
Ronat, L., Rönnlund, M., Adolfsson, R., Hanganu, A. & Pudas, S. (2024). Revised temperament and character inventory factors predict neuropsychiatric symptoms and aging-related cognitive decline across 25 years. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 16, Article ID 1335336.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revised temperament and character inventory factors predict neuropsychiatric symptoms and aging-related cognitive decline across 25 years
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2024 (English)In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 16, article id 1335336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Personality traits and neuropsychiatric symptoms such as neuroticism and depression share genetic overlap and have both been identified as risks factors for development of aging-related neurocognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This study aimed to examine revised personality factors derived from the Temperament and Character Inventory, previously shown to be associated with psychiatric disorders, as predictors of neuropsychiatric, cognitive, and brain trajectories of participants from a population-based aging study.

Methods: Mixed-effect linear regression analyses were conducted on data for the full sample (Nmax = 1,286), and a healthy subsample not converting to AD-dementia during 25-year follow-up (Nmax = 1,145), complemented with Cox proportional regression models to determine risk factors for conversion to clinical AD.

Results: Two personality factors, Closeness to Experience (CE: avoidance of new stimuli, high anxiety, pessimistic anticipation, low reward seeking) and Tendence to Liabilities (TL: inability to change, low autonomy, unaware of the value of their existence) were associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress (CE), sleep disturbance (TL), as well as greater decline in memory, vocabulary and verbal fluency in the full sample. Higher CE was additionally associated with greater memory decline across 25 years in the healthy subsample, and faster right hippocampal volume reduction across 8 years in a neuroimaging subsample (N = 216). Most, but not all, personality-cognition associations persisted after controlling for diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Concerning risks for conversion to AD, higher age, and APOE-ε4, but none of the personality measures, were significant predictors.

Conclusion: The results indicate that personality traits associated with psychiatric symptoms predict accelerated age-related neurocognitive declines even in the absence of neurodegenerative disease. The attenuation of some personality effects on cognition after adjustment for health indicators suggests that those effects may be partly mediated by somatic health. Taken together, the results further emphasize the importance of personality traits in neurocognitive aging and underscore the need for an integrative (biopsychosocial) perspective of normal and pathological age-related cognitive decline.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2024
Keywords
personality, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms, Alzheimer’s dementia, MRI, longitudinal study
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221338 (URN)10.3389/fnagi.2024.1335336 (DOI)2-s2.0-85186625892 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 1988-0082:17Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 2001-0682Swedish Research Council, D1988-0092Swedish Research Council, D1989-0115Swedish Research Council, D1990-0074Swedish Research Council, D1991-0258Swedish Research Council, D1992-0143Swedish Research Council, D1997-0756Swedish Research Council, D1997-1841Swedish Research Council, D1999-0739Swedish Research Council, B1999-474Swedish Research Council, F377/1988-2000Swedish Research Council, 1988-1990:88-0082Swedish Research Council, 311/1991-2000Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977
Available from: 2024-02-21 Created: 2024-02-21 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Nowakowska, I. & Rönnlund, M. (2023). Future of nature, our future. A preregistered report on future time perspective, social value orientation, and pro-environmental outcomes based on data from Poland and Sweden. Frontiers in Psychology, 14, Article ID 1217139.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future of nature, our future. A preregistered report on future time perspective, social value orientation, and pro-environmental outcomes based on data from Poland and Sweden
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1217139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The objective of the study was to examine the role of social value orientation and future time perspective to account for individual differences in pro-environmental behaviors, intentions, and opinions about the link between pro-environmental action and pandemic threat (three separate models) in Polish and Swedish samples expected to differ in rate of pro-environmental behaviors (higher in Sweden). We hypothesized that for Poland, future time perspective would be linked to pro-environmental outcomes only when social value orientation is average or high. In contrast, for Sweden, we expected a significant link between these variables regardless of social value orientation.

Methods: In total, 301 (150 Polish, 151 Swedish) participants completed online surveys via Prolific.co research panel. We controlled for individualizing/binding moral foundations, present time perspectives, and selected demographic variables in the analyses.

Results: In line with expectations, the individualizing moral foundations were a significant predictor across all three models. The data did not support our focal hypothesis regarding the interaction between future time perspective and social value orientation. For pro-environmental behaviors in the past 6 months, the future time perspective was a predictor only when social value orientation was low.

Discussion: The results suggest that when encouraging more competitive (compared to altruistic) people to behave in a green way, it might be crucial to underline the future consequences and benefits, consistent with the future time perspective. The pro-environmental campaigns could, therefore, highlight how green behavior may bring personal gains in the future, which are typically valued by individualistic people, such as savings or social status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218520 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1217139 (DOI)2-s2.0-85179655795 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-20 Created: 2023-12-20 Last updated: 2023-12-27Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M., Åström, E., Westlin, W., Flodén, L., Unger, A., Papastamatelou, J. & Carelli, M. G. (2021). A Time to Sleep Well and Be Contented: Time Perspective, Sleep Quality, and Life Satisfaction. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, Article ID 627836.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Time to Sleep Well and Be Contented: Time Perspective, Sleep Quality, and Life Satisfaction
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2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 627836Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A major aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between time perspective, i.e., habitual ways of relating to the past, present, and future and sleep quality. A second aim was to test a model by which the expected negative relationship between deviation from a balanced time perspective (DBTP), a measure taking temporal biases across all three frames into account, and life satisfaction was mediated by poor sleep quality. To these ends, a sample of young adults (N = 386) completed a version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (S-ZTPI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). A measure of chronotype was in addition included for control purposes. Bivariate analyses revealed that the S-ZTPI subscales Past Negative, Future Negative, and Present Fatatlistic were associated with poorer sleep quality (higher PSQI scores), with significant associations in the opposite direction for Past Positive and Future Positive. However, DBTP was the strongest predictor of (poor) sleep quality, suggesting that time perspective biases have and additive effect on sleep quality. Regression analyses with PSQI as the dependent variable and alll six ZTPI subscales as the predictors indicated that time perspective accounted for about 20% of the variance in sleep quality (17% beyond chronotype), with Past Negative, Past Positive, and Future Negative as the unique predictors. The results additionally confirmed a strong relation between DBTP and life satisfaction. Finally, data were consistent with the hypothesis that the association of DBTP and life satisfaction is mediated, in part, by sleep quality. Taken together, the results confirmed a substantial link between time perspective and sleep-related problems, factors that may have a negative impact on life satisfaction. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2021
Keywords
sleep quality, time perspective, balanced time perspective, chronotype, life satisfaction
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182529 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2021.627836 (DOI)000645542500001 ()2-s2.0-85105142936 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Individuellt tidsperspektiv
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2021-04-25 Created: 2021-04-25 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Stenling, A., Sundström, A., Rönnlund, M., Vega-Mendoza, M., Hansson, P. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2021). Occupational cognitive complexity and episodic memory in old age. Intelligence, 89, Article ID 101598.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational cognitive complexity and episodic memory in old age
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2021 (English)In: Intelligence, ISSN 0160-2896, E-ISSN 1873-7935, Vol. 89, article id 101598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate occupational cognitive complexity of main lifetime occupation in relation to level and 15-year change in episodic memory recall in a sample of older adults (≥ 65 years, n = 780). We used latent growth curve modelling with occupational cognitive complexity (O*NET indicators) as independent variable. Subgroup analyses in a sample of middle-aged (mean: 49.9 years) men (n = 260) were additionally performed to investigate if a general cognitive ability (g) factor at age 18 was predictive of future occupational cognitive complexity and cognitive performance in midlife. For the older sample, a higher level of occupational cognitive complexity was related to a higher level of episodic recall (β = 0.15, p < .001), but the association with rate of change (β = 0.03, p = .64) was not statistically significant. In the middle-aged sample, g at age 18 was both directly (β = 0.19, p = .01) and indirectly (via years of education after age 18, ab = 0.19) predictive of midlife levels of occupational cognitive complexity. Cognitive ability at age 18 was also a direct predictor of midlife episodic recall (β = 0.60, p ≤ 0.001). Critically, entry of the early adult g factor attenuated the association between occupational complexity and cognitive level (from β = 0.21, p = .01 to β = 0.12, p = .14). Overall, our results support a pattern of preserved differentiation from early to late adulthood for individuals with different histories of occupational complexity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Cognitive reserve, Episodic memory, Intelligence, Occupational cognitive complexity, Preserved differentiation
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189589 (URN)10.1016/j.intell.2021.101598 (DOI)000720544800001 ()2-s2.0-85118684966 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205Swedish Research Council, K2010-61X-21446-01, 2017-00273, 2007–2653Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013–2056
Available from: 2021-11-16 Created: 2021-11-16 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
Pyszkowska, A. & Rönnlund, M. (2021). Psychological Flexibility and Self-Compassion as Predictors of Well-Being: Mediating Role of a Balanced Time Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, Article ID 671746.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological Flexibility and Self-Compassion as Predictors of Well-Being: Mediating Role of a Balanced Time Perspective
2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 671746Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Measures of psychological flexibility and self-compassion are strongly associated with well-being. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that these relationships are mediated by a balanced time perspective, a proposed ideal way of relating to the past, present, and future that may correspond with an ability to flexibly switch temporal focus. For this purpose, a Polish community sample (N = 421) responded to a web-survey including measures of psychological flexibility (AAQ-II), self-compassion (SCS), two measures of positive aspects of well-being (Satisfaction with Life, Quality of Life), and the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI). Structural equation models, involving a measure of deviation from a balanced time perspective (DBTP) as a mediator of relationships between latent-level psychological flexibility, self-compassion and well-being factors, were tested. We examined separate models for psychological flexibility and self-compassion and a model including both constructs. The results for separate models were consistent with partial mediation of relationships with well-being, both for psychological flexibility and self-compassion. Results for the analysis involving both constructs, suggested unique contributions of both to DBTP, which in turn predicted well-being, but the link between psychological flexibility and DBTP appeared to be the strongest. In further analyses, three ZTPI dimensions were identified as most critical, namely Past Positive, Present Fatalistic, and Past Negative, each of which were part of an indirect effect on well-being. Psychological flexibility in particular, showed a strong negative association with a Past Negative orientation. Taken together, the results indicate that time perspective is a factor to understand the links between psychological flexibility/self-compassion and well-being. While the results pertaining to self-compassion were consistent with results of a couple of prior studies, this is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a link between psychological flexibility and a balanced time perspective. These findings should be relevant for clinical research and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2021
Keywords
DBTP, psychological flexibility, self-compassion, time perspective, well-being
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-185748 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2021.671746 (DOI)000664741700001 ()2-s2.0-85108677563 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-07-05 Created: 2021-07-05 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sundström, A., Rönnlund, M. & Josefsson, M. (2020). A Nationwide Swedish Study of Age at Retirement and Dementia Risk. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 35(10), 1234-1249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Nationwide Swedish Study of Age at Retirement and Dementia Risk
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 1234-1249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this nationwide study was to examine the association between age at retirement and dementia risk, with a follow-up period of up to 24 years.

Methods/design: This cohort study comprised Swedish citizens born in 1930 who were alive in the year 1990 (n=63,505). The cohort was followed for incidents of dementia through data provided by the Swedish National Patient Register and the Cause of Death Register. Age at retirement and socioeconomic variables were retrieved from Statistics Sweden.

Results: During the follow-up, 5,181 individuals received a dementia diagnosis. Competing risk regression models, adjusted for sex, education, marital status, occupation, and previous history of cardiovascular diseases, showed that later-than-average retirement age was associated with decreased dementia risk.

Conclusions: The present results supports the idea that individuals who retired at an older age has a decrease risk of dementia. However, as this was an observation study, unmeasured factors, such as premorbid cognitive level and genetic predisposition, may have influenced our findings and remains to be elucidated in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
age at retirement, aging, cognitive aging, cognitive decline, dementia, retirement
National Category
Psychology Geriatrics
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-172957 (URN)10.1002/gps.5363 (DOI)000571331000020 ()32557831 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087426926 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-06-25 Created: 2020-06-25 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, L., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P., Herlitz, A., Kauppi, K., . . . Adolfsson, R. (2020). Biological and environmental predictors of heterogeneity in neurocognitive ageing: Evidence from Betula and other longitudinal studies. Ageing Research Reviews, 64, Article ID 101184.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biological and environmental predictors of heterogeneity in neurocognitive ageing: Evidence from Betula and other longitudinal studies
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2020 (English)In: Ageing Research Reviews, ISSN 1568-1637, E-ISSN 1872-9649, Vol. 64, article id 101184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individual differences in cognitive performance increase with advancing age, reflecting marked cognitive changes in some individuals along with little or no change in others. Genetic and lifestyle factors are assumed to influence cognitive performance in ageing by affecting the magnitude and extent of age-related brain changes (i.e., brain maintenance or atrophy), as well as the ability to recruit compensatory processes. The purpose of this review is to present findings from the Betula study and other longitudinal studies, with a focus on clarifying the role of key biological and environmental factors assumed to underlie individual differences in brain and cognitive ageing. We discuss the vital importance of sampling, analytic methods, consideration of non-ignorable dropout, and related issues for valid conclusions on factors that influence healthy neurocognitive ageing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
ageing, memory, longitudinal, brain, genetics, lifestyle, brain maintenance, cognitive reserve
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-176224 (URN)10.1016/j.arr.2020.101184 (DOI)000595935300003 ()32992046 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85092710312 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW-scholarEU, Horizon 2020, 732592EU, Horizon 2020, H2020-SC1-2016-2017EU, Horizon 2020, H2020-SC1-2016-RTDSwedish Research Council, 2017- 00639Region VästerbottenThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Swedish Research Council, 2015–02199Swedish Research Council, 2017- 03011Swedish Research Council, (2018-01729Swedish Research Council Formas, 942–2015-1099
Available from: 2020-10-22 Created: 2020-10-22 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
Hasselberg, A. & Rönnlund, M. (2020). Cultivating self-kindness and attention to the present moment in the young: A pilot study of a two-week internet-delivered mindfulness and self-compassion program. Cogent Psychology, 7(1), Article ID 1769807.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultivating self-kindness and attention to the present moment in the young: A pilot study of a two-week internet-delivered mindfulness and self-compassion program
2020 (English)In: Cogent Psychology, E-ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 1769807Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a two-week web-based program targeting mindfulness and self-compassion. The program was developed with young adults in mind and involves 15 minutes of training per day, 5 days a week. In an RCT study, 56 participants (18–25 years) were randomly assigned to a training group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-five participants, 15 in the training group and 20 in the control group, completed assessments of self-compassion, mindfulness, and indicators of mental health (stress, emotion regulation, affect balance, time perspective) before and directly after the two-week period. Mixed linear analyses revealed several significant group-by-time interactions, with selective changes in the intervention group. The results revealed a large effect for self-compassion (d = 1.0) and a medium effect for mindfulness (d = 0.52; p =.07 for the interaction). Statistically significant group-by-time interactions and small to medium effects were observed for stress (d = 0.67, reduced scores), affect balance (d = 0.43; increased scores), cognitive appraisal (d = 0.43; increased scores) and a Present Hedonistic time perspective (d = 0.67; increased scores). No significant effects were observed for other time perspective dimensions or for a measure of expressive suppression. In spite of limitations, including a small sample, lack of an active control group and follow-up assessments, the results indicate that the program may have potential as one tool to reduce stress and improve mental health in young individuals. Further evaluations may, therefore, be motivated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2020
Keywords
self-compassion, mindfulness, intervention, internet-based, emerging adults
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174659 (URN)10.1080/23311908.2020.1769807 (DOI)000612986600001 ()2-s2.0-85086455994 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-29 Created: 2020-08-29 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5726-4101

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