Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Frykholm, E., Simonsson, E., Levik Sandström, S., Hedlund, M., Holmberg, H., Johansson, B., . . . Rosendahl, E. (2024). Applicability of a supramaximal high-intensity interval training program for older adults previously not engaged in regular exercise: analyses of secondary outcomes from the Umeå HIT Study. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 73, Article ID 102647.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applicability of a supramaximal high-intensity interval training program for older adults previously not engaged in regular exercise: analyses of secondary outcomes from the Umeå HIT Study
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 73, article id 102647Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This analysis of secondary outcomes investigated the applicability of supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIT) with individually prescribed external intensity performed on stationary bicycles. Sixty-eight participants with a median (min; max) age of 69 (66; 79), at the time not engaged in regular exercise were randomized to 25 twice-weekly sessions of supramaximal HIT (20-min session with 10 × 6-s intervals) or moderate-intensity training (MIT, 40-min session with 3 × 8-min intervals). The primary aim was outcomes on applicability regarding; adherence to prescribed external interval intensity, participant reported positive and negative events, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE 6–20), and affective state (Feeling Scale, FS -5–5). A secondary aim was to investigate change in exercise-related self-efficacy (Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale) and motivation (Behavioural Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2). Total adherence to the prescribed external interval intensity was [median (min; max)] 89 % (56; 100 %) in supramaximal HIT, and 100 % (95; 100 %) in MIT. The supramaximal HIT group reported 60 % of the positive (112 of 186) and 36 % of the negative (52 of 146) events. At the end of the training period, the median (min; max) session RPE was 15 (12; 17) for supramaximal HIT and 14 (9; 15) for MIT. As for FS, the median last within-session rating was 3 (−1; 5) for supramaximal HIT and 3 (1; 5) for MIT. Exercise-related motivation increased (mean difference in Relative Autonomy Index score = 1.54, 95 % CI [0.69; 2.40]), while self-efficacy did not change (mean difference = 0.55, 95 % CI [-0.75; 1.82]), regardless of group. This study provide support for supramaximal HIT in supervised group settings for older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Feasibility, HIIT, Randomized controlled trial, SIT, Sprint interval training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223607 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2024.102647 (DOI)38604572 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85190305065 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017–00912Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020–00159The Kamprad Family FoundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedFoundation for the Memory of Ragnhild and Einar LundströmThe Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2024-05-02 Created: 2024-05-02 Last updated: 2024-05-02Bibliographically approved
Lindelöf, N., Nilsson, I., Littbrand, H., Gustafson, Y., Olofsson, B. & Fjellman-Wiklund, A. (2023). A focus groups study of staff team experiences of providing interdisciplinary rehabilitation for people with dementia and their caregivers: a co-creative journey. BMC Geriatrics, 23(1), Article ID 572.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A focus groups study of staff team experiences of providing interdisciplinary rehabilitation for people with dementia and their caregivers: a co-creative journey
Show others...
2023 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 572Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The World Health Organization claims that rehabilitation is important to meet the needs of persons with dementia. Rehabilitation programmes, however, are not routinely available. Person-centred, multidimensional, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation can increase the opportunities for older adults with dementia and their informal primary caregivers to continue to live an active life and participate in society. To our knowledge, staff team experiences of such rehabilitation programmes, involving older adults with dementia and their informal caregivers has not been previously explored.

Methods: The aim of this qualitative focus group study was to explore the experiences of a comprehensive staff team providing person-centred multidimensional, interdisciplinary rehabilitation to community-dwelling older adults with dementia, including education and support for informal primary caregivers. The 13 staff team members comprised 10 professions who, during a 16-week intervention period, provided individualised interventions while involving the rehabilitation participants. After the rehabilitation period the staff team members were divided in two focus groups who met on three occasions each (in total six focus groups) and discussed their experiences. The Grounded Theory method was used for data collection and analysis.

Results: The analysis resulted in four categories: Achieving involvement in rehabilitation is challenging, Considering various realities by acting as a link, Offering time and continuity create added value, and Creating a holistic view through knowledge exchange, and the core category: Refining a co-creative process towards making a difference. The core category resembles the collaboration that the staff had within their teams, which included participants with dementia and caregivers, and with the goal that the intervention should make a difference for the participants. This was conducted with flexibility in a collaborative and creative process.

Conclusions: The staff team perceived that by working in comprehensive teams they could provide individualised rehabilitation in creative collaboration with the participants through interaction, knowledge exchange, time and continuity, coordination and flexibility, and a holistic view. Challenges to overcome were the involvement of the person with dementia in goal setting and the mediating role of the staff team members. The staff pointed out that by refinement they could achieve well-functioning, competence-enhancing and timesaving teamwork.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Dementia, Experiences, Grounded theory, Informal caregiver, Interdisciplinary health team, Person-centered care, Rehabilitation
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214772 (URN)10.1186/s12877-023-04269-3 (DOI)37723442 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85171536442 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-0897Promobilia foundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedThe Janne Elgqvist Family FoundationRegion VästerbottenAlzheimerfondenFoundation for the Memory of Ragnhild and Einar LundströmStiftelsen Gamla Tjänarinnor
Available from: 2023-10-18 Created: 2023-10-18 Last updated: 2023-10-18Bibliographically approved
Simonsson, E., Levik Sandström, S., Hedlund, M., Holmberg, H., Johansson, B., Lindelöf, N., . . . Rosendahl, E. (2023). Effects of controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness and global cognitive function in older adults: the Umeå hit study-a randomized controlled trial. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 78(9), 1581-1590
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness and global cognitive function in older adults: the Umeå hit study-a randomized controlled trial
Show others...
2023 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 78, no 9, p. 1581-1590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: This study examined the effects of regulated and controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIT) adapted for older adults, compared to moderate-intensity training (MIT), on cardiorespiratory fitness; cognitive, cardiovascular, and muscular function; and quality of life.

METHODS: Sixty-eight nonexercising older adults (66-79 years, 44% males) were randomized to 3 months of twice-weekly HIT (20-minute session including 10 × 6-second intervals) or MIT (40-minute session including 3 × 8-minute intervals) on stationary bicycles in an ordinary gym setting. Individualized target intensity was watt controlled with a standardized pedaling cadence and individual adjustment of the resistance load. Primary outcomes were cardiorespiratory fitness (V̇o2peak) and global cognitive function (unit-weighted composite).

RESULTS: V̇o2peak increased significantly (mean 1.38 mL/kg/min, 95% CI [0.77, 1.98]), with no between-group difference (mean difference 0.05 [-1.17, 1.25]). Global cognition did not improve (0.02 [-0.05, 0.09]), nor differed between groups (0.11 [-0.03, 0.24]). Significant between-group differences in change were observed for working memory (0.32 [0.01, 0.64]), and maximal isometric knee extensor muscle strength (0.07 N·m/kg [0.003, 0.137]), both in favor of HIT. Irrespective of the group, there was a negative change in episodic memory (-0.15 [-0.28, -0.02]), a positive change in visuospatial ability (0.26 [0.08, 0.44]), and a decrease in systolic (-2.09 mmHg [-3.54, -0.64]) and diastolic (-1.27 mmHg [-2.31, -0.25]) blood pressure.

CONCLUSIONS: In nonexercising older adults, 3 months of watt-controlled supramaximal HIT improved cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular function to a similar extent as MIT, despite half the training time. In favor of HIT, there was an improvement in muscular function and a potential domain-specific effect on working memory.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT03765385.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
Aerobic capacity, HIIT, Moderate-intensity training, SIT, Sprint interval training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214207 (URN)10.1093/gerona/glad070 (DOI)000959356800001 ()36972981 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169177109 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00912Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00159The Kamprad Family FoundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedFoundation for the Memory of Ragnhild and Einar LundströmThe Kempe FoundationsUmeå University
Available from: 2023-09-08 Created: 2023-09-08 Last updated: 2023-09-08Bibliographically approved
Simonsson, E., Jonasson Stiernman, L., Lundquist, A., Rosendahl, E., Hedlund, M., Lindelöf, N. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2022). Dopamine d2/3-receptor availability and its association with autonomous motivation to exercise in older adults: an exploratory [11c]-raclopride study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 16, Article ID 997131.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dopamine d2/3-receptor availability and its association with autonomous motivation to exercise in older adults: an exploratory [11c]-raclopride study
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 16, article id 997131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Autonomous motivation to exercise occurs when the activity is voluntary and with a perceived inherent satisfaction from the activity itself. It has been suggested that autonomous motivation is related to striatal dopamine D2/3-receptor (D2/3R) availability within the brain. In this study, we hypothesized that D2/3R availability in three striatal regions (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen) would be positively associated with self-reported autonomous motivation to exercise. We also examined this relationship with additional exploratory analyses across a set of a priori extrastriatal regions of interest (ROI).

Methods: Our sample comprised 49 older adults (28 females) between 64 and 78 years of age. The D2/3R availability was quantified from positron emission tomography using the non-displaceable binding potential of [11C]-raclopride ligand. The exercise-related autonomous motivation was assessed with the Swedish version of the Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2.

Results: No significant associations were observed between self-reported autonomous motivation to exercise and D2/3R availability within the striatum (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen) using semi-partial correlations controlling for ROI volume on D2/3R availability. For exploratory analyses, positive associations were observed for the superior (r = 0.289, p = 0.023) and middle frontal gyrus (r = 0.330, p = 0.011), but not for the inferior frontal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, or anterior insular cortex.

Conclusion: This study could not confirm the suggested link between striatal D2/3R availability and subjective autonomous motivation to exercise among older adults. The exploratory findings, however, propose that frontal brain regions may be involved in the intrinsic regulation of exercise-related behaviors, though this has to be confirmed by future studies using a more suitable ligand and objective measures of physical activity levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
aging, autonomous motivation, dopamine, exercise motivation, PET, self-determination theory (SDT)
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201462 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2022.997131 (DOI)000889590000001 ()2-s2.0-85142664855 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-00530Region VästerbottenSwedish National Centre for Research in SportsThe Kamprad Family Foundation
Available from: 2022-12-06 Created: 2022-12-06 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, Å., Olofsson, B., Stenvall, M. & Lindelöf, N. (2022). Older adults' perspectives on rehabilitation and recovery one year after a hip fracture – a qualitative study. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1), Article ID 423.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older adults' perspectives on rehabilitation and recovery one year after a hip fracture – a qualitative study
2022 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 423Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In order to improve quality of care and recovery after hip fracture we need to include the perspectives of the individual older adults when evaluating different rehabilitation interventions. The aim of this study was therefore to explore older adults’ experiences of their rehabilitation after a hip fracture and of the recovery process during the 12 months following the fracture. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 older adults (70–91 years of age) who had participated in a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effects of early discharge followed by geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation compared to in-hospital care according to a multifactorial rehabilitation program. Ten participants from each group were interviewed shortly after the one-year follow-up when the study was completed. Data were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis resulted in four themes: Moving towards recovery with the help of others; Getting to know a new me; Striving for independence despite obstacles; and Adapting to an altered but acceptable life. The participants emphasised the importance of having access to rehabilitation that was provided by skilled staff, and support from family members and friends for well-being and recovery. They experienced a change in their self-image but strove for independence despite struggling with complications and functional limitations and used adaptive strategies to find contentment in their lives. Conclusions: Rehabilitation interventions provided by competent health care professionals, as well as support from family members and friends, were emphasised as crucial for satisfactory recovery. Participants’ experiences further highlight the importance of targeting both physical and psychological impacts after a hip fracture. To improve recovery, rehabilitation providers should customise future interventions to suit each individual´s wishes and needs and provide rehabilitation in various settings throughout the recovery process. Trial registration: The trial is registered at Current Controlled Trials Ltd, ICRCTN 15738119. Date of registration 16/06/2008, retrospectively registered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
Keywords
Experiences, Geriatric team rehabilitation, Hip fracture, Home rehabilitation, Qualitative content analysis, Recovery
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203592 (URN)10.1186/s12877-022-03119-y (DOI)000795563800001 ()35562681 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85130011158 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-19 Created: 2023-01-19 Last updated: 2023-01-19Bibliographically approved
Sondell, A., Lampinen, J., Conradsson, M., Littbrand, H., Englund, U., Nilsson, I. & Lindelöf, N. (2021). Experiences of community-dwelling older people with dementia participating in a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program. BMC Geriatrics, 21(1), Article ID 341.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of community-dwelling older people with dementia participating in a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program
Show others...
2021 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is great need for development of feasible rehabilitation for older people with dementia. Increased understanding of this population’s experiences of rehabilitation participation is therefore important. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of community-dwelling older people with dementia participating in a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program.

Methods: Sixteen older people with dementia were interviewed about their experiences of participation in a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program. The program comprised assessments by a comprehensive team of rehabilitation professionals followed by a rehabilitation period of 16 weeks, including interventions based on individualized rehabilitation goals conducted with the support of the rehabilitation team. The rehabilitation was performed in the participants’ homes, in the community and at an outpatient clinic, including exercise with social interaction in small groups offered twice a week to all participants. The interviews were conducted at the end of the rehabilitation period and analysed with qualitative content analysis.

Results: The analysis resulted in one overarching theme: Empowered through participation and togetherness and four sub-themes: Being strengthened through challenges; Gaining insights, motives, and raising concerns about the future; Being seen makes participation worthwhile; and Feelings of togetherness in prosperity and adversity. The participants increased their self-esteem by daring and coping in the rehabilitation. The insights about themselves and their condition motivated them to continue with their prioritized activities, but also raised concerns about how the future would play out. Collaboration in the group and being seen and acknowledged by staff strengthened their own motivation and self-efficacy.

Conclusion: According to community-dwelling older people with dementia, a person-centred multidimensional interdisciplinary rehabilitation program was experienced as viable and beneficial. The participants seemed empowered through the rehabilitation and expressed mostly positive experiences and perceived improvements. Providers of interdisciplinary rehabilitation programs for this group should consider aspects raised by the participants e.g. the positive experience of being challenged in both exercise and daily activities; the importance of being seen and feeling secure; the benefits and challenges of collaboration with others in the same situation; and the generation of new perspectives of current and future situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2021
Keywords
Aged, Dementia, Experiences, Interdisciplinary, Qualitative research, Rehabilitation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-184444 (URN)10.1186/s12877-021-02282-y (DOI)000660608300004 ()2-s2.0-85107216049 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-06-14 Created: 2021-06-14 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, Å., Lindelöf, N., Olofsson, B., Berggren, M., Gustafson, Y., Nordström, P. & Stenvall, M. (2020). Effects of Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation on Independence in Activities of Daily Living in Older People With Hip Fracture: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Paper presented at World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 10–13, 2019. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 101(4), 571-578
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation on Independence in Activities of Daily Living in Older People With Hip Fracture: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 101, no 4, p. 571-578Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate the effects of early discharge followed by geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation for older people with hip fracture on independence in activities of daily living (ADL) compared with inhospital geriatric care according to a multifactorial rehabilitation program.

Design: Planned analysis of a randomized controlled trial with 3- and 12-month follow-ups.

Setting: Geriatric ward, ordinary housing, and residential care facilities.

Participants: Of 466 people screened for eligibility, participants (N=205) with acute hip fracture, aged 70 years or older, including those with cognitive impairment and those living in residential care facilities, were randomized to intervention or control groups.

Intervention: Individually designed interdisciplinary home rehabilitation for a maximum of 10 weeks. The intervention aimed at early hospital discharge and focused on prevention of falls, independence in daily activities, and walking ability indoors and outdoors.

Main Outcome Measures: Independence in ADL was measured using the Barthel ADL Index, and the ADL Staircase including the Katz ADL Index during hospital stay (prefracture performance) and at the follow-up visits in the participants’ homes.

Results: There were no significant differences in ADL performance between the groups, and they recovered their prefracture level of independence in personal and instrumental ADL comparably. At 12 months, 33 (41.3%) in the intervention group vs 33 (41.8%) in the control group (P=.99) had regained or improved their prefracture ADL performance according to the Barthel ADL Index, and 27 (37.0%) vs 36 (48.6%) according to the ADL Staircase (P=.207).

Conclusions: In older people with hip fracture, early discharge followed by geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation resulted in a comparable recovery of independence in ADL at 3 and 12 months as inhospital geriatric care and rehabilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Activities of daily living, Geriatrics, Hip fractures, Patient care team, Rehabilitation
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173439 (URN)10.1016/j.apmr.2019.12.007 (DOI)000543000800001 ()31935353 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079068977 (Scopus ID)
Conference
World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, May 10–13, 2019
Funder
Region VästerbottenThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedThe Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2020-07-10 Created: 2020-07-10 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, Å., Berggren, M., Olofsson, B., Stenvall, M., Gustafson, Y., Nordström, P. & Lindelöf, N. (2020). Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture in People with Dementia-A Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 15, 1575-1586
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture in People with Dementia-A Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 15, p. 1575-1586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To investigate if the effects of geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation after hip fracture were different among people with dementia compared to those without dementia and to describe the overall outcome after hip fracture in people with dementia. Patients and Methods: A post hoc subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial was conducted including 205 people with hip fracture, aged >70, living in ordinary housing or residential care facilities. Early discharge followed by individually designed interdisciplinary home rehabilitation for a maximum of 10 weeks was compared to in-hospital geriatric care according to a multifactorial rehabilitation program. Outcomes were hospital length of stay (LOS), readmissions, falls, mortality, performance in activities of daily living (ADL), and walking ability. Results: Interdisciplinary home rehabilitation vs in-hospital care had comparable effects on falls and mortality between discharge and 12 months and on ADL and walking ability at 3 and 12 months regardless of whether the participants had dementia or not (P 0.05 for all). Among participants with dementia, postoperative LOS was a median of 18 days (interquartile range [IQR] 14-30) in the home rehabilitation group vs 23 days (IQR 15-30) in the control group (P=0.254) with comparable numbers of readmissions after discharge. Dementia was associated with increased risk of falling (odds ratio [OR] 3.86; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.05-7.27; P<0.001) and increased mortality (OR 4.20; 95% CI 1.79-9.92, P=0.001) between discharge and 12 months and with greater dependence in ADL and walking at 3 and 12 months compared to participants without dementia (P<0.001 for all). Conclusion: The effects of geriatric interdisciplinary home rehabilitation vs in-hospital geriatric care did not differ in participants with and without dementia. However, the statistical power of this subgroup analysis was likely insufficient to detect differences between the groups. Dementia was associated with a substantial negative impact on the outcomes following the hip fracture. Our findings support offering interdisciplinary home rehabilitation after hip fracture to people with dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD,, 2020
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-175642 (URN)10.2147/CIA.S250809 (DOI)000569480000002 ()32943858 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85091192468 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-08 Created: 2020-10-08 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Fischl, C., Lindelöf, N., Lindgren, H. & Nilsson, I. (2020). Older adults’ perceptions of contexts surrounding their social participation in a digitalized society: an exploration in rural communities in Northern Sweden. European Journal of Ageing, 17, 281-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older adults’ perceptions of contexts surrounding their social participation in a digitalized society: an exploration in rural communities in Northern Sweden
2020 (English)In: European Journal of Ageing, ISSN 1613-9372, E-ISSN 1613-9380, Vol. 17, p. 281-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social participation and digital engagement can contribute to health and well-being among older adultsBecause of older adults’ decline in abilities, coupled withcomplex technology and its perceived insufficient relevance to daily life, there is a need to create and tailor social opportunities and services that are supported by digital technologies for older adults to continue participating in society. Thus, it becomes relevant to explore older adults’ perceptions about contexts surrounding their social participation in a digital society. This exploration used a qualitative research design with focus group interviews and qualitative content analysis. Eighteen older adults, aged 66-81 years, from rural communities in Northern Sweden, participated in this study. The analysis resulted in three categories: Experiencing conditions for social participation in a state of flux, Perceiving drawbacks of urbanization on social participation, Welcoming digital technology that facilitates daily and community living.These categories were encapsulated in the theme –The juxtaposition of narrowing offline social networks and expanding digital opportunities for social participation. The findings suggested that co-creating usable digitalized services and facilitating satisfactory use of digital technologies could support older adults’ social participation through activities that they find relevant in their lives, and subsequently, might enable them to live longer at home.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Computer, Digital technology, Information and communication technology, Internet, Older people, Social activities
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Occupational therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168409 (URN)10.1007/s10433-020-00558-7 (DOI)000516042500002 ()32904866 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079421835 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2143European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)
Available from: 2020-02-24 Created: 2020-02-24 Last updated: 2021-11-04Bibliographically approved
Hedlund, M., Lindelöf, N., Johansson, B., Boraxbekk, C.-J. & Rosendahl, E. (2019). Development and Feasibility of a Regulated, Supramaximal High-Intensity Training Program Adapted for Older Individuals. Frontiers in Physiology, 10, Article ID 590.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and Feasibility of a Regulated, Supramaximal High-Intensity Training Program Adapted for Older Individuals
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: High-intensity training (HIT) with extremely short intervals (designated here as supramaximal HIT) is a time-efficient training method for health and performance. However, a protocol for regulation and control of intensity is missing, impeding implementation in various groups, such as older individuals.

Methods: This study presents the development and characteristics of a novel training protocol with regulated and controlled supramaximal intervals adapted for older people. Using both quantitative and qualitative analyses, we explored the feasibility of the program, performed in a group training setting, with physically active older individuals (aged 65–75, n = 7; five women). The developed supramaximal HIT program consisted of 10 × 6 s cycle sprint intervals with ∼1 min of active recovery with the following key characteristics: (1) an individual target power output was reached and maintained during all intervals and regulated and expressed as the percentage of the estimated maximum mean power output for the duration of the interval (i.e., 6 s); (2) pedaling cadence was standardized for all participants, while resistance was individualized; and (3) the protocol enabled controlled and systematic adjustments of training intensity following standardized escalation criteria.

Aim: Our aim was to test the feasibility of a novel training regimen with regulated and controlled supramaximal HIT, adapted for older people. The feasibility criteria for the program were to support participants in reaching a supramaximal intensity (i.e., power output > 100% of estimated VO2 max), avoid inducing a negative affective response, and have participants perceive it as feasible and acceptable.

Results: All feasibility criteria were met. The standardized escalation procedure provided safe escalation of training load up to a supramaximal intensity (around three times the power output at estimated VO2 max). The participants never reported negative affective responses, and they perceived the program as fun and feasible.

Conclusion: This novel program offers a usable methodology for further studies on supramaximal HIT among older individuals with different levels of physical capacity. Future research should explore the effects of the program in various populations of older people and their experiences and long-term adherence compared with other forms of training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
sprint interval training, high-intensity interval training, affective state, perceived exertion, training intensity, aging
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159855 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2019.00590 (DOI)000468572300001 ()2-s2.0-85068240254 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4449-049x

Search in DiVA

Show all publications