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Tast, A., Kasén, A., Bölenius, K. & Hilli, Y. (2024). Being a newly qualified nurse: a Nordic focus group study. Sage Open Nursing, 10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a newly qualified nurse: a Nordic focus group study
2024 (English)In: Sage Open Nursing, E-ISSN 2377-9608, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The transition to working life as a newly qualified nurse (NQN) can be challenging, leading to heightened stress levels. While NQNs are generally enthusiastic about starting their careers, they often express concerns about various responsibilities and a perceived lack of experience in independently dealing with clinical care in complex environments.

Objective: To acquire an in-depth understanding, from a caring science perspective, of what it means to be an NQN during the transition period of the first 18 months in the profession.

Methods: This study relied on an exploratory qualitative design. The methodological approach followed Gadamer's hermeneutic philosophy. Six focus group interviews were conducted in northern Norway (n = 3) and northern Sweden (n = 3) from January through May 2021. The interpretation of the data was inspired by Fleming et al. Nineteen female and seven male NQNs working in different contexts, including hospitals and municipalities, participated in the study. The consolidated criteria for qualitative research were used to report the results.

Results: Perspectives on NQNs are presented as three themes: a) the responsibility was perceived as a significant challenge, b) being a nurse is complex and demanding, and c) a desire for personal and professional development. Learning to be a nurse shouldering responsibility necessitates support and guidance from caring and compassionate colleagues and leaders.

Conclusions:  This study sheds light on the importance of creating a workplace culture where NQNs’ learning is promoted and supported by designated mentors during their transition to working life. The responsibilities should be aligned with their level of knowledge. It is important that leaders hold developmental dialogues and ensure a career plan for NQNs to continuously develop their knowledge and skills. Intervention studies designed to evaluate the meaning of the support from appointed mentors within structured mentorship programs are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2024
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223026 (URN)10.1177/23779608241244679 (DOI)001194391600001 ()38562954 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85192800576 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Umeå University, 202100-2874Region Västerbotten, 232100-0222
Available from: 2024-04-08 Created: 2024-04-08 Last updated: 2024-05-28Bibliographically approved
Reierson, I. Å., Ravik, M., Blomberg, K., Bjørk, I. T., Bölenius, K., Vesterager Stenholt, B. & Husebø, S. E. (2024). Comparing didactic approaches for practical skills learning in Scandinavian nursing simulation centres: a qualitative comparative study. Journal of Advanced Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing didactic approaches for practical skills learning in Scandinavian nursing simulation centres: a qualitative comparative study
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore and compare the didactic approaches to practical skills learning at simulation centres in Scandinavian universities and university colleges.

Background: Academic simulation centres are an important arena for learning practical nursing skills which are essential to ensure competent performance regarding patient safety and quality of care. Knowledge of didactic approaches to enhance learning is essential in promoting the provision and retention of students' practical nursing skills. However, research on didactical approaches to practical nursing skills learning is lacking.

Design: A qualitative comparative design was used.

Methods: During November and December 2019, interviews were conducted with a total of 37 simulation centre directors or assistant directors, each of whom possessed in-depth knowledge of practical skills in teaching and learning. They represented bachelor nursing education in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. A qualitative deductive content analysis was conducted.

Results: The results revealed all five predetermined didactical components derived from the didactical relationship model. Twenty-two corresponding categories that described a variation in didactic approaches to practical skills learning in Scandinavian nursing simulation centres were identified. The didactical components of Learning process revealed mostly similarities, Setting mostly differences and Assessment showed only differences in didactic approaches.

Conclusion: Although various didactic approaches were described across the countries, no common approach was found. Nursing educational institutions are encouraged to cooperate in developing a shared understanding of how didactic approaches can enhance practical skills learning.

Implications for Profession and/or Patient Care: Cross-country comparisons of practical nursing skills learning in Scandinavian countries highlight the importance of educator awareness concerning the impact diverse didactic approaches may have on competent performance in nursing education. Competent performance is pivotal for ensuring patient safety and the provision of high-quality care.

Patient or Public Contribution: No Patient or Public Contribution.

Reporting Method: This study followed the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research reporting guidelines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
bachelor nursing education, cross-country, deductive analysis, didactic, didactical components, didactical relationship model, pedagogy, practical nursing skills, qualitative comparative research, simulation centre
National Category
Nursing Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223883 (URN)10.1111/jan.16150 (DOI)001194400700001 ()38558162 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85189633406 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-30 Created: 2024-04-30 Last updated: 2024-04-30
Kallerhult Hermansson, S., Kasén, A., Hilli, Y., Norström, F., Vaag, J. R. & Bölenius, K. (2024). Exploring registered nurses’ perspectives as mentors for newly qualified nurses: a qualitative interview study. BMJ Open, 14(5), e082940-e082940
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring registered nurses’ perspectives as mentors for newly qualified nurses: a qualitative interview study
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2024 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 14, no 5, p. e082940-e082940Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective Existing research has focused mostly on mentees’ experiences of mentoring rather than mentors’ experiences. Therefore, this study describes registered nurses’ experiences of being a mentor for newly qualified nurses.

Design A qualitative interview study based on semistructured individual interviews. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Participants and setting A purposive sample of experienced registered nurses (n=21) from healthcare units in northern Sweden and northern Norway. Inclusion criteria were to have been a mentor to at least one newly qualified nurse, hold permanent employment of 75%–100% as a registered nurse and to be able to communicate in Swedish or Norwegian.

Results Our study’s findings suggest that being a mentor plays a crucial role in establishing safety in complex work environments. The main theme consists of three themes: feeling motivated in being a mentor; continuously developing the learning environment; and navigating obstacles and cultivating support.

Conclusion Being a mentor is a complicated role for registered nurses. The mentoring role is beneficial—ie, positive and rewarding—if facilitated sufficiently in the context of a structured organisation. This study brings a more profound understanding of and provides new insights into registered nurses’ perspectives and needs regarding being a mentor and the study’s findings make an important contribution to the field of nursing regarding the facilitation of mentoring.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-225090 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2023-082940 (DOI)
Funder
Umeå University
Available from: 2024-05-27 Created: 2024-05-27 Last updated: 2024-05-27
Norström, F., Zingmark, M., Pettersson-Strömbäck, A., Sahlen, K.-G., Öhrling, M. & Bölenius, K. (2023). How does the distribution of work tasks among home care personnel relate to workload and health-related quality of life?. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 96(8), 1167-1181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does the distribution of work tasks among home care personnel relate to workload and health-related quality of life?
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2023 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 96, no 8, p. 1167-1181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The work for Swedish home care workers is challenging with a variety of support and healthcare tasks for home care recipients. The aim of our study is to investigate how these tasks relate to workload and health-related quality of life among home care workers in Sweden. We also explore staff preferences concerning work distribution.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 16 municipalities in Northern Sweden. Questionnaires with validated instruments to measure workload (QPSNordic) and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), were responded by 1154 (~ 58%) of approximately 2000 invited home care workers. EQ-5D responses were translated to a Quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) score. For 15 different work task areas, personnel provided their present and preferred allocation. Absolute risk differences were calculated with propensity score weighting.

Results: Statistically significantly more or fewer problems differences were observed for: higher workloads were higher among those whose daily work included responding to personal alarms (8.4%), running errands outside the home (14%), rehabilitation (13%) and help with bathing (11%). Apart from rehabilitation, there were statistically significantly more (8–10%) problems with anxiety/depression for these tasks. QALY scores were lower among those whose daily work included food distribution (0.034) and higher for daily meal preparation (0.031), both explained by pain/discomfort dimension. Personnel preferred to, amongst other, spend less time responding to personal alarms, and more time providing social support.

Conclusion: The redistribution of work tasks is likely to reduce workload and improve the health of personnel. Our study provides an understanding of how such redistribution could be undertaken.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
EQ-5D, Health care, Occupational health, QPSNordic, Sweden, Work environment
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212245 (URN)10.1007/s00420-023-01997-2 (DOI)2-s2.0-85164466556 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00647
Available from: 2023-07-20 Created: 2023-07-20 Last updated: 2023-12-22Bibliographically approved
Bölenius, K., Lämås, K. & Edvardsson, D. (2023). Older adults' experiences of self-determination when needing homecare services—an interview study. BMC Geriatrics, 23(1), Article ID 824.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older adults' experiences of self-determination when needing homecare services—an interview study
2023 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Self-determination has been shown to be an important factor in mental health and wellbeing, but from the homecare recipients' point of view, autonomy and self-determination is not fully integrated into homecare services. The aim of this study was to explore older adults’ experiences of self-determination when needing homecare services.

Methods: In 2018, a qualitative descriptive study was conducted and a convenience sample of 15 older adults from 3 homecare service facilities were invited to participate in individual interviews. Data were analysed using qualitative content analyse.

Results: The theme Transitioning from self-determination as independence towards self-determination as shared decision-making emerged through the older adults' narratives. This ‘transition’ is one in which older adult’s understanding of self-determination and self-esteem was transitioning towards the acceptance of shared decision-making. The person's inner strength and willingness to make decisions was promoting to enact and preserve independence. Accepting one's dependence on others and being in a positive atmosphere were described as promoting self-determination and shared decision-making, and vice versa. The above overarching theme permeated all subthemes, which included: mobilising inner strength to enact independence; accepting increasing dependence on others; and being influenced by the atmosphere.

Conclusions: The study contributes increased understanding of older adults' experiences of self-determination. The results can act as a guide when planning future person-centred care interventions in the context of homecare services and help improve homecare services' ability to meet the needs of older adults. To summarise, older adults' reflections on their own self-determination highlighted relationships with other people as important for shared decision-making, which could help preserve older adults’ autonomy and self-esteem.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Decision-making, Homecare service, Interview, Involvement, Older adults, Personal autonomy, Self-determination
National Category
Nursing Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218097 (URN)10.1186/s12877-023-04533-6 (DOI)38066429 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178953748 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2023-12-15 Created: 2023-12-15 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Kallerhult Hermansson, S., Hilli, Y., Norström, F., Solbakken, R., Rennemo Vaag, J. & Bölenius, K. (2023). The impact of a mentorship program with digital solutions: Mentors' experiences, self-reported self-efficacy, and clinical teaching behavior. In: : . Paper presented at 5th Nordic conference in nursing research, Reykjavik, Iceland, October 2-4, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of a mentorship program with digital solutions: Mentors' experiences, self-reported self-efficacy, and clinical teaching behavior
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: In 2021, a two-fold mentorship program was developed in collaboration with new and experienced registered nurses and leaders in healthcare units and municipalities in two regions in northern Sweden and northern Norway. The mentorship program aimed to support newly qualified nurses into working life as well as support mentors and was tested in intervention units from October-21 to April-22. The aim of this sub-study was to evaluate the mentors´ experiences, self-reported self-efficacy, and clinical teaching behavior.

Methods: A mixed methods design was used where data was collected via focus-group interviews (n=5) directly after the intervention. A follow-up, self-reported questionnaire study was conducted at three different time points: pre-test, baseline, and post-test I, directly after the intervention, and post-test II, eight months after the intervention. Transcribed interview data will be analyzed using qualitative content analysis, and self-reported answers will be analyzed using suitable statistical methods.

Results and conclusion: Preliminary results will be presented at the conference. The evaluation will highlight the potential effects and meaning of the mentorship program from the mentors´ perspective as well as what it means to be a mentor.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215260 (URN)
Conference
5th Nordic conference in nursing research, Reykjavik, Iceland, October 2-4, 2023
Available from: 2023-10-13 Created: 2023-10-13 Last updated: 2023-10-13Bibliographically approved
Cadamuro, J., Baird, G., Baumann, G., Bölenius, K., Cornes, M., Ibarz, M., . . . Von Meyer, A. (2022). Preanalytical quality improvement - an interdisciplinary journey, on behalf of the European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE). Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, 60(5), 662-668
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preanalytical quality improvement - an interdisciplinary journey, on behalf of the European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE)
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2022 (English)In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 662-668Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the beginning of laboratory medicine, the main focus was to provide high quality analytics. Over time the importance of the extra-analytical phases and their contribution to the overall quality became evident. However, as the initial preanalytical processes take place outside of the laboratory and mostly without its supervision, all professions participating in these process steps, from test selection to sample collection and transport, need to engage accordingly. Focusing solely on intra-laboratory processes will not be sufficient to achieve the best possible preanalytical quality. The Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE) of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) has provided several recommendations, opinion papers and scientific evidence over the past years, aiming to standardize the preanalytical phase across Europe. One of its strategies to reach this goal are educational efforts. As such, the WG-PRE has organized five conferences in the past decade with the sole focus on preanalytical quality. This year's conference mainly aims to depict the views of different professions on preanalytical processes in order to acquire common ground as basis for further improvements. This article summarizes the content of this 6th preanalytical conference.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2022
Keywords
errors, integrated diagnostics, interdisciplinary, laboratory medicine, preanalytical phase, quality, standardization
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193352 (URN)10.1515/cclm-2022-0117 (DOI)000765920600001 ()35258235 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85126545039 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-29 Created: 2022-03-29 Last updated: 2022-08-05Bibliographically approved
Lämås, K., Härgestam, M., Jonsson, K. & Bölenius, K. (2022). Students’ performance in venous blood specimen collection practice before internship: an observation study. Creative Education, 13(07), 2340-2353
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students’ performance in venous blood specimen collection practice before internship: an observation study
2022 (English)In: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 13, no 07, p. 2340-2353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Newly trained nurses experience a lack of preparedness in practical skills, and research shows  that students and newly trained nurses have deficiencies in performing practical skills such as venous blood specimen collection. There is a lack of knowledge regarding the level of accuracy reached by students after training at clinical training centres and before entering clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of venous blood specimen collection among nursing students after regular education and training at the clinical training centre but before starting an internship. 

Methods: Twenty-three nursing students were observed and video-recorded. An observation protocol was developed based on a validated questionnaire measuring adherence to valid guidelines, and a model for practical skills performance. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. 

Results: A large variation was found in students’ performance with respect to information provided to the patient, patient identification procedures, and tourniquet procedures. The students gave adequate information in 39% of cases, accurately performed patient identification in 83% of cases, and accurately performed the tourniquet procedure in 22% of cases. 

Conclusions: Many nursing students are not prepared to practice on real patients. It is therefore important for university lecturers to develop more efficient teaching methods and to communicate students’ skill levels to the supervisor at the clinic, in order for the clinical training to be adapted to a suitable level. There is a need for further research on how to close the gap between the university and internship in order to ensure patient safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2022
Keywords
Noggrannhet, Clinical Training Center, Utbildning, Omvårdnad, Task Performance
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200771 (URN)10.4236/ce.2022.137149 (DOI)
Available from: 2022-11-07 Created: 2022-11-07 Last updated: 2022-11-07Bibliographically approved
Bjørk, I. T., Larsen, K., Ravik, M., Reierson, I. Å., Sommer, I., Stenholt, B., . . . Hagtvet, K. A. (2021). Development and testing of an instrument for summative assessment of practical skill performance: A generalizability theory approach. Journal of Nursing Measurement, 29(3), E162-E191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and testing of an instrument for summative assessment of practical skill performance: A generalizability theory approach
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Measurement, ISSN 1061-3749, E-ISSN 1945-7049, Vol. 29, no 3, p. E162-E191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Many newly graduated nurses lack proficiency in practical skill performance. Presently, nursing students' practical skill is assessed by summative instruments with overarching items. The purpose of this study was to develop a more detailed instrument to use in summative assessment of nursing students' practical skill performance and to assess its psychometric properties.

METHODS: A 50-item instrument was developed. Video-recorded performances were rated by experienced clinical supervisors. A multifacet measurement design was developed. Relevant parameters were estimated by generalizability analysis.

RESULTS: Findings indicated that error of measurement were mainly caused by raters far more than by items.

CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggested that summative assessment in realistic settings may not apply one rater only. Two to three/four raters appear necessary to dependably measure most skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
generalizability estimation, multifacet summative assessment, nursing education, practical skill performance
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189045 (URN)10.1891/JNM-D-20-00003 (DOI)000727388300002 ()34518433 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85120690263 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-02 Created: 2021-11-02 Last updated: 2023-09-08Bibliographically approved
Lämås, K., Bölenius, K., Sandman, P.-O., Lindkvist, M. & Edvardsson, D. (2021). Effects of a person-centred and health-promoting intervention in home care services – a non-randomized controlled trial. BMC Geriatrics, 21(1), Article ID 720.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a person-centred and health-promoting intervention in home care services – a non-randomized controlled trial
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2021 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 720Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Home care recipients have reported little self-determination and opportunity to influence their own care. Person-centred care focusing on involvement has improved the quality of life of older adults in health care and nursing homes; however, knowledge about the effects of person-centred interventions in aged care at home is sparse. The aim of this study was to study the effects of a person-centred and health-promoting intervention, compared with usual care, on health-related quality of life, thriving and self-determination among older adults, and on job satisfaction, stress of conscience and level of person-centred care among care staff.

Methods: This is a non-randomized controlled trial with a before/after design. Participants from five home care districts in one municipality in northern Sweden were recruited to an intervention or control group. We evaluated health-related quality of life, thriving and self-determination among older home care recipients, and job satisfaction, person-centred care and stress of conscience among care staff. Evaluation was performed by questionnaires and responses were analysed using parametric and non-parametric statistical analyses.

Results: Eighty-one older adults and 48 staff were included in the study. A clinically moderate and statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups was found in thriving and negative emotions among older adults. The intervention contributed to maintaining high thriving levels, in contrast to decreased thriving in the control group (intervention: + 1, control: − 4, p 0.026, CI: − 10. 766, − 0.717). However, the intervention group rated an increase in negative emotions, while the control group was unchanged (intervention: − 7 control: + − 0, p 0.048, CI: − 17.435, − 0.098). No significant effects were found among staff.

Conclusions: The intervention contributed to maintaining high levels of thriving in contrast to low levels found in the control group, and it seems reasonable to consider the intervention focus on staff as more person-centred and health-promoting. The finding that the intervention group had increase in negative emotions is difficult to interpret, and warrants further exploration. Even though the results are sparse, the challenges discussed may be of importance for future studies in the context of HCS.

Trial registration: NCT02846246. Date of registration: 27 July 2016.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2021
Keywords
Home care service, Intervention, Older adults, Person-centred care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190870 (URN)10.1186/s12877-021-02661-5 (DOI)000731390300013 ()34922494 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85121427403 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2021-12-30 Created: 2021-12-30 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1074-0729

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