Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Rosenbaum, A., Dahlin, A. M., Andersson, U., Björkblom, B., Wu, W.-Y. Y., Hedman, H., . . . Melin, B. S. (2023). Low-grade glioma risk SNP rs11706832 is associated with type I interferon response pathway genes in cell lines. Scientific Reports, 13, Article ID 6777.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-grade glioma risk SNP rs11706832 is associated with type I interferon response pathway genes in cell lines
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, article id 6777Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have contributed to our understanding of glioma susceptibility. To date, 25 risk loci for development of any of the glioma subtypes are known. However, GWAS studies reveal little about the molecular processes that lead to increased risk, especially for non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). A particular SNP in intron 2 of LRIG1, rs11706832, has been shown to increase the susceptibility for IDH1 mutated low-grade gliomas (LGG). Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains protein 1 (LRIG1) is important in cancer development as it negatively regulates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); however, the mechanism responsible for this particular risk SNP and its potential effect on LRIG1 are not known. Using CRISPR-CAS9, we edited rs11706832 in HEK293T cells. Four HEK293T clones with the risk allele were compared to four clones with the non-risk allele for LRIG1 and SLC25A26 gene expression using RT-qPCR, for global gene expression using RNA-seq, and for metabolites using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The experiment did not reveal any significant effect of the SNP on the expression levels or splicing patterns of LRIG1 or SLC25A26. The global gene expression analysis revealed that the risk allele C was associated with upregulation of several mitochondrial genes. Gene enrichment analysis of 74 differentially expressed genes in the genome revealed a significant enrichment of type I interferon response genes, where many genes were downregulated for the risk allele C. Gene expression data of IDH1 mutated LGGs from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) revealed a similar under expression of type I interferon genes associated with the risk allele. This study found the expression levels and splicing patterns of LRIG1 and SLC25A26 were not affected by the SNP in HEK293T cells. However, the risk allele was associated with a downregulation of genes involved in the innate immune response both in the HEK293T cells and in the LGG data from TCGA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-208211 (URN)10.1038/s41598-023-33923-4 (DOI)000984494600021 ()37185361 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85154566176 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Foss-Skiftesvik, J., Li, S., Rosenbaum, A., Munch Hagen, C., Stoltze, U. K., Ljungqvist, S., . . . Wiemels, J. L. (2023). Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 4069 children with glioma identifies 9p21.3 risk locus. Neuro-Oncology, 25(9), 1709-1720
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 4069 children with glioma identifies 9p21.3 risk locus
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1709-1720Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Although recent sequencing studies have revealed that 10% of childhood gliomas are caused by rare germline mutations, the role of common variants is undetermined and no genome-wide significant risk loci for pediatric central nervous system tumors have been identified to date.

METHODS: Meta-analysis of 3 population-based genome-wide association studies comprising 4069 children with glioma and 8778 controls of multiple genetic ancestries. Replication was performed in a separate case-control cohort. Quantitative trait loci analyses and a transcriptome-wide association study were conducted to assess possible links with brain tissue expression across 18 628 genes.

RESULTS: Common variants in CDKN2B-AS1 at 9p21.3 were significantly associated with astrocytoma, the most common subtype of glioma in children (rs573687, P-value of 6.974e-10, OR 1.273, 95% CI 1.179-1.374). The association was driven by low-grade astrocytoma (P-value of 3.815e-9) and exhibited unidirectional effects across all 6 genetic ancestries. For glioma overall, the association approached genome-wide significance (rs3731239, P-value of 5.411e-8), while no significant association was observed for high-grade tumors. Predicted decreased brain tissue expression of CDKN2B was significantly associated with astrocytoma (P-value of 8.090e-8).

CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based genome-wide association study meta-analysis, we identify and replicate 9p21.3 (CDKN2B-AS1) as a risk locus for childhood astrocytoma, thereby establishing the first genome-wide significant evidence of common variant predisposition in pediatric neuro-oncology. We furthermore provide a functional basis for the association by showing a possible link to decreased brain tissue CDKN2B expression and substantiate that genetic susceptibility differs between low- and high-grade astrocytoma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
Childhood brain tumors, genetic susceptibility, glioma, GWAS, pediatric neuro-oncology
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214245 (URN)10.1093/neuonc/noad042 (DOI)000959346400001 ()36810956 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151731119 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer FoundationCancerforskningsfonden i NorrlandSwedish Research CouncilSwedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2023-09-18 Created: 2023-09-18 Last updated: 2023-09-18Bibliographically approved
Wu, W.-Y. Y., Dahlin, A. M., Wibom, C., Björkblom, B. & Melin, B. S. (2022). Prediagnostic biomarkers for early detection of glioma: using case-control studies from cohorts as study approach. Neuro-Oncology Advances, 4, II73-II80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediagnostic biomarkers for early detection of glioma: using case-control studies from cohorts as study approach
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology Advances, E-ISSN 2632-2498, Vol. 4, p. II73-II80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Understanding the trajectory and development of disease is important and the knowledge can be used to find novel targets for therapy and new diagnostic tools for early diagnosis.

Methods: Large cohorts from different parts of the world are unique assets for research as they have systematically collected plasma and DNA over long-time periods in healthy individuals, sometimes even with repeated samples. Over time, the population in the cohort are diagnosed with many different diseases, including brain tumors.

Results: Recent studies have detected genetic variants that are associated with increased risk of glioblastoma and lower grade gliomas specifically. The impact for genetic markers to predict disease in a healthy population has been deemed low, and a relevant question is if the genetic variants for glioma are associated with risk of disease or partly consist of genes associated to survival. Both metabolite and protein spectra are currently being explored for early detection of cancer.

Conclusions: We here present a focused review of studies of genetic variants, metabolomics, and proteomics studied in prediagnostic glioma samples and discuss their potential in early diagnostics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
Keywords
genetic variants, glioblastoma, metabolites, prediagnositic sample, proteins
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-209135 (URN)10.1093/noajnl/vdac036 (DOI)000890147900012 ()36380862 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159173442 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Cancer SocietySjöberg Foundation
Available from: 2023-06-07 Created: 2023-06-07 Last updated: 2023-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wu, W.-Y. Y., Späth, F., Wibom, C., Björkblom, B., Dahlin, A. M. & Melin, B. S. (2022). Pre-diagnostic levels of sVEGFR2, sTNFR2, sIL-2Rα and sIL-6R are associated with glioma risk: A nested case–control study of repeated samples. Cancer Medicine, 11(4), 1016-1025
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-diagnostic levels of sVEGFR2, sTNFR2, sIL-2Rα and sIL-6R are associated with glioma risk: A nested case–control study of repeated samples
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 1016-1025Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

No strong aetiological factors have been established for glioma aside from genetic mutations and variants, ionising radiation and an inverse relationship with asthmas and allergies. Our aim was to investigate the association between pre-diagnostic immune protein levels and glioma risk. We conducted a case–control study nested in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study cohort. We analysed 133 glioma cases and 133 control subjects matched by age, sex and date of blood donation. ELISA or Luminex bead-based multiplex assays were used to measure plasma levels of 19 proteins. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios and 95% CIs. To further model the protein trajectories over time, the linear mixed-effects models were conducted. We found that the levels of sVEGFR2, sTNFR2, sIL-2Rα and sIL-6R were associated with glioma risk. After adjusting for the time between blood sample collection and glioma diagnosis, the odds ratios were 1.72 (95% CI = 1.01–2.93), 1.48 (95% CI = 1.01–2.16) and 1.90 (95% CI = 1.14–3.17) for sTNFR2, sIL-2Rα and sIL-6R, respectively. The trajectory of sVEGFR2 concentrations over time was different between cases and controls (p-value = 0.031), increasing for cases (0.8% per year) and constant for controls. Our findings suggest these proteins play important roles in gliomagenesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-191666 (URN)10.1002/cam4.4505 (DOI)000742347600001 ()35029050 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122760856 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-21 Created: 2022-01-21 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Dahlin, A. M., Wibom, C., Andersson, U., Bybjerg-Grauholm, J., Deltour, I., Hougaard, D. M., . . . Melin, B. S. (2020). A genome-wide association study on medulloblastoma. Journal of Neuro-Oncology, 147(2), 309-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A genome-wide association study on medulloblastoma
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 0167-594X, E-ISSN 1573-7373, Vol. 147, no 2, p. 309-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Medulloblastoma is a malignant embryonal tumor of the cerebellum that occurs predominantly in children. To find germline genetic variants associated with medulloblastoma risk, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) including 244 medulloblastoma cases and 247 control subjects from Sweden and Denmark.

Methods: Genotyping was performed using Illumina BeadChips, and untyped variants were imputed using IMPUTE2.

Results: Fifty-nine variants in 11 loci were associated with increased medulloblastoma risk (p < 1 × 10–5), but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple testing (p < 5 × 10–8). Thirteen of these variants were genotyped, whereas 46 were imputed. Genotyped variants were further investigated in a validation study comprising 249 medulloblastoma cases and 629 control subjects. In the validation study, rs78021424 (18p11.23, PTPRM) was associated with medulloblastoma risk with OR in the same direction as in the discovery cohort (ORT = 1.59, pvalidation = 0.02). We also selected seven medulloblastoma predisposition genes for investigation using a candidate gene approach: APCBRCA2PALB2PTCH1SUFUTP53, and GPR161. The strongest evidence for association was found for rs201458864 (PALB2, ORT = 3.76, p = 3.2 × 10–4) and rs79036813 (PTCH1, ORA = 0.42, p = 2.6 × 10–3).

Conclusion: The results of this study, including a novel potential medulloblastoma risk loci at 18p11.23, are suggestive but need further validation in independent cohorts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Pediatric cancers, CNS cancers, Adolescents and young adults (AYA), Epidemiology, Genetics of risk, outcome, and prevention
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168914 (URN)10.1007/s11060-020-03424-9 (DOI)000516094000001 ()32056145 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079528189 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, NCS2009-0001Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PR2017-0157Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, NC2011-0004Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, TJ2015-0044Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 2018/390Swedish Research Council, 2016-01159_ 3NIH (National Institute of Health), P30ES007033NIH (National Institute of Health), R01CA116724NIH (National Institute of Health), R03CA106011Novo Nordisk
Available from: 2020-03-17 Created: 2020-03-17 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D., Rentoft, M., Dahlin, A. M., Lundholm, E., Olason, P. I., Sjödin, A., . . . Johansson, E. (2020). A whole-genome sequenced control population in northern Sweden reveals subregional genetic differences. PLOS ONE, 15(9), Article ID e0237721.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A whole-genome sequenced control population in northern Sweden reveals subregional genetic differences
Show others...
2020 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, no 9, article id e0237721Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The number of national reference populations that are whole-genome sequenced are rapidly increasing. Partly driving this development is the fact that genetic disease studies benefit from knowing the genetic variation typical for the geographical area of interest. A whole-genome sequenced Swedish national reference population (n = 1000) has been recently published but with few samples from northern Sweden. In the present study we have whole-genome sequenced a control population (n = 300) (ACpop) from Västerbotten County, a sparsely populated region in northern Sweden previously shown to be genetically different from southern Sweden. The aggregated variant frequencies within ACpop are publicly available (DOI 10.17044/NBIS/G000005) to function as a basic resource in clinical genetics and for genetic studies. Our analysis of ACpop, representing approximately 0.11% of the population in Västerbotten, indicates the presence of a genetic substructure within the county. Furthermore, a demographic analysis showed that the population from which samples were drawn was to a large extent geographically stationary, a finding that was corroborated in the genetic analysis down to the level of municipalities. Including ACpop in the reference population when imputing unknown variants in a Västerbotten cohort resulted in a strong increase in the number of high-confidence imputed variants (up to 81% for variants with minor allele frequency < 5%). ACpop was initially designed for cancer disease studies, but the genetic structure within the cohort will be of general interest for all genetic disease studies in northern Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library Science, 2020
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-175837 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0237721 (DOI)000571887500123 ()32915809 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85090917774 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-16 Created: 2020-10-16 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Sjöström, O., Dahlin, A. M., Silander, G., Syk, I., Melin, B. S. & Numan Hellquist, B. (2020). Travel time to care does not affect survival for patients with colorectal cancer in northern Sweden: A data linkage study from the Risk North database. PLOS ONE, 15(8), Article ID e0236799.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Travel time to care does not affect survival for patients with colorectal cancer in northern Sweden: A data linkage study from the Risk North database
Show others...
2020 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, no 8, article id e0236799Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Numerous prior studies, even from countries with free access to care, have associated long travel time to care with poor survival in patients with colorectal cancer.

Methods: This is a data-linkage study of all 3718 patients with colorectal cancer, diagnosed between 2007 and 2013 in Northern Sweden, one of the most sparsely populated areas in Europe. Travel time to nearest hospital was calculated based on GPS coordinates and multivariable Cox regression was used to analyse possible associations between travel time and cause-specific survival.

Results: No association between travel time and survival was observed, either in univariable analysis (colon HR 1.00 [95% CI 0.998-1.003]; rectal HR 0.998; [95% CI 0.995-1.002]) or in multivariable Cox regression analysis (colon HR 0.999 [95% CI 0.997-1.002]; rectal HR 0.997 [95% CI 0.992-1.002]).

Conclusions: In contrast to most other studies, no association between travel time and colorectal cancer survival was found; despite that longer travel time was associated with known risk factors for poorer outcome. In the Swedish health care setting, travel time does not appear to represent a barrier to care or to negatively influence outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2020
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174724 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0236799 (DOI)000560393300024 ()32756574 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85089170391 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-14 Created: 2020-09-14 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Dahlin, A. M., Wibom, C., Andersson, U., Hougaard, D. M., Bybjerg-Grauholm, J., Deltour, I., . . . Melin, B. S. (2019). Genetic Variants in the 9p21.3 Locus Associated with Glioma Risk in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: A Case-Control Study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 28(7), 1252-1258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic Variants in the 9p21.3 Locus Associated with Glioma Risk in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: A Case-Control Study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 1252-1258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified germline genetic variants in 25 genetic loci that increase the risk of developing glioma in adulthood. It is not known if these variants increase the risk of developing glioma in children and adolescents and young adults (AYA). To date, no studies have performed genome-wide analyses to find novel genetic variants associated with glioma risk in children and AYA.

Methods: We investigated the association between 8,831,628 genetic variants and risk of glioma in 854 patients diagnosed up to the age of 29 years and 3,689 controls from Sweden and Denmark. Recruitment of patients and controls was population based. Genotyping was performed using Illumina BeadChips, and untyped variants were imputed with IMPUTE2. We selected 41 established adult glioma risk variants for detailed investigation.

Results: Three adult glioma risk variants, rs634537, rs2157719, and rs145929329, all mapping to the 9p21.3 (CDKN2B-AS1) locus, were associated with glioma risk in children and AYA. The strongest association was seen for rs634537 (odds ratioG = 1.21; 95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.35; P = 5.8 × 10−4). In genome-wide analysis, an association with risk was suggested for 129 genetic variants (P <1 × 10−5).

Conclusions: Carriers of risk alleles in the 9p21.3 locus have an increased risk of glioma throughout life. The results from genome-wide association analyses require validation in independent cohorts.

Impact: Our findings line up with existing evidence that some, although not all, established adult glioma risk variants are associated with risk of glioma in children and AYA. Validation of results from genome-wide analyses may reveal novel susceptibility loci for glioma in children and AYA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162886 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-1026 (DOI)000481682500019 ()31040135 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068755478 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-04 Created: 2019-09-04 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Sjöberg, R. L., Wu, W.-Y. Y., Dahlin, A. M., Tsavachidis, S., Bondy, M. L. & Melin, B. S. (2019). Role of monoamine-oxidase-A-gene variation in the development of glioblastoma in males: a case control study. Journal of Neuro-Oncology, 145(2), 287-294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of monoamine-oxidase-A-gene variation in the development of glioblastoma in males: a case control study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 0167-594X, E-ISSN 1573-7373, Vol. 145, no 2, p. 287-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Mono-amine oxidase-A (MAO-A) enzyme is involved in the degradation and regulation of catecholamines such as serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine and nor-epinephrine. Preclinical studies suggest that this enzyme may contribute to an environment favorable for growth of malignant glioma. The MAO-A gene is located on the X-chromosome and has at least one functional genetic polymorphism. The aim of the present study was to explore possible effects of MAO-A genotype on development of glioblastoma in males.

Methods: Genotypes for 437 glioma cases and 876 population-based controls from the Swedish Glioma International Case–Control study (GICC) were compared. We analyzed the germline DNA using the Illumina Oncoarray. We selected seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the MAO-A gene, and imputed genotypes based on data from the 1000 genomes project. We used 1579 male glioblastoma cases and 1875 controls comprising the whole GICC cohort for subsequent validation of findings.

Results: The rs144551722 SNP was a significant predictor of development of glioblastoma in males (p-value = 0.0056) but not in females even after correction for multiple testing. We conducted haplotype analysis to confirm an association between MAO-A gene and risk of glioblastoma (p-value = 0.016). We found similar results in the validation sample.

Conclusions: These results suggest the possibility of a role for the MAO-A enzyme and the MAO-A gene in the development of glioblastoma in males.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
MAOA genetics glioblastoma males
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166478 (URN)10.1007/s11060-019-03294-w (DOI)000496571900010 ()31556016 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075091744 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NIH (National Institute of Health), R01CA139020NIH (National Institute of Health), R01 CA139020
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Andersson, U., Degerman, S., Dahlin, A. M., Wibom, C., Johansson, G., Bondy, M. L. & Melin, B. S. (2019). The association between longer relative leukocyte telomere length and risk of glioma is independent of the potentially confounding factors allergy, BMI, and smoking. Cancer Causes and Control, 30(2), 177-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between longer relative leukocyte telomere length and risk of glioma is independent of the potentially confounding factors allergy, BMI, and smoking
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 177-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Previous studies have suggested an association between relative leukocyte telomere length (rLTL) and glioma risk. This association may be influenced by several factors, including allergies, BMI, and smoking. Previous studies have shown that individuals with asthma and allergy have shortened relative telomere length, and decreased risk of glioma. Though, the details and the interplay between rLTL, asthma and allergies, and glioma molecular phenotype is largely unknown. Methods: rLTL was measured by qPCR in a Swedish population-based glioma case–control cohort (421 cases and 671 controls). rLTL was related to glioma risk and health parameters associated with asthma and allergy, as well as molecular events in glioma including IDH1 mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and EGFR amplification. Results: Longer rLTL was associated with increased risk of glioma (OR = 1.16; 95% CI 1.02–1.31). Similar to previous reports, there was an inverse association between allergy and glioma risk. Specific, allergy symptoms including watery eyes was most strongly associated with glioma risk. High body mass index (BMI) a year prior diagnosis was significantly protective against glioma in our population. Adjusting for allergy, asthma, BMI, and smoking did not markedly change the association between longer rLTL and glioma risk. rLTL among cases was not associated with IDH1 mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, or EGFR amplification, after adjusting for age at diagnosis and sex. Conclusions: In this Swedish glioma case–control cohort, we identified that long rLTL increases the risk of glioma, an association not confounded by allergy, BMI, or smoking. This highlights the complex interplay of the immune system, rLTL and cancer risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Glioma, Relative leukocyte telomere length (rLTL), Allergy, BMI, Smoking, IDH1, 1p/19q, EGFR
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157597 (URN)10.1007/s10552-018-1120-2 (DOI)000459153800007 ()30560391 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058693170 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6754-2571

Search in DiVA

Show all publications