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Rasmuson Lestander, Asa
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Skottheim Honn, J., Johansson, L. & Rasmuson Lestander, A. (2016). Regulation of twin of eyeless during Drosophila development. Gene Expression Patterns, 20(2), 120-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulation of twin of eyeless during Drosophila development
2016 (English)In: Gene Expression Patterns, ISSN 1567-133X, E-ISSN 1872-7298, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Pax-6 protein is vital for eye development in all seeing animals, from sea urchins to humans. Either of the Pax6 genes in Drosophila (twin of eyeless and eyeless) can induce a gene cascade leading to formation of entire eyes when expressed ectopically. The twin of eyeless (toy) gene in Drosophila is expressed in the anterior region of the early fly embryo. At later stages it is expressed in the brain, ventral nerve cord and (eventually) the visual primordium that gives rise to the eye-antennal imaginal discs of the larvae. These discs subsequently form the major part of the adult head, including compound eyes. We have searched for genes that are required for normal toy expression in the early embryo to elucidate initiating events of eye organogenesis. Candidate genes identified by mutation analyses were subjected to further knock-out and miss-expression tests to investigate their interactions with toy. Our results indicate that the head-specific gap gene empty spiracles can act as a repressor of Toy, while ocelliless (oc) and spalt major (salm) appear to act as positive regulators of toy gene expression. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Drosophila melanogaster, Eye development, Pax6, twin of eyeless
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121601 (URN)10.1016/j.gep.2016.03.002 (DOI)000375160800006 ()2-s2.0-84961839081 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-21 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Chen, S. & Rasmuson-Lestander, Å. (2009). Regulation of the Drosophila engrailed gene by Polycomb repressor complex 2. Mechanisms of Development, 126(5-6), 443-448
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulation of the Drosophila engrailed gene by Polycomb repressor complex 2
2009 (English)In: Mechanisms of Development, ISSN 0925-4773, E-ISSN 1872-6356, Vol. 126, no 5-6, p. 443-448Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Suppressor-of-zeste-12 (Su(z)12) is a core component of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which has a methyltransferase activity directed towards lysine residues of histone 3. Mutations in Polycomb group (PcG) genes cause de-repression of homeotic genes and subsequent homeotic transformations. Another target for Polycomb silencing is the engrailed gene, which encodes a key regulator of segmentation in the early Drosophila embryo. In close proximity to the en gene is a Polycomb Response Element, but whether en is regulated by Su(z)12 is not known. In this report, we show that en is not de-repressed in Su(z)12 or Enhancer-of-zeste mutant clones in the anterior compartment of wing discs. Instead, we find that en expression is down-regulated in the posterior portion of wing discs, indicating that the PRC2 complex acts as an activator of en. Our results indicate that this is due to secondary effects, probably caused by ectopic expression of Ubx and Abd-B.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2009
Keywords
Gene regulation, Su(z)12, Engrailed, Wing disc, Drosophila
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Developmental Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-18646 (URN)10.1016/j.mod.2009.01.004 (DOI)000266975100014 ()19368801 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-67349277120 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-02-20 Created: 2009-02-20 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, L., Kronhamn, J. & Rasmuson-Lestander, Å. (2009). The Drosophila Pax6 paralogs have different functions in head development but can partially substitute for each other. Molecular Genetics and Genomics, 282(3), 217-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Drosophila Pax6 paralogs have different functions in head development but can partially substitute for each other
2009 (English)In: Molecular Genetics and Genomics, ISSN 1617-4615, E-ISSN 1617-4623, Vol. 282, no 3, p. 217-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are two Pax6 genes in Drosophila melanogaster; eyeless (ey) and twin-of-eyeless (toy), due to a duplication, which most likely occurred in the insect lineage. They encode transcription factors important for head development. Misexpression of either toy or ey can induce formation of ectopic compound eyes. Toy regulates the ey gene by binding to an eye-specific enhancer in its second intron. However, Toy can induce ectopic eyes also in an ey( - ) background, which indicates a redundancy between the two Pax6 copies in eye formation. To elucidate to what extent these two genes are interchangeable, we first generated toy-Gal4 constructs capable of driving the Pax6 genes in a toy-specific manner. Genetic dissection of the promoter proximal region of toy identified a 1,300-bp region around the canonical transcription start that is sufficient to drive toy expression in embryonic brain and eye primorida and in larval eye-antennal discs. We find that exogenous expression of toy can partially rescue the lethality and eye phenotype caused by lethal mutations in ey and vice versa. We therefore conclude that Toy and Ey, to some extent, can substitute for each other. Nevertheless, the phenotypes of the rescued flies indicate that the two Pax6 genes are specialized to regulate defined structures of the fly head.

Keywords
Pax6 - Twin-of-eyeless - Eyeless - Mutant rescue - Drosophila
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-33092 (URN)10.1007/s00438-009-0458-2 (DOI)19484263 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-69249209831 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-04-12 Created: 2010-04-12 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Chen, S., Birve, A. & Rasmuson-Lestander, Å. (2007). In vivo analysis of Drosophila SU(Z)12 function. Molecular Genetics and Genomics, 279(2), 159-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vivo analysis of Drosophila SU(Z)12 function
2007 (English)In: Molecular Genetics and Genomics, ISSN 1617-4615, E-ISSN 1617-4623, Vol. 279, no 2, p. 159-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are required to maintain a stable repression of the homeotic genes during Drosophila development. Mutants in the PcG gene Supressor of zeste 12 (Su(z)12) exhibit strong homeotic transformations caused by widespread misexpression of several homeotic genes in embryos and larvae. Su(z)12 has also been suggested to be involved in position effect variegation and in regulation of the white gene expression in combination with zeste. To elucidate whether SU(Z)12 has any such direct functions we investigated the binding pattern to polytene chromosomes and compared the localization to other proteins. We found that SU(Z)12 binds to about 90 specific eukaryotic sites, however, not the white locus. We also find staining at the chromocenter and the nucleolus. The binding along chromosome arms is mostly in interbands and these sites correlate precisely with those of Enhancer-of-zeste and other components of the PRC2 silencing complex. This implies that SU(Z)12 mainly exists in complex with PRC2. Comparisons with other PcG protein-binding patterns reveal extensive overlap. However, SU(Z)12 binding sites and histone 3 trimethylated lysine 27 residues (3meK27 H3) do not correlate that well. Still, we show that Su(z)12 is essential for tri-methylation of the lysine 27 residue of histone H3 in vivo, and that overexpression of SU(Z)12 in somatic clones results in higher levels of histone methylation, indicating that SU(Z)12 is rate limiting for the enzymatic activity of PRC2. In addition, we analyzed the binding pattern of Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1) and found that SU(Z)12 and HP1 do not co-localize.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7290 (URN)10.1007/s00438-007-0304-3 (DOI)18034266 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-38349048060 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-01-07 Created: 2008-01-07 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Ryder, E., Ashburner, M., Bautista-Llacer, R., Drummond, J., Webster, J., Johnson, G., . . . Russell, S. (2007). The DrosDel deletion collection: A Drosophila genomewide chromosomal deficiency resource. Genetics, 177(1), 615-629
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The DrosDel deletion collection: A Drosophila genomewide chromosomal deficiency resource
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2007 (English)In: Genetics, ISSN 0016-6731, E-ISSN 1943-2631, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 615-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We describe a second-generation deficiency kit for Drosophila melanogaster composed of molecularly mapped deletions on an isogenic background, covering 77% of the Release 5.1 genome. Using a previously reported collection of FRT-bearing P-element insertions, we have generated 655 new deletions and verified a set of 209 deletion-bearing fly stocks. In addition to deletions, we demonstrate how the P elements may also be used to generate a set of custom inversions and duplications, particularly useful for balancing difficult regions of the genome carrying haplo-insufficient loci. We describe a simple computational resource that facilitatesselection of appropriate elements for generating custom deletions. Finally, we provide a computational resource that facilitates selection of other mapped FRT-bearing elements that, when combined with the DrosDel collection, can theoretically generate over half a million precisely mapped deletions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Austin, Tex.: Genetics Society of America, 2007
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-16815 (URN)10.1534/genetics.107.076216 (DOI)17720900 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-35048876714 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-10-12 Created: 2007-10-12 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Zeng, Q.-Y., Westermark, S.-O., Rasmuson-Lestander, Å. & Wang, X.-R. (2006). Detection and quantification of Cladosporium in aerosols by real-time PCR. Journal of Environmental Monitoring, 8(1), 153-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection and quantification of Cladosporium in aerosols by real-time PCR
2006 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cladosporium is one of the most common airborne molds found in indoor and outdoor environments. Cladosporium spores are important aeroallergens, and prolonged exposure to elevated spore concentrations can provoke chronic allergy and asthma. To accurately quantify the levels of Cladosporium in indoor and outdoor environments, two real-time PCR systems were developed in this study. The two real-time PCR systems are highly specific and sensitive for Cladosporium detection even in a high background of other fungal DNAs. These methods were employed to quantify Cladosporium in aerosols of five different indoor environments. The investigation revealed a high spore concentration of Cladosporium (10(7) m(-3)) in a cow barn that accounted for 28-44% of the airborne fungal propagules. In a countryside house that uses firewood for heating and in a paper and pulp factory, Cladosporium was detected at 10(4) spores m(-3), which accounted for 2-6% of the fungal propagules in the aerosols. The concentrations of Cladosporium in these three indoor environments far exceeded the medical borderline level (3000 spores m(-3)). In a power station and a fruit and vegetable storage, Cladosporium was found to be a minor component in the aerosols, accounted for 0.01-0.1% of the total fungal propagules. These results showed that monitoring Cladosporium in indoor environments is more important than in outdoor environments from the public health point of view. Cladosporium may not be the dominant fungi in some indoor environments, but its concentration could still be exceeding the threshold value for clinical significance. The methods developed in this study could facilitate accurate detection and quantification of Cladosporium for public health related risk assessment.

Keywords
Aerosols/analysis, Air Microbiology, Air Pollution; Indoor/*analysis, Cladosporium/genetics/*isolation & purification, Colony Count; Microbial, DNA; Fungal/analysis, DNA; Mitochondrial/analysis, DNA; Ribosomal/analysis, Environmental Monitoring/methods, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sequence Alignment, Sequence Analysis; DNA
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-16825 (URN)10.1039/b509515h (DOI)16395473 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33644841470 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-10-12 Created: 2007-10-12 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Zhou, G.-Q., Zhang, Y., Ferguson, D. J., Chen, S., Rasmuson-Lestander, Å., Campbell, F. C. & Watt, S. M. (2006). The Drosophila ortholog of the endolysosomal membrane protein, endolyn, regulates cell proliferation.. J Cell Biochem, 99(5), 1380-96
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Drosophila ortholog of the endolysosomal membrane protein, endolyn, regulates cell proliferation.
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2006 (English)In: J Cell Biochem, ISSN 0730-2312, Vol. 99, no 5, p. 1380-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Endolyn (CD164) is a sialomucin that regulates the proliferation, adhesion, and migration of human haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. This molecule is predominately localized in endocytotic compartments, where it may contribute to endolysosomal biogenesis and trafficking. In order to more closely define the function of endolyn from an evolutionary view-point, we first analyzed endolyn orthologs in species ranging from insects, fish, and birds to mammals. The predicted molecular structures of the endolyn orthologs from these species are well conserved, particularly with respect to significant O-linked glycosylation of the extracellular domain, and the high degree of amino acid similarities within their transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, with the latter possessing the lysosomal target signal, YXXphi. Focusing on Drosophila, our studies showed that the subcellular distribution of endolyn in non-polarized Drosophila S2 cells resembles that of its human counterpart in hematopoietic cells, with its predominant localization being within intracellular vesicles, while a small fraction occurs on the cell surface. Both Y --> A and L --> A mutations in the YHTL motif perturbed the normal subcellular distribution of Drosophila endolyn. Interestingly, embryonic and early larval development was often arrested in endolyn-deficient Drosophila mutants. This may partly be due to the role of endolyn in regulating cell proliferation, since knock-down of endolyn expression in S2 cells resulted in up to 50% inhibition of cell growth, with a proportion of cells undergoing apoptosis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that endolyn is an evolutionarily conserved sialomucin fundamentally involved in cell proliferation in both the human and Drosophila melanogaster. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Antigens; CD164/genetics/*metabolism, Cell Line, Cell Proliferation, Computational Biology, Drosophila Proteins/genetics/*metabolism, Drosophila melanogaster/genetics/metabolism, Humans, Microscopy; Immunoelectron, Molecular Sequence Data, Phenotype, RNA; Double-Stranded/genetics/metabolism, Recombinant Fusion Proteins/genetics/metabolism, Sequence Alignment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-16823 (URN)16924678 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33751190312 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-10-12 Created: 2007-10-12 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Zeng, Q.-Y., Westermark, S.-O., Rasmuson-Lestander, Å. & Wang, X.-R. (2004). Detection and quantification of Wallemia sebi in aerosols by real-time PCR, conventional PCR, and cultivation. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 70(12), 7295-7302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection and quantification of Wallemia sebi in aerosols by real-time PCR, conventional PCR, and cultivation
2004 (English)In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 70, no 12, p. 7295-7302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wallemia sebi is a deuteromycete fungus commonly found in agricultural environments in many parts of the world and is suspected to be a causative agent of farmer's lung disease. The fungus grows slowly on commonly used culture media and is often obscured by the fast-growing fungi. Thus, its occurrence in different environments has often been underestimated. In this study, we developed two sets of PCR primers specific to W. sebi that can be applied in either conventional PCR or real-time PCR for rapid detection and quantification of the fungus in environmental samples. Both PCR systems proved to be highly specific and sensitive for W. sebi detection even in a high background of other fungal DNAs. These methods were employed to investigate the presence of W. sebi in the aerosols of a farm. The results revealed a high concentration of W. sebi spores, 10(7) m(-3) by real-time PCR and 10(6) m(-3) by cultivation, which indicates the prevalence of W. sebi in farms handling hay and grain and in cow barns. The methods developed in this study could serve as rapid, specific, and sensitive means of detecting W. sebi in aerosol and surface samples and could thus facilitate investigations of its distribution, ecology, clinical diagnosis, and exposure risk assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Microbiology, 2004
Keywords
Agriculture, Air Microbiology, Ascomycota/classification/genetics/growth & development/*isolation & purification, Colony Count; Microbial, Culture Media, DNA Primers, Molecular Sequence Data, Polymerase Chain Reaction/*methods, Sensitivity and Specificity, Sequence Analysis; DNA, Species Specificity, Spores; Fungal/isolation & purification, Time Factors
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-16826 (URN)10.1128/AEM.70.12.7295-7302.2004 (DOI)000225719300044 ()15574929 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-10444226582 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-10-12 Created: 2007-10-12 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Zeng, Q.-Y., Rasmuson-Lestander, Å. & Wang, X.-R. (2004). Extensive set of mitochondrial LSU rDNA-based oligonucleotide probes for the detection of common airborne fungi.. FEMS Microbiology Letters, 237(1), 79-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extensive set of mitochondrial LSU rDNA-based oligonucleotide probes for the detection of common airborne fungi.
2004 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, ISSN 0378-1097, E-ISSN 1574-6968, Vol. 237, no 1, p. 79-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fungi exist in every indoor and outdoor environment. Many fungi are toxigenic or pathogens that may cause various public health concerns. Rapid and accurate detection and identification of fungi require specific markers. In this study, partial mitochondrial large subunit rDNA was amplified and sequenced from 32 fungal strains representing 31 species from 14 genera. Based on the sequence variation pattern, 26 oligonucleotide probes were designed for their discrimination. The specificity of the probes was evaluated through homology search against GenBank database and hybridization examination on 38 fungal strains. The 26 probes were verified as highly specific to 20 fungal species. A two-step detection procedure through PCR followed by probe hybridization gave ten-fold increase in detection sensitivity than single-step PCR assay and would be a practical approach for environmental sample screening. The probes developed in this study can be applied in clinical diagnosis and environmental monitoring of fungal agents.

Keywords
Air Microbiology, Base Sequence, Conserved Sequence, DNA; Fungal/analysis/chemistry, DNA; Mitochondrial/*genetics, DNA; Ribosomal/*analysis, Fungi/*genetics/*isolation & purification, Genes; rRNA, Molecular Sequence Data, Nucleic Acid Hybridization, Oligonucleotide Probes, Polymerase Chain Reaction, RNA/genetics, Sensitivity and Specificity, Sequence Alignment, Sequence Analysis; DNA
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-17912 (URN)10.1111/j.1574-6968.2004.tb09681.x (DOI)15268941 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-3242757529 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-11-23 Created: 2007-11-23 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Ryder, E., Blows, F., Ashburner, M., Bautista-Llacer, R., Coulson, D., Drummond, J., . . . Russell, S. (2004). The DrosDel collection: a set of P-element insertions for generating custom chromosomal aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster.. Genetics, 167(2), 797-813
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The DrosDel collection: a set of P-element insertions for generating custom chromosomal aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster.
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2004 (English)In: Genetics, ISSN 0016-6731, Vol. 167, no 2, p. 797-813Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We describe a collection of P-element insertions that have considerable utility for generating custom chromosomal aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster. We have mobilized a pair of engineered P elements, p[RS3] and p[RS5], to collect 3243 lines unambiguously mapped to the Drosophila genome sequence. The collection contains, on average, an element every 35 kb. We demonstrate the utility of the collection for generating custom chromosomal deletions that have their end points mapped, with base-pair resolution, to the genome sequence. The collection was generated in an isogenic strain, thus affording a uniform background for screens where sensitivity to genetic background is high. The entire collection, along with a computational and genetic toolbox for designing and generating custom deletions, is publicly available. Using the collection it is theoretically possible to generate >12,000 deletions between 1 bp and 1 Mb in size by simple eye color selection. In addition, a further 37,000 deletions, selectable by molecular screening, may be generated. We are now using the collection to generate a second-generation deficiency kit that is precisely mapped to the genome sequence.

Keywords
Animals, Chromosome Aberrations, DNA Transposable Elements/*genetics, Drosophila melanogaster/*genetics, Genetic Techniques, Mutagenesis; Insertional/methods
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-16827 (URN)15238529 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-2942743598 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-10-12 Created: 2007-10-12 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
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