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Karlsson Wirebring, Linnea
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Karlsson Wirebring, L., Wiklund-Hörnqvist, C., Stillesjö, S., Granberg, C., Lithner, J., Andersson, M., . . . Jonsson, B. (2022). An fMRI intervention study of creative mathematical reasoning: behavioral and brain effects across different levels of cognitive ability. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 29, Article ID 100193.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An fMRI intervention study of creative mathematical reasoning: behavioral and brain effects across different levels of cognitive ability
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2022 (English)In: Trends in Neuroscience and Education, ISSN 2452-0837, E-ISSN 2211-9493, Vol. 29, article id 100193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Many learning methods of mathematical reasoning encourage imitative procedures (algorithmic reasoning, AR) instead of more constructive reasoning processes (creative mathematical reasoning, CMR). Recent research suggest that learning with CMR compared to AR leads to better performance and differential brain activity during a subsequent test. Here, we considered the role of individual differences in cognitive ability in relation to effects of CMR.

Methods: We employed a within-subject intervention (N=72, MAge=18.0) followed by a brain-imaging session (fMRI) one week later. A battery of cognitive tests preceded the intervention. Participants were divided into three cognitive ability groups based on their cognitive score (low, intermediate and high).

Results: On mathematical tasks previously practiced with CMR compared to AR we observed better performance, and higher brain activity in key regions for mathematical cognition such as left angular gyrus and left inferior/middle frontal gyrus. The CMR-effects did not interact with cognitive ability, albeit the effects on performance were driven by the intermediate and high cognitive ability groups.

Conclusions: Encouraging pupils to engage in constructive processes when learning mathematical reasoning confers lasting learning effects on brain activation, independent of cognitive ability. However, the lack of a CMR-effect on performance for the low cognitive ability group suggest future studies should focus on individualized learning interventions, allowing more opportunities for effortful struggle with CMR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Angular gyrus, fMRI, Individual differences, Intervention, Mathematical reasoning, Problem solving
National Category
Neurosciences Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200872 (URN)10.1016/j.tine.2022.100193 (DOI)000891628800003 ()2-s2.0-85140885425 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-2099
Available from: 2022-11-09 Created: 2022-11-09 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, B., Mossegård, J., Lithner, J. & Karlsson Wirebring, L. (2022). Creative Mathematical Reasoning: Does Need for Cognition Matter?. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, Article ID 797807.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creative Mathematical Reasoning: Does Need for Cognition Matter?
2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 797807Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A large portion of mathematics education centers heavily around imitative reasoning and rote learning, raising concerns about students’ lack of deeper and conceptual understanding of mathematics. To address these concerns, there has been a growing focus on students learning and teachers teaching methods that aim to enhance conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills. One suggestion is allowing students to construct their own solution methods using creative mathematical reasoning (CMR), a method that in previous studies has been contrasted against algorithmic reasoning (AR) with positive effects on test tasks. Although previous studies have evaluated the effects of CMR, they have ignored if and to what extent intrinsic cognitive motivation play a role. This study investigated the effects of intrinsic cognitive motivation to engage in cognitive strenuous mathematical tasks, operationalized through Need for Cognition (NFC), and working memory capacity (WMC). Two independent groups, consisting of upper secondary students (N = 137, mean age 17.13, SD = 0.62, 63 boys and 74 girls), practiced non-routine mathematical problem solving with CMR and AR tasks and were tested 1 week later. An initial t-test confirmed that the CMR group outperformed the AR group. Structural equation modeling revealed that NFC was a significant predictor of math performance for the CMR group but not for the AR group. The results also showed that WMC was a strong predictor of math performance independent of group. These results are discussed in terms of allowing for time and opportunities for struggle with constructing own solution methods using CMR, thereby enhancing students conceptual understanding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
algorithmic reasoning, creative mathematical reasoning, mathematical struggle, Need for Cognition (NFC), working memory capacity
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-192077 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2021.797807 (DOI)000756963400001 ()2-s2.0-85123190532 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-02 Created: 2022-02-02 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Stillesjö, S., Karlsson Wirebring, L., Andersson, M., Granberg, C., Lithner, J., Jonsson, B., . . . Wiklund-Hörnqvist, C. (2021). Active math and grammar learning engages overlapping brain networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 118(46), Article ID e2106520118.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Active math and grammar learning engages overlapping brain networks
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2021 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 118, no 46, article id e2106520118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We here demonstrate common neurocognitive long-term memory effects of active learning that generalize over course subjects (mathematics and vocabulary) by the use of fMRI. One week after active learning, relative to more passive learning, performance and fronto-parietal brain activity was significantly higher during retesting, possibly related to the formation and reactivation of semantic representations. These observations indicate that active learning conditions stimulate common processes that become part of the representations and can be reactivated during retrieval to support performance. Our findings are of broad interest and educational significance related to the emerging consensus of active learning as critical in promoting good long-term retention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Academy of Sciences, 2021
Keywords
Multidisciplinary
National Category
Psychology Neurosciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Psychology; biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189659 (URN)10.1073/pnas.2106520118 (DOI)000722462500012 ()2-s2.0-85119248707 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, V.R., grant no. 721-2014-2099
Available from: 2021-11-22 Created: 2021-11-22 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Ilgunas, A., Lövgren, A., Fjellman-Wiklund, A., Häggman-Henrikson, B., Karlsson Wirebring, L., Lobbezoo, F., . . . Durham, J. (2021). Conceptualizing the clinical decision-making process in managing temporomandibular disorders: a qualitative study. European Journal of Oral Sciences, 129(5), Article ID e12811.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptualizing the clinical decision-making process in managing temporomandibular disorders: a qualitative study
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2021 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 129, no 5, article id e12811Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Management of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) appears to be more challenging than for other dental conditions. This study aimed to explore the decision-making process in TMD management, and thereby to conceptualize the decision-making process in dentistry. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted during 2018 and 2019 with a purposive sample of 22 general dental practitioners from the Public Dental Healthcare Services and private practices in the Region of Västerbotten, Northern Sweden. The interviews were analysed using the Grounded Theory approach of Charmaz. Data analysis resulted in the core category 'Combining own competence and others' expectations in the desire to do the right thing'. The dentists showed interest in and a desire to apply professional knowledge, but also reflected on challenges and complexity in the decision-making process forTMD. The challenges were primarily related to organisational factors and lack of self-confidence. This identifies a need for re-organisation of daily clinical management in dentistry, and a need for more postgraduate training to improve self-confidence. The complexity of the decision-making process for TMD makes the study findings applicable in other dental situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
decision-making, dental health services, evidence-based dentistry, qualitative research, temporomandibular joint disorders
National Category
Dentistry Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Odontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-184795 (URN)10.1111/eos.12811 (DOI)000662824700001 ()34145628 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85107969782 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ujl
Available from: 2021-06-18 Created: 2021-06-18 Last updated: 2023-12-14Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Eriksson, J., Stillesjö, S., Juslin, P., Nyberg, L. & Karlsson Wirebring, L. (2020). Neurocognitive processes underlying heuristic and normative probability judgments. Cognition, 196, 1-7, Article ID 104153.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurocognitive processes underlying heuristic and normative probability judgments
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2020 (English)In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 196, p. 1-7, article id 104153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Judging two events in combination (A&B) as more probable than one of the events (A) is known as a conjunction fallacy. According to dual-process explanations of human judgment and decision making, the fallacy is due to the application of a heuristic, associative cognitive process. Avoiding the fallacy has been suggested to require the recruitment of a separate process that can apply normative rules. We investigated these assumptions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during conjunction tasks. Judgments, whether correct or not, engaged a network of brain regions identical to that engaged during similarity judgments. Avoidance of the conjunction fallacy additionally, and uniquely, involved a fronto-parietal network previously linked to supervisory, analytic control processes. The results lend credibility to the idea that incorrect probability judgments are the result of a representativeness heuristic that requires additional neurocognitive resources to avoid.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER, 2020
Keywords
Decision making, Dual-system, Dual-process, fMRI, Representativeness
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169341 (URN)10.1016/j.cognition.2019.104153 (DOI)000518704700021 ()31838247 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076262700 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ujl
Available from: 2020-04-15 Created: 2020-04-15 Last updated: 2023-12-14Bibliographically approved
Stillesjö, S., Nyberg, L. & Karlsson Wirebring, L. (2019). Building Memory Representations for Exemplar-Based Judgment: A Role for Ventral Precuneus. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 13, Article ID 228.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building Memory Representations for Exemplar-Based Judgment: A Role for Ventral Precuneus
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 13, article id 228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The brain networks underlying human multiple-cue judgment, the judgment of a continuous criterion based on multiple cues, have been examined in a few recent studies, and the ventral precuneus has been found to be a key region. Specifically, activation differences in ventral precuneus (as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI) has been linked to an exemplar-based judgment process, where judgments are based on memory for previous similar cases. Ventral precuneus is implicated in various episodic memory processes, notably such that increased activity during learning in this region as well as in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and the medial temporal lobes (MTL) have been linked to retrieval success. The present study used fMRI during a multiple-cue judgment task to gain novel neurocognitive evidence informative for the link between learning-related activity changes in ventral precuneus and exemplar-based judgment. Participants (N = 27) spontaneously learned to make judgments during fMRI, in a multiple-cue judgment task specifically designed to induce exemplar-based processing. Contrasting brain activity during late learning to early learning revealed higher activity in ventral precuneus, the bilateral MTL, and the vmPFC. Activity in the ventral precuneus and the vmPFC was found to parametrically increase between each judgment event, and activity levels in the ventral precuneus predicted performance after learning. These results are interpreted such that the ventral precuneus supports the aspects of exemplar-based processes that are related to episodic memory, tentatively by building, storing, and being implicated in retrieving memory representations for judgment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
multiple-cue judgment, exemplar-based model, cognitive modeling, fMRI, judgment and decision making, precuneus
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159176 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2019.00228 (DOI)000475956500001 ()31379536 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069499904 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ujl
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Karlsson Wirebring, L., Stillesjö, S., Eriksson, J., Juslin, P. & Nyberg, L. (2018). A Similarity-Based Process for Human Judgment in the Parietal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 481.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Similarity-Based Process for Human Judgment in the Parietal Cortex
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One important distinction in psychology is between inferences based on associative memory and inferences based on analysis and rules. Much previous empirical work conceive of associative and analytical processes as two exclusive ways of addressing a judgment task, where only one process is selected and engaged at a time, in an either-or fashion. However, related work indicate that the processes are better understood as being in interplay and simultaneously engaged. Based on computational modeling and brain imaging of spontaneously adopted judgment strategies together with analyses of brain activity elicited in tasks where participants were explicitly instructed to perform similarity-based associative judgments or rule-based judgments (n = 74), we identified brain regions related to the two types of processes. We observed considerable overlap in activity patterns. The precuneus was activated for both types of judgments, and its activity predicted how well a similarity-based model fit the judgments. Activity in the superior frontal gyrus predicted the fit of a rule-based judgment model. The results suggest the precuneus as a key node for similarity-based judgments, engaged both when overt responses are guided by similarity-based and rule-based processes. These results are interpreted such that similarity-based processes are engaged in parallel to rule-based-processes, a finding with direct implications for cognitive theories of judgment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
judgment and decision-making, fMRI, exemplar model, multiple-cue judgment, cognitive model
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154869 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2018.00481 (DOI)000453235900001 ()2-s2.0-85058995922 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ujl
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Lövgren, A., Karlsson Wirebring, L., Häggman-Henrikson, B. & Wänman, A. (2018). Decision-making in dentistry related to temporomandibular disorders: a 5-yr follow-up study. European Journal of Oral Sciences, 126(6), 493-499
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision-making in dentistry related to temporomandibular disorders: a 5-yr follow-up study
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 126, no 6, p. 493-499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are common, but many patients with such disorders go undetected and under-treated. Our aim was to evaluate the outcome of using a screening tool (5 yr after it was first implemented), on the clinical decision-making for patients with TMDs. Adults who attended for a dental check-up at the Public Dental Health Services in Västerbotten, Sweden, answered three screening questions (3Q/TMD) on frequent jaw pain, pain on jaw function, and catching/locking of the jaw. The dental records of a random sample of 200 individuals with at least one positive response to 3Q/TMD (3Q screen-positive patients) and 200 individuals with all negative responses (3Q screen-negative patients) were reviewed for TMD-related treatment decisions. A clinical decision related to TMD was absent in 45.5% of 3Q screen-positive patients. Treatment of TMDs was associated with a positive response to the screening question on jaw pain (OR = 6.7, 95% CI: 3.2-14.0) and was more frequent among 3Q screen-positive patients (24%) than among 3Q screen-negative patients (2%; OR = 15.5, 95% CI: 5.5-43.9), just as a female examiner was associated with more frequent treatment of TMDs (OR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2-8.4). The results indicate under-treatment of TMD within general dental practice and that male clinicians are less likely to initiate TMD treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
clinical decision-making, facial pain, prospective study, temporomandibular joint disorders, therapy
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152625 (URN)10.1111/eos.12572 (DOI)000449881600007 ()30298596 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054595325 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ujl
Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2023-12-14Bibliographically approved
van den Broek, G., Takashima, A., Wiklund-Hörnqvist, C., Karlsson Wirebring, L., Segers, E., Verhoeven, L. & Nyberg, L. (2016). Neurocognitive mechanisms of the "testing effect": a review. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 5(2), 52-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurocognitive mechanisms of the "testing effect": a review
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2016 (English)In: Trends in Neuroscience and Education, ISSN 2452-0837, E-ISSN 2211-9493, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 52-66Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Memory retrieval is an active process that can alter the content and accessibility of stored memories. Of potential relevance for educational practice are findings that memory retrieval fosters better retention than mere studying. This so-called testing effect has been demonstrated for different materials and populations, but there is limited consensus on the neurocognitive mechanisms involved. In this review, we relate cognitive accounts of the testing effect to findings from recent brain-imaging studies to identify neurocognitive factors that could explain the testing effect. Results indicate that testing facilitates later performance through several processes, including effects on semantic memory representations, the selective strengthening of relevant associations and inhibition of irrelevant associations, as well as potentiation of subsequent learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Testing effect, Retrieval, Test-potentiated learning, fMRI, Semantic elaboration, Search set restriction
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122415 (URN)10.1016/j.tine.2016.05.001 (DOI)000392619800002 ()2-s2.0-84974783084 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-17 Created: 2016-06-17 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Karlsson Wirebring, L., Lithner, J., Jonsson, B., Liljekvist, Y., Norqvist, M. & Nyberg, L. (2015). Learning mathematics without a suggested solution method: durable effects on performance and brain activity. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 4(1-2), 6-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning mathematics without a suggested solution method: durable effects on performance and brain activity
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2015 (English)In: Trends in Neuroscience and Education, ISSN 2211-9493, Vol. 4, no 1-2, p. 6-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A dominant mathematics teaching method is to present a solution method and let pupils repeatedly practice it. An alternative method is to let pupils create a solution method themselves. The current study compared these two approaches in terms of lasting effects on performance and brain activity. Seventythree participants practiced mathematics according to one of the two approaches. One week later, participants underwent fMRI while being tested on the practice tasks. Participants who had created the solution method themselves performed better at the test questions. In both conditions, participants engaged a fronto-parietal network more when solving test questions compared to a baseline task. Importantly, participants who had created the solution method themselves showed relatively lower brain activity in angular gyrus, possibly reflecting reduced demands on verbal memory. These results indicate that there might be advantages to creating the solution method oneself, and thus have implications for the design of teaching methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Mathematics, Learning, fMRI, Parietal cortex, Angular gyrus, Education
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109088 (URN)10.1016/j.tine.2015.03.002 (DOI)000363545300002 ()2-s2.0-84929957661 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-17 Created: 2015-09-17 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
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