Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Hansson, Patrik
Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Colombo, S., Hansson, P. & Nyström, M. (2023). Mining players' experience in computer games: immersion affects flow but not presence. Computers in Human Behavior Reports, 12, Article ID 100334.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mining players' experience in computer games: immersion affects flow but not presence
2023 (English)In: Computers in Human Behavior Reports, ISSN 2451-9588, Vol. 12, article id 100334Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate whether different levels of immersion while playing a computer game affect the participant's experiences of flow and presence. Understanding how different levels of immersion influence the experiences of flow and presence can shed light on the intricate interplay between these constructs and provide valuable insights into the factors that contribute to engaging and immersive gameplay. The independent variable, immersion, was manipulated in three conditions (high, moderate, and low) in a between-subject design within the video game Minecraft. Participants were asked to complete 15 minutes of gameplay and then fill out the questionnaires concerning flow and presence. The experiment was conducted remotely on a video-sharing platform. Bayesian analysis revealed an effect of immersion level on flow, while no evidence of an effect was found for the experience of presence. This study provides evidence in favor of a relation between flow and immersion while supporting a presumed double dissociation of immersion from presence. Future research using a Bayesian approach is encouraged to build further knowledge on this research topic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Computer games, Minecraft, Immersion, Flow, Presence, Human-computer interaction, Player experience
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214792 (URN)10.1016/j.chbr.2023.100334 (DOI)2-s2.0-85172998051 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-29 Created: 2023-09-29 Last updated: 2023-10-18Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Eriksson Dahl, K., Lindmark, D., Hansson, P., Vega-Mendoza, M. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2022). Relationships between Dota 2 expertise and decision-making ability. PLOS ONE, 17(3), Article ID e0264350.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships between Dota 2 expertise and decision-making ability
Show others...
2022 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 3, article id e0264350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Esports is an often time-consuming activity that has become increasingly popular with billions of players all over the world. The objective of this study was to investigate if there is a relationship between skill level in the strategy video game Dota 2, a game that places many demands on decision making to be successful, and decision making under ambiguity and experience as measured by performance in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), a task known to have ecological validity. Two indicators of players' performance in Dota 2, namely matchmaking rating (MMR) and Medal, were used as predictors of performance in the IGT in path models. Results showed that Medal was a significant predictor of performance in IGT, while MMR score was borderline significant. The cognitive reflection task, included in the models as an indicator of the ability to engage in conscious, analytical, rational, and logical thinking, was a significant predictor of performance in IGT, and was significantly and positively related to MMR. The findings from this study give insight into the cognitive demands related to performance in Dota 2. Although results suggest that strategy video gaming may be a factor that contributes to increased decision making abilities, a reversed relationship is also possible, whereby individuals who are better at decision making are also more likely to become successful in Dota-2. More studies, preferably longitudinal, are needed to replicate the findings of this study and to establish the directionality between factors. Copyright: © 2022 Sörman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2022
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193109 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0264350 (DOI)000849744700017 ()35231043 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85125583697 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Available from: 2022-03-15 Created: 2022-03-15 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Stenling, A., Sundström, A., Rönnlund, M., Vega-Mendoza, M., Hansson, P. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2021). Occupational cognitive complexity and episodic memory in old age. Intelligence, 89, Article ID 101598.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational cognitive complexity and episodic memory in old age
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Intelligence, ISSN 0160-2896, E-ISSN 1873-7935, Vol. 89, article id 101598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate occupational cognitive complexity of main lifetime occupation in relation to level and 15-year change in episodic memory recall in a sample of older adults (≥ 65 years, n = 780). We used latent growth curve modelling with occupational cognitive complexity (O*NET indicators) as independent variable. Subgroup analyses in a sample of middle-aged (mean: 49.9 years) men (n = 260) were additionally performed to investigate if a general cognitive ability (g) factor at age 18 was predictive of future occupational cognitive complexity and cognitive performance in midlife. For the older sample, a higher level of occupational cognitive complexity was related to a higher level of episodic recall (β = 0.15, p < .001), but the association with rate of change (β = 0.03, p = .64) was not statistically significant. In the middle-aged sample, g at age 18 was both directly (β = 0.19, p = .01) and indirectly (via years of education after age 18, ab = 0.19) predictive of midlife levels of occupational cognitive complexity. Cognitive ability at age 18 was also a direct predictor of midlife episodic recall (β = 0.60, p ≤ 0.001). Critically, entry of the early adult g factor attenuated the association between occupational complexity and cognitive level (from β = 0.21, p = .01 to β = 0.12, p = .14). Overall, our results support a pattern of preserved differentiation from early to late adulthood for individuals with different histories of occupational complexity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Cognitive reserve, Episodic memory, Intelligence, Occupational cognitive complexity, Preserved differentiation
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189589 (URN)10.1016/j.intell.2021.101598 (DOI)000720544800001 ()2-s2.0-85118684966 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205Swedish Research Council, K2010-61X-21446-01, 2017-00273, 2007–2653Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013–2056
Available from: 2021-11-16 Created: 2021-11-16 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
Stenling, A., Eriksson Sörman, D., Lindwall, M., Hansson, P., Körning-Ljungberg, J. & Machado, L. (2021). Physical activity and cognitive function: between-person and within-person associations and moderators. Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, 28(3), 392-417
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity and cognitive function: between-person and within-person associations and moderators
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, ISSN 1382-5585, E-ISSN 1744-4128, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 392-417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the present study, we decomposed between- and within-person effects and examined moderators of the longitudinal physical activity-cognition association. Participants (N = 1722) were drawn from the Betula study and we included four waves of data across 15 years. Bayesian multilevel modeling showed that self-reported physical activity did not predict changes in cognitive function. Physical activity positively predicted cognitive performance at baseline, and the relations were stronger for more active (compared to less active) older adults. Physical activity had a positive within-person effect on cognitive function. The within-person effect of physical activity on episodic memory recall was stronger for participants who on average engaged in less physical activity. The within-person effect on verbal fluency was stronger for participants with more education. Our results suggest that preserving cognitive functioning in old age might be more a matter of what you do in old age than reflecting what you did earlier in life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021
Keywords
Betula study, cognitive functioning, aging, physical activity, within-person effects
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173695 (URN)10.1080/13825585.2020.1779646 (DOI)000546793700001 ()32564660 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087167452 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00273Swedish Research Council, K2010-61X-21446-01Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 1988-1990: 88-0082Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 311/1991-2000
Available from: 2020-07-24 Created: 2020-07-24 Last updated: 2024-05-03Bibliographically approved
Vega-Mendoza, M., Hansson, P., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2021). Testing the foreign language effect on cognitive reflection in older adults. Brain Sciences, 11(11), Article ID 1527.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing the foreign language effect on cognitive reflection in older adults
2021 (English)In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 1527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing number of people around the world communicate in more than one language, resulting in them having to make decisions in a foreign language on a daily basis. Interestingly, a burgeoning body of literature suggests that people’s decision-making is affected by whether they are reasoning in their native language (NL) or their foreign language (FL). According to the foreign language effect (FLe), people are less susceptible to bias in many decision-making tasks and more likely to display utilitarian cost-benefit analysis in moral decision-making when reasoning in a FL. While these differences have often been attributed to a reduced emotionality in the FL, an emerging body of literature has started to test the extent to which these could be attributable to increased deliberation in the FL. The present study tests whether increased deliberation leads to a FLe on cognitive reflection in a population of older adults (Mage = 65.1), from the successful aging project in Umeå, Sweden. We explored whether performance on a 6-item version of the cognitive reflection test (CRT) adapted to Swedish would differ between participants for whom Swedish was their NL and those for whom Swedish was their FL. The CRT is a task designed to elicit an incorrect, intuitive answer. In order to override the intuitive answer, one requires engaging in deliberative, analytical thinking to determine the correct answer. Therefore, we hypothesized that if thinking in a FL increases deliberation, then those performing the task in their FL would exhibit higher accuracy rates than those performing in their NL. Our results showed that age and level of education predicted performance on the task but performance on the CRT did not differ between the NL and the FL groups. In addition, in the FL group, proficiency in the FL was not related to performance in the CRT. Our results, therefore, do not provide evidence that thinking in a FL increases deliberation in a group of older adults performing a logical reasoning task that is not typically associated with an emotional connotation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
foreign language effect, bilingualism, multilingualism, aging, older adulthood, decisionmaking, reasoning
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190032 (URN)10.3390/brainsci11111527 (DOI)000725335200001 ()2-s2.0-85119921067 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205
Available from: 2021-12-01 Created: 2021-12-01 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, L., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P., Herlitz, A., Kauppi, K., . . . Adolfsson, R. (2020). Biological and environmental predictors of heterogeneity in neurocognitive ageing: Evidence from Betula and other longitudinal studies. Ageing Research Reviews, 64, Article ID 101184.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biological and environmental predictors of heterogeneity in neurocognitive ageing: Evidence from Betula and other longitudinal studies
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Ageing Research Reviews, ISSN 1568-1637, E-ISSN 1872-9649, Vol. 64, article id 101184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individual differences in cognitive performance increase with advancing age, reflecting marked cognitive changes in some individuals along with little or no change in others. Genetic and lifestyle factors are assumed to influence cognitive performance in ageing by affecting the magnitude and extent of age-related brain changes (i.e., brain maintenance or atrophy), as well as the ability to recruit compensatory processes. The purpose of this review is to present findings from the Betula study and other longitudinal studies, with a focus on clarifying the role of key biological and environmental factors assumed to underlie individual differences in brain and cognitive ageing. We discuss the vital importance of sampling, analytic methods, consideration of non-ignorable dropout, and related issues for valid conclusions on factors that influence healthy neurocognitive ageing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
ageing, memory, longitudinal, brain, genetics, lifestyle, brain maintenance, cognitive reserve
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-176224 (URN)10.1016/j.arr.2020.101184 (DOI)000595935300003 ()32992046 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85092710312 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW-scholarEU, Horizon 2020, 732592EU, Horizon 2020, H2020-SC1-2016-2017EU, Horizon 2020, H2020-SC1-2016-RTDSwedish Research Council, 2017- 00639Region VästerbottenThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Swedish Research Council, 2015–02199Swedish Research Council, 2017- 03011Swedish Research Council, (2018-01729Swedish Research Council Formas, 942–2015-1099
Available from: 2020-10-22 Created: 2020-10-22 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
Del Missier, F., Hansson, P., Parker, A. M., de Bruin, W. B. & Mäntylä, T. (2020). Decision-Making Competence in Older Adults: A Rosy View From a Longitudinal Investigation. Psychology and Aging, 35(4), 553-564
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision-Making Competence in Older Adults: A Rosy View From a Longitudinal Investigation
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Psychology and Aging, ISSN 0882-7974, E-ISSN 1939-1498, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 553-564Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cross-sectional studies have suggested age-related differences in decision-making competence, but these differences may also reflect cohort-related effects. We present a longitudinal study of age-related changes over 5 years in older adults (aged 60-85) for 3 important aspects of decision-making competence: resistance to framing, applying decision rules, and resistance to sunk costs. The findings show small age-related longitudinal declines in resistance to framing but no decline in applying decision rules or resistance to sunk costs. The results also indicate that individuals' decision-making competence after 5 years is significantly related to their initial decision-making competence assessment and that the contribution of crystallized abilities to decision making in older adults is greater than previously thought.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2020
Keywords
decision-making competence, decision making, cognitive aging, individual differences, cognitive reserve
National Category
Geriatrics Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-172847 (URN)10.1037/pag0000443 (DOI)000538465600009 ()31971414 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078829008 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-06-26 Created: 2020-06-26 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Sundström, A., Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P., Körning-Ljungberg, J. & Adolfsson, R. (2020). Mental demands at work and risk of dementia. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 74(3), 735-740
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental demands at work and risk of dementia
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 735-740Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High mental demands at work was examined as a possible protective factor to reduce the risk of dementia in 1,277 initially dementia-free participants, aged 60 years and older. The cohort was followed for a mean of 13.6 years. During follow-up, 376 participants developed all-cause dementia (Alzheimer’s disease = 199; vascular dementia = 145). The association between mental demands at work and dementia was analyzed with Cox hazard models, adjusted for a range of covariates. The results revealed no significant association between mental demands at work and incidence of dementia. Based on the measures used in this study, it was concluded that high mental demands at work may not reduce the risk of dementia later on in life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2020
Keywords
aging, Alzheimer’s disease, cognitive occupation complexity, cognitive reserve, dementia, mental demands at work, vascular dementia
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169514 (URN)10.3233/JAD-190920 (DOI)000526816100002 ()32083580 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85083293840 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-04-02 Created: 2020-04-02 Last updated: 2024-05-03Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Nääs, S., Berginström, N., Nordström, P., Hansson, P. & Nordström, A. (2020). Sedentary behavior as a potential risk factor for depression among 70-year-olds. Journal of Affective Disorders, 263, 605-608
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sedentary behavior as a potential risk factor for depression among 70-year-olds
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 263, p. 605-608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sedentary behavior has previously been associated with the risk of depression. In addition, older adults have been proven to be more sedentary and more depressed than other age groups. However, studies using objective measures of sedentary behavior and taking physical activity into account are lacking. Thus, the purpose of this population-based study was to examine how total sedentary time and length of sedentary bouts were associated with the risk of depression among 70-year-olds.

Methods: The present study used data from the Healthy Ageing Initiative (n = 3,633), an ongoing cross-sectional research project in Umeå, Sweden. Sedentary behavior was measured objectively with the ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer, and depression was measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale. Several covariates, including physical activity, were included in logistic regression analyses.

Results: Results from two hierarchical logistic regression models showed that a greater percentage of the day spent sedentary [odds ratio (OR) = 1.031, p = 0.010] and longer average length of sedentary bouts (OR = 1.116, p = 0.045) increased the risk of depression.

Limitations: Limitations include of possible underrepresentation of severely depressed participants, and possible observer effects.

Conclusions: The present study verified the relationship between sedentary behavior and depression and provides new information about the risks associated with increased length of sedentary bouts.  These findings may be important to consider in the development of future recommendations for the prevention of depression among older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Depression, Older/elderly adult, Sedentary lifestyle
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165729 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2019.11.035 (DOI)000508874400080 ()31759668 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075892639 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P., Pritschke, I. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2019). Complexity of Primary Lifetime Occupation and Cognitive Processing. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 1861.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complexity of Primary Lifetime Occupation and Cognitive Processing
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1861Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today, there are a lack of studies focusing on the relationship between occupational complexity and executive functioning. This is noteworthy since executive functions are core aspects of cognitive processing. The present study was aimed to investigate if three occupational complexity factors (with data, people, and things) of main lifetime occupation were related to performance in executive tasks (inhibition, switching, updating). We analyzed cross-sectional data that were available for 225 participants aged 50–75 years. Results from structural equation models showed that higher complexity levels of working with data were related to lower error rates in the updating component of cognitive control. In addition, higher rates of complexity working with people was associated with lower error rates in task-switching, which also persisted after adjustment of fluid intelligence. Complexity with things, however, was not related to performance in the executive tasks. Future studies would benefit from a longitudinal design to investigate if the results from this study also hold in the long term and to further investigate the directionality between factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162532 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01861 (DOI)000482078700001 ()2-s2.0-85071953724 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2024-05-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications