Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
McGrath, Aleksandra M
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Mendiratta, D., Liggio, D. F., Levidy, M. F., Mahajan, J., Chu, A. & McGrath, A. (2024). Educational quality of YouTube content on brachial plexus injury and treatment. Microsurgery (1), Article ID e31099.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Educational quality of YouTube content on brachial plexus injury and treatment
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Microsurgery, ISSN 0738-1085, E-ISSN 1098-2752, no 1, article id e31099Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: While surgical literature exists on birth-related brachial plexus injury (BPI), there are not validated sources of information on BPI for patients, which can impact patient autonomy and decision-making. With YouTube as a popular source for patients to research diagnoses, this study aims to evaluate the quality of information regarding BPI and its treatment available on the platform.

Materials and Methods: BPI YouTube videos were screened independently by two reviewers. Videos were categorized by source: (1) academic, government, and non-profit organizations; (2) private practices, companies, and for-profit organizations; (3) independent users. Each video was evaluated for reliability, credibility, and quality using the modified DISCERN criteria (scale, 0–5), Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) criteria (scale, 0–4), and Global Quality Scale (GQS; scale, 1–5). Surgical treatment videos were analyzed by the senior author using a modified “treatment” DISCERN criteria (scale, 8–40). Non-English videos were excluded from this study. Analysis of variance tests were used to compare means.

Results: One hundred and fifteen videos were selected for final analysis. The mean modified DISCERN score was 3.26; JAMA was 2.31; GQS was 3.48. Videos were subdivided according to source. Group 1, 2, and 3 had 45, 24, and 46 videos, respectively. Modified DISCERN score was greater for Group 1 than Group 2 (3.58 vs. 3.04, p <.001) and Group 3 (3.58 vs. 3.07, p <.001). JAMA score was greater for Group 1 than Group 2 (2.63 vs 2.15, p =.041) and Group 3 (2.63 vs. 2.08, p =.002). GQS score was greater for Group 1 than Group 2 (3.93 vs. 3.31, p =.031) and Group 3 (3.93 vs. 3.13, p <.001). Of the 34 videos (44.7%) that mentioned treatment, the DISCERN score was 14.32.

Conclusion: The videos analyzed were found to have moderate reliability, credibility, and quality. The reliability of information regarding treatments for BPI was poor. Healthcare providers should supply additional information on treatment of BPI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-213736 (URN)10.1002/micr.31099 (DOI)001048522900001 ()37578115 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85168096753 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-13 Created: 2023-09-13 Last updated: 2024-04-29Bibliographically approved
Azer, A., Hanna, A., Shihora, D., Saad, A., Duan, Y., McGrath, A. M. & Chu, A. (2024). Forearm and elbow secondary surgical procedures in neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a systematic scoping review. JSES Reviews, Reports, and Techniques, 4(1), 61-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forearm and elbow secondary surgical procedures in neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a systematic scoping review
Show others...
2024 (English)In: JSES Reviews, Reports, and Techniques, E-ISSN 2666-6391, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 61-69Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Neonatal Brachial plexus palsy is an injury during delivery that can lead to loss of motor function and limited range of motion in patients due to damage of nerves in the brachial plexus. This scoping review aims to explore types of procedures performed and assess outcomes of forearm and elbow secondary surgery in pediatric patients.

Methods: Searches of PubMed, Cochrane, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Sciences, and Scopus were completed to obtain studies describing surgical treatment of elbow and forearm in pediatric patients with neonatal Brachial plexus palsy. 865 abstracts and titles were screened by two independent reviewers resulting in 295 full text papers; after applying of inclusion and exclusion criteria 18 articles were included. The level of evidence of this study is level IV.

Results: Ten main procedures were performed to regain function of the forearm and elbow in neonatal brachial plexus birth palsy patients. Procedures had different aims, with supination contracture (6) and elbow flexion restoration (5) being the most prevalent. The variance between preoperative and postoperative soft tissue and bony procedures outcomes decreased and showed improvement with respect to the aim of each procedure category. For soft tissue procedures, a statistically significant increase was found between preoperative and postoperative values for active elbow flexion, passive supination, and active supination. For bony procedures, there was a statistically significant decrease between preoperative and postoperative values of passive and active supination.

Conclusion: Overall, all procedures completed in the assessed articles of this study were successful in their aim. Bony procedures, specifically osteotomies, were found to have a wider range of results, whereas soft tissue procedures were found to be more consistent and reproducible with respect to their outcomes. Bony and soft tissue procedures were found vary in their aims and outcomes. This study indicates the need for further research to augment knowledge about indications and long-term benefits to each procedure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Brachial plexus, Elbow surgery, Forearm surgery, Level IV, Neonatal brachial plexus palsy, Secondary surgery, Surgical outcomes, Systematic Review
National Category
Surgery Orthopaedics Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-220441 (URN)10.1016/j.xrrt.2023.10.003 (DOI)38323202 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182999735 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-09 Created: 2024-02-09 Last updated: 2024-02-09Bibliographically approved
Abdelmalek, G., Mina, G. E., Pant, K., Zheng, Z., Mahajan, J., Srinivasan, N., . . . Chu, A. (2024). Intercostal nerve transfer for biceps reinnervation in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: a preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis for individual patient data systematic review using individualized fusion and comparison to supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting. Journal of Children's Orthopaedics, 18(1), 54-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intercostal nerve transfer for biceps reinnervation in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: a preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis for individual patient data systematic review using individualized fusion and comparison to supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Journal of Children's Orthopaedics, ISSN 1863-2521, E-ISSN 1863-2548, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 54-63Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The objective of this study was to search existing literature on nerve reconstruction surgery in patients with obstetric brachial plexus palsy to determine whether treatment with supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting produced better elbow flexion outcomes compared to intercostal nerve transfer.

Methods: This study was a systematic review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis for Individual Patient Data guidelines. A systematic search was conducted using multiple databases. An ordinal regression model was used to analyze the effect of using supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting or intercostal nerve on elbow flexion with the two scores measured: elbow flexion Medical Research Council scores and Toronto active movements scale scores for elbow flexion.

Results: A final patient database from 6 published articles consisted of 83 supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting patients (73 patients with Medical Research Council and 10 patients with Toronto score) and 7 published articles which consisted of 131 intercostal nerve patients (84 patients with Medical Research Council and 47 patients with Toronto scores). Patients who underwent supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting presented with an average Medical Research Council score of 3.9 ± 0.72 and an average Toronto score of 6.2 ± 2.2. Patients who underwent intercostal nerve transfer presented with an average Medical Research Council score of 3.9 ± 0.71 and an average Toronto score of 6.4 ± 1.2. There was no statistical difference between supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting and intercostal nerve transfer when utilizing Medical Research Council elbow flexion scores (ordinal regression: 0.3821, standard error: 0.4590, p = 0.2551) or Toronto Active Movement Scale score for elbow flexion (ordinal regression: 0.7154, standard error: 0.8487, p = 0.2188).

Conclusion: Regardless of surgical intervention utilized (supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting or intercostal nerve transfers), patients had excellent outcomes for elbow flexion following obstetric brachial plexus palsy when utilizing Medical Research Council or Toronto scores for elbow flexion. The difference between these scores was not statistically significant.

Type of study/Level of evidence: Therapeutic Study: Investigating the Result of Treatment/level III.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2024
Keywords
elbow flexion, intercostal, nerve grafting, nerve transfer, Obstetric brachial plexus palsy
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221854 (URN)10.1177/18632521231211644 (DOI)001159149500002 ()38348437 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85185481115 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-03-12 Created: 2024-03-12 Last updated: 2024-03-12Bibliographically approved
Mendiratta, D., Levidy, M. F., Chu, A. & McGrath, A. M. (2024). Rehabilitation protocols in neonates undergoing primary nerve surgery for upper brachial plexus palsy: a scoping review. Microsurgery, 44(3), Article ID e31154.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rehabilitation protocols in neonates undergoing primary nerve surgery for upper brachial plexus palsy: a scoping review
2024 (English)In: Microsurgery, ISSN 0738-1085, E-ISSN 1098-2752, Vol. 44, no 3, article id e31154Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Surgical management is recommended in patients with severe neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) within the first 6 months of age to regain best possible function. Rehabilitation post-surgery remains relatively unexplored. This is a scoping review that explores, which rehabilitation modalities exist and how they vary for different microsurgical approaches in NBPP.

Materials and Methods: A systematic search was conducted to include articles about upper trunk obstetric brachial plexus nerve microsurgery in pediatric patients that made mention of rehabilitation protocols. The aims of rehabilitation modalities varied and were grouped: “passive” movement to prevent joint contracture or stiffness, “active” or task-oriented movement to improve motor function, or “providing initial motor recovery”. Surgical approach was described as either exploration of the brachial plexus (EBP) or nerve transfer without root exploration (NTwoRE). Technique was categorized into transfers and non-transfers.

Results: Thirty-six full-text articles were included. Initiation of rehabilitation was 22.26 days post-surgery. Twenty-eight studies were EBP, and six were NTwoRE. Of studies classifiable by aims, nine were “passive”, nine were “active”, and five were “providing initial motor recovery”. Only 27.7% of EBP studies mentioned active therapy, while 75.0% of NTwoRE studies mentioned active therapy. The average age of patients in the EBP procedure category was 7.70 months, and NTwoRE was 17.76 months. Within transfers, the spinal accessory to suprascapular group was more likely to describe an active shoulder exercise therapy, whereas contralateral C7 group was more likely to describe “initial motor recovery”, especially through the use of electrostimulation. All articles on electrostimulation recommended 15–20-minute daily treatment.

Conclusion: Information on rehabilitation is limited post-nerve surgery in NBPP. However, when mentioned, the aims of these therapies vary with respect to surgical approach and technique. The type of therapy to employ may be a multifaceted decision, involving factors such as patient age, initial deformity, and goals of the care team.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221644 (URN)10.1002/micr.31154 (DOI)38376241 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85185510172 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-29 Created: 2024-02-29 Last updated: 2024-02-29Bibliographically approved
Szaro, P., Suresh, R., Molokwu, B., Sibala, D. R., Mendiratta, D., Chu, A. & McGrath, A. M. (2023). Magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of suspected neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome: a systematic scoping review. Frontiers in Physiology, 14, Article ID 1198165.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of suspected neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome: a systematic scoping review
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 14, article id 1198165Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (nTOS) is a rare pathology caused by dynamic conditions or compression of neurovascular structures in the thoracic outlet region. nTOS can be difficult to diagnose due to nonspecific symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are increasingly used to aid the diagnosis and surgical planning. This scoping systematic review explores how MRI is used for diagnosing nTOS and summarizes details of published MRI protocols.

Methods: A systematic screening of PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, and CINAHL databases using PRISMA-IPD guidelines was conducted in September 2022 to include full-text English papers on MRI and nTOS. Inclusion criteria involved studies describing MRI protocols for the diagnosis of TOS, with a focus on the imaging sequences and protocols.

Results: 6289 papers were screened to include 28 papers containing details of MRI protocols. The details of MRI protocols in the analyzed articles were incomplete in all studies. Most authors used 1.5T systems and included T1 and T2-weighted sequences. Most studies applied fat suppression, mainly with STIR. Positioning of the arm differed between studies, including neutral, hyperabducted and abducted and externally rotated positions.

Conclusion: Our review highlights a prevalent lack of detailed MRI protocol documentation for brachial plexus. Authors primarily rely on conventional 1.5T systems, employing standard T1 and T2-weighted sequences. The adoption of novel MRI sequences is notably lacking, and fat suppression techniques predominantly adhere to older methods as STIR. There is a clear imperative for authors to provide more comprehensive reporting of the MRI protocols utilized in their studies, ultimately enhancing comparability and clinical applicability. Establishing clear protocol reporting guidelines is crucial to allow for comparison between studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
brachial plexus, magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, MRI protocol, neurogenic, thoracic outlet syndrome
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216630 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2023.1198165 (DOI)37920804 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175546192 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-20 Created: 2023-11-20 Last updated: 2024-04-10Bibliographically approved
Berglund, L., von Knorring, J. & McGrath, A. M. (2023). When theory meets reality - a mismatch in communication: a qualitative study of clinical transition from communication skills training to the surgical ward. BMC Medical Education, 23(1), Article ID 728.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When theory meets reality - a mismatch in communication: a qualitative study of clinical transition from communication skills training to the surgical ward
2023 (English)In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 728Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Communication skills training in patient centered communication is an integral part of the medical undergraduate education and has been shown to improve various components of communication. While the effects of different educational interventions have been investigated, little is known about the transfer from theoretical settings to clinical practice in the context of communication skills courses not integrated in the clinical curriculum. Most studies focus on single factors affecting transfer without considering the comprehensive perspective of the students themselves. The aim of this study is to explore how the students experience the transition to clinical practice and what they perceive as challenges in using patient centered communication.

Methods: Fifteen 4th year medical students were interviewed 3 weeks after the transition from an advanced communication skills course to surgical internship using semi-structured interviews. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the interviews.

Results: The analysis resulted in a theme 'When theory meets reality- a mismatch in communication'. It was comprised of four categories that encompassed the transfer process, from theoretical education, practical communication training and surgical internship to students' wishes and perceived needs.

Conclusions: We concluded that preparing the students through theoretical and practical training should reflect the reality they will face when entering clinical practice. When educating medical students as a group, their proclivity for perfectionism, high performance environment and achievement-related stress should be taken into consideration. The role of tutors being role models, offering guidance, giving feedback and providing support plays a major part in facilitating transfer of communication skills. To enable transfer to a larger extent, the environment needs to promote patient centeredness and students need more opportunities to practice communication with their patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Communication skills, Knowledge transfer, Medical education, Patient centered care, Qualitative study, Sweden
National Category
Learning Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215704 (URN)10.1186/s12909-023-04633-2 (DOI)001079283200003 ()37794444 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173771784 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-10 Created: 2023-11-10 Last updated: 2024-04-10Bibliographically approved
Szaro, P., McGrath, A., Ciszek, B. & Geijer, M. (2022). Magnetic resonance imaging of the brachial plexus. Part 1: Anatomical considerations, magnetic resonance techniques, and non-traumatic lesions. European Journal of Radiology Open, 9, Article ID 100392.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Magnetic resonance imaging of the brachial plexus. Part 1: Anatomical considerations, magnetic resonance techniques, and non-traumatic lesions
2022 (English)In: European Journal of Radiology Open, ISSN 2352-0477, Vol. 9, article id 100392Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of non-traumatic brachial plexus (BP) lesions, sequences with contrast injection should be considered in the differentiation between tumors, infection, postoperative conditions, and post-radiation changes. The most common non-traumatic inflammatory BP neuropathy is radiation neuropathy. T2-weighted images may help to distinguish neoplastic infiltration showing a high signal from radiation-induced neuropathy with fibrosis presenting a low signal.

MRI findings in inflammatory BP neuropathy are usually absent or discrete. Diffuse edema of the BP localized mainly in the supraclavicular part of BP, with side-to-side differences, and shoulder muscle denervation may be found on MRI.

BP infection is caused by direct infiltration from septic arthritis of the shoulder joint, spondylodiscitis, or lung empyema.

MRI may help to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses of tumors. The most common tumor of BP is metastasis. The most common primary tumor of BP is neurofibroma, which is visible as fusiform thickening of a nerve. In its solitary state, it may be challenging to differentiate from a schwannoma.

The most common MRI finding is a neurogenic variant of thoracic outlet syndrome with an asymmetry of signal and thickness of the BP with edema. In abduction, a loss of fat directly related to the BP may be seen.

Diffusion tensor imaging is a promising novel MRI sequences; however, the small diameter of the nerves contributing to the BP and susceptibility to artifacts may be challenging in obtaining sufficiently high-quality images.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Brachial plexus, Injury, Tumor, Compression, Neuropathy
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190663 (URN)10.1016/j.ejro.2021.100392 (DOI)000819932000002 ()2-s2.0-85121557109 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-21 Created: 2021-12-21 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Gupta, S., Srinivasan, N., Mahajan, J., Song, A., Chu, A. & McGrath, A. M. (2022). Outcome measures in OBPP. In: Jörg Bahm (Ed.), Brachial plexus injury: new techniques and ideas. INTECH
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome measures in OBPP
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Brachial plexus injury: new techniques and ideas / [ed] Jörg Bahm, INTECH, 2022Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Traditional outcome measurement scales, such as the Medical Research Council (MRC) score, the Active Movement Scale (AMS), and Mallet score, are used by surgeons to assess outcomes in patients with obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP). The measurement scales used to evaluate patients fall under the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) domains of Body Function, Body Structure, Activity, Participation, and Environment and are used to assess function and disability of patients. Currently used outcome measures scales for OBPP are also contrasted with those used for another perinatal condition affecting the upper limb, cerebral palsy (CP).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INTECH, 2022
Keywords
brachial plexus injury, brachial plexus palsy, evaluation measurement, international classification, outcome assessment
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190664 (URN)10.5772/intechopen.98796 (DOI)978-1-83969-687-9 (ISBN)978-1-83969-686-2 (ISBN)978-1-83969-688-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-12-21 Created: 2021-12-21 Last updated: 2023-03-14Bibliographically approved
Srinivasan, N., Mahajan, J., Gupta, S., Shah, Y. M., Shafei, J., Levidy, M. F., . . . McGrath, A. M. (2022). Surgical timing in neonatal brachial plexus palsy: A PRISMA-IPD systematic review. Microsurgery, 42(4), 381-390
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surgical timing in neonatal brachial plexus palsy: A PRISMA-IPD systematic review
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Microsurgery, ISSN 0738-1085, E-ISSN 1098-2752, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 381-390Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) is a serious complication of high-risk deliveries with controversy surrounding timing of corrective nerve surgery. This review systematically examines the existing literature and investigates correlations between age at time of upper trunk brachial plexus microsurgery and surgical outcomes.

Methods: A systematic screening of PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, and CINAHL databases using PRISMA-IPD guidelines was conducted in January 2020 to include full-text English papers with microsurgery in upper trunk palsy, pediatric patients. Spearman rank correlation analysis and two-tailed t-tests were performed using individual patient data to determine the relationship between mean age at time of surgery and outcome as determined by the Mallet, Medical Research Council (MRC), or Active Movement Scale (AMS) subscores.

Results: Two thousand nine hundred thirty six papers were screened to finalize 25 papers containing individual patient data (n = 256) with low to moderate risk of bias, as assessed by the ROBINS-I assessment tool. Mallet subscore for hand-to-mouth and shoulder abduction, AMS subscore for elbow flexion and external rotation, and MRC subscore for elbow flexion were analyzed alongside the respective age of patients at surgery. Spearman rank correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation (ρ = −0.30, p <.01, n = 89) between increasing age (5.50 ± 2.09 months) and Mallet subscore for hand-to-mouth (3.43 ± 0.83). T-tests revealed a significant decrease in Mallet hand-to-mouth subscores after 6 months (p <.05) and 9 months (p <.05) of age. No significant effects were observed for Mallet shoulder abduction, MRC elbow flexion, or AMS elbow flexion and external rotation.

Conclusion: The cumulative evidence suggests a significant negative correlation between age at microsurgery and Mallet subscores for hand-to-mouth. However, a similar correlation with age at surgery was not observed for Mallet shoulder abduction, MRC elbow flexion, AMS external rotation, and AMS elbow flexion subscores.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-192665 (URN)10.1002/micr.30871 (DOI)000754025700001 ()35147253 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124519220 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-21 Created: 2022-02-21 Last updated: 2023-06-27Bibliographically approved
Shafei, J., Levidy, M. F., Srinivasan, N., Mahajan, J., Gupta, S., Abdelmalek, G., . . . Chu, A. (2022). Trends of age and geographical location in microsurgical treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Bulletin of the Hospital for Joint Diseases, 80(2), 195-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends of age and geographical location in microsurgical treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Bulletin of the Hospital for Joint Diseases, ISSN 2328-4633, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 195-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Debate over the optimal age at time of surgery for treatment of brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) remains controversial, and there exists geographical variation in surgical preference for age at time of surgery. The objective of this review was to analyze trends in age and geography in brachial plexus microsurgery for treatment of brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) over time.

Methods: Review of the literature in this study was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were searched.

Results: Pediatric patients undergoing brachial plexus microsurgery described in published reports before 2011 had a mean of 7.15 ± 6.56 months of age, while pediatric patients undergoing brachial plexus microsurgery surgery described in published reports after 2011 had a mean of 11.23 ± 9.76 months of age (p < 0.05). The mean age at surgery was lower in publications from Asian countries (6.29 months) than in publications from North America (11.34 months; p <0.05).

Conclusions: Age at time of microsurgery for treatment of BPBI is increasing, with mean age at surgeries occurring in and after 2011 being 4 months higher than thos occuring before 2011. The mean age at surgery was about 5 months higher in North American publications than in Asian publications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
J. Michael Ryan Publishing, 2022
National Category
Surgery Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203063 (URN)000809359500005 ()35643484 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85131217162 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-16 Created: 2023-01-16 Last updated: 2023-06-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications