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Sandlund, Marlene, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4781-862X
Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
An, Q., Sandlund, M., Agnello, D., Mccaffrey, L., Chastin, S., Helleday, R. & Wadell, K. (2023). A scoping review of co-creation practice in the development of non-pharmacological interventions for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Paper presented at 2023 ERS International Congress. European Respiratory Journal, 62(Suppl. 67), Article ID PA2416.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A scoping review of co-creation practice in the development of non-pharmacological interventions for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
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2023 (English)In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 62, no Suppl. 67, article id PA2416Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) [Artistic work] Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Incorporating co-creation process in the development of interventions may improve the outcome. However, there is a lack of synthesis of co-creation practices in the development of Non-Pharmacological Interventions (NPIs) for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

Objective: This scoping review aimed to examine the co-creation practice used when developing NPIs for people with COPD.

Methods: The methodology proposed by Arksey and O’Malley for scoping reviews was followed, and it was reported according to the PRISMA-ScR framework. The search included PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, and Web of Science. Studies reporting on the process and/or analysis of applying co-creation practice in developing NPIs for people with COPD were included.

Results: 13 articles complied with the inclusion criteria. The composition of co-creators was diverse and reported in most of the included studies. Facilitating factors described in the co-creation practices included administrative preparations, diversity of stakeholders, cultural considerations, employment of creative methods, creation of an appreciative environment, and digital assistance. Few creative methods were mentioned or explained in the studies. Challenges around the physical limitations of patients, the absence of key stakeholder opinions, a prolonged process, recruitment, and digital illiteracy of co-creators were listed. Most of the studies did not report implementation considerations as a discussion point in their co-creation workshops.

Conclusion: This review provides suggestions for evidence-based co-creation in COPD care which may improve the quality of care delivered by NPIs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Respiratory Society (ERS), 2023
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221314 (URN)10.1183/13993003.congress-2023.PA2416 (DOI)001109120504395 ()
Conference
2023 ERS International Congress
Available from: 2024-02-20 Created: 2024-02-20 Last updated: 2024-02-21Bibliographically approved
An, Q., Sandlund, M., Agnello, D., McCaffrey, L., Chastin, S., Helleday, R. & Wadell, K. (2023). A scoping review of co-creation practice in the development of non-pharmacological interventions for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a health CASCADE study. Respiratory Medicine, 211, Article ID 107193.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A scoping review of co-creation practice in the development of non-pharmacological interventions for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a health CASCADE study
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2023 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 211, article id 107193Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Incorporating co-creation processes may improve the quality of outcome interventions. However, there is a lack of synthesis of co-creation practices in the development of Non-Pharmacological Interventions (NPIs) for people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), that could inform future co-creation practice and research for rigorously improving the quality of care.

Objective: This scoping review aimed to examine the co-creation practice used when developing NPIs for people with COPD.

Methods: This review followed Arksey and O'Malley scoping review framework and was reported according to the PRISMA-ScR framework. The search included PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, and Web of Science Core Collection. Studies reporting on the process and/or analysis of applying co-creation practice in developing NPIs for people with COPD were included.

Results: 13 articles complied with the inclusion criteria. Limited creative methods were reported in the studies. Facilitators described in the co-creation practices included administrative preparations, diversity of stakeholders, cultural considerations, employment of creative methods, creation of an appreciative environment, and digital assistance. Challenges around the physical limitations of patients, the absence of key stakeholder opinions, a prolonged process, recruitment, and digital illiteracy of co-creators were listed. Most of the studies did not report including implementation considerations as a discussion point in their co-creation workshops.

Conclusion: Evidence-based co-creation in COPD care is critical for guiding future practice and improving the quality of care delivered by NPIs. This review provides evidence for improving systematic and reproducible co-creation. Future research should focus on systematically planning, conducting, evaluating, and reporting co-creation practices in COPD care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
COPD, Co-creation, Creativity, Non-pharmacological interventions, Participation, Stakeholder
National Category
Nursing Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205629 (URN)10.1016/j.rmed.2023.107193 (DOI)000952167500001 ()36889517 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150368110 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 956501
Available from: 2023-03-10 Created: 2023-03-10 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, B., Lundell, S., Lundin-Olsson, L. & Sandlund, M. (2023). 'Maintaining balance in life'—exploring older adults' long-term engagement in self-managed digital fall prevention exercise. European Review of Aging and Physical Activity, 20(1), Article ID 12.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Maintaining balance in life'—exploring older adults' long-term engagement in self-managed digital fall prevention exercise
2023 (English)In: European Review of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1813-7253, E-ISSN 1861-6909, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Accidental falls are one of the greatest threats to older adults’ health and well-being. The risk of falling can be significantly reduced with strength and balance interventions. However, there needs to be further knowledge into how older adults can be supported to achieve a maintained exercise behaviour. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore factors that enabled older adults to maintain their exercise during a 1-year self-managed digital fall prevention exercise intervention.

Methods: This study used a grounded theory methodology. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted by phone or conference call. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults aged 70 years or more participated. The participants had a self-reported exercise dose of 60 min or more per week during the last three months of participation in a 12-months intervention of self-managed digital fall prevention exercise, the Safe Step randomized controlled trial. Open, axial, and selective coding, along with constant comparative analysis, was used to analyze the data.

Results: The analysis resulted in a theoretical model. We found that the fall prevention exercise habits of adults were developed through three stages: Acting against threats to one’s own identity, Coordinating strategies to establish a routine, and Forming habits through cues and evaluation. The main category of Maintaining balance in life encases the participants transition through the three stages and reflects balance in both physical aspects and in between activities in daily life. The process of maintaining balance in life and desire to do so were mediated both by intrinsic person-dependent factors and the Safe Step application acting as an external mediator.

Conclusion: This study identified three stages of how older adults developed self-managed fall prevention exercise habits, supported by a digital application. The generated theoretical model can inform future interventions aiming to support long-term engagement in digitally supported and self-managed fall prevention interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Aged, Behaviour change, eHealth, Exercise, Fall prevention, Grounded Theory, Habit formation, mHealth, Older adults, Self-management
National Category
Physiotherapy Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212503 (URN)10.1186/s11556-023-00322-7 (DOI)37464299 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165253094 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020–00589
Available from: 2023-08-01 Created: 2023-08-01 Last updated: 2023-08-01Bibliographically approved
Verloigne, M., Altenburg, T., Cardon, G., Chinapaw, M., Dall, P., Deforche, B., . . . Chastin, S. (2023). Making co-creation a trustworthy methodology for closing the implementation gap between knowledge and action in health promotion: the Health CASCADE project [Letter to the editor]. Perspectives in Public Health, 143(4), 196-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making co-creation a trustworthy methodology for closing the implementation gap between knowledge and action in health promotion: the Health CASCADE project
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2023 (English)In: Perspectives in Public Health, ISSN 1757-9139, E-ISSN 1757-9147, Vol. 143, no 4, p. 196-198Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

This article looks at the Health CASCADE project, a European-funded Innovative Training Network project that aims to advance co-creation into a rigorous scientific methodology with evidence-based methods, practices and supportive technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-213739 (URN)10.1177/17579139221136718 (DOI)37589328 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85168246550 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 956501
Available from: 2023-09-06 Created: 2023-09-06 Last updated: 2023-09-06Bibliographically approved
Andersdotter Sandström, A., Fjellman-Wiklund, A., Sandlund, M. & Eskilsson, T. (2023). Patients with stress-induced exhaustion disorder and their experiences of physical activity prescription in a group context. Global Health Action, 16(1), Article ID 2212950.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients with stress-induced exhaustion disorder and their experiences of physical activity prescription in a group context
2023 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 2212950Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Physical activity is a useful means to improve symptoms and memory performance to some extent in individuals with stress-induced exhaustion disorder. Individuals in this group commonly do not need to reach the recommended levels of physical activity. Developing methods to support physical activity as a lasting behaviour is important.

Objective: The aim of the study was to explore the processes involved when using physical activity prescription as part of rehabilitation in a group context for individuals with stress-induced exhaustion disorder.

Method: A total of 27 individuals with stress-induced exhaustion disorder participated in six focus groups. The informants underwent a multimodal intervention including prescription of physical activity. The physical activity prescription had a cognitive behaviour approach and included information about physical activity, home assignments and goal setting. The data was analysed with grounded theory method using constant comparison.

Results: The analysis of the data was developed into the core category ‘trying to integrate physical activity into daily life in a sustainable way’, and three categories: ‘acceptance of being good enough’, ‘learning physical activity by doing’ and ‘advocation for physical activity in rehabilitation’. The informants identified that during the physical activity prescription sessions they learned what physical activity was, what was ‘good enough’ in terms of dose and intensity of physical activity, and how to listen to the body’s signals. These insights, in combination with performing physical activity during home assignments and reflecting with peers, helped them incorporate physical activity in a new and sustainable way. A need for more customised physical activity with the ability to adjust to individual circumstances was requested.

Conclusion: Prescription of physical activity in a group context may be a useful method of managing and adjusting physical activity in a sustainable way for individuals with stress-induced exhaustion disorder. However, identifying people who need more tailored support is important.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Burnout, Physical activity, Focus groups, Goals, Grounded theory
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-210098 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2023.2212950 (DOI)001005756700001 ()37314383 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85163193261 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-22 Created: 2023-06-22 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Månsson, L., Pettersson, B., Rosendahl, E., Skelton, D. A., Lundin-Olsson, L. & Sandlund, M. (2022). Feasibility of performance-based and self-reported outcomes in self-managed falls prevention exercise interventions for independent older adults living in the community. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1), Article ID 147.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feasibility of performance-based and self-reported outcomes in self-managed falls prevention exercise interventions for independent older adults living in the community
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2022 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Little is known about associations between performance-based measurements and self-reported scales, nor about ceiling effects or sensitivity to change to evaluate effects in the target population for self-managed exercise interventions. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of using performance-based outcomes for gait speed, functional leg strength and balance, and self-reported outcomes of falls-efficacy and functional ability in two self-managed falls prevention exercise interventions for community dwelling older adults.

METHODS: Independent living, community-dwelling older adults (n = 67) exercised with one of two self-managed falls prevention exercise programmes, a digital programme (DP) or a paper booklet (PB) in a 4-month participant preference trial. Pre- and post-assessments, by blinded assessors, included Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and 30s Chair stand test (30s CST). Participants completed self-reported questionnaires: Activities-specific and Balance Confidence scale (ABC), Iconographical Falls Efficacy Scale (Icon-FES), Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument Function Component (LLFDI-FC). In addition, improvement in balance and leg strength was also self-rated at post-assessment. Participants' mean age was 76 ± 4 years and 72% were women.

RESULTS: Ceiling effects were evident for the balance sub-component of the SPPB, and also indicated for ABC and Icon-FES in this high functioning population. In SPPB, gait speed, 30s CST, and LLFDI-FC, 21-56% of participants did not change their scores beyond the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID). At pre-assessment all performance-based tests correlated significantly with the self-reported scales, however, no such significant correlations were seen with change-scores. Improvement of performance-based functional leg strength with substantial effect sizes and significant correlations with self-reported exercise time was shown. There were no differences in outcomes between the exercise programmes except that DP users reported improved change of leg strength to a higher degree than PB users.

CONCLUSION: The LLFDI-FC and sit-to-stand tests were feasible and sensitive to change in this specific population. The balance sub-component of SPPB and self-reported measures ABC and Icon-FES indicated ceiling effects and might not be suitable as outcome measures for use in a high functioning older population. Development and evaluation of new outcome measures are needed for self-managed fall-preventive interventions with high functioning community-dwelling older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022
Keywords
Aged, Falls prevention, Patient outcome assessment, Self-managed
National Category
Geriatrics Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-192876 (URN)10.1186/s12877-022-02851-9 (DOI)000759555200002 ()35193495 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85125155283 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03481Swedish Research Council, 521-2011-3250Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2022-03-08 Created: 2022-03-08 Last updated: 2022-04-29Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, V., Sandlund, M., Eriksson, C., Janols, R., Lind, T. & Fjellman-Wiklund, A. (2022). How children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis participate in their healthcare: health professionals' views. Disability and Rehabilitation, 44(10), 1908-1915
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis participate in their healthcare: health professionals' views
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2022 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1908-1915Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The study explores how healthcare professionals view participation of children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, in healthcare encounters.

Methods: This qualitative study includes focus groups of HCPs from different professions. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

Results: The theme “Creating an enabling arena” illuminates how HCPs face possibilities and challenges when enabling children to communicate and participate in clinical encounters. HCPs, parents, and the healthcare system need to adjust to the child. The sub-theme “Bringing different perspectives” describes how children and their parents cooperate and complement each other during healthcare encounters. The sub-theme “Building a safe and comfortable setting” includes how HCPs address the child’s self-identified needs and make the child feel comfortable during encounters. The sub-theme “Facilitating methods in a limiting organisation” includes how HCPs’ working methods and organization may help or hinder child participation during encounters.

Conclusions: HCPs encourage children and adolescents to make their views known during healthcare encounters by creating an enabling arena. Collaboration and building good relationships between the child, the parents and the HCPs, before and during the healthcare encounters, can help the child express their wishes and experiences. Clinical examinations and use of technology, such as photos, films and web-bases questionnaires can be a good start for a better child communication in healthcare encounters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Adolescent, child, chronic condition, communication, healthcare professionals, participation, qualitative
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-175079 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2020.1811406 (DOI)000565631500001 ()32875956 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85090155995 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-30 Created: 2020-09-30 Last updated: 2022-07-12Bibliographically approved
Janols, R., Sandlund, M., Lindgren, H. & Pettersson, B. (2022). Older adults as designers of behavior change strategies to increase physical activity: report of a participatory design process. Frontiers In Public Health, 10, Article ID 988470.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older adults as designers of behavior change strategies to increase physical activity: report of a participatory design process
2022 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 10, article id 988470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite the significant value of physical activity for the health of older adults, this population often fails to achieve recommended activity levels. Digital interventions show promise in providing support for self-managed physical activity. However, more information is needed about older adults' preferences for digital support to change physical activity behaviors as well as the process of designing them. The aim of this paper was to describe the participatory design process in which older adults were involved in the co-creation of digitally supported behavioral change strategies to support self-managed physical activity, and how the results were integrated in a prototype.

Methods: The participatory design process involved with nine older adults and two researchers. The participants were divided in two groups, and each group participated in three workshops and completed home tasks in between workshops. Following an iterative design process influenced by theories of behavior change, the workshops and home tasks were continuously analyzed, and the content and process were developed between groups and the next set of workshops. Prototypes of a mobile health (mHealth) solution for fall preventive exercise for older adults were developed in which the conceptualized strategies were integrated. To support coherence in reporting and evaluation, the developed techniques were mapped to the Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy v1 and the basic human psychosocial needs according to the Self-determination Theory.

Results: The results highlight different preferences of older adults for feedback on physical activity performance, as well as the importance of transparency regarding the identification of the sender of feedback. Preferences for content and wording of feedback varied greatly. Subsequently, the design process resulted in a virtual health coach with three different motivational profiles and tools for goal setting and self-monitoring. These behavior change strategies were integrated in the exercise application Safe Step v1. The conformity of the design concepts with the needs of Self-determination Theory and Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy v1 are presented.

Conclusion: The participatory design process exemplifies how older adults successfully contributed to the design of theory-based digital behavior change support, from idea to finished solution. Tailoring feedback with a transparent sender is important to support and not undermine motivation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
behavior change, co-creation, digital technology, mHealth, motivation, participatory design
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-202585 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2022.988470 (DOI)000910855400001 ()36620266 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145500489 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521–2011-3250Swedish Research Council, 2015-03481Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2023-01-12 Created: 2023-01-12 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Bajraktari, S., Zingmark, M., Pettersson, B., Rosendahl, E., Lundin-Olsson, L. & Sandlund, M. (2022). Reaching older people with a digital fall prevention intervention in a Swedish municipality context: an observational study. Frontiers In Public Health, 10, Article ID 857652.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reaching older people with a digital fall prevention intervention in a Swedish municipality context: an observational study
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 10, article id 857652Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is robust evidence that falls in old age can be prevented by exercise programs that include balance training, functional exercises, and strength training. For the interventions to have a population health impact, outreach to the population of focus with suitable interventions is needed. While digital interventions are promising there is limited knowledge on the characteristics of who is reached. The aim of this study was to describe the recruitment process, estimate reach rate at the population level and to describe participants characteristics and representativeness in a digital fall prevention intervention study.

Methods: In a municipality-based observational study, reach of a digital fall prevention intervention was evaluated. The intervention included a digital exercise programme (Safe Step) and optional supportive strategies, complemented with a range of recruitment strategies to optimize reach. Recruitment during a period of 6 months was open to people 70 years or older who had experienced a fall or a decline in balance the past year. Reach was based on data from the baseline questionnaire including health and demographic characteristics of participants. Representativeness was estimated by comparing participants to a sample of older people from the Swedish National Public Health Survey.

Results: The recruitment rate was 4.7% (n = 173) in relation to the estimated population of focus (n = 3,706). Most participants signed up within the first month of the intervention (n = 131). The intervention attracted primarily women, older people with high education, individuals who used the internet or digital applications almost every day and those perceiving their balance as fair or poor. Safe step participants lived more commonly alone and had higher education and better walking ability in comparison to the Swedish National Public Health Survey.

Conclusions: With a range of recruitment strategies most participants were recruited to a digital fall intervention during the first month. The intervention attracted primarily highly educated women who frequently used the internet or smart technologies. In addition to digital fall prevention interventions, a higher diversity of intervention types (digital and non-digital) is more likely to reach a larger group of older people with different needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
accidental falls, aged, balance and strength exercise, digital health, mobile health, RE-AIM framework, reach
National Category
Physiotherapy Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-194291 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2022.857652 (DOI)000795835400001 ()35548075 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85129978211 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00589
Available from: 2022-04-29 Created: 2022-04-29 Last updated: 2023-04-04Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, B., Bajraktari, S., Skelton, D., Zingmark, M., Rosendahl, E., Lundin-Olsson, L. & Sandlund, M. (2022). Recruitment strategies and reach of a digital fall-prevention intervention for community-dwelling older adults. Digital health, 8, Article ID 20552076221126050.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recruitment strategies and reach of a digital fall-prevention intervention for community-dwelling older adults
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2022 (English)In: Digital health, Vol. 8, article id 20552076221126050Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: To have an impact on the population's health, preventive interventions have to reach a large proportion of the intended population. Digital solutions show potential for providing wider access to fall preventive exercise. However, there is a lack of knowledge about how to reach the target group. The aim of this study was to describe the recruitment process used in the Safe Step randomised controlled trial and the characteristics of the participants reached.

Methods: Several recruitment methods, both digital and non-digital, were adopted to reach the intended sample size. Sociodemographic parameters from the baseline questionnaire were used to describe participant characteristics. The characteristics were also compared to a representative sample of older adults in the Swedish population.

Results: In total, 1628 older adults were recruited. Social media proved to be the most successful recruitment strategy, through which 76% of the participants were recruited. The participants reached had a mean age of 75.9 years, lived in both urban and rural locations, were already frequent users of the Internet and applications (smartphone/tablet) (79.9%), had higher education (71.9%), and a large proportion were women (79.4%). In comparison with the general population participants in the Safe Step study were more highly educated (p < 0.001), women in the study more frequently lived alone (p < 0.001) and men more often reported poorer self-rated health (p = 0.04). Within the study, men reported a faster deteriorating balance (p = 0.003) and more prescribed medication (p < 0.001) than women.

Conclusion: Recruitment via social media is a useful strategy for reaching older adults, especially women and frequent users of the Internet, for a fully self-managed and digital fall prevention exercise intervention. This study underlines that a range of interventions must be available to attract and suit older adults with different functional statuses and digital skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
accidental falls, aged, eHealth, exercise, fall prevention, Geriatric medicine, preventive medicine, reach, recruitment, self-management
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-183076 (URN)10.1177/20552076221126050 (DOI)000855672000001 ()36118253 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85138745998 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03481Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00589Umeå UniversityKarolinska Institute
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2021-05-17 Created: 2021-05-17 Last updated: 2022-10-12Bibliographically approved
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